Togo

Lavie Water Project - Togo

Villagers cleaning out the water hole

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

​This project has been completed and the updated conclusion report can be read below. (click
#CONCLUSION REPORT)

LocationWaterfall Water Source
Canton of Apedome, Lavie, Kloto Prefecture, Togo

Community Description
Lavie is located in the prefecture of Kloto, just 13 kilometers away from Kpalime, in a mountainous region that borders Ghana.  Lavie is composed of two cantons, Apedome and Rhume, each with a population of about 6,000 inhabitants. Lavie neighbors a popular tourist village named Kpime, famous for its beautiful waterfalls and hikes. This community is surrounded by beautiful green mountains and is abundant in fruits and vegetables. The climate is tropical, and the community consists of lush green, tropical trees, flora, and fauna. It is famous for the tree nurseries, as many individuals from around Togo visit the community for hard to find species of trees.

Colette Van Dyke, the Peace Corp Volunteer directing this project reports:

“I feel so at home in my community, and just wake up feeling lucky to be in such a loving and beautiful place. When I wake up in the morning, I have the blessing of being able to see the green, misty mountains in the distance, and breathe in clean, unpolluted, fresh air. The vegetables and fruits I buy at the local market are always fresh and natural, as my village is abundant in tropical and wild collections of fruits and vegetables. When I walk outside of my compound, I follow a beautiful red dirt road with green lush surrounding me.  Neighbors, friends, school children, always greet me and ask how I are doing when I walk down the street. My favorite time of the year is mango season (around March-April) during which my host brothers and sisters and I sit under the shade of the mango trees, to eat mangoes and talk. To put it simply, life in Lavie is happiness to me.”

The majority of the community members speak French, but the predominant language is Ewe. There are also smaller groups of Kabiye, Moba, and Kotokoli throughout the village. We are a medium sized community with roughly 12,000 inhabitants in total, and many schools, kindergarten to high school.  There are NGOs working nearby. The majority of individuals in the community rely on crop cultivation for food and income generation. The entire village of Lavie is equipped with electricity and running water, making living a bit more comfortable. Because the region receives heavy amounts of rainfall throughout the year, the fertile land is able to produce abundant amounts of cash crops such as coffee, yams, bananas, and pineapples. While this heavy rainfall is a blessing in this respect, it also poses problems for the water source, as will be explained further below.

Dirty water the villagers currently utilizeProblem Addressed
The heavy rainfall the community receives every year causes problems for the water source. Erosion leaves piping exposed, bruised and vulnerable to breakage. The main water source is a waterfall located up in the mountains. When rain falls, a collection of debris, dust, dirt, leaves, twigs, and feces fall in to that open water source, and channel out to community members.

To put it simply, this community lacks clean, hygienic, potable water. The village currently relies on an old, broken down system of water that was constructed over 60 years ago by USAID. The water filter that the entire community relies on consists of a simple plastic container with punctured holes, to keep out leaves and twigs, but does not actually purify water.

The entire community essentially drinks brown, unfiltered water that is channeled through dirty, aging, deteriorated and molding piping. Due to erosion from rainfall, the pipes are exposed, punctured, and burned from years of hot sun exposure. Because of this exposure, the elasticity of these pipes is weak and when rocks, rainfall, or humans step over the exposed piping they are easily cracked and broken. When a pipe is cracked, which happens often, water spews from the pipe, causing a blockage that prevents water from running to the rest of the village. Community members are then forced to shut down the entire water system, starting from the water tower, until the punctured pipe is taped back together. This is a process that takes several hours, and deprives community members of water for periods at a time.

The local health clinic is constantly treating patients due to water-related illnesses. This problem has a huge effect on students, especially girls, who are consistently absent from class due to unsanitary water. The lack of a clean water source creates barriers for female students to keep up throughout the school year, which greatly jeopardizes their potential to graduate and pursue a career. A clean water source would reduce the influx of patients at the already understaffed health clinic and diminish absentee rates at schools. Additionally, the water system serves 2 neighboring villages, with an additional population of 2,000 inhabitants.

Project DescriptionMan checking the pipes
This water sanitation project will implement the following in the water dam, which is located at the base of the waterfall used as the water source: 

First the five old rotten pipes located at the dam will be replaced with five stainless steel pipes. 

Next a new water filter will be inserted in the dam, which will transform the water into a potable source. An iron fence will be erected around the filter to block leaves and other particles from dirtying and entering the filter. 

Next a cement slab will be constructed with an iron filling that will cover the third dam filling and filter to prevent debris and particles from clogging the filter from above. 

A floodgate will be installed at the base of the wall of the dam, or spigot, that will allow water to evacuate from the dam to allow for cleaning.  In addition, a vacuum (motor pump) that electrically evacuates water will be installed so inhabitants are not forced to jump into the dam and manually evacuate water with buckets and shovels (a process that takes at least 4 hours).  Then two connection pieces will be installed that will connect the water spigot to the piping.

The following are the steps to complete the project and timeline.

1) Withdrawal of money (Colette Van Dyke) (1 day)
2) Travel to Lome to buy materials (Water Commission Board Members- Mr. Kpetsu and Mr. Agon) (2 days)
3) Return to Lavie with materials (1 day)
4) Announcements and mobilization of community, by district. Community Development committee will execute this (1 day)
5) Collection of sand and gravel with the community, students, farmers, general community members, water board members(1 day)
6) Transport of materials from the village up to the dam. Various members of the community (1 day)
7) Construction of cement slabs for the dam, 3 local carpenters (3 days)
8) Installation of piping and connection pieces, water technician. (1 day)      
9) Installation of filter and metal caging, water technician (1 day)
10) Installation of flood gate, water technician (1 day)
11) Follow up, Colette Van Dyke (one week)

The community will participate in all aspects of manual labor involved in this project and will provide food and water for those working. The community will help mobilize its members to work and oversee the completion of the project in an organized manner. The community is the driving force behind this project, as they have urged Collette since her arrival, to help them improve their water source.

countrysideAfter conducting a needs assessment with the entire community, they listed their water filtration system as the number one pressing need. They are motivated and ready to help in any way they can to ameliorate their water source.

This motivation was witnessed first hand when APCD, Paul Siyanda, came to visit the community. The members of the community were able to organize a community-wide water cleanup day in which they emptied and cleaned the dam. Each times the rainfalls and the water system stops, community members have no choice but to work together to clean, fix, and unclog our filter and dam. This community collaboration is essential to sustaining the water, and subsequently life in village. Otherwise, the community cannot continue to survive.
Clean water is a base element of life that should be available to everybody, but is sadly a problem people are grappling with each day.

The funds will go directly towards all the materials and parts needed to replace old, deteriorated materials (filter, piping, water valves, floodgate, etc.) with new and durable materials. General community members, the Village Development Committee Board, Water Association Board, students, parents, and teachers will assist in implementing the water system. Having those who will benefit from cleaner water involved in the implementation process invest them in the success and sustainability of the end product.  Additionally, cleaner water leads to better health, allocating more free time and energy to other activities such as working in the fields, teaching, learning, working, etc.

Project Impact
This project will impact 14,000 people, as well as any visitors to the area.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Colette Van Dyke

Monitoring and Maintenance
filtering waterThe community will be able to sustain the benefits of this project by enforcing a strict monthly community contribution plan. Each household will contribute 100 cfa each month that will go towards water repairs, materials, and water clarification. The Water Development Board Members are committed to collecting this contribution each month, and will take turns amongst each other to implement this. The local water technicians will then use this money to maintain and make repairs when needed. If a person refuses to contribute, their water source can and will be shut off. The water commission and technician in the community will oversee, and do manual checkups to make sure materials are protected, maintained, and taken care of for future years.

Comments  and Let Girls Learn:

According to Colete:

This problem has a huge effect on students, especially girls, who are consistently absent from class due to our unsanitary water. According to the registry at our local hospital clinic, approximately 127 girls were reported to have fallen ill with giardiasis, dysentery, diarrhea, gastroenteritis, or typhoid just in 2014. In 2015, 169 cases of these waterborne diseases among girls were reported in our registry. The lack of a clean water source creates barriers for female students to keep up throughout the school year, which greatly jeopardizes their potential to graduate and pursue a career. A clean water source would diminish absentee rates at our schools, especially among the girls. In general, clean water through a new and improved system, will save the entire community money and time that could be used towards raising families or sending children to school, which paves the way for a brighter future.

When I arrived in Lavie in May 2015, two days into my welcoming the community members took me up to their water source to explain where the most development was needed. This took me aback, as it usually takes weeks for community members to reveal community needs.   I was pleasantly surprised by their motivation and devotion to this project. After they had detailed all the problems with their water system, I promised them I would do my best to help them out. Afterwards, one of my work partners whipped out a bottle of the local drink (sodabe), and we all toasted to the year ahead of us, and that I could bring good work and blessings to their community.

On our hike back down from the water dam, one of my work partners spotted a porcupine hiding amidst the brush. He smiled and looked back at me, and I looked back at him, puzzled. He excitedly told me he had just spotted a porcupine, and I thought "cool! so what?" What made it special was what he told me next. He explained to me that in Ewe culture, a porcupine is a symbol of hope for those who are in pain or in need of help. When the quills of a porcupine are engaged, they are filled with air, allowing them to float. This buoyancy is symbolic of the ability to stay "above water", to remain calm in the face of emotional waters. In other words, when life casts you problems, you invoke porcupine energy to keep you afloat upon troubled waters. My work partner then told me that perhaps it’s a sign that I am a source of new hope for Lavie. I mulled over this the entire hike down. I was just presented with my first major task, a water sanitation project, and I was hoping I could be that "hope" for her new community.  I hoped that I could lessen the suffering even just a little. I had no idea how I was going to tackle such a project, but I hoped that I could invoke this "porcupine energy" to keep me afloat and balanced, to help find a clear solution amidst my community's problems.

Today, I can happily say that Water Charity is that solution, that hope for my community. I'm sending a big Thank You to Water Charity for all the work you do!

 


Lavie Project Completed

Lavie Water Project - Togo - Conclusion

Colette Van Dyke Reports (in 2 phases):

 

Water Sanitation Part 1: Local Water Filtration System

 

Your Story: The impact our Water Charity Let Girls Learn grant had was deeply felt by community members and surrounding villages throughout my region. Through dedication, teamwork, perseverance, and commitment my community was able to turn an unhygienic water source in to a clean and consistently running spring. Over the course of one month, my community worked together to install new piping, a new filter, and cement over our water dam. These simple steps allowed for an entire community to reduce the percentage of individuals who fall sick due to our previously unsanitary water source, thereby diminishing absentee rates at our schools. After a series of randomized household surveys, visits to the school and health clinic, the findings from this grant proved to be generally positive. Working water system

Goals Achieved, Changes in Initial Objectives, and Community Feeling:

In a study conducted by school officials for academic year 2015-2016, our total absentee rate for students at the middle and high school level hovered at around the 29% mark. Towards the end of academic year 2015-2016 and at the beginning of academic year 2016-2017, the absentee rate among middle and high school students is now at around the 24% mark. When a work partner and I conducted surveys, more than half of the participants (composed of students, school administration, and teachers) responded that one of the top potential reasons for this decrease is due to improved health. When my work partner and I visited the primary health clinic in our community, we were able to retrieve statistics from clinic staff regarding rates of girls who have fallen ill due to water related diseases. In 2015, our registry reported 169 cases of illness regarding waterborne diseases. However, thus far in 2016, our health clinic has reported 112 cases. This data was compiled from reports school officials and health clinic staff provided to us using statistics acquired over a period of time. In order to further corroborate the positive trend in our findings, my work partner and I decided to conduct randomized household surveys to find how the water quality has affected general community members. After conducting 20 randomized household visits, we found that around half of the families surveyed found a) a noticeable difference in water quality and b) generally improved quality of life due to this our water sanitation grant.   

Capacity and Skills Built: General community members, our village development committee board, water association board, students, parents, and teachers assisted in implementing our water piping and materials. They took care of all the manual labor, such as digging trenches, collecting sand and gravel, transporting materials up to our source, etc. Our two water technicians who work on the upkeep of our water piping, learned how to manage and budget monetary monthly contribution. Because of these technicians, the maintenance of our water system is sustainable.  

Sustainability: The sustainability of our project has posed some difficulties but also some opportunities for community members. After the completion of our water sanitation installment, the community selected two trusted inhabitants of the community to oversee the maintenance of our water system. It has been difficult holding these individuals accountable, and ensuring that they complete their duties. After our first community reunion, we held these individuals responsible and questioned them on the difficulties of the job. They were able to point out some improvements they could make, and this has been fruitful in holding them accountable. As of now, I believe if the community continues to hold quarterly meetings with all interested stakeholders, the sustainability of this portion of our water project will go much more smoothly.

            Another aspect of our water project hinges on a monthly contribution of 100cfa from all community members. The president of our water association has been tasked with collecting the money, however he has been unable to do so consistently due to time conflicts. We are in the process of appointing other members within the water association board to take on the responsibilities of this post. 

Unexpected Events and Recommendations: Unexpected events and recommendations include the following:Ribbon Cutting

·      Organized, collaborative, and cooperative community contribution. The community came together to collect gravel, carry cement up to our water dam, install piping pieces, clean out the dam, and many other tasks. I was very surprised to see how much my community was motivated and cooperative. I was very proud to see them coming together like a team to complete a task for the greater good of the community.

·      I did not expect for the water maintenance system to break down as early as it did. The initial organization of maintaining and protecting the newly installed water system took some time to figure out in the beginning. However, after our community meetings we were able to establish a rhythm that worked for our maintenance individuals and the community.

·      After my community saw how our impactful and beneficial our project became, I began receiving more interest in work offers from inhabitants in the surrounding villages. I also began receiving requests for additional water sanitation projects that I simply cannot accommodate any longer.

·      As for recommendations, I would recommend discussing water maintenance details before initiating another water sanitation project. The maintenance relies on the motivation and dedication of the community, and if this is lacking, the sustainability of this project crumbles. I would recommend having a clearer maintenance vision before engaging in any other funded project.  

Lessons Learned and Promising Practices : This water sanitation grant was my first real time taking out a grant. I learned how to orchestrate the details of a grant, and control many moving parts. I learned how to delegate tasks, manage a budget, assign roles and responsibilities, and keep an organized count of actions performed. I learned how to monitor progress and conduct follow up work to measure results. These are promising practices that can be carried on in to any future large-scale funded projects I conduct. 

 

 

Water Sanitation Part 2: Replacement of Piping for Cleaner Water in Lavie

 

Filling bucket on headYour Story: The first part of our water sanitation grant focused on improving the quality of our water through better piping, and a new filter. This second part of our Let Girls Learn grant focused on adding and extending piping as well as constructing water fountains as a way to improve access to our water to all community members. This involved building and implementing water fountains, and extending piping to exterior communities. The impact this Let Girls Learn grant had was deeply felt by community members and surrounding villages throughout my region. Over the course of two months, my community worked together to install new piping, water fountains, and extend pipe pieces to neighboring districts. During our randomized household surveys, 17 out of 20 houses reported they benefited greatly from the implementation of these water fountains. In addition, 16 out of 20 houses reported that the amount of time spent fetching water was reduced significantly due to the closer proximity of our water fountains. The way my work partner and I conducted follow-up work involved selecting 20 households within our district, and performing household surveys in order to garner responses to a series of questions related to our water grant. In addition, we visited the local health clinic and central school to measure the impact this increased access to water affected these two populations. In general, our findings proved generally positive as we found the majority of community members benefited greatly from this grant.

Goals Achieved, Changes in Initial Objectives, and Community Feeling:

In a study conducted by school officials for academic year 2015-2016, our total absentee rate for students at the middle and high school level hovered at around the 29% mark. Towards the end of academic year 2015-2016 and at the beginning of academic year 2016-2017, the absentee rate among middle and high school students has stayed stagnant at around the 23-24% mark. When my work partner and I conducted surveys among 30 subjects in the school community, more than half of the participants (composed of students, school administration, and teachers) responded that one of the top potential reasons for this decrease remained at “improved health”. When my work partner and I visited the primary health clinic in our community, we were able to retrieve statistics from clinic staff regarding rates of girls who have fallen ill due to water related diseases. In 2015, our registry reported 169 cases of illness regarding waterborne diseases. However, thus far in 2016, our health clinic has remained constant from our previous follow up work, at 112 cases.

This data was compiled from reports school officials and health clinic staff provided to us using statistics acquired over a period of time. In order to further corroborate the positive trend in our findings, my work partner and I decided to conduct randomized household surveys to find how the water quality has affected general community members. After conducting 20 randomized household visits, we found that around half of the families surveyed found a) a noticeable difference in water quality, b) generally improved quality of life due and (c ) more time saved to perform other activities, due to improved access to water.to this our water sanitation grant.   

 Capacity and Skills Built: Our water commission has learned how to budget and collectively organize themselves to collect our monthly community contribution. Each month, water commission members take turns in making the rounds and talking to various households. Each water commission member has been trained in how to log and categorize our community logbook. These are skills that will be carried on to the future. 

Kids with waterSustainability: My community has been able to sustain the benefits of this project by enforcing a strict monthly community contribution plan. In the four months since my community completed this grant, each household has been able to contribute 100 cfa each month that will be saved towards water reparations, materials, and water chlorification. Our water development board members have done a fantastic job at collecting this contribution each month, and will continue to take turns amongst each other to implement this. They record the savings in a budget book, with the name of each household, as well as their contribution. If a household refuses to contribute, they are at risk of having their water source shut off. Our local water technicians have not tapped in to our collective funds as of yet, because no major repairs have been needed.  

Unexpected Events and Recommendations: An unexpected positive result of this grant occurred towards the end of our project. One of the neighboring districts in our community caught on to the work we were doing, and collectively rose money to extend our piping to their community. The motivation and commitment my community exhibited has been uplifting and inspirational for me. This collective action has motivated me to continue working on projects such as this.

            Another unexpected positive result was the publishing of our grant in WorldView magazine. I was also surprised to see how direct excerpts from my initial grant application were directly pasted in to the article. This grant not only aided an entire community with cleaner, potable water, but also introduced the dedication and hard work of my community to the entire world.

Because of work commitments, I was not able to closely monitor the progress of this grant as closely as other grants. Due to my absence, I was not able to partake in community labor, and feel my lack of presence made community members feel I was not supportive or didn’t care. In the future, I would recommend that I try my best to be present for major grants such as this. 

Lessons Learned and Promising Practices: Through this grant, I was able to witness the motivation and work capacity my community is capable of. When put to the test, I have seen that my community is capable of accomplishing so much. I also learned that a grant that is well written is capable of not only receiving funds, but also serving as a role model to other volunteers.

Personal promising practices include, strong writing skills, which convey the need of the community and address the 5 W’s (who, what, when, where, why). In terms of my community, promising practices I witnessed include the ability to mobilize and organize a community to execute a major goal. In addition, our water commission has developed a sustainable, and organized method of collecting water maintenance funds. They record their collections in a community logbook, and maintain this logbook monthly. These practices can and will be continued in to the future. In summary, these practices are definitely assets my community can capitalize on to contribute to future development.

Community GroupTogo Ribbon Cutting for Project

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Djamde Health Clinic Water Project - Togo

NPCA and WC logos

Djamde Health Clinic Water Project - Togo

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Village of Djamde, Kozah District, Kara Region, Togo

Community Description
In Togo, 368 mothers die for every 100,000 live births and roughly 1 in 10 children born will die before their 5th birthday, an astounding 15 times the child mortality rate of developed countries. The majority of these deaths are caused by easily preventable conditions that could be treated at very low costs. Furthermore, the majority of these deaths happen in the neglected, northern region of Togo, in villages like Djamde.

Djamde Health Clinic Water Project - TogoThirty kilometers west of the city of Kara, Djamde is a large village at the foot of mountains. The vast majority of the 5,340 inhabitants are subsistence farmers belonging to the Kabiyè ethnic group. Due to a myriad of factors, the population of Djamde rarely frequented the health center prior to the support of Hope Through Health (HTH). In July 2015, the Djamde Health Center reported a 37% coverage rate, and less than 10 facility-based deliveries per month.

Problem Addressed
HTH works to eliminate barriers to good health by eliminating user fees for patients, deploying Community Health Workers, mentoring nurses and midwives in public clinics, and improving supply chains in nine communities across northern Togo, including Djamde. They have been able to make excellent strides toward reducing mortality and morbidity in Djamde, but the state of the health center remains a limiting factor.

The Djamde Health Center is in need of extensive repairs and renovations, including improved water source and plumbing. The center provides lifesaving care to a population of 5,340, all without running water. While the clinic has plumbing, this system has fallen into disrepair and needs to be restored. Staff members harvest rainwater from the roof during the rainy season or water is carried from an alternative source in the community.

Djamde Health Clinic Water Project - TogoWithout proper plumbing and electric systems, the center is ill-equipped to provide high quality healthcare services to meet the needs of the surrounding communities.

Project Description
A borehole will be drilled to a depth of 70-100 meters. The existing concrete tank will be replaced by a polytank, and new piping installed. Faulty supply piping to the wash basin taps inside the building will be replaced.

Hope Through Health, in partnership Construction for Change (CFC) and the 30/30 Project, will renovate the Djamde Health Center so that the quality of the building matches the excellent services being delivered inside its walls. This will include a new water system, as outlined below.

The Djamde clinic has an existing plumbing system. However, the current water tower/tank on the property is not functional. The system will be modified to include a borehole with a 2kfa hydraulic pump, a 3,000-liter water storage polytank, and improvements to the existing concrete water tower.

Project Managers from CFC who are based in Togo will oversee this project. They have already performed site assessments and have a detailed outline of how to accomplish each of these tasks. They will hire a Togolese construction company to complete the work.

Djamde Health Clinic Water Project - TogoThe construction company will hire some members of the community as laborers for the duration of the project. All major decisions on renovations will be made in collaboration with the Togolese Ministry of health.

Funds from Water Charity will go specifically to labor and materials costs associated with improving the water supply at the health center.

Project Impact
5,340 people will benefit from the project.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jennifer Schechter, RPCV and Executive Director, Hope Through Health

Monitoring and Maintenance
CFC Program Managers will oversee the project’s progress until completion. Thereafter, HTH will monitor the functioning of the clinic and assure that all technology is running smoothly. HTH’s Clinical Mentor will visit the Djamde Health Center two times a month for ongoing coaching; during these visits he will be able to take note of any issues.

In addition, HTH will collect service indicators from the center each month, including number of children under five treated, number of facility based deliveries, and number of women who adopt family planning methods. Monitoring these indicators will also help HTH see how the renovation project is contributing to the health of the community.

Renovating the Djamde Health Center is a sustainable project because it is a top-off investment to what the Ministry of Health (MOH) is already investing in the center. The MOH pays salaries of staff for the clinic as well as other ongoing costs such as utilities. With the renovated clinic, HTH expects coverage rates to increase, meaning that the MOH is able to reach more patients with their current investment. Strengthening the existing health center with a goal of government adoption makes the impact sustainable over the long term.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - Togo

Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - Togo

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxxxx, Tchaoudjo Prefecture, Central Region, Togo

Community Description
The village of Xxxxxxxxxx is located in the Northeast corner of the Central Region of Togo. It is 27 km from the regional capital of Sokode and is nestled in the mountains between Sokode and the Benin border. Nearly all inhabitants are ethnically Kotikoli Muslim, and speak the language Tem. A minority of people (mostly educated males) speaks French.

The clinic and middle school serve Xxxxxxxxxx and six other surrounding villages. The total clinic catchment area is close to 4,000 people. The village of Xxxxxxxxxx itself has roughly 1,000 inhabitants. Most everyone in Xxxxxxxxxx is a farmer, owning at most 2 hectares of land, and participates in small animal husbandry, including raising goats, sheep, and chickens. Additionally, the village is known for its traditional fabrics made by local weavers.

The biggest health issues are malaria and diarrheal diseases. There is one pump in Xxxxxxxxxx. Most people get their water from open wells or the nearby stream, all of which usually dry up during the dry season.

In terms of fetching water, showering, finding vegetables, and other daily activities, living in Xxxxxxxxxx is difficult. However, although the villagers are isolated and live in poverty, they are open, friendly, welcoming, and eager to learn.

Problem Addressed
There is no clean water available at the Xxxxxxxxxx clinic and no water source at the Xxxxxxxxxx middle school. The lack of clean, running water at the clinic lowers the overall level of hygiene at the clinic, especially during births. The clinic staff makes village women, oftentimes the family members of women giving birth, bring water (oftentimes from the non-potable, open well nearby) to the delivery room to clean the room, supplies, bloody rags, etc. and to provide drinking water for the pregnant mother.

A lack of running water also makes it difficult for health practitioners to wash their hands regularly. There is no available drinking water for clinic staff and patients. Pregnant women are often forced to return to their homes during their pre-natal consultations to bring drinking water in order to take their anti-malarial medications. If the women come from outlying villages, they are forced to buy water to take their medications, which can be a barrier to some women.

Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoThe lack of a water source at the Xxxxxxxxxx middle school also presents a plethora of problems. Teachers and students alike do not wash their hands after defecating or before eating during recess. Food vendors do not have access to water to wash their hands before serving food to the children or to appropriately wash dishes between student use. The nurse has often seen waves of diarrheal diseases among students that stem from these food vendors' unsanitary practices.

Children also have no water to drink during the school day. Some students are forced to go without water all day, especially those who cannot return home during lunch because they live too far away. If a child is thirsty, they must walk to the stream 1 km away to drink dirty river water or ask households beside the school to give water.

Handwashing efforts at the school have failed because of this water access issue. Teachers even make female students fetch water from the stream during class, making them even more behind in their studies.

The Xxxxxxxxxx clinic was constructed in 2000. The original clinic construction included a tower and pipes to provide running water. Villagers or clinic staff would manually pump water every morning, which would be propelled into the sinks at the clinic.

When the clinic and water system was built, the workers stopped digging once they hit rock. Consequently, the running water was only available during the rainy season and dried up completely during the dry season. The running water system stopped working entirely in 2013. An Islamic NGO recently built a shallow well with a manual pump head mechanism close to the clinic. However, this pump head mechanism continuously breaks, and the well is not deep enough to sustain itself during the dry season.

Project Description
This project is to rebuild the water system at the clinic and provide a new water source at the middle school by constructing a well.

The project funds will be used to dig this well deeper (with help from the Islamic NGO) and connect new piping to the original tower. The water will then be pumped into the clinic sinks using electricity (the village got electricity last year).

The second part of the project will build a new 15-meter well at the Xxxxxxxxxx middle school. The well will be covered with a manual pump head mechanism. A well-experienced plumber from Sokode is in charge of all technical construction. Villagers will provide unskilled labor (e.g., digging the well deeper, withdrawing water, sand collection at the riverbed, etc.).

The president of the Village Development Committee is the project leader and will coordinate the clinic and school water committees. The clinic nurse and middle school teachers will co-implement trainings with the PCV.

Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoThe already-established Committee for the Organization and Overview of Community Health will serve as the water committee for the repaired clinic water system. Several members of the parent teacher association, student leaders, and teachers, as well as the school director, will serve on the school water committee.

Both water communities will collect money periodically to make sure that there is always a current sum in their account to fix the systems at any given moment. The electricity bill for the improved clinic water system will be paid out of pharmacy and consultation revenues.

This project includes the following trainings: intensive WASH training (including treatment of water) with both water committees, handwashing and handwashing station construction training with the entire student body, and a gender equitable practices training with the middle school teachers. Fifteen water committee members (of the nineteen total for the two committees) will be able to identify at least three critical times to wash hands, as evidenced by pre- and post-tests.

Project Impact
4,000 inhabitants in the canton, including 260 students at the middle school, will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Y. Ryder

Monitoring and Maintenance
By participating in the water committee, five parents will strengthen the community-school relationship. Four students will also serve on the school water committee. These students will demonstrate leadership by motivating other students and food vendors to maintain school hygiene.

Observation logs will be used to monitor handwashing and water treatment at the school, improved hygiene by the school vendors, handwashing and water treatment at the clinic, and implementation of gender equitable practices by teachers in the classroom. By the end of the project, at least three teachers will have demonstrated gender equitable practices in the classroom.

The two water committees, one at the middle school and the other at the clinic, will ensure maintenance and sustainability of the project. The clinic water committee will be molded into the already well-established COGES committee. Future repairs to the water system will be paid for by the COGES's reserve account, which comes from pharmacy funds and village collections.

Because the new running water system will be powered through electricity, the clinic's monthly electricity bill will increase slightly. The clinic will still be responsible for paying all electricity bills.

The water committee at the middle school will be made up mostly of members from the Parent Teachers' Association, an active group in village. Repairs will come from the Middle School account, which gets money from school fees. The school water committee will collect money from students and their parents at the beginning of the project to add to the school account, and will continue this collection annually.

Both teachers and students in the water committee will ensure that water is treated before drinking and arrange work schedules to fill all classroom water buckets and handwashing stations.

Let Girls Learn
Women and girls are disproportionately affected by the lack of water at the clinic and middle school. More specifically, the lack of water at the school has spiraling negative effects on girls' education in Xxxxxxxxxx.

Girls are often pulled out of class to fetch water. This trip can take up to thirty minutes, especially if they are going to the nearby stream. Lack of water also makes girls late for school because they have to fetch water for the classrooms or school food vendors in the morning before class.

Girls are less likely to come to school during their menstrual cycles because they know they will not have access to clean water. Because they do not come to school full-time, they become very far behind and must drop out or retake a grade level.

This project will not only provide a water source at the school but will also teach the teachers how to implement gender-equitable practices in the classroom. One teacher and the director of the middle school have already attended a Student Friendly Schools training and will help me facilitate the gender training and classroom observations.

The Water Charity participation in this project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.

Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoClinic and Middle School Water System Project - Togo

Country: 
Tags: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Tandjoare District Pump and Reforestation Project - Togo

Tandjoare District Pump and Reforestation Project - Togo

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Tandjoare District Pump and Reforestation Project - TogoLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxx, Tandjoare District, Savannah Region, Togo

Community Description
The village of Xxxxx is a beautiful village located in northern Togo. With about 1,200 people living there, it is a somewhat large village, although it still has few amenities. Located about 450 meters above sea level and with cliffs on two sides, the village offers stunning views of the other plateaus in the area as well as views of the city of Dapaong and Ghana, some 15 miles away.

The people are very hard-working. Most of the houses are built with mud bricks and are covered with corrugated tin or traditional thatched roofs.

The village also hosts a site listed by UNESCO. In the 18th and 19th centuries, villagers built clay jars in a cave on the side of the cliff to store food and to seek refuge in when people from the south would come on slave raids. The site is still in fairly good condition, with about 150 intact jars, which the villagers are very proud of.

During the rainy season, the village resembles a paradise. Small streams run through the village, some of which cascade off of the cliffs as waterfalls, and the entire village is carpeted in the bright green of growing corn, beans, and millet. While nearly everyone is busy working in the fields, they have also been able to start some gardens and conduct reforestation projects in village.

Tandjoare District Pump and Reforestation Project - TogoDuring the dry season, however, the whole village dries up and dust swirls through the air. During this time, most people in village relax and prepare for the coming growing season. However, construction of houses, as well as latrines, also takes up a significant amount of time.

Problem Addressed
As the village is located on an isolated plateau in the Savannah Region of Togo, water is a near constant issue. Even during the rainy season, most villagers gather water from shallow wells or ponds, which is usually not treated and therefore leads to a large amount diarrheal sickness and digestive problems.

During the dry season from October to June, many villagers end up having to wait four or five hours just to get one bucket of water. Many will go down at night in order to decrease the wait time, but then have to walk a kilometer up a rocky path while balancing a heavy bucket full of water on their head, often without a flashlight. For this reason, the villagers consistently say that the problem of water is the most pressing for the village.

Due to unsustainable agricultural practices and the need for firewood, the area was largely deforested in the past. This has led to a large amount of wind and water erosion which has decreased the quality of the soil. As there are few trees, many streams in the village that used to run year-round are now only seasonal. There is also a lack of fodder for livestock and the temperatures are often hotter and more variable due to the lack of shade.

Tandjoare District Pump and Reforestation Project - TogoProject Description
This project is to renovate the borehole and install a new handpump. In addition, a tree nursery and reforestation project will be implemented.

The Xxxxx Water Committee will invite a local mechanic to help take out the old, broken pump. Then a group of technicians will come up to the village to pump pressurized air into the pump borehole, to help remove the dirty water and ensure that water from the water table is quickly entering into the borehole.

Next, the technicians will test the pump to determine the quantity of water that can be pumped per hour to ensure that the villagers do not excessively use the pump. By following these recommendations, the Water Committee will help ensure that the pump will remain working for a long time.

After that, another group will come up with the new India Mark II handpump. Working with the villagers, they will disinfect the borehole, install the pump and verify that it is working properly.

Before the actual repair of the pump, the Peace Corps Volunteer will have several meetings with the already-established village water committee to determine the best way to manage the pump. Several people will be selected to open the pump at certain times, so that villagers can get water for construction, gardening, or household use. They would likely charge something around 10 francs CFA (about 1 cent) per bucket and 25 (about 2 cents) francs CFA for a large water basin, as is the practice in other villages. The money gained from such fees will help ensure that the pump is regularly maintained and that it can be quickly repaired when needed.

The members of the committee will also be trained in responsible fiscal management. After the system has been established, they will hold a meeting with village members and the village chief to explain the process. Additionally, working with the village community health agents, a training will be given on the importance of hand - washing as well as how to properly treat water and how to construct hand-washing stations.

At the same time, the villagers will be working on the reforestation aspect of the project. Beginning in February, they will start collecting tree seeds. At the beginning of March, they will plant the tree nurseries and begin to water them. This will ensure that the trees have a chance to sprout and grow to a good size before being planting when the rains start in June. This way, the trees will be well established by the end of the rainy season in October. As there are two villagers who already have established tree nurseries, about 400 trees total will be purchased from them in order to support their efforts.

Tandjoare District Pump and Reforestation Project - TogoVillagers will again be invited to attend a meeting to discuss the importance of planting trees, the environmental issues of the area, and be shown how to establish tree nurseries. From these meetings, at least 20 villagers will be chosen and will each be responsible for setting up a nursery of 20 trees, which they will donate to the project.

The total of 800 trees will be used to reforest approximately two hectares of land, with trees being planted about five meters from one another. Attention will be paid to plant trees near existing rock lines in order to help reinforce them and help create terraces. After the villagers have planted the trees, they will be responsible for finding spiky branches and other protective enclosures to protect the trees to ensure that they can make it through the dry season.

After the project has been completed, the number of trees that have survived, as well as the number of villagers who maintained a tree nursery, will be tracked. The number of people who attended trainings on environmental issues and handwashing will also be noted. Finally, the number of people who use the repaired pump and the amount of money earned from water fees will also be recorded.

Project Impact
1,200 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
M. Curcio

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Xxxxx Water Committee, will collect pump fees and use them to maintain the pump and repair it when needed.

The project will be monitored by the Peace Corps Volunteer to ensure that it is properly implemented. Weekly meetings with the Water Committee will be held to resolve any problems.

For the reforestation part of the project, the two villagers who have established tree nurseries will be responsible for supplying and maintaining 400 trees. As this will be a large responsibility, 400 sturdy tree protectors will be purchased to facilitate their work. As for the other 400 trees, as each villager will be responsible for only 20 trees each, they are expected to make their own tree protectors with local materials.

Fundraising Target
$2,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$2,500 + additional funds for other projects.

Dollar Amount Needed

$0 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the G3 Foundation, of Costa Mesa, CA, USA.  Additional funds have been contributed by the friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer M. Curcio

Additional donations will be allocated for other projects in Togo.

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Kati Pump Replacement Project - Togo

Kati Pump Replacement Project - Togo

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kati Pump Replacement Project - Togo Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Kati, Togo

Community Description
The community of Kati is a rather large village by country standards, with a population of about 8,023 people who are predominantly farmers. It is located in the lush Plateau region of Togo near the regional capital of Kpalimé.

The area is surrounded by waterfalls and mountains, with the tallest mountain in Togo, Mt. Agou visible in the distance. Like much of the south of Togo, the community predominately grows corn and yams. On Tuesdays a very large and plentiful market takes place in Kati, and those from the surrounding cities of Lomé and Atakpamé come to buy goods and produce from villagers at a low price.

Although the community does not have amenities like electricity or running water, it is prosperous, and has great potential for growth. It is located on the road from Notse to Kpalimé- two major Togolese cities. There is much traffic in and out of the village from the market and travelers.

The community is very diverse; the majority of the population is Ewe, (an ethnicity that makes up almost all of the south), but ethnic groups from the north of Togo are represented. Thus, there is a great mixture of cultural traditions, with everyone learning from each other.

People in Kati are very sophisticated and open to new ideas. The community is highly motivated and organized, already fostering great initiative for its own projects in its Village Development Committee. The community just established its own high school, and already in existence are two middle schools and two elementary schools (Public and Catholic).

Kati Pump Replacement Project - Togo Problem Addressed
The majority of the community does not have direct access to potable water and may lose access completely if change does not occur in the near future. Currently, twelve 30-year-old pumps of a 32-meter depth exist in the community. The pumps break frequently; of the twelve only six are functioning, and only two are functioning well at this moment. The existing parts for the pumps are rare, and if found in the market, prove to be expensive.

To collect water, women, boys and girls are walking forty minutes to the River Zio and/or stagnant puddles left over from the rainy season to avoid long wait times at the pump. Additionally, many of them are walking far from their homes because their closest pump is broken and has stayed broken for months or even years.

When they finally arrive at home with water from the river, it is dirty and unsafe to drink. They consume it untreated and use it to prepare meals for their families. After consumption of this dirty water, many community members in Kati visit the local clinic complaining of symptoms of diarrhea and hematuria, (the appearance of blood during urination).

Consultation records at the local clinic in Kati show a high influx of patients suffering from a variety of gastro-intestinal parasites contracted from the intake of non-potable water. There are more likely others who suffer that will never visit the clinic, due to lack of funds or a preference for traditional medicine.

Project Description
This project is to replace 5 wells in the community.

Component one, of four components of this project, is the creation of water management committees made up of three women and two men, for each pump existing in Kati. This component has been completed.

Kati Pump Replacement Project - Togo The second component is the rigorous three-day training of the water committees on how to manage a pump, conducted by a hydraulics expert, (who is partnered with the Togolese government), and a representative from PLAN Togo. These two men have already successfully led trainings for water committees in other villages. The first two days will present the roles and responsibilities of the water committee along with safe water consumption and hand washing practices. The third day of training will challenge gender norms in regard to water management in the household and village, as well as address the importance of girls' education. Corresponding trainings will also occur for students in every middle and high school and for community members at pump sites.

The third component is the replacement of five pumps with the Togo standard, India Mark II Pump. First, the old cast-iron pumps, along with the concrete slabs that the pumps rest on will be removed. This will be completed by Kati’s own local water pump technician. Next, a mason from Kati will create new concrete slabs for the new pumps. Closely following, the new stainless steel Indian Mark II pumps will be installed.

The new pumps will be purchased from an established boutique in the capital city of Lomé which has, (due to the size of the order), agreed to transport them at no cost. The installation will be completed by two water pump technicians and their teams. The first technician is from Lomé. He has over twenty-three years of experience and has installed pumps for the Togolese government and UNICEF. The second technician is his apprentice, who resides in the neighboring county of Agou, (only thirty minutes away from Kati). He has over fifteen years of experience and has also installed pumps for UNICEF.

When the new pumps have been installed, the water committees will implement their selected manner of fund collection; (some villages select to charge monthly for water, while some charge for each basin). These funds will be kept in an account at the local micro-finance institution. These funds will exist to maintain and repair the new pumps.

The fourth component of this project is an effort to raise the water table in Kati by planting over 1,500 Teak trees on community-donated land. Kati has donated two hectares of land for the project. An agreement will be signed by the chief, local authorities and the local military police. Community members from each neighborhood will come together when the rainy season begins to plant the Teak tree seedlings on this land.

The funds from the Water Charity will be used for the following:

-labor for first technician and his team to remove ancient pumps along with old concrete slabs
-labor for mason to create new concrete slabs
-labor for second and third technician with their teams to install new Indian Mark II Pumps
-the five new India Mark II Pumps and materials (pump exterior, piping, rods, cylinder, strainer, teflon, bolts, nuts, bags of cement)
-per diem and materials for three-day water committee trainings (pens, notebooks, food, gasoline to transport trainers)
-transportation by motorcycle truck of Teak tree seedlings

Project Impact
8,023 people will benefit from the project

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
J. Slayton

Monitoring and Maintenance
After three months following the installation of the pumps, the technician nearby in Agou (that installed the pumps), will return to assure they remain in good form. He will make any necessary repairs. Monitoring will continue with succeeding Peace Corp volunteers in Kati.

In the future, the water committees will continue to oversee and maintain this project. The rigorous three-day training will help prepare them for lasting successful management.

The Village Development Committee will oversee the water committees and the project, and the Village Development Committee will be monitored by “Les Affaires Sociales”, a local development organization (partnered with the Togolese government) that created the Village Development Committee and has assisted in the implementation of this project.

Let Girls Learn
This is a designated “Let Girls Learn” project. It is projected that absentee and drop-out rates will decrease for girls in Kati after this project. Having potable water sources close to home will help them gain more access to education and future opportunities.

Additionally, girls will have more access to a quality education. After trainings demonstrating safe water consumption practices and hand washing, as well as the addition of nearby potable water sources, girls will be far less likely to fall ill from non-potable water. Sickness from dirty water can greatly limit the educational opportunities and future prospects for girls in the community.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

Country: 
Tags: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Dankpen Well Rehab Project - Togo

Dankpen Well Rehab Project - Togo

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Dankpen Well Rehab Project - TogoLocation
Bikpandji, Tchangblib, Koutiere, Bapure, and Nakpagnodo in the Dankpen Prefecture, West Kara, Togo

Community Description
The five communities (Bikpandji, Koutiere, Tchangblib, Hakpagnodo, and Bapure) this project will work with are all located in the Dankpen prefecture in the Kara region of Togo. The communities are extremely remote and are often only accessible by motorcycle or bike. The populations of these communities range from just over 500 inhabitants to around 1,500, with agriculture as their primary source of income.

Living with broken pumps for years, communities find themselves in difficult situations with their next nearest water source over 20 km away. Due to strict gender roles in Togo, the task of collecting water falls to women and girls who must walk these distances to fetch water for their families leaving them little time to attend school.

Many communities are forced to drink water from rivers, springs, and, during hot season when the river and springs go dry, water that has collected on the road. Because the communities are so remote and road conditions so poor, it is difficult for people to reach a clinic or hospital if they become sick.

Problem Addressed
The five pumps to be repaired are either non-working or work poorly, primarily because their parts are over 20 years old. While the communities have tried to make small repairs throughout the years they do not have the funds to make all repairs necessary.

Additionally, many communities find the pumps dry up in the dry season because the water level has fallen throughout the years.

Project Description
This project is to rehabilitate 5 wells in the prefecture.

The depth of the water table rages from 70 to 120 meters. The work will be done by an experienced team of Togolese mechanics. The repairs involve taking the pump apart, removing the old pieces such as pipes and the head of the pump, and replacing them with new ones. Work will begin in January 2017.

Dankpen Well Rehab Project - TogoWater Charity funds will be used for parts and materials, the salaries of the mechanics, and the cost of transport to the villages.

Seminars will be conducted on proper use and maintenance of the pumps, as well as gender equality, food security, and sanitation practices with the community.

Project Impact
5,432 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Paige McKinsey

Monitoring and Maintenance
In order to properly monitor and evaluate the impact of the project, site visits will be made to the villages in March 2017. These will determine how the pumps are being used, how water is stored, and if the water committee is still performing its duties.

This project is sustainable due to the emphasis it places on capacity building and community involvement. Not only will communities receive new pumps, but they will receive the knowledge on how to properly manage and take care of their pump to ensure its durability.

Dankpen Well Rehab Project - Togo

 

Through the efforts taken to raise a 25% community contribution, these communities learn the importance of a village working together for their collective benefit.

Additionally, on the day of installation, the water committee will receive two wrenches for pump maintenance. This project gives communities both the resources and knowledge necessary to ensure sustainability.

Let Girls Learn
Girls in the village have to walk long distances to fetch water, and they did not have time to attend school or struggled to stay in school. While this project is not designated as an official Let Girls Learn project, it works to achieve the same ends. It will help girls in these communities stay in school by saving them hours of time a day they currently spend walking to get water, and thus comes under our LGL+ designation.

Fundraising Target
$6,000

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been funded through the generosity of David Ashby, of Yuba City, CA, U.S.A.

Additional donations will be allocated to other projects in Togo.

 

Dankpen Well Rehab Project - Togo

 

 
Country: 
Tags: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Bassar Borehole Repair Project - Togo

Bassar Borehole Repair Project - Togo

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
District of Bassar, Kara Region, Togo

Bassar Borehole Repair Project - TogoCommunity Description
Bassar is a relatively large district in the West Kara Region of Togo. There are two larger towns, Bassar and Kabou, and all other villages are rural, agrarian, and more impoverished.

The community has selected 8 pumps in the district to repair in a variety of communities. One pump was chosen in both Bassar and Kabou; the neighborhoods that utilize those pumps have combined close to 4,500 inhabitants. These areas are very densely populated and the mechanical stress on each pump affects water security for the entire community. When one pump is poorly functioning, there is a significant increase in mechanical stress on the surrounding pumps, increasing also their likelihood of mechanical problems.

The remaining 6 pumps are in a variety of rural communities. The total population in these villages is around 10,000. 3 villages are 3-20 kilometers from Kabou, the remaining 3 are 2-57 kilometers from Bassar.

In the Canton of Kabou, two villages are very agrarian, have a combined population of around 2,500 and are only accessible by motorcycle. One of these villages has no functioning pump at all, and water is only available in a neighboring village 2 kilometers away or in a nearby river. The other has only one poorly functioning pump, and the next closest pump is in Kabou 3 kilometers away.

The remaining village has is agrarian but accessible by car, incredibly motivated, and has a population of around 1,500. The community has both many corn and yam fields, but also has many self-guided gardens surrounding the pump, as well as very successful and organized animal husbandry practices. They have an incredible understanding of nutrition and health considering their generally low level of education, and have taken many steps as a community to improve their health and quality of life. They have two pumps, one functioning the other functioning poorly, the one functioning poorly located next to the elementary school and surrounded by their community garden.

Bassar Borehole Repair Project - TogoIn the Canton of Bassar, there is a wider variety in both distance from Bassar and primary populations using the pumps chosen for repair. There is one pump in a village of about 3,500 people, about 2 kilometers from Bassar. The pump is centrally located and is used much more than the other pumps as a result of its location. The second pump is at an elementary school in a neighboring village. There are close to 1,000 students who attend the elementary school, all of whom use the pump, but it is also used by the surrounding neighborhood, with a population of around 500 people.

The final and farthest pump is 57 kilometers from Bassar, has a population of about 1,000 people, and has only one, very poorly functioning pump. The nearest village is 7 kilometers away, but there is a river that runs directly through the village. Unfortunately, as a result of this, the rates of waterborne diseases are very high and the village is 7 kilometers from their closest health clinic as well. Because they are among the more impoverished villages included in this year’s projects, many of these diseases go untreated, and morbidity and mortality is unnecessarily high.

There is also a population of migratory people who live in the forests surrounding this village who have access to the pump. The population of this community is changing, but it is estimated to be around 100 people at any given time. While they don't live in the village itself, they would directly benefit from the pump repairs as well.

Problem Addressed
Togo is a developing country in West Africa, and as such struggles with high rates of (1) disease, (2) food insecurity, and (3) gender inequality. While some connections are more direct, pump repairs will have an impact on all three of these major development impairments in the Bassar District of Togo.

Two of the villages selected this year rely almost exclusively on river water and are two or more kilometers from their closest health clinic. Northern Togo also has much poorer sanitation practices than in the South. In some of the villages selected this year, there are no latrines present at all. Open defecation coupled by poor access to water increases the transmission of many diarrheal diseases. In Togo, diarrheal diseases are one of the largest causes of infant and childhood morbidity and mortality.

Food insecurity is more of an issue in Northern Togo as well. The rains are less frequent than down south, and as a result of this in many northern villages fruits and vegetables are only readily available for a fraction of the year. This sparsity of nutrients results in much higher rates of malnutrition in these communities. Poor nutrition has been shown to decrease the ability of our immune system to fight disease as well as poor performance academically.

Bassar Borehole Repair Project - TogoGender inequality is also a major problem throughout Togo. Women and girls are commonly the only people who get water, sometimes kilometers away for each basin of water. Northern Togo also generally has larger family sizes, which correlates directly with number of basins required each day. Because this responsibility, as well as all other household responsibilities, falls on women and girls, their autonomy is significantly decreased.

Of the 8 pumps selected, 5 are very poorly functioning. 4 of them have another pump within 1 kilometer, whereas the fifth is the only pump in the village. Two of the pumps are not functional at all, and they are both the only pump in the village. The last is a complete installation of all mechanical pieces, although the hole has been dug and water has already been found.

Project Description
This project is to rehabilitate 8 boreholes in the Bassar Region.

The Togo | Clean Water Project is an ongoing initiative in Northern Togo, started almost 10 years ago. It is a collaboration between Peace Corps Volunteers and the Bassar Community Water Committee.

A Peace Corps official counterpart was identified, Kader, who is a hydraulics engineer. He started working very closely with the volunteers in the area and has since developed a team of hard working and trustworthy mechanics. The team is made up of 5 mechanics, Kader, and the volunteers in the area who are participating in the project that year. Since its beginning, Kader and his team have fixed hundreds of pumps in the region.

The Togo | Clean Water Project is a multifaceted approach to improving each of the three struggles discussed above, accomplishing more than the simple repair of the pumps. All villages selected have an existing and functioning water committee, that meets regularly and collects money from the community. They must keep in contact with the mechanics so they can do biannual maintenance, reducing the likelihood of large and expensive repairs in the future. Because the team of mechanics live in the same region, this creates sustainability long after the repair is completed.

Each pump is visited by the Volunteer and the two main pump mechanics prior to the start of the project. For each pump the mechanics determine its depth, and the number of pipes required to sufficiently maintain water access. All of the pumps will get brand new piping and mechanical parts, but only one will get a completely new pump head.

As for details of the repairs themselves, seven of the pumps will have everything replaced except for the external head and hand lever.

  • Pump 1: Depth is 45 meters, complete restoration of pump Mechanics
  • Pump 2: Depth is 45 meters, complete restoration of pump Mechanics
  • Pump 3: Depth is 30 meters, complete restoration of pump Mechanics
  • Pump 4: Depth is 45 meters, installation of new pump
  • Pump 5: Depth is 36 meters, complete restoration of pump Mechanics
  • Pump 6: Depth is 48 meters, complete restoration of pump Mechanics
  • Pump 7: Depth is 30 meters, complete restoration of pump Mechanics
  • Pump 8: Depth is 36 meters, complete restoration of pump mechanics

While the mechanics do the physical pump repairs, the team of Volunteers leads a community-wide education/training session with a local language translator. One component is health specific in which hand washing, water storage and food preparation techniques are discussed. Diarrheal diseases, their effects on the community, and the relative burden felt in the region of Togo are discussed. The importance of soap, or ash if soap is not easily available, is discussed. The impact of hygiene on health, including the health of others, particularly children, is discussed. The last component of this portion of the training is a physical demonstration of the proper hand washing techniques.

The Volunteers also talk about nutrition in respect to food security, the importance of a variety of fruits, vegetables, and meats for everyone, and the positive effects of good nutrition and overall health. The development of gardens and the use of plants with high nutritional impact, such as Moringa, are discussed.

Each community is also given 20-30 Moringa saplings to plant around each pump. This is for added nutritional value, but also can be used as a source of income for the communities which they can put towards future pump repairs.

The final component of the Volunteer training is regarding gender equality. A skit is performed which highlights the difference in workload between girls and boys, and the overall effect that has on their academic performance. After the Volunteers finish the skit itself, the head pump mechanic talks to the communities in local language about the long-term effects this disparity has on families, but also the communities as a whole. He is very passionate about gender work in Togo, and we have found that communities are more engaged in these discussions when it comes from him as opposed to the Volunteers. He is a very strong asset to the project, both in the physical repairs of the pumps as well as his passion for these issues.

Project Impact
15,000 people will benefit from the project

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Marguerite Clougherty

Monitoring and Maintenance
The final stage of the pump project is follow-up. Three months following each repair, the pumps are visited by Kader, the other head mechanic, and the primary Volunteer. They check to make sure the pumps are still in good condition and working properly, as well as check in with the water committee to ensure they are still collecting money for maintenance visits. In the event a pump is not working, the mechanics repair it again free of charge for the first year. If the pump is working, the mechanics will revisit each pump every six months for bi-annual maintenance and a check-

Each village collects money either by the basin or by person per month. This ensures they have money for the maintenance visits as well as for future repairs should the pump break again.

Let Girls Learn
It is very challenging for some women to have time for income-generating activities, and it is very challenging for girls to have ample time to study and excel in school. These are two major factors in the delayed development of all of the communities.

While this is not an official Peace Corps Let Girls Learn project, we have designated it Let Girls Learn Plus, as it carries with it the same goals, objectives, and methodologies to create conditions that make it easier for girls to start and remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$6,700

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$6,700

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been fully funded by an anonymous donor.  

Additional donations will go to other projects in Togo.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE

Country: 
Tags: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Pagala Village Health Clinic Water Project - Togo

Pagala Village Health Clinic Water Project - Togo

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Pagala Village Health Clinic Water Project - TogoLocation
Pagala Village, Blitta Prefecture, Centrale Region, Togo

Community Description
Pagala Village is a small rural village nestled in the forests of Western Togo. The traditional ethnic group is Agnyanga and the majority of the village speaks a language of the same name. However, due to the large migrant population of the village, Ewe, the language of Southern Togo and French are spoken at the markets, in schools, and at large gatherings. French, the official language of Togo, is spoken mostly by adult men and school children.

There are three primary schools and one middle school located in Pagala Village. At the middle school level, male students outnumber the female students 3:1. The gender divide is less visible at the primary school level, but present nonetheless.

Approximately 95 percent of the population are subsistence farmers, growing primarily maize, and supplementing it with yams, manioc, gboma, sesame, and beans.

Located in the center of town is the village health clinic staffed by a nurse, a birth attendant and the pharmacist. These three individuals are responsible for attending to the medical needs of the 4,000 people in the 8 villages that reside within the canton. Resources are few, but the health staff works tirelessly to accommodate every single person that comes into the health clinic seeking care. The village also has access to 11 Community Health Workers, all volunteers, who have assisted with vaccination campaigns and meningitis education after an outbreak this past February.

Problem Addressed
In Togo, poverty is omnipresent as are the diseases that accompany it, such as cholera, dysentery, hepatitis, and typhoid. The primary cause of this is lack of access to clean, potable water. These same problems persist in Pagala Village.

The clinic does not have a reliable and accessible source of safe water to use in its delivery of services.

For women ready to give birth, farmers, motorcyclists who are injured, and children with open wounds, there is no source of water readily accessible for a clean environment, and the tools necessary for the safe delivery of a child are lacking. Patients must rely on friends and family members to fetch clean water from a pump or river, over a kilometer away.

There is no safe drinking water for hydration or for taking medications, and the existing water is not sufficient for effective hand washing by health providers, patients, and their visitors. This contributes to the cycle of disease that already runs rampant in the community due to a lack of latrines and safe feces disposal.

Project Description
This project is to provide running water for the clinic by drilling a borehole, and installing an electric pump, storage tank, and piping system.

Water is expected to be reached at a depth of 10 meters by a team with experience in doing similar projects in the area. Piping and an electric pump will be installed to carry the water to an elevated 2,000-liter polytank. Water will be piped on demand under pressure to 3 rehabilitated washing stations in the clinic, located in the birthing room, a consultation office and the procedure room. There will be an additional tap located outside of the clinic to service local community water needs.

Pagala Village Health Clinic Water Project - TogoThe 12-meter tower on which the tank will be installed will consist of 4 legs, made from cement, gravel, and iron. The work on the tower will be done by experienced carpenters and welders.

The project is expected to take a month to complete.

In March 2016 a water committee was formed to rally community support for the installation of a water pump at the health clinic. Members from this committee met with a pump technician later that month to discuss the cost of installation and work out details for the budget. Moreover, this committee is to ensure community support of the installation of the pump and the maintenance of it for the years to come.

The PCV, along with members of the water committee, completed a canton-wide Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Campaign to discuss the importance of having access to clean, safe drinking water and how to prevent transmission of communicable diseases through improved hygiene and sanitation practices. These trainings focused on mothers with children under five years old, and delivered transferrable skills such as ORS (Oral Rehydration Salt) preparation and proper handwashing techniques that can easily be followed in their own home.

The community will contribute 25% of the project cost, including for transportation of technicians and materials to the pump site as well as the outright cost of pump parts and manual labor by the skilled pump mechanics and other experienced workers to oversee village-contributed volunteers.

Pagala Village Health Clinic Water Project - TogoProject Impact
3,891 in the 8 villages served by the clinic will benefit from this project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Katie Sonnefeldt

Monitoring and Maintenance
The water committee will ensure pump longevity by clearly dividing and outlining the responsibilities of its members. This will ensure that from the beginning, the community members in charge of overseeing pump installation and usage will know how to address problems, should they arise, including the implementation of a system for collecting funds to be kept aside for pump maintenance. This group will also monitor the pump’s function and attend to any repairs needed.

Comments
This project will vastly improve the quality of care that patients receive at the clinic. It will reduce infant mortality, prevent the spread of disease, and allow villagers to recover from illness and return to productive life.

Let Girls Learn
Although this is not a Peace Corps Let Girls Learn project, it contains the same elements directed toward improving the opportunities for girls to remain in school, and we categorize it as Let Girls Learn +.

The installation of an additional water pump in the village will provide clean water for an entire quarter whose closest water source is a dirty stream. Since women and girls usually bear the responsibility of retrieving water, this project will accrue most directly to their benefit.

Additionally, as women are more likely to accompany and take care of a sick family member, water at the health clinic will allow for effective hand washing and prevent disease transmission amongst these caregivers.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.  If you would like to see more projects like this, please click the Donate button below.  Your contribution will be credited to this project, but will be used to fund an upcoming project in Togo.

 

Country: 
Tags: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Tchore Borehole Project - Togo

Tchore Borehole Project - Togo

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Tchore Borehole Project - TogoLocation
Tchore Center, Canton of Tchore, Kara Region, Togo

Community Description
This community received its political autonomy in 2012. The village is the seat of the regional chief, and all disputes or social affairs take place in his courtyard. There is a small clinic which provides first-aid, medicine and midwife services. This clinic services the seven surrounding villages which make up the political limits.

The market in the center of town goes from morning to night every Tuesday, with plenty of local beer and fried doughnuts. Next to the market is the elementary school, with a kindergarten. The pace of life is very slow, but not boring.

Problem Addressed
The most fundamental problem of the community is the scarcity of water. The rains stop in mid-November and do not begin again until May. During this seven- month interval, the river dries up and so do the three wells. The only water to be found comes from holes in the ground, which is hardly enough to sustain life.

The mid-wife at the hospital uses dirty groundwater to wash newborn babies and to clean the vaginal tracts of new mothers. The use of dirty water leads to elevated rates of dermatologic and infectious diseases.

Women and girls are exhausted by the competition for resources because they have to wake up early and go far to fetch water. Many women spend their whole day trying to accumulate enough water for their families.

A main source of income for women is the preparation of local sorghum beer, but women use dirty water and the community often suffers from intestinal worms and parasites.

Tchore Borehole Project - Togo

 

Project Description
This project is to build a borehole with a hand pump in proximity to the community hospital and elementary school.

The well will be dug to about 40-60 meters and be enclosed by a cement wall. After the technical work, the community will plant trees around the pump in the hopes of retaining water and beautifying the environment around the well.

An open community meeting will be held to choose a water committee to oversee the management of the well. This committee will decide the method of payment for water, and how to collect this money. There will be members designated as daily maintenance agents and several women will be trained by the pump technicians on preventative maintenance and small repairs.

Water Charity funds will go to renting heavy machinery, drilling the well, purchasing the materials (such as pipes, pump hardware, cement) and the paying of skilled labor.

The community will add approximately $2,000 to the project's total funds, along with sand, gravel, manual labor and lodging of the skilled laborers.

The company contracted to perform the work is E-Forage Togo, a local business based in Kara.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from the project.

Let Girls Learn
This project will allow girls to stay in school because it brings water closer to them, reducing the amount of time it takes for them to retrieve water for the daily needs of their families.

In addition, clean water will reduce illness, allowing them to devote more energy to their studies and attend school more regularly.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Riley Pavelich

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community has formed a committee for monitoring and maintaining the pump. Members of this committee have been designated for cleaning and upkeep, collecting fees, and repairing breakdowns quickly.

People wishing to use the pump will have to pay a nominal fee, and the money raised will go into a specific bank account. The company installing the well will train a group of women to make small repairs and to service the pump regularly to prevent eventual problems.

Comments
Riley notes:
“This project is possible through the participation of Water Charity and two generations of Peace Corps Volunteers. As the current volunteer, I see the desperate need for a protected source of water. The previous volunteer, once home in the US, fund-raised more than $2,000 and sent it to the president of the Village Development Committee (who is a good friend of his).”

This project is being paid for through the generosity of an anonymous donor. If you would like to support additional great projects such as this one, please contribute to our Western Africa Water and Sanitation Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

Tchore Borehole Project - TogoTchore Borehole Project - Togo

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Bassar Prefecture Water Project - Togo

Youth drinking water

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Bassar Prefecture, Kara Region, TogoCommunity clearing land around the pump in Dimori

Community Description
Kara is one of Togo's five regions and is divided into the prefectures of Assoli, Bassar, Bimah, Dankpen, Doufelgou, Kéran, and Kozah. A need for water in rural regions of Kara was identified.

Problem Addressed
Potable water is a crucial resource that is difficult to come by in Togo. The villagers are forced to walk many kilometers to find a water pump or to collect river water. In dry season, which in northern Togo is 6-7 months long, this becomes even more of a problem. Women and children bear this burden and the time spent collecting water causes radically imbalanced dropout rates of girls as opposed to boys in high school, middle school, and even elementary school.

After recognizing the need for water in the most rural areas of Kara, a plan was developed with a reliable, local mechanic and pump part distributor to search out the most needy communities. Radio announcements were made  and flyers were posted in the Bassar and Dankpen areas. Interested villages filled out applications with their water committees.  Over forty villages were considered and eighteen were visited. Twelve were chosen in the Bassar prefecture of Kara, Togo.

These villages were required to have a well-organized, elected water committee with a bank account as well as a high need for potable water.  Communities were chosen based on the organization of the water committees, motivation of the community, and scarcity of water.

Kader taking notes at the pump in DimoriProject Description
This project entails fixing twelve pumps in Bassar prefecture.

A precise diagnosis of the problem with each pump will be made, and the parts will be ordered.  Upon arrival, an experienced pump technician will make the necessary repairs.

Twelve one-day-long workdays in each identified community will be carried out.  Hand washing will be demonstrated, moringa trees will be planted, and skits will be performed in local languages that demonstrate the need for gender equality.

The twelve communities chosen have already raised their share of 25% of funds. 

Project Impact
This project will impact 11,504 people in Bassar prefecture.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Megan Konigkramer

Monitoring and Maintenance
Megan and the water committee will visit the pumps three months after completion.  Subequent Peace Corps Volunteers will follow up to ensure that the pumps continue to function properly

Comments
This is a Let Girls Learn project, which will improve access to clean water, thus decreasing the amount of time that school aged girls, spend collecting water for their families each day. This time saved translates directly into time that can be better spent doing homework, arriving to school on time, and participating in extracurricular activities. This project will discuss these ideas in local languages through skits that we have written in "Bassar" and "Konkomba."

This project falls under both our Let Girls Learn Initiative, and our ongoing Western Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  If you like this project, and would like to help with similar projects in Togo, please click on the Donate button below.

 

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Taking apart the non-functioning pump at the hospital and maternity center in Nangbani Mechanic, Kader; PCV, Meg Konigkramer; Mechanic, Darinyon

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Togo

Follow Us

Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google+ icon
YouTube icon
RSS icon


Donate $25 or more for Water Charity projects.

SiteLock

GlobalGiving vetted Organization 2016

***  Copyright 2017 ©  -  Water Charity is a 501(c)(3) non-profit (DLN 17053217312048) based in California & operating Worldwide  ***

 
 
Support Us