Zambia

Water For Zambia Program - Zambia

Water For Zambia Program - Zambia

NPCA - WC Logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location: 
Mansa District School, ZambiMansa District, Luapula Province, Zambia
 
Community Description: 
The primary schools where this project will take place are located in and around Mansa District in the Luapula Provnice of Zambia. These communities and schools are often without electricity and running water. The villages surrounding the schools consist of mud huts with grass thatch roofs. The main source of income in these communities is subsistence farming. 
 
Problem Addressed: 
The lack of safe drinking water at the middle schools of the district is the main problem to be addressed.  
 
Another community need is for food security, as schools are not currently able to create gardens and orchards due to the long distance to reach a water source.  A new water source will allow easy watering of plants and provide improved knowledge of gardening for students, as well as a convenient food supply.
 

Project Description:

This project is to restore water to 13 schools through the installation of a new water pump and associated improvements at each school. 

During Emily’s time as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia, she recognized the problem of inadequate access to safe drinking water sources throughout her 20-km catchment area. She was shocked to discover that all of the three schools in the area lacked an on-site, working water source.

Borehole and Pump - ZambiaThere was an existing play pump structure at all three schools, but the pumps had not worked since 2009. With the help of Water Charity, she was able to work with a local government group (similar to a Public Works Department) to renovate the water systems at all three primary schools. Each borehole now functional, and is expected to provide access to clean, safe drinking water for 300 people daily for a lifetime of 50 years.

Emily was informed of 13 other schools in Mansa District, with the identical play pump structures, currently facing water crises. She determined that the problem could easily and affordably be solved with the demolition of the existing structures and installation of new Afridev borehole pumps.

 
When she returned home after her Peace Corps service, she vowed to find a way to return to Zambia and renew her efforts to bring safe water to schools in the country.  She reached out to Water Charity to assist her in this endeavor, and a plan was developed for her to go back to Zambia and do this series of projects as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.  Water Charity decided to send her back with enough funding to accomplish this ambitious goal. 
 
This is one of the rare cases where WC paid to send someone to a location, and foot their living expenses while there.  The fact that she is doing 13 schools, and will also be sharing her experience with currently serving PCVs to develop their own WASH development work, makes this cost effective.
 
The work will be supervised by Emily and done by skilled technicians.  At each school, on the first day, there will be some demolition and installation of the pedestals. Then, after one week, allowing the pedestals to cure, the pumps and PVC piping will be installed
 

Each installation will include a runoff area, drain, soak pit, and other improvements as necessary.Mansa School Borehole Project - Zambia

 
Each community will provide the sand and perform the unskilled labor.
 
Each community will create an action plan regarding borehole maintenance, budgeting for spare parts, security, and sensitization of students, teachers, and surrounding communities.
 
Each school will host an orchard and garden.  The project will allow schools to complete other projects which may have been delayed due to a lack of water.
 
During Emily's stay in Zambia, as mentioned above, she will work with serving Peace Corps Volunteers to assist them in developing additional water and sanitation projects.  She will help them with all phases, including conceptualizing with the community, planning and budgeting, implementation, and maintenance and evaluation.  Her efforts in training and support on behalf of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association will result in a continuing flow of needed development projects. 

Project Impact: 
3.900 people will benefit from the project.  
 
Mbaso SchoolEach borehole will provide access to clean, safe drinking water for 300 people daily, for an expected lifetime of 50 years. As a result of this clean drinking water source, communities will experience improved health and sanitation. School absences for teachers and pupils (especially girls) will decrease, improving education for all.  There will be an increased knowledge of gardening and agriculture, food security, and community development.
 
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project: 
Emily McKeone, RPCV
 
Monitoring and Maintenance:
Local Community Maintenance Committees, School Administration, and Mansa District Municipal Council will play roles in the monitoring and maintenance
 
Comments:
In 2014, during Emily McKeone’s Peace Corps service, new boreholes were installed at an initial three primary schools within Mansa District in conjunction with Water Charity, as mentioned above. To read about that project CLICK HERE.  Not only did the communities report improved health and sanitation, but schools were also able to complete construction projects and further develop their infrastructure. This project and its 3 schools/ boreholes served can be considered the pilot project, or 1st project of this program.  Thus, when finished, a total of 16 schools and their defunct boreholes will have been served.
 
Dollar Amount of Project: 
13 additional schools at a cost of $28,000
 

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.

 
Any additional donations will be utilized to fund additional projects in Zambia.
 
Emily at her first borehole project for WC
Water For Zambia

 

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Funds Needed : 
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Chimdomba Borehole Project - Zambia

Chimdomba Borehole Project - Zambia

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Chimdomba Borehole Project - ZambiaLocation
Chimdomba Village, Lundazi, Eastern Province, Zambia

Community Description
Chimdomba is a village located under Magodi Chiefdom in Lundazi district. It is an extremely rural village, located about 60 kilometers in the bush from the town of Lundazi. The people in the community speak Chitumbuka. The Tumbuka people are a small tribe located in north Eastern Zambia and Northern Malawi with a population about 1 million.

Chimdomba Village contains 27 families with a total of 176 people. This village is mainly farmers who seasonally depend on harvests of maize, soybeans, cotton, and sunflowers. It is one of the largest villages in the catchment area. This village is only growing and the demand for water is only rising.

Problem Addressed
Being one of the largest communities, Chimdomba lacks any viable water source. Eastern Province is one of the driest in the country so there are no nearby lakes, streams, or rivers around the area. Water is mainly gathered from open wells, and boreholes.

The nearest borehole, located 3.5 kilometers away, is located in Chazovu Primary School. Women and children daily carry 20-liter jerry cans every day just to complete daily chores.

Chimdomba Borehole Project - ZambiaThe borehole at Chazovu is being highly used, so breakdowns are common and the risk of water drying out is a huge possibility for the school.

Many families in Chimdomba store water in open containers and this creates a place for mosquitos to breed. Malaria is rampant in the region, and many families are affected by it. Children in Chimdomba village tend not to practice good hygiene, so head sores are very common.

Project Description
This project is to build a borehole in the community. Community and PTA meetings were conducted, and Chimdomba decided on a central location for the borehole, and elected a committee that will maintain it.

STE Drilling will drill the borehole to a depth of 50 meters. An India Mark-II handpump will be installed. Full installation and training will be completed within a week. They will also teach the village about maintenance, and contribute a 10,000 Kwacha discount.

The community will then build a surrounding wall and drainage to help with cleanliness. This will be made with sand, stone, and bricks. The work will be done by contributions and labor provided by community members.

After construction of the borehole the PCV will hold community meetings to speak about proper hygiene and the importance of not storing large amounts of stagnant water in open containers.

Project Impact
27 families, comprised of 176 people, as well as others from nearby villages will benefit from the project.

Chimdomba Borehole Project - ZambiaPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Adrian Valenzuela

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community will collect a small amount from those using the borehole, to be used for maintenance. Community members will have been trained in proper monitoring and maintenance.

Comments
The borehole will provide water for a growing village. Women and girls will be relieved from having to walk 7 km round trip to retrieve water, allowing them to focus on helping with care for their homes and families. Children will also be able to bathe every day, and better hygiene will lead to a reduction of illness in the community.

While this project is not a part of the Peace Corps Let Girls Learn program, it embraces the same values. Hence, it is included under our Let Girls Learn Plus program.

Women and children, mostly girls of school age, are largely responsible for collecting water for their families. Multiple trips daily to collect water affects girls’ education. It is a draining task, taking a great amount of time, and leading to less energy and focus on school activities. When the borehole is built, girls will be largely relieved of that responsibility, allowing them to attend school.

The school offers a GLOW (Girls Leading Our World) club, which promote girls empowerment, gender equality, and furthering education. The borehole will result in all an increase in attendance.

Fundraising Target
$2,700

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,700

This project has been completed. However, we are still accepting donations to cover the funds we have advanced, so that we have money on hand to continue to work with PCVs in Zambia on projects such as this one.

To read about the conclusion of this project, CLICK HERE.

 

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Chaliwa Borehole Project - Zambia

Chaliwa Borehole Project - Zambia

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Chaliwa Village, Lundazi, Eastern Province, Zambia

Chaliwa Borehole Project - ZambiaCommunity Description
Chaliwa Village is located in Magodi Chiefdom of Lundazi District in Eastern Province, Zambia. It is currently composed of 116 residents. Lundazi District is inhabited by the Tumbuka tribe. This is a small, distinct group in Zambia that speaks their own language, Chitumbuka. Chitumbuka is spoken worldwide by about 1 million people, a number that is slowly decreasing year to year.

The Tumbukas, and more specifically the Tumbukas found in Chaliwa, are smallholder farmers that grown maize, cotton, sunflower, soy beans, and peanuts for a living. Their diets are heavily maize-based, evidenced by their staple food, nshima. Nshima is ground maize that is boiled till thick and has a consistency resembling mashed potatoes. This is eaten at every meal and is their primary source of calories, as well as income.

Because of their heavy dependence on farming, they also depend on rain. Unfortunately, there are limited natural bodies of water in Lundazi District and this makes farming difficult at times, especially now, since the region is facing recent drought. The lack of water sources and low rainfalls have made their lives challenging because they are unable to consistently irrigate their farms without either.

That said, despite these challenges, they are as proud, happy, and as welcoming a people that you will ever find. They treat visitors as their own and are a joy to live with. Chaliwa is made up mainly of the very large Zimba family, and they are unrivaled in their hospitality.

Problem Addressed
Chaliwa Village has an uncovered, manually-operated well that is contaminated. The well's water causes illness and is dangerous to consume. There have been a myriad of negative physical effects caused by drinking from this water source, the primary being diarrhea. This is potentially lethal for the young and elderly, and it has caused deaths in Chaliwa in the past.

Furthermore, the well dries up in the summer months, ranging from May to November. Because of these problems, the people must fetch their water over 2-kilometers away by hand at another water source. This is often done on foot because only a few residents have working bicycles.

Fetching water by hand is a very arduous task and is done by placing a 20-liter jerrycan on the head and then simultaneously balancing and walking it back home. This technique is commonly used, and causes a remarkable amount of strain to the neck and back. This is done multiple times a day, daily.

Imagine for a moment, every time you wanted to take a shower or wash dishes you had to walk a mile-and-a-half, crank a borehole for 10 minutes, and then proceed to carry a 44-pound jug on your neck the same distance back home.

The lack of access to readily-available, clean water contributes to school and work absenteeism. Time that could be spent working or learning is often used fetching water. Not only does time contribute to absenteeism but also illness caused by the contaminated well. This absenteeism has far-reaching economic effects. Not being able to fully devote one's self to studying or work limits the quality of the education attained and the quality of the work done. Absenteeism leads to poor crop yields, poor class attendance, and poor studying habits.

Chaliwa Borehole Project - ZambiaProject Description
This project is to construct a covered borehole in an easily accessible location within the community.

Water Charity funds will pay for the drilling of the borehole and the purchase and installation of a Mono Pump. The work will be done by a local company, STE Drilling, based in Chipata, Zambia.

The Mono Pump is an India Mark 2 Hand Pump, which is the best-selling hand pump in the world. The borehole will be drilled to a depth of 50 meters, ensuring that the water pumped will be in plentiful amounts and uncontaminated.

Surrounding the borehole will be a drainage basin made of cement, stone, and sand. The raw materials and labor will be provided by community members.

The project was initially proposed by Chaliwa community members. Chaliwa's Headman (the community leader, Tundu Zimba) will work with the PCV to oversee the project.

Project Impact
216 people will benefit from the project, including 116 in the immediate community and over 100 in 3 nearby villages.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Zachary Howarth

Monitoring and Maintenance
The people who reside in Chaliwa Village, who are project benefactors and owners, will have the sole responsibility for maintaining borehole. Mono Pump maintenance and repair training will be given to members of the community. This will ensure that problems will be identified and quickly repaired.

A borehole maintenance account will provide funds for any repairs that are needed in the future. This will be organized by the Headman, with mandatory contributions coming from community members.

Comments
This project will enable Chaliwa residents to build capacity in a number of ways. Most apparent will be the improvement of hygiene and health. Clean water will mitigate waterborne illness and improve hygiene by making hand washing, bathing, and washing clothes more accessible. By reducing waterborne sickness, farmers will be able to work in their fields more and students will be able to go to school and study more. This will cut down absenteeism in both work and school, contributing to improved economic, educational, and overall quality of life.

Furthermore, by placing the borehole at a close and centralized location, time spent fetching water will be decreased drastically. The borehole will be within 100 meters of the community, and the addition of a Mono Pump will make fetching water a much faster task for all community members.

Also, the surrounding communities are likely to benefit from the new borehole because of a favorable distance and improved pumping technology.

Fundraising Target
$2,700

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$270

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,430

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE. We are still requesting donations.

Chaliwa Borehole Project - ZambiaChaliwa Borehole Project - Zambia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chaliwa Borehole Project - ZambiaChaliwa Borehole Project - Zambia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chaliwa Borehole Project - Zambia

Chaliwa Borehole Project - Zambia
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chaliwa Borehole Project - Zambia

Chaliwa Borehole Project - Zambia

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Kaole Primary School Water Project - Zambia

Site of the Well at Kaole Primary School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Kaole Primary School, Mansa District, Luapula Province, ZambiaKaole Primary School Sign

Community Description
The Kaole community is rural and there is no electricity or running water.  Community members live in mud huts with grass thatch roofs.  Most community members rely on farming as their source of income.  Kaole Primary School is about 10 km or about 6.2 miles from the Provincial Capital of Mansa. This school serves the most students of any of the other schools assisted by the Water for Zambia project.

Problem Addressed
Kaole Primary School had no functioning source of water on their campus.  There was an open, shallow well, over 100 meters from school.  Since there is no lid or cover, the well is easily contaminated.  The water cannot be trusted as a safe drinking water source and often dries up completely in the hot season. 

Like all the schools that the Water for Zambia project has targeted, there was a merry-go-round play pump that had not worked since 2009. This pump was intended to pump water through the energy created by children playing on the merry-go-round.  Unfortunately, the project failed and the pump quit working after just one year. 

Project Description
This project is to renovate a well to bring it to full functionality. As part of the Water for Zambia Program, this project will remove the merry-go-round and all the rusted piping below. The merry-go-round will be installed elsewhere for the children to play on. The rusted piping will be removed and replaced with PVC pipes.  Each section of the PVC piping is 3 meters.  The pipes will be securely connected with solvent cement.  

Under the Water for Zambia Program, all targeted schools require borehole rehabilitations. These rehabilitations require no further drilling.  The borehole at Kaole Primary School is 11.9 meters deep, with a static water level of 6.1 meters.  At the bottom of the well there will be a sand layer.  At the end of the piping will be a sand screen to prevent any sand and debris from coming up through the pumping.  The pedestal will then be attached to the concrete and a hand pump will be installed.  The construction process will take a total of 5 days. 

Site of Well at Kaole Primary SchoolThe pumping will allow water to flow at a rate of 10 liters per 21 seconds. The pump is easy for students to utilize and the water will be potable without purification. The new borehole will allow for students and teachers to improve the cleanliness of all school facilities, including toilets.  The convenient source of water will allow student hygiene to also improve.  Girls are most impacted by this development.  Many young girls would once drop out of school after reaching puberty.  The new water source will allow the girls to remain in school. 

Additionally, the surrounding villages and community members will come to the school to access the new source of water. There are certain hours when the borehole will be open to the community.  During open hours, the borehole will be a center of activity. Men, women, and children of many ages will come to collect water, chat, and laugh.  All community members utilizing the water source will pay a small fee to the school that will be saved in a spare parts fund for future repairs.

The above-ground improvements will include the creation of a cement apron around the pump and a drainage way to direct overflow to a soak pit. The soak pit collects all runoff water.  Students will be provided with fruit trees to plant near the new water source.

All construction will be carried out by the Water for Zambia project in partnership with the local government council.  The construction team comes from the Mansa Municipal Council located in the district capital, Mansa, in the Luapula Province. There are five men involved in the project. 

The schools and surrounding communities have been involved in every step of this project’s progress. These boreholes have an expected lifetime of 50 years. It is the hope of many that the communities will sustain their borehole for that lifetime. During the construction process, the community provided labor, sand, and stone for the project. The value of these contributions is about 20% of full project cost.

The students will be engaged in the process of sensitizing the community.  Teachers will prepare a course about water, sanitation, and proper utilization of the borehole.  Class discussions will include information about boiling drinking water, chlorine usage, washing hands after latrine use and proper hygiene.  Following the course, students will create sketches, poems, dances, and songs of various scenarios around water and sanitation. The performances will demonstrate proper and improper borehole use.  The students will present to the community at large for a day of sensitization and celebration.

Project Impact
This project will impact 2,150 people directly, 2,098 students and a teaching staff of 52.  This project will also impact any visitors and future students.

broken pumpReturned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily McKeone

Monitoring and Maintenance  
Kaole Primary School has formed a maintenance committee to monitor and protect the borehole. Teachers and the Parent Teacher Association are involved in the committee and will ensure proper regulation, operation, and maintenance. This committee will meet regularly to address any issues that arise. The committee is responsible for determining hours of operation for the borehole (and locking the borehole on off hours), as well as collecting community fees.  All community fees should be safely secured for a spare parts fund.  Spare parts are available in the district capital of Mansa. Additionally, rural area pump minders are trained to repair the Afridev boreholes. Area pump minders (or APM’s) are equipped with toolkits and bicycles to reach rural areas and assist with repairs. 

Comments
The school will now have a reliable source of drinking water. The struggle to find water and the time spent searching will be eliminated. Since the task of fetching water mostly falls on young girls, this project will most impact them. The students will have more time to dedicate to their studies and other tasks. The impact of a clean water source on campus is expected to improve health and sanitation at school, resulting in improved school attendance.

The school will be instructed to plant fruit trees near the borehole, to also assist with the issue of food security in the area. Finally, the school is in the process of constructing an additional classroom for students. It is expected that construction will be completed sooner as a result of the new, convenient source of water. 

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it does fall into Water Charity's LGL+ grouping of projects that have a pronounced element involving helping girls go to, and stay in, school, and part of Water Charity's Let Girls Learn Initiative.

Emily McKeone worked with Water Charity as a PCV, directing the prototype project, which created boreholes for three schools.  With the assistance of Water Charity, she was able to come back to Zambia as an RPCV and continue her work.  This project is #13 of 13 school boreholes with Emily, bringing the total to 16 schools boreholes in Zambia.

$0 - This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.

This program is part of the Water Charity and National Peace Corps Association East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

This project has been completed, marking the end of the Water for Zambia program.  To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.
 

Kaole Primary SchoolSchool group

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
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Chisongo Primary School Water Project - Zambia

Students at Chisongo Primary School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logo

Location

Chisongo Primary School, Mansa District, Luapula Province, Zambia

Community Description
The Chisongo community is rural and there is no electricity or running water.  Community members live in mud huts with grass thatch roofs. Most community members rely on farming as their source of income.  Chisongo Primary School is about 25 km or about 15.5 miles from the Provincial Capital of Mansa.  

Problem Addressed
Chisongo Primary School has no functioning source of water on their campus.  There are open wells, each over 100 meters from school.  Having no lid or cover, these wells could easily be contaminated.  The water could not be trusted as a safe drinking water source and often dried completely in the hot season.

Like all the schools that the Water for Zambia project has targeted thus far, there was a merry-go-round play pump that had not worked since 2009.  This pump was intended to pump water through the energy created by children playing on the merry-go-round. As with many of these "play pumps" that were installed by well-meaning charities, the concept was not as successful in practice due in part to playing and needing water not always coinciding.  Unfortunately, the project failed and the pump quit working after just one year. 

Water For Zambia LogoProject Description
Water for Zambia is a movement started by RPCV Emily McKeone after her experience doing a number of similar water projects as a PCV in Zambia with Water Charity. We helped send her back to Zambia and continue where she left off, so to speak.  

This project will remove the merry-go-round and all the rusted piping below.  The merry-go-round will be installed elsewhere for the children to play on. The rusted piping will be removed and replaced with PVC pipes. Each section of the PVC piping is 3 meters. The pipes will be securely connected with solvent cement. Then, a rope will be utilized to connect all piping together.

Under the Water for Zambia program, all targeted schools require borehole rehabilitations.  These rehabilitations require no further drilling.  The borehole at Chisongo Primary School will be 22.8 meters deep, with a static water level of 11.4 meters.  At the bottom of the well there will be a sand layer. At the end of the piping will be a sand screen to prevent any sand and debris from coming up through the pumping. The pedestal will then be attached to the concrete and a hand pump installed. The construction process will take a total of 5 days. 

The pumping will allow water to flow at a rate of 10 liters per 21 seconds. The pump is easy for students to utilize and the water will be potable without purification. The new borehole will allow for students and teachers to improve the cleanliness of all school facilities, including toilets. The convenient source of water will allow student hygiene to also improve.  Girls are most impacted by this development.  Many young girls would once drop out of school after reaching puberty. The new water source will allow the girls to remain in school. 

Additionally, the surrounding villages and community members will come to the school to access the new source of water. There are certain hours when the borehole will be open to the community.  During open hours, the borehole will be a center of activity, where men, women, and children of many ages can come to collect water, chat, and laugh.  All community members utilizing the water source will pay a small fee to the school that is then saved in a spare parts fund for future repairs.

The above- ground improvements will include the creation of a cement apron around the pump and a drainage way to direct overflow to a soak pit. The soak pit collects all runoff water. Students will be provided with fruit trees to plant near the new water source.

Kids ZambiaAll construction carried out by the Water for Zambia project is done in partnership with the local government council. The construction team comes from the Mansa Municipal Council located in the district capital, Mansa, in the Luapula Province. There are five men involved in the project. 

Swala Mumba is certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is directing the team and handling all administrative tasks on the ground in Mansa. Swala is trained in record keeping, program planning, and accounting. He has an advanced diploma in project management from the Institute of Commercial Management (located in the UK). He started working at the Mansa Municipal Council in 2008 as a rural water supply and sanitation assistant. 

Bernard Chansa is also certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is also the only plumber at the Mansa Municipal Council, and is, therefore, always needed for countless tasks. He started working at the council in 2006. He leads the construction team in the field. 

Patrick Chabu is a skilled bricklayer. He is in charge of the soak pit construction and plastering at all the schools. He started working for the council in 2007. Michael Mpana and Daniel Impundu are half brothers. Michael is 20 years old and Daniel is 19. They are both handymen and help with all the labor heavy tasks. They are in training with Mr. Chansa in borehole construction and maintenance. 

The schools and surrounding communities have been involved in every step of this project’s progress. These boreholes have an expected lifetime of 50 years. It is the hope of many that the communities will sustain their borehole for that lifetime.

During the construction process, the community will provide sand, and stone for the project. The value of these contributions is about 20% of full project cost. 

The students will be engaged in the process of sensitizing the community.  Teachers will prepare a course about water, sanitation, and proper utilization of the borehole.  Class discussions will include information about boiling drinking water, chlorine usage, washing hands after latrine use and proper hygiene.  Following the course, students will create sketches, poems, dances, and songs of various scenarios around water and sanitation. The performances will demonstrate proper and improper borehole use.  The students will present to the community at large for a day of sensitization and celebration.

Project Impact
This project will impact 727 people, comprised of 716 students enrolled at the school and a teaching staff of 11. 

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily McKeone

Teacher and pupilsMonitoring and Maintenance 
Chisongo Primary School has formed a maintenance committee to monitor and protect the borehole. Teachers and the Parent Teacher Association are involved in the committee and will ensure proper regulation, operation, and maintenance. This committee will meet regularly to address any issues that arise. The committee will be responsible for determining hours of operation for the borehole (and locking the borehole on off hours), as well as community fees. All community fees will be safely secured for a spare parts fund.  Spare parts are available in the district capital of Mansa. Additionally, rural area pump minders are trained to repair the Afridev boreholes. Area pump minders (or APM’s) are equipped with toolkits and bicycles to reach rural areas and assist with repairs. 

Comments
The school will now have a reliable source of drinking water. The struggle to find water and the time spent searching will be eliminated. Since the task of fetching water mostly falls on young girls, this project will most impact them. The students will have more time to dedicate to their studies and other tasks. The impact of a clean water source on campus is expected to improve health and sanitation at school, resulting in improved school attendance. The school will be instructed to plant fruit trees near the borehole, to also assist with the issue of food security in the area. Finally, the school is in the process of constructing an additional classroom for students. It is expected that construction will be completed sooner as a result of the new, convenient source of water. 

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it does fall into Water Charity's LGL+ grouping of projects that have a pronounced element involving helping girls go to, and stay in, school, and part of Water Charity's Let Girls Learn Initiative.

Emily McKeone worked with Water Charity as a PCV, directing the prototype project, which created boreholes for three schools.  With the assistance of Water Charity, she was able to come back to Zambia as an RPCV and continue her work.  This project is #12 of 13 school boreholes with Emily, bringing the total to 16 schools boreholes in Zambia.

$0 - This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.  Any additional donations will be utilized to fund more projects in Zambia.

This program is part of the Water Charity and National Peace Corps Association East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Mabumba Primary School Water Project - Zambia

Workers fixing the well

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Mabumba Primary School, Mansa District, Luapula Province, ZambiaStudents at the Mabumba Primary School

Community Description
The Mabumba community is rural and there is no electricity or running water.  Community members live in mud huts with grass thatch roofs.  Most community members rely on farming as their source of income.  Mabumba Primary School is about 17 km or about 10.6 miles from the Provincial Capital of Mansa.  

Problem Addressed
Mabumba Primary School has no functioning source of water on their campus.  There are two open wells, each over 150 meters from school.  These wells can be easily contaminated since they have no lid or cover.  The water cannot be trusted as a safe drinking water source and often dries completely in the hot season.
 
Like all the schools that the Water for Zambia project has targeted, there was a merry-go-round play pump that had not worked since 2009. This pump was intended to pump water through the energy created by children playing on the merry-go-round. Unfortunately, the project failed and the pump quit working after just one year.

Project Description
The Water for Zambia project will remove the merry-go-round and all the rusted piping below. The merry-go-round will be installed elsewhere for the children to play on.  The rusted piping will be removed and replaced with PVC pipes. Each section of the PVC piping is 3 meters. The pipes will be securely connected with solvent cement.  

well siteUnder the Water for Zambia project, all targeted schools require borehole rehabilitations.  These rehabilitations require no further drilling. The borehole at Mabumba Primary School is 21.3 meters deep, with a static water level of 8.5 meters.  At the bottom of the well, will be a sand layer.  At the end of the piping, will be a sand screen to prevent any sand and debris from coming up through the pumping. The pedestal will then be attached to the concrete and a hand pump will be installed. The construction process will take a total of 5 days. 

The pumping will allow water to flow at a rate of 10 liters per 21 seconds. The pump will be easy for students to utilize and the water is potable without purification. The above- ground improvements will include the creation of a cement apron around the pump and a drainage way to direct overflow to a soak pit.  The soak pit collects all runoff water.  Students have been provided with fruit trees to plant near the new water source.

Additionally, the surrounding villages and community members will come to the school to access the new source of water. There are certain hours when the borehole will be open to the community. During open hours, the borehole will be a center of activity. Men, women, and children of many ages will come to collect water, chat, and laugh. All community members utilizing the water source will pay a small fee to the school that will be saved in a spare-parts fund for future repairs.

The new borehole allows for students and teachers to improve the cleanliness of all school facilities, including toilets. The convenient source of water allows student hygiene to improve.  Girls are most impacted by this development.  Many young girls would once drop out of school after reaching puberty.  The new water source will allow the girls to remain in school.

This project is being completed in collaboration with Water for Zambia.  All construction carried out by the Water for Zambia project is done in partnership with the local government council. The construction team will come from the Mansa Municipal Council located in the district capital, Mansa, in the Luapula Province.  

There are five men involved in the project.   Swala Mumba is certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is directing the team and handling all administrative tasks on the ground in Mansa.  Swala is trained in record keeping, program planning, and accounting. He has an advanced diploma in project management from the Institute of Commercial Management (located in the UK). He started working at the Mansa Municipal Council in 2008 as a rural water supply and sanitation assistant. 

Bernard Chansa is also certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is also the only plumber at the Mansa Municipal Council, and is, therefore, always needed for countless tasks. He started working at the council in 2006. He leads the construction team in the field.  Patrick Chabu is a skilled bricklayer. He is in charge of the soak pit construction and plastering at all the schools. He started working for the council in 2007.  Michael Mpana and Daniel Impundu are half-brothers. Michael is 20 years old and Daniel is 19. They are both handymen and help with all the heavy labor tasks. They are in training with Mr. Chansa in borehole construction and maintenance. 

Project Impact
This project will impact 1,212 people at the school directly; 1,190 students enrolled at the school and a teaching staff of 22.   In addition, many of the villagers, as well as visitors and future students, will utilize the water .he number of people impacted by this project is likely to be well over 2,000.

Drainage pit

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily McKeone

Monitoring and Maintenance 
The schools and surrounding communities have been involved in every step of this project’s progress. These boreholes have an expected lifetime of 50 years.  It is the hope of many that the communities will sustain their borehole for that lifetime.

During the construction process, the community will provide labor, sand, and stone for the project.  The value of these contributions is about 20% of full project cost. 

The students will be engaged in the process of sensitizing the community. Teachers will prepare a course about water, sanitation, and proper utilization of the borehole.  Class discussions will include information about boiling drinking water, chlorine usage, washing hands after latrine use and proper hygiene.  Following the course, students will create sketches, poems, dances, and songs of various scenarios around water and sanitation. The performances will demonstrate proper and improper borehole use.  The students will present to the community at large for a day of sensitization and celebration.

Lastly, Mabumba Primary School has formed a maintenance committee to monitor and protect the borehole.  Teachers and the Parent Teacher Association are involved in the committee and will ensure proper regulation, operation, and maintenance.  This committee meets regularly to address any issues that arise. The committee will be responsible for determining hours of operation for the borehole, locking the borehole on off hours, and collecting community fees.  All community fees will be safely secured for a spare parts fund.  Spare parts are available in the district capital of Mansa. Additionally, rural area pump minders are trained to repair the Afridev boreholes. Area pump minders (or APM’s) are equipped with toolkits and bicycles to reach rural areas and assist with repairs. 

Comments
The school will now have a reliable source of drinking water.  The struggle to find water and the time spent searching have been eliminated.  Since the task of fetching water mostly falls on young girls, this project will have the most impact them.  The students will have more time to dedicate to their studies and other tasks. The impact of a clean water source on campus is expected to improve health and sanitation at school, resulting in improved school attendance.  The school has been instructed to plant fruit trees near the borehole, to also assist with the issue of food security in the area. Finally, the school is in the process of constructing an additional classroom for students.  It is expected that construction will be completed sooner as a result of the new, convenient source of water. 

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it does fall into Water Charity's LGL+ grouping of projects that have a pronounced element involving helping girls go to, and stay in, school, and part of Water Charity's Let Girls Learn Initiative.

Emily McKeone worked with Water Charity as a PCV, directing the prototype project, which created boreholes for three schools.  With the assistance of Water Charity, she was able to come back to Zambia as an RPCV and continue her work.  This project is #11 of 13 school boreholes with Emily,  bringing the total to 16 schools boreholes in Zambia.

This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.

 
Any additional donations will be utilized to fund additional projects in Zambia.
 
This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.
 
Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Fimpulu Primary School Water Project - Zambia

A teacher and pupils at Fimpulu Primary School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Fimpulu Primary School, Mansa District, Luapula Province, Zambia
old well
Community Description
The Fimpulu community is rural and there is no electricity or running water. Community members live in mud huts with grass thatch roofs. Most community members rely on farming as their source of income. Fimpulu Primary School is about 26 km or about 16 miles from the Provincial Capital of Mansa.

Problem Addressed
Fimpulu Primary School had no functioning source of water on their campus. Work on Fimpulu’s new borehole began in the thick of dry season, and their open well near the school had dried completely. Identical to other schools that the Water for Zambia project has targeted, there was a merry-go-round play pump that had not worked since 2009. This pump was intended to pump water through the energy created by children playing on the merry-go-round. Unfortunately, the project failed and the pump quit working after just one year.

The Water for Zambia project will remove the merry-go-round and all the rusted piping below. The merry-go-round will be installed elsewhere for children to play. Next, the piping will be replaced with PVC pipes. Each section of the PVC piping is 3 meters. The pipes will be securely connected with solvent cement. Then, a rope will be utilized to connect all piping together.

Under the Water for Zambia project, all targeted schools require borehole rehabilitations. These rehabilitations require no further drilling. The borehole at Fimpulu Primary School is 30.6 meters deep, with a static water level of 9 meters. At the bottom of the well there will be a sand layer. At the end of the piping will be a sand screen to prevent any sand and debris from coming up through the pumping. The pedestal will then be attached to the concrete and a hand pump is installed. The construction process will take a total of 5 days.

The pumping will allow water to flow at a rate of 10 liters per 21 seconds. The pump will be easy for students to utilize and the water will be potable without purification. The new borehole will allow for students and teachers to improve the cleanliness of all school facilities, including toilets. The convenient source of water will allow student hygiene to also improve. Girls will be the most impacted by this development. Many young girls would once drop out of school after reaching puberty. The new water source will allow the girls to remain in school.

teacher execited after receiving safe drinking waterAdditionally, the surrounding villages and community members will come to the school to access the new source of water. There are certain hours when the borehole is open to the community. During open hours, the borehole will be a center of activity. Men, women, and children of many ages will come to collect water, chat, and laugh. All community members utilizing the water source will pay a small fee to the school that will then be saved in a spare-parts fund for future repairs.

The above ground improvements will include the creation of a cement apron around the pump and a drainage way to direct overflow to a soak pit. The soak pit will collect all runoff water. Students will be provided with fruit trees to plant near the new water source.

Project Description
All construction carried out by the Water for Zambia project will be done in partnership with the local government council. The construction team will come from the Mansa Municipal Council located in the district capital, Mansa, in the Luapula Province. There are five men who will be involved in the project. Swala Mumba will oversee the work on the ground in Zambia for Fimpulu Primary School.

Swala Mumba is certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is a counterpart to Emily who assists with directing the team and administrative tasks.  Emily has trained Swala in record keeping, program planning, and accounting. He has an advanced diploma in project management from the Institute of Commercial Management (located in UK). He started working at the Mansa Municipal Council in 2008 as a rural water supply and sanitation assistant.


Bernard Chansa is also certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is also the only plumber at the Mansa Municipal Council, and is, therefore, always needed for countless tasks. He started working at the council in 2006. He leads the construction team in the field. Patrick Chabu is a skilled bricklayer. He is in charge of the soak pit construction and plastering at all the schools. He started working for the council in 2007.

Michael Mpana and Daniel Impundu are half-brothers. Michael is 20 years old and Daniel is 19. They are both handymen and help with all the labor- heavy tasks. They are in training with Mr. Chansa in borehole construction and maintenance.

Project ImpactParents attending a meeting at Fimpulu
This project will directly impact 807 people; 797 students enrolled at the school and a teaching staff of 10.  It also will impact surrounding villages (who will have access to the borehole), visitors and future students.  Conservative estimate of the total impact is closer to 3,000 people.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily McKeone

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school and surrounding communities have been involved in every step of this project’s progress. It is a long held belief, that development without community engagement is not sustainable. These boreholes have an expected lifetime of 50 years. It is the hope of many that the communities will sustain their borehole for that lifetime.

During the construction process, the community will provide labor, sand, and stone for the project. The value of these contributions is about 20% of full project cost.

The students will be engaged in the process of sensitizing the community. Teachers will prepare a course about water, sanitation, and proper utilization of the borehole. Class discussions will include information about boiling drinking water, chlorine usage, washing hands after latrine use and proper hygiene. Following the course, students will create sketches, poems, dances, and songs of various scenarios around water and sanitation. The performances will demonstrate proper and improper borehole use.  The students will present to the community at large for a day of sensitization and celebration.

Lastly, Fimpulu Primary School has formed a maintenance committee to monitor and protect the borehole. Teachers and the Parent Teacher Association are involved in the committee and will ensure proper regulation, operation, and maintenance. This committee will meet regularly to address any issues that arise. The committee will be responsible for determining hours of operation for the borehole (and locking the borehole on off hours), as well as collecting community fees. All community fees will be safely secured for a spare parts fund.  Spare parts are available in the district capital of Mansa. Additionally, rural area pump minders are trained to repair the Afridev boreholes. Area pump minders (or APM’s) are equipped with toolkits and bicycles to reach rural areas and assist with repairs.

runoff areaComments
The school will now have a reliable source of drinking water. The struggle to find water and the time spent searching will be eliminated. Since the task of fetching water mostly falls on young girls, this project will most impact them. The students will have more time to dedicate to their studies and other tasks. The impact of a clean water source on campus is expected to improve health and sanitation at school, resulting in improved school attendance. The school has been instructed to plant fruit trees near the borehole, to also assist with the issue of food security in the area.

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it does fall into Water Charity's LGL+ grouping of projects that have a pronounced element involving helping girls go to, and stay in, school, and part of Water Charity's Let Girls Learn Initiative.

Emily McKeone worked with Water Charity as a PCV, directing the prototype project, which created boreholes for three schools.  With the assistance of Water Charity, she was able to come back to Zambia as an RPCV and continue her work.  Now we are completing 13 more school boreholes with Emily, of which this is #10, bringing the total to 16 schools boreholes in Zambia.

This project is part of our Water for Zambia Program.   It also falls under our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

This project has been fully paid for by an anonymous donor.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

If you like this project, please donate to the Water for Zambia Program so that we will have money available for similar projects.
 

Pupils dancing during sensitization meeting

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Lukangaba Primary School Water Project - Zambia

Students at Lukangaba Primary School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logo

Location

Lukangaba Primary School, Mansa District, Luapula Province, Zambia

Getting ReadyCommunity Description
The Lukangaba community is rural and there is no electricity or running water. Community members live in mud huts with grass thatch roofs. Most community members rely on farming as their source of income. Lukangaba Primary School is about 20 km or 12.4 miles from the Provincial Capital of Mansa.

Problem Addressed
Lukangaba Primary School has no functioning source of water on their campus. The teachers and students have to walk over a kilometer to reach a river for drinking water. Work on Lukangaba’s new borehole begins in the thick of dry season, and any well source of water near the school has dried. Like all the schools that the Water for Zambia project has targeted, there is a merry-go-round play pump that has not worked since 2009. This pump was intended to pump water through the energy created by children playing on the merry-go-round. Unfortunately, the project failed and the pump quit working after just one year.

Project Description
The Water for Zambia project will remove the merry-go-round and all the rusted piping below. The merry-go-round will be installed elsewhere for children to play.

Next, the piping will be replaced with PVC pipes. Each section of the PVC piping is 3 meters. The pipes are securely connected with solvent cement. Then, a rope is utilized to connect all piping together. Under the Water for Zambia project, all targeted schools require borehole rehabilitations. The borehole at Lukangaba Primary School is 33 meters deep, with a static water level of 9 meters. At the bottom of the well will be a sand layer. At the end of the piping will be a sand screen to prevent any sand and debris from coming up through the pumping. The pedestal will then be attached to the concrete and a hand pump will be installed. The construction process will take a total of 5 days.

The pumping will allow water to flow at a rate of 10 liters per 21 seconds. The pump will be easy for students to utilize, and the water is potable without purification. The new borehole will allow for students and teachers to improve the cleanliness of all school facilities, including toilets.

Additionally, the surrounding villages and community members will come to the school to access the new source of water. There are certain hours when the borehole will be open to the community. During open hours, the borehole will be the center of activity where, men, women, and Lukangaba Primary Schoolchildren of many ages come to collect water, chat, and laugh.  All community members utilizing the water source will pay a small fee to the school that is then saved in a spare parts fund for future repairs.

The above ground improvements will include the creation of a cement apron around the pump and a drainage way to direct overflow to a soak pit. The soak pit will collect all runoff water. Students have been provided with fruit trees to plant near the new water source.

All construction carried out is done in partnership with the local government council. The construction team comes from the Mansa Municipal Council located in the district capital, Mansa, in the Luapula Province. There are five men involved in the project.  Swala Mumba is certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance.  He is a counterpart to Emily who assists with directing the team and administrative tasks.  Emily has trained Swala in record keeping, program planning, and accounting. He has an advanced diploma in project management from the Institute of Commercial Management (located in UK). He started working at the Mansa Municipal Council in 2008 as a rural water supply and sanitation assistant.

Bernard Chansa is also certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is also the only plumber at the Mansa Municipal Council, and is, therefore, always needed for countless tasks. He started working at the council in 2006. He leads the construction team in the field.  Patrick Chabu is a skilled bricklayer. He is in charge of the soak pit construction and plastering at all the schools. He started working for the council in 2007.  Michael Mpana and Daniel Impundu are half brothers. Michael is 20 years old and Daniel is 19. They are both handymen and help with all the labor heavy tasks. They are in training with Mr. Chansa in borehole construction and maintenance.

Project Impact
This project will directly impact at least 1,200 people. There are the 576 people at the school; 564 students enrolled at the school and a teaching staff of 12. And, as well, this project will also impact neighboring villagers, visitors, and future students.

Lukangaba SensitizationReturned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily McKeone

Monitoring and Maintenance
The schools and surrounding communities have been involved in every step of this project’s progress. It is a long held belief, that development without community engagement is not sustainable. These boreholes have an expected lifetime of 50 years. It is the hope of many that the communities will sustain their borehole for that lifetime.

During the construction process, the community will provide labor, sand, and stone for the project. The value of these contributions is about 20% of full project cost.

The students have been engaged in the process of sensitizing the community. Teachers prepared a course about water, sanitation, and proper utilization of the borehole. Class discussions will include information about boiling drinking water, chlorine usage, washing hands after latrine use and proper hygiene. Following the course, students will create sketches, poems, dances, and songs of various scenarios around water and sanitation. The performances will demonstrate proper and improper borehole use.  The students will present to the community at large for a day of sensitization and celebration.

Lastly, Lukangaba Primary School has formed a maintenance committee to monitor and protect the borehole. Teachers and the Parent Teacher Association are involved in the committee and ensure proper regulation, operation, and maintenance. This committee meets regularly to address any issues that arise. The committee is responsible for determining hours of operation for the borehole, locking the borehole on off hours as well as collecting community fees. All community fees will be safely secured for a spare parts fund.  Spare parts are available in the district capital of Mansa.  Additionally, rural area pump minders are trained to repair the Afridev boreholes. Area pump minders (or APM’s) are equipped with toolkits and bicycles to reach rural areas and assist with repairs.

Comments
The convenient source of water will allow student hygiene to improve. Girls will be most impacted by this development. Many young girls would once drop out of school after reaching puberty. The new water source will allow the girls to remain in school. The struggle to find water and the time spent searching will be eliminated. Since the task of fetching water mostly falls on young girls, this project will most impact them. The students will have more time to dedicate to their studies and other tasks. The impact of a clean water source on campus is expected to improve health and sanitation at school, resulting in improved school attendance. As such, this project receives the WC designation LGL+, for projects that promote the values and intentions of the Let Girls Learn program without actually being part of the official program. It is a part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative.

The school has been instructed to plant fruit trees near the borehole to also assist with the issue of food security in the area.Gathering water

During Emily’s time as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia, she recognized the problem of inadequate access to safe drinking water sources. She was shocked to discover that all of the schools in the area lacked an on-site, working water source.  Water Charity helped her do her first 3 school borehole projects as a PCV.  After her COS, she decided to return to Zambia as an RPCV, and start her own effort, Water for Zambia.  We at Water Charity have joined with Emily and Water for Zambia and have funded all of the work she has done for Zambia.  At present, we have committed to do 13 school water projects.  This is number 9 of 13.

$0 - This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.

 
Any additional donations will be utilized to fund additional projects in Zambia.
 
This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.
 
 
Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Malamba Primary School Water Project - Zambia

Boys from the Malanda School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC LOGOS

Location
Malamba Primary School, Mansa District, Luapula Province, Zambia

Community Description
The Malamba community is rural and there is no electricity or running water. Community members live in mud huts with grass thatch roofs. Most community members rely on Malamba Primary Schoolfarming as their source of income. Malamba Primary School is about 40 km or 24.8 miles from the Provincial Capital of Mansa.

Problem Addressed
Malamba Primary School had no functioning source of water on their campus. There was an open well near the school that was utilized for water to clean with. The water from the well is unfit for consumption. The next nearest source of water was over 1 km away. Like all the schools that the Water for Zambia project has targeted, there was a merry-go-round "play pump" that had not worked since 2009. This pump was intended to pump water through the energy created by children playing on the merry-go-round. Unfortunately, the project failed and the pump quit working after just one year.  Water Charity has never used these play pumps, but has done a number of projects to tear them out and install functional hand pumps.

Girls are most impacted by this development. Many young girls drop out of school after reaching puberty. A new water source will allow the girls to remain in school.


Malamba school bathroomsProject Description
This Water for Zambia project will remove the merry-go-round and all the rusted piping below. The merry-go-round will be installed elsewhere for children to play. Next, the piping will be replaced with PVC pipes. Each section of the PVC piping is three meters. The pipes will be securely connected with solvent cement. Then, a rope will be utilized to connect all piping together. Under the Water for Zambia project, all targeted schools require borehole rehabilitations. These rehabilitations require no further drilling. The borehole at Malamba Primary School is 26 meters deep, with a static water level of 8.5 meters. At the bottom of the well there will be a sand layer. At the end of the piping will be a sand screen to prevent any sand and debris from coming up through the pumping. The pedestal will then be attached to the concrete and a hand pump will be installed. The construction process takes a total of five days.  The pumping will allow water to flow at a rate of ten liters per 21 seconds.

Additionally, the surrounding villages and community members will come to the school to gain access the new source of water. There are certain hours when the borehole will be open to the community. During open hours, the borehole will be a center of activity. Men, women, and children of many ages will come to collect water, chat, and laugh.

All community members utilizing the water source will pay a small fee to the school, that is then saved in a spare parts fund for future repairs.

The above-ground improvements will include the creation of a cement apron around the pump, and a drainage way to direct overflow to a soak pit. The soak pit will collect all runoff water. Students will be provided with fruit trees to plant near the new water source.

All construction will be carried out by the Water for Zambia project, and will be done in partnership with the local government council. The construction team comes from the building the wellMansa Municipal Council located in the district capital, Mansa, in the Luapula Province. There are five men involved in the project.

Swala Mumba is certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is a counterpart to Emily that assists with directing the team and administrative tasks.  Emily is training Swala in record keeping, program planning, and accounting. He has an advanced diploma in project management from the Institute of Commercial Management (located in UK). He started working at the Mansa Municipal Council in 2008 as a rural water supply and sanitation assistant.

Bernard Chansa is also certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is also the only plumber at the Mansa Municipal Council, and is, therefore, always needed for countless tasks. He started working at the council in 2006. He leads the construction team in the field.

Patrick Chabu is a skilled bricklayer. He is in charge of the soak pit construction and plastering at all the schools. He started working for the council in 2007.  Michael Mpana and Daniel Impundu are half brothers. Michael is 20 years old and Daniel is 19. They are both handymen and help with all the labor heavy tasks. They are in training with Mr. Chansa in borehole construction and maintenance.


Project Impact
There are more than 900 people that will be directly impacted by this project, 459 students enrolled at the school, a teaching staff of 10, and another 450 local villagers who will come to get water from the well.  Visitors to the school and future students will also be impacted. 


Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily McKeone
 
villagers
Monitoring and Maintenance
The schools and surrounding communities have been involved in every step of this project’s progress. Development without community engagement is not sustainable.

These boreholes have an expected lifetime of 50 years. It is the hope of many, that the communities will sustain their borehole for that lifetime.

During the construction process, the community provided labor, sand, and stone for the project. The value of these contribution is about 20% of full project cost.

The students will be engaged in the process of sensitizing the community. Teachers will prepare a course about water, sanitation, and proper utilization of the borehole. Class discussions will include information about boiling drinking water, chlorine usage, washing hands after latrine use and proper hygiene. Following the course, students will create sketches, poems, dances, and songs of various scenarios around water and sanitation. The performances will demonstrate proper and improper borehole use.  The students will be presented to the community at large for a day of sensitization and celebration.

Lastly, Malamba Primary School has formed a maintenance committee to monitor and protect the borehole. Teachers and the Parent Teacher Association is involved in the committee and will ensure proper regulation, operation, and maintenance. This committee will meet regularly to address any issues that arise. The committee is responsible for determining hours of operation for the borehole, locking the borehole on off hours, and collecting community fees. All community fees will be safely secured for a spare parts fund.  Spare parts are available in the district capital of Mansa. Additionally, rural area pump minders will be trained to repair the Afridev boreholes. Area pump minders (or APM’s) will be equipped with tool kits and bicycles to reach rural areas and assist with repairs.

Comments
The school will now have a reliable source of drinking water. The struggle to find water and the time spent searching will be eliminated. Since the task of fetching water mostly school signfalls on young girls, this project will most impact them. The students will have more time to dedicate to their studies and other tasks. The impact of a clean water source on campus is expected to improve health and sanitation at school, resulting in improved school attendance.

The school has been instructed to plant fruit trees near the borehole, to assist also with the issue of food security in the area. Malamba Primary School is also in the process of constructing an additional classroom for students. It is expected that construction will be completed sooner as a result of the new, convenient source of water.  The pump will be easy for students to utilize and the water will be potable without purification. The new borehole will allow for students and teachers to improve the cleanliness of all school facilities, including toilets. The convenient source of water will allow student hygiene also to improve.

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it does fall into Water Charity's LGL+ grouping of projects that have a pronounced element involving helping girls go to, and stay in, school. 

Emily McKeone worked with Water Charity as a PCV, directing the prototype project, which created boreholes for three schools.  With the assistance of Water Charity she was able to come back to Zambia as an RPCV and continue her work.  Now we are completing 13 more school boreholes in conjunction with Emily, bringing the total to 16 schools boreholes in Zambia.  This is school #7 of 13.

This project is part of our Water for Zambia Program.   It also falls under our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

This project has been fully paid for by an anonymous donor.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

If you like this project, please donate to the Water for Zambia Program so that we will have money available for similar projects.
 

Country: 
Progress: 

Namandwe Primary School Borehole Project - Zambia

Students at the Namandwe Primary School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Namandwe Primary School, Mansa District, Luapula Province, Zambia

Community Description
The Namandwe community is rural and there is no electricity or running water. Community members live in mud huts with grass thatch roofs.  Most community members rely Students and teachers at the Namandwe Primary Schoolon farming as their source of income.  Namandwe Primary School is about 10 km or 6.2 miles from the Provincial Capital of Mansa.

Problem Addressed
Namandwe Primary School had no functioning source of water on their campus.  There was an old play pump structure that had been removed and an India Mark II borehole was installed. Due to the steel piping of this borehole, and an excess amount of iron in the ground of Luapula Province, the pipes quickly rusted and contaminated the water.

Project Description
This project is to rehabilitate the borehole at the school.

All of the rusted piping will be removed and replaced by PVC pipes.  Each section of the PVC piping is 3 meters in length.  The pipes will be securely connected with solvent cement. 

The above-ground improvements include the creation of a cement apron around the pump and a drainage way to direct overflow to a soak pit.  The soak pit collects all runoff water.  Students have been provided with fruit trees to plant near the new water source.

Under the Water for Zambia Program, all targeted schools require borehole rehabilitations. These rehabilitations require no further drilling. The borehole at Namandwe Primary School is 22.3 meters deep, with a static water level of 5 meters. At the bottom of the well there is a sand layer. At the end of the piping will be a sand screen to prevent any sand and debris from coming up through the pumping. The pedestal will then be attached to the concrete and a hand pump will be installed. The construction process will take a total of 5 days.

young boys at the boreholeThe pumping allows water to flow at a rate of 10 liters every 21 seconds.  The pump will be easy for students to utilize, and the water is potable without purification. 

The new borehole will allow for students and teachers to improve the cleanliness of all school facilities, including toilets.  The convenient source of water will improve student hygiene.  Girls are most impacted by this development.  Many young girls would drop out of school after reaching puberty if there are not adequate bathroom facilities. The new water source allows the girls to remain in school.

Additionally, the surrounding villages and community members will be able to come to the school to access the new source of water.  There will be certain hours when the borehole is open to the community.  During open hours, the borehole will be the center of activity.  Men, women, and children of many ages will come to collect water, chat, and laugh.  All community members utilizing the water source will pay a small fee to the school that will then be saved in a spare parts fund for future repairs.

All construction carried out by the Water for Zambia project is done in partnership with the local government council.  The construction team comes from the Mansa Municipal Council located in the district capital, Mansa, in the Luapula Province. There are five men involved in the project.

Swala Mumba is certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is a counterpart to Emily who assists with directing the team and administrative tasks.  Emily is training Swala in record keeping, program planning, and accounting.  He has an advanced diploma in project management from the Institute of Commercial Management (located in UK).  He started working at the Mansa Municipal Council in 2008 as a rural water supply and sanitation assistant.

Bernard Chansa is also certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance.  He is also the only plumber at the Mansa Municipal Council, and is, therefore, always needed for countless tasks.  He started working at the council in 2006. He leads the construction team in the field.

Patrick Chabu is a skilled bricklayer. He is in charge of the soak pit construction and plastering at all the schools. He started working for the council in 2007.

Michael Mpana and Daniel Impundu are half brothers. Michael is 20 years old and Daniel is 19. They are both handymen and help with all the heavy labor tasks.  They have trained with Mr. Chansa in borehole construction and maintenance.

Project Impact
This project will directly impact 1,409 people, 1,371 students enrolled at the school and a teaching staff of 38.   This will indirectly impact other villagers, visitors and future students.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily McKeone
Student instruction
Monitoring and Maintenance
The schools and surrounding communities will be involved in every step of this project’s progress.  It is a long held belief, that development without community engagement is not sustainable. These boreholes have an expected lifetime of 50 years.  It is the hope of many that the communities will sustain their borehole for that lifetime.

During the construction process, the community will provide labor, sand, and stone for the project.  The value of these contributions is about 20% of full project cost.

The students will engage in the process of sensitizing the community.  Teachers will prepare a course about water, sanitation, and proper utilization of the borehole.  Class discussions will include information about boiling drinking water, chlorine usage, washing hands after latrine use and proper hygiene.  Following the course, students will create sketches, poems, dances, and songs of various scenarios around water and sanitation.  The performances will demonstrate proper and improper borehole use.   There will be a day of sensitization and celebration at which the students will present their performances to the community.

Lastly, Namandwe Primary School has formed a maintenance committee to monitor and protect the borehole.  Teachers and the Parent Teacher Association are involved in the committee to ensure proper regulation, operation, and maintenance.  This committee will meet regularly to address any issues that arise.  The committee is responsible for determining hours of operation for the borehole and locking the borehole on off hours, as well as community fees.   All community fees should be safely secured for a spare parts fund.  Spare parts are available in the district capital of Mansa.  Additionally, rural area pump minders are trained to repair the Afridev boreholes.   Area pump minders (or APM’s) are equipped with toolkits and bicycles to reach rural areas and assist with repairs.

School and water tankComments
The school will now have a reliable source of drinking water. The struggle to find water and the time spent searching have been eliminated. Since the task of fetching water mostly falls on young girls, this project will most impact them. The students will have more time to dedicate to their studies and other tasks.

The impact of a clean water source on campus is expected to improve health and sanitation at school, resulting in improved school attendance.  The school has been instructed to plant fruit trees near the borehole, to also assist with the issue of food security in the area.

Finally, the school is in the process of constructing an additional classroom for students.  It is expected that construction will be completed sooner as a result of the new, convenient source of water.

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it does fall into Water Charity's LGL+ grouping of projects that have a pronounced element involving helping girls go to, and stay in, school. 

Emily McKeone worked with Water Charity as a PCV, directing the prototype project, which created boreholes for 3 schools.  With the assistance of Water Charity she was able to come back to Zambia as a RPCV and implement the Water for Zambia program.  Now we are completing 13 more school boreholes, bringing the total to 16 schools boreholes in Zambia.  This is school #8 of 13.

This project is part of our Water for Zambia Program.   It also falls under our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

This project has been fully paid for by an anonymous donor.

If you like this project, please donate to the Water for Zambia Program so that we will have money available for similar projects.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

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