SLOW LIFE Foundation

Sinthian Medina Cherif Latrine Project - Senegal

Sinthian Medina Cherif Latrine Project - Senegal
Location
Sinthian Medina Cherif, Velingara District, Kolda Region, Senegal

Community Description
Sinthian Medina Cherif is a village in the department of Velingara, region of Kolda, with a population of about 250 people. It is located next to a national road and surrounded by trees and farms. The next nearest village is about 5 kilometers away.

The village has one elementary/middle school, which was opened in 2005. It has had an increase of students, and today has an attendance of 70 students, 32 males and 38 females.

The school has three teachers, two permanent classrooms, with two different classes, and one classroom made of bamboo fencing.

Sinthian Medina Cherif Latrine Project - SenegalProblem Addressed
The school has no latrines, and when children need to go to the restroom they go to the bush in the back of the school building. This makes the surrounding area very unsanitary, and during the rainy season there is a high rate of giardia, diarrhea, and skin infections.

Project Description
This project will construct two ventilated pit latrines, one for male students and the other for female students.

The people directly involved in implementing the project are the two teachers and the principal. They will supervise the work of the mason and making sure that everything goes smoothly.

The latrine structure will include two stalls, each 1 meter by 1.5 meters. The5 walls will be made of cement bricks, and the foundation will be made of solid cement bricks. The roof will be made of corrugated aluminum and the doors will be made of corrugated aluminum and wood. Each stall will also have its own ventilation pipe, with a screen to prevent the entry of mosquitos.

Sinthian Medina Cherif Latrine Project - SenegalThe latrine pit will be 3 meters deep. The walls will be reinforced with a rebar grid covered with cement.

Parents will contribute to the project by supplying local materials, including rock and sand. Each student will contribute 300 cfa (about 60 US cents).

The principal and teachers will dedicate a class to teaching hand washing and proper latrine use to achieve health benefits.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase wood, cement, rebar, pipes, and aluminum. They will also pay for the work of the mason and the laborers.

Project Impact
70 students will benefit from the project.


Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Socorro Leandro

Comments
This is an important project that will improve the health and wellbeing of the students and teachers.

Dollar Amount of Project
$471.80

Donations Collected to Date
$471.80

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the SLOW LIFE Foundation as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Socorro Leandro of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Socorro and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished.  To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

 

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Keur Daouda Cisse Well Project – Senegal

Keur Daouda Cisse Well Project – Senegal

Location
Keur Daouda Cisse, Thies region, Senegal

Community Description
Keur Daouda Cisse is a small village about 6 miles outside of Thies. 300+ villagers share about 20 compounds in a sandy, land-locked village with no electricity.

Keur Daouda Cisse Well Project – Senegal

Some compounds have access to a water spigot that connects to a water tower in Tawa Fall. However, most villagers rely on one well in the center of the village.

There is a second, more recently-built well. However, it was not dug deep enough, so it lies dormant and unused. Both wells need immediate work.

Problem Addressed
The first well, located next to the village Mosque, is relied on by most of the villagers. It is old and its interior is disintegrating, and the water is not clean.

The second well was built in 2003, but is presently unusable. It is 21 meters deep, and the walls are in good shape. However, it does not produce enough water during the dry season.

Project Description
This project is to refurbish two wells in Keur Daouda Cisse.

The first well will be rebuilt by deepening it until it has a minimum of 4 ft. clear water, and repairing and extending the walls.

The second well will be deepened until it has minimum of 4 ft. of clear water. The wall will be extended in the newly-dug area.

All work to be done in village by trusted, local, competent well-builders. The technology will be basic manual labor, working with rebar, wiring, concrete, and shovels.

Water Charity funds will be used for the labor of the skilled workers and the materials.

The community will provide local materials and unskilled labor as necessary to complete the project.

The community is also contributing $190 that was raised through the sale of music recorded in partnership with Community Voice International (CVI).

Keur Daouda Cisse Well Project – Senegal

Project Impact
About 300 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Karen Chaffraix

Comments
This is the first partnership effort between Water Charity and CVI whereby funds raised through the recording and marketing of local music is channeled back to the community to implement community development projects of their choice. It is hoped that this demonstration will promote further collaboration.

The project brings back to functionality two essential sources of water for the community. It is extremely well-planned and supported, and demonstrates the power of the community to bring about necessary improvements.

Dollar Amount of Project
$1,554.00

Donations Collected to Date
$0.00

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,554.00


This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Bamkoto Latrine Project - Senegal

Bamkoto Latrine Project - Senegal
Location
Bamkoto, Kaffrine, Senegal

Community Description
Bamkoto is a small village in Kaffrine, comprised of 160 people living in 8 compounds.

Problem Addressed
There is only one latrine in the village. For most adults and children, the only place to urinate and defecate is in the surrounding fields. The lack of a proper waste disposal system is responsible for many cases of diarrhea and other sanitation-related illnesses in the area.

Project DescriptionBamkoto Latrine Project - SenegalThis project is to build 8 latrines in Bamkoto.

Each household will be responsible for digging a 2 x 2 meter hole and making the necessary bricks. The hole will be reinforced with cement bricks. A pipe will connect the toilet with the pit, and a screened vertical pipe will provide ventilation while preventing the entry of mosquitos.

The materials will be purchased in Kaffrine and transported to Bamkoto on horse carts.

A skilled mason will manage the construction, with the help of 18 villagers.

After all the latrines have been completed, there will be a community training on how to prevent diarrhea, including the importance of washing hands with soap.

With the skills developed, villagers will have the capacity to keep the latrines in repair and build more in the future as the village grows.

Project Impact
150 people will benefit from the project.

Bamkoto Latrine Project - SenegalPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jessie Maier

Comments
With the completion of this project there will be a latrine in every compound, eliminating the open defecation that currently causes diseases such as diarrhea, dysentery, typhoid, and cholera.

Dollar Amount of Project
$438.46

Donations Collected to Date
$438.46

 

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the SLOW LIFE Foundation as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Jessie Maier of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Jessie and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief - Philippines

Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief - Philippines

Super Typhoon Haiayn, known as Yolanda in the Philippines, has been a true calamity for those who had to endure its awesome storm surge and 195mph winds.

As most of you know, Tacloban city bore the brunt of what looks to be the strongest storm on record to ever make landfall. Lt. Col. Marciano Jesus Guevara of the Filipino military aid said that the biggest problem in Tacloban is a lack of clean drinking water. "Water is life," he said. "If you have water with no food, you'll survive."

Within days after the devastating typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines, and while it was still ravaging Vietnam, Water Charity began this effort to get water filters to the victims. With over 800,000 evacuees still housed in makeshift housing, churches and community centers, and well before any refugee camps had been constructed, Water Charity was already organizing the delivery of life-saving carbon nanotube filters.

TaclobanOur first shipment of filters was paid for out of our own pockets, and was flown to the Philippines personally by one of our colleagues to expedite distribution.

Far and away the best and most cost-efficient filter technology, these lightweight, durable and highly effective filters are engineered to less than a micron, and thus prevent all known pathogens, bacteria, cysts, protozoa, and even the smallest virus from passing through.

We started using this technology under our Filters for Life Program, so when the extent of the devastation became apparent, we were ready to step up and help with the relief effort.

The Sawyer filters are a practical, immediate, and long-term solution to the need for safe drinking water. They can last for over 10 years of heavy use, are washable, and are extremely versatile.

With filters ranging from $15 to $80 depending on usage, source water, and volume needed, there is no reason not to ensure that every single victim of this catastrophe can't at least have the best quality water possible.

The need for water is acute, and will be for quite some time. Long after this event has passed from the news, there will still be people without villages to return to, and helping them with this most basic of necessities is the most efficacious way to contribute to their health and wellbeing.

Waterborne illnesses are the scourge of refugee camps the world over. 80% of all diseases are waterborne, and the damage they do is compounded in the close-quarters and makeshift nature of any such camp. Help us prevent cholera outbreaks, amoebic dysentery, giardia and the host of other illnesses that are all too common in these situations.

Please give generously to this ongoing program. We will accept what you can afford, but we will give special recognition for donations of $100 or more.

Esteemed Donors

The SLOW LIFE Foundation, United Kingdom - $10,000
CannedWater4Kids, Sussex, WI, USA - $1,000
Michael and Carla Boyle, Nelsonville, OH, USA - $500
Elmo Foundation, Charlottesville, VA, USA - $500
Dr. & Mrs. Gary Fraser, Redlands, CA, USA - $200
Carol Host, Glendale, CA, USA - $100
Elena Kramer, Raleigh, NC, USA - $100
Diane Ray, Chattanooga, TN, USA - $100
Robert & Sandy Barrett, Calimesa, CA, USA - $100
Gail Strasser, Perris, CA, USA - $100
Desmyrna Taylor, Loma Linda, CA, USA - $100
Irving Ostrow, Los Angeles, CA, USA - $100

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia

This is a tremendous new project that is being implemented under the direction of Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak. The project is to secure access to clean and protected water for Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Villages by installing 3 Blue Pumps.

Jeremy previously completed the Dankunku, Fula Kunda, and Brikama Lefaya Pump Project – The Gambia during his service as a Peace Corps Volunteer, and also finished the Niamina Dankunku Area Pump Project - The Gambia and the Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda Pump Project – The Gambia as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.

Project Location
Si Kunda and Kalikajara Villages, Niamina Dankunku District, and Choya Village, Niamina West District; Central River Region South, The Gambia, West Africa

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaDescription of Project Community
Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara are all ethnic Fula Villages. Most of them make their livelihoods through farming coos, peanuts, and rice in the dry season, and by tending cattle. Poverty is manifest in many ways, most prominently not having enough to eat. Compounded with poor water access (and use of open wells in Si Kunda and Kalikajara), sickness is common, as are skin diseases and other infections.

Water shortage is clearly an everyday problem, with people having to queue to draw water (or pump it at Choya's old Mark II, which was only recently rehabilitated with a previous Water Charity project). Yerro An, Si Kunda's alkalo, or village head, says, "We know our water is not clean or safe to drink, but what else can we do? We don't have any other sources of water."

Description of Project
This project seeks to secure access to clean and protected water for Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Villages by installing 3 Blue Pumps. Blue Pumps, made by Fairwater, are much more robust and long last than the typical outdated Mark II pumps seen in many villages, and the water output is much higher, averaging 12-20 liters a minute. It is much easier to use, especially for children, since there is less handle pressure resistance, and maintenance is minimal because of very few moving parts (as compared to the Mark II)

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaChoya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara each have or had Mark II pumps, but for a variety of reasons, are not having their water needs met. Si Kunda and Kalikajara are each now depending exclusively on open wells to meet their water needs, presenting serious health and sanitation concerns.

Choya in Niamina West has 380 residents / 23 compounds. One of their Mark II hand pumps work (only because it was rehabilitated through the last Water Charity project), the other does not--A pipe broke and the cylinder fell into the water. Villagers have tried two times to pull it out, but no luck. Sometimes water stresses are so heavy, that village women have to trek to fetch water in nearby Sara Bakary, Medina Wollom, or Sara Sambel.

Si Kunda in Niamina Dankunku has 300 residents / 17 compounds. They had two Mark II pumps installed 7 years ago. However, the pumps experienced problems 4 years ago. A local well mechanic pulled everything out, promising to bring new pipes and parts, but hasn't. The community, relying only on an open well for their needs and their cattle's water needs, opened the well last year to ease the dependence on that solitary well.

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaKalikajara in Niamina Dankunku has 115 residents / 11 compounds. Their Mark II pumps are 16 years old. They were pulled out 2 years ago. The pipes were stolen from the alkalo's compound, and so, the community opened the well and relies on the pulley and bucket system.

The Fairwater Foundation has agreed to donate 3 Blue Pumps, 1 each to Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara, with possibly 1 more each for the latter 2 villages. These pumps cost more than $3,000 each installed. The only thing that Swe-Gam, the implementing partner, is asking for is roughly $500 for installation fees and fuel costs from Banjul.

Each community has already agreed to supply the cement, sand, and gravel needed to make the pedestal base for each Blue Pump.

To make a contribution for this project, please click the Donate button below.

$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the SLOW LIFE Foundation as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Jeremy of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Jeremy and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Shinabatende Protected Spring Project - Kenya

Shinabatende Protected Spring Project - KenyaLocation
Shinabatende, Lurambi Division, Kakamega Central District, Western Province, Kenya

Community Description
Shinabatende is a community located between Kakamega and Mumias in Western Kenya. It is populated by members of the Luhya tribe, which is a polygamous tribe. The community has both Christians and Muslims.

The people are mostly small-scale farmers that grow maize, beans and sugar cane. Very few members of the community have permanent employment.

The majority of the population is under the age of 25. While primary education is compulsory, the majority of children drop out of school, typically around the ages of 13-20. As a result it is rare for someone to complete high school.

The community health workers have found that there is a lot of water borne disease, such as typhoid, dysentery and skin diseases. To reduce these diseases, the community health workers want to protect and treat the water.

Shinabatende Protected Spring Project - KenyaThe unprotected spring currently cannot be used for drinking, so the population has to walk to neighboring villages for water where they have to pay for the water they carry. Many have to cross the highway causing many accidents.

The spring is located in the middle of Shinabatende. It is near one of the churches and not far from one of the main roads. It is on private land, but the landowner has been allowing people to draw water from the spring for many years and has said that he will continue to do so. It is also near the Emusanda Health Clinic, so the community health workers will be able to easily monitor it.

The water in the spring was tested and it was discovered that it is currently undrinkable due to E Coli. By protecting the spring, using chlorine, and educating the villagers, the water can be fully utilized. The best way to protect and prevent E Coli contamination is by physically covering the water and using UV ray, chlorine, or ozone.

Project Description
This project is to protect the spring, and treat the water utilizing a chlorine dispenser.

The spring will be protected by constructing a brick structure around the water source and then by using a chlorine dispenser to kill any bacteria that may be present in the water.

Shinabatende Protected Spring Project - KenyaThe chlorine dispenser is one that is commonly used in Kenya. It is a tank that is placed on a stand near the well or other water source. To use the dispenser, the water container is placed under the spout. Upon pushing the button on the spout, the dispenser releases the proper amount of concentrated chlorine to treat 20 liters of water.

The dispenser requires minimal maintenance. The primary concern is making sure that the dispenser is refilled. The Kenyan government works in partnership with health centers to maintain the supply of chlorine.

Additionally, community health workers will be working to educate villagers about reducing and eliminating contamination, and the proper use of the dispenser.

Project funds will be used to purchase the materials, including porous stones, pipes, bricks, wire mesh, sand, cement, and the chlorine dispenser. Labor will be provided by the community.

Project Impact
The village of Shinabatende has a population of 420 people who will benefit from safe water from the spring.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Hayley Webster

Comments
This is an essential infrastructure project for the community. By keeping contaminants from and purifying the water, a large number of water borne diseases will be eliminated, dramatically improving the quality of life in the community.

Dollar Amount of Project
$541.00

Donations Collected to Date
$541.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the SLOW LIFE Foundation as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative, with help from friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Hayley Webster.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Hayley of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Hayley and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Eshmanbet School Water Project - Kyrgyzstan

Eshmanbet School Water Project - KyrgyzstanLocation
Kirk Kazik Village, Talas Rayon, Talas Oblast, Kyrgyzstan

Community Description
Kirk Kazik is a village of 5,448 residents living in approximately 300 family units. The main sources of income are from school or field work.

This village has one school, the Eshmanbet School, for all school-age children. There are 578 students from 1st through 11th grades. The school is staffed with 46 teachers and 15 other people who work as support staff.

Currently the students and staff who spend their days at Eshmanbet School do not have running water on the property. Lack of running water presents many challenges for the school, including inadequate water for drinking, cooking, washing hands, and cleaning dishes. Although this has been difficult, staff has made do by collecting water from the public water spout, a source of potable water, located about 100 meters from the school.

Eshmanbet School Water Project - KyrgyzstanThe main inconvenience for students and staff is hand washing throughout the school day. As most eat at the school cafeteria and use the restrooms at school, this presents a big hygiene problem for the students and staff.

Project Description
This project is to create a method bringing water to the school and storing it for use in the school's kitchen. This will greatly aid in the process of cooking and cleaning for the students and staff.

In addition, this project will build three handwashing stations, to be available for drinking and hygiene purposes.

The school will purchase three fifteen-liter buckets for kitchen water storage, to be used for cooking and cleaning purposes.

Eshmanbet School Water Project - KyrgyzstanThe handwashing stations will be located in the school's cafeteria. They will consist of a pot for clean water from which three faucets draw the water, and a basin below where the dirty water drains. The dirty water basin will be emptied by students on duty as often as it fills.

The stations will be built of wood, in addition to the metal water containers, faucets, and sink bed. They will be built by a Kirk Kazik local.

Project funds will be used to purchase the materials to build the sinks (including boards, hinges, faucets, hose, nails, screws, sink bed, sealer, and pails) and the buckets for the kitchen.

Any budgetary shortfall will be borne by the school.

Project Impact
This project will benefit 639 people, including the 578 students, 46 teachers and 15 other employees.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Claire Oyler

Comments
This is a low-tech solution to an urgent need for safe water at the school. It will have widespread benefits in reducing illness and improving the wellbeing of all of those who spend their days at the school.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the SLOW LIFE Foundation as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative, with the help of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Claire Oyler.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Claire of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Claire and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Sovetskiy Regional Creativity Center for Children and Youth Sanitation Project - Ukraine

Sovetskiy Regional Creativity Center for Children and Youth Sanitation Project - Ukraine
Location
Sovetskiy, AR Crimea, Ukraine

Community Description
Sovetskiy district is located in a rural area, 120 km northeast of Simferopol, capital of AR Crimea. It consists of 40 small family farming villages mainly producing grains and vegetables. Its population of approximately 35,000 is diverse with Ukrainian, Russian, Crimean Tartar, and other minorities.

Sovetskiy Regional Creativity Center for Children and Youth (The Center) is a comprehensive extracurricular educational institution located in the Town of Sovetskiy, district center of Sovetskiy. Its main activities are on artistic and aesthetic, scientific, humanitarian, tourism, and regional studies to promote development of talents in children and youth.

The Center provides after-school programs for 305 elementary school students in Sovetskiy district on a regular basis. Children come to The Center to engage in handicrafts, visual arts, music, dance, drama and chess classes. In addition The Center is frequently used for concerts, contests, and tournaments for students from 16 schools and disabled children in Sovetskiy District, as well as for various meetings and seminars for teachers and community members throughout the year. The center also houses an NGO, Perspektiva with seven staff and volunteers.

Sovetskiy Regional Creativity Center for Children and Youth Sanitation Project - UkraineThe cesspool that is connected to The Center is very close to the building and cannot handle large drainage since it will damage the foundation of the building. Therefore there exists only one toilet for the whole building, with a limited supply of water, in order to control the volume of drainage.

Currently, the toilet tank has been disabled and only bucket water is used to flush the toilet, which small children are not able to handle. It is causing serious sanitary and odor problems, not to mention not being able to meet the needs of children and community members on a daily basis.

Project Description
This project is to remediate all of the sanitation problems at the school.

The existing sump and plumbing will be renovated to handle larger volume of drainage, and the existing toilet facility will be replaced.

The existing sit-down- toilet will be converted to a squat-down style that is more commonly used for school children in Ukraine. A urinal for boys, a new sink, and a ventilation system will be added.

The work will proceed as follows:

  1. Dig a 1.5m x 1.5m x 1.5m hole outside next to the building.  Line the hole with bricks and cover with a concrete slab.  Install 5.1 cubic meter sewer trench and 7.5m sewer pipe.
  2. Dismantle old plumbing and equipment – toilet, sink, faucet and pipes.  Install new plumbing and equipment including a new urinal.
  3. Relocate existing toilet door to next to new urinal.  Install a forced air ventilating fan on the wall, and paint the interior.


Sovetskiy Regional Creativity Center for Children and Youth Sanitation Project - UkraineProject funds will be used to pay for equipment, materials, and labor.

Community members will donate the paint and paint the interior after repair work is finished by local contractor.

Project Impact
This project will benefit 305 students and 10 staff members.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Joohee Lee

Comments
This is an essential infrastructure project to ensure the health and wellbeing of the students and staff.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the SLOW LIFE Foundation as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative, with the assistance of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Joohee Lee.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Joohee of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Joohee and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Izvoare Kindergarten Water Project - Moldova

Lyndsey Rozzi - Moldova
Location
Izvoare, Falesti, Moldova

Community Description
Izvoare is a small village in western Moldova in the district of Falesti. Izvoare translates to springs, referring to the abundance of natural springs and lakes that surround the area. The village sits atop a hill providing a breathtaking view of the lakes, rolling fields and surrounding villages.

Lyndsey Rozzi - Moldova

The recorded population of Izvoare is 2,500 but as is common in Moldovan villages it is actually much lower due to working-age residents leaving the community and their children to search for jobs in cities or other countries. This creates a dynamic of aging residents left to raise their grandchildren.

The kindergarten in the village provides the children with a place to learn and grow as well as two meals per day. It was built in 1980 and has undergone only one major repair since. The families of the children attending the kindergarten along with the 22 employees have proven to be committed to making it a proper place to support the needs of the children.

In 2007, they contributed funds and in kind donations to help build a new roof. However, as economic struggles continue to plague the village, the kindergarten continues to deteriorate.

There are 174 children between the ages 3 and 6 living in Izvoare with only 89 of them currently enrolled in the kindergarten. The poor conditions of the latrines and the lack of basic hygienic needs often cause the families to keep the children home in order to keep them from becoming ill. This causes more work and stress for the grandparents, while it denies the children access to early education and positive social interactions with other children. The latrines are full and must be manually emptied causing major health concerns.

Currently there are plastic bins nailed to the wall that are manually filled with water and used for hand washing. An attempt was made in 1990 to bring running water to the building but the project fell through because of a lack of funding and was never completed.

Project Description
The project will provide running water to the kindergarten, which will enable adequate sanitation and hygiene.

The water supply consists of a well and a basin located behind the building. A trench 100 meters long and 1 meter deep will be dug from the well to the location of the bathroom.

Lyndsey Rozzi - MoldovaA new water closet will be installed. A sink and faucet that were previously installed are in working condition and will be used in the project.

Project funds will be used to purchase 100 meters of cable and piping as well as 20 industrial fasteners. In addition, an electric vacuum pump will be used to extract the water.

The labor will be provided by local community members, including a specialist.

Although the water will not initially be potable, a follow-up project is envisioned by the school to install a filter so that the water can be used for drinking. Also planned for the future is a drainage system and toilets to remedy the situation of the poor condition of the outdoor latrines.

Project Impact
89 children and 22 employees will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Lyndsey Rozzi

Comments
Bringing running water to the building will be the first step toward creating healthy, complete, indoor facilities for the children.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative, with help from friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Lyndsey Rozzi.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Lyndsey of your donation. Additional funds will go toward projects in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Funds Needed : 
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Bolduresti Ecology Club Ave Terra Protected Spring Project - Moldova

Bolduresti Ecology Club Ave Terra Protected Spring Project - Moldova
Location
Bolduresti Village, Nisporeni District, Republic of Moldova

Community Description
Bolduresti is a rural Moldovan village with just over 4,200 residents. It is located in the Nisporeni District in Western Moldova, right on the Prut River, which forms Moldova's border with Romania. Members of the village are generally hard working and traditional.

The community's economy is heavily based on agriculture, with nearly all of the agricultural operations being small and locally owned. Outside of agriculture the largest employment sectors are local public administration and education.

In 2009 a small group of environmentally-minded citizens in Bolduresti organized an NGO named Ave Terra. They partnered with

Bolduresti Ecology Club Ave Terra Protected Spring Project - Moldova

 the local high school to create an ecology club. One of the first activities of the NGO and club was to partner with a French NGO which helped train the involved students on environmentally sustainable ways to live.

As part of this training, the team tested approximately 100 water sources (wells and springs) throughout the community. Unfortunately they found that a majority of the sources were contaminated with various harmful compounds.

One of the main sources of contamination is agricultural, animal, and household wastes being disposed of in the vicinity of the water source. Of the sources tested there is one spring used by 39 different households that has particularly good water. Currently this spring is simply a metal pipe extending from the hillside that creates a muddy pool which tends to attract animals and trash.

Project Description
In order to protect the spring and secure the safety of those families that rely on its water, the ecology club will develop the spring to eliminate exposure to contamination.

With labor donated by skilled community members, and material transportation donated by the local mayor's office, a small trough will be created to contain water from the spring, cover the spring and trough to prevent contamination, install a new pipe, install rock and sand around the spring, and finally pour a small amount of cement to help maintain cleanliness.

Water Charity funds will be used to procure materials with which to improve and protect the spring.

Bolduresti Ecology Club Ave Terra Protected Spring Project - MoldovaAs part of the project the ecology club students will visit each household that relies on the spring to help educate them about the need for maintaining clean water and a clean environment, and teach methods to achieve same. Additionally they will use this project as an example to help promote future education in the community.

Project Impact
110 people will benefit from this project, including those living in households using the well, students, and NGO management.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Curtis Adams and Brittany Hill

Comments
This is an important infrastructure project for the community. It will improve the health and wellbeing of all the residents.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteers Curtis Adams and Brittany Hill of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Curtis and Brittany and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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