Madagascar

Amporoforo Clinic Shower Facility - Madagascar

Amporoforo Clinic Shower Facility - Madagascar

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Amporoforo Clinic Shower Facility - MadagascarLocation
Amporoforo Commune, Farafanga District, Finar Region, Madagascar

Community Description
Amporoforo is a rural community approximately 97 square kilometers in size, located off the RN 12 in the Sud-Est of Madagascar. The CSB II (clinic) serves the 10 villages in the Amporoforo commune. There are 12,543 people living in the commune according to the census data collected from community health workers in August, 2015.

Expecting mothers and those who have recently given birth currently clean themselves in the river in which other residents do their personal hygiene and washing. Families use the river to wash bloody soiled linens after their visit to the CSB II. The river is the closet water sources to the CSB II. In October, 2015 UNICEF fixed the water pump located 1 kilometer south of the CSB II. UNICEF is in the process of building 6 more water sources, with a faucet in the Amporoforo area.

Presently, UNICEF is funding a project to bring clean water to the community. The USAID health worker, community leaders, community health workers and the PCV are promoting latrine building in each of the villages, and latrine use and hand washing with soap at each household.

Amporoforo Clinic Shower Facility - MadagascarProblem Addressed
Birthing mothers, and ill and wounded individuals walk or are carried through rice fields to the road where they walk from 1-18 kilometers to get medical care. Individuals use a piece of cloth to clean wounds before seeing the doctor. The cloth is reused to wipe the floor if any bodily secretions are left.

The Peace Corps Volunteer (PCV) conducted health surveys with a sample group of 25 families from 5 villages. Eight heads of household stated their main health concern as diarrhea, and another eight heads of household stated their main health concern as malaria illness. She states:

To decide on which health area to focus I made observations at the clinic. I have seen mothers washing their face, hands, legs, and feet at the river. I also have seen children with diarrhea being cleaned with a cloth, the cloth then laid on the grassy area by the clinic to dry. Sometimes the dirty cloth was taken to the river to be rinsed and then dried in the grassy area in front of the clinic to be reused.

The clinic doctor has stressed the importance of having a place for patients to clean themselves to reduce the spread of bacteria.

Amporoforo Clinic Shower Facility - MadagascarProject Description
This project is to build a shower facility to serve the clinic.

Access to a shower with clean water and soap will reduce the risk of infection to the person, as well as reduce contamination by viruses and bacteria in the clinic area. The shower will be approximately 10 meters from the clinic, in proximity to the clinic latrine. The shower will be accessed by birthing mothers, wounded, and also mothers needing to clean their babies while they wait for the doctor.

The project will be implemented under the direction of the Amporoforo Water Committee. The building will contain two shower stalls.

The area of the cement shower is 3 meters in length, 4 meters in width and 2.5 meters in height. 1.5 meters of the wall will be tiled to facilitate cleaning and disinfecting.

Two rows of clear (transparent) blocks will be set along the top of the shower to let light in. Tin sheets will be placed at the top to protect against weather damage. PE pipes will be used to connect the shower head to the water chateau, being built by UNICEF in the Amporoforo commune (25 meters from where the shower will be built).

An area behind the shower will be dug for water evacuation.

Ongoing training will be provided by the clinic staff and the PCV on how to use and clean the shower. Mothers will be educated during their prenatal visits on the importance of washing hands regularly with soap. During prenatal visits, mothers will also be trained on how to make their own liquid soap with local materials. Shower usage and the use of soap will be measured through monthly surveys before, during, and after the project.

Amporoforo Clinic Shower Facility - MadagascarProject Impact
12,543 people who are served by the clinic will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Margarita Zertuche

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Water Committee, composed of residents living around the water source and clinic, will be in charge of maintaining the shower. Each month, one member will be identified to check the faucets and hoses to assure they are working. A local person from the community will help build the shower, and thus will have the knowledge to replace parts as needed. Another local member, who has been designated to clean the clinic area, will also clean the shower.

To monitor the effectiveness of the project, surveys will be distributed to expecting mothers and mothers with children from birth to age 5 during their clinic visits. The PCV will also be conducting observations one month after the project is finished to document the benefits from the shower.

Comments
The outcome of this project is for birthing mothers and ill individuals to have access to a shower with clean water to limit infections and reduce the spread of bacteria. It will have a large impact in the reduction of disease.

Let Girls Learn
Although this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it contains all of the same elements required under that program, and we give the designation LGL+. The reduction of illness in adolescent girls will have the benefit of allowing them to remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$2,450

Donations Collected to Date
$2,450

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

Additional donations will go for other projects in Madagascar.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

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Mandritsara Tree Nursery Project - Madagascar

Mandritsara Tree Nursery Project - Madagascar

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Mandritsara Tree Nursery Project - MadagascarLocation
Mandritsara, Sofia region, Madagascar

Community Description
Mandritsara is a city and commune in northern Madagascar. It belongs to the district of Mandritsara, which is a part of Sofia Region. The population of the commune is about 17,000.

Problem Addressed
Rapid deforestation in Madagascar has been a major cause of the loss of many endemic plant and animal species. It has resulted in soil degradation, erosion, and increased carbon emissions, and has had direct effects on the quality and quantity of food and water.

Madagascar has already lost about 90% of their original rain forest due to the slash and burn agricultural technique, along with local needs for cooking and building homes.

Project Description
This project is to build a tree nursery that will have widespread impact on the health and nutrition of the community, create food security, increase the available water supply, and provide economic benefits.

The nursery will impact upon 100 communes in the region, each with about 3,000 people.

The work will be carried out under the direction of Centre de Service Agricole Mandritsara (CSA).

The planning, including conducting feasibility studies, preparing a business plan, and calculating expenditures and income, has been completed. The community has made a ten-year plan to reach even more people and communities after the project is complete.

The project will begin by creating a place to grow the trees, a compost bin for a source of fertilizer, and other related physical improvements. This will be followed by the actual planting of the trees.

Approximately 2,500 trees will be planted and sold or given away each month. The trees that do not get sold that month will either be donated or planted locally.

Within 6 months, the tree nursery will distribute 15,000 free tree saplings to local villages, schools, religious organizations, and community groups.

Trainings will be conducted on basic business skills, such as bookkeeping, marketing, computer literacy, market and product extension. This will serve to amplify the impact of the nursery project.

In addition, the implementation of a marketing campaign will make many people aware of the benefits of environmental protection, thus, compelling them to plant more trees in the future. People will be reached through trainings, radio advertisements, brochures, flyers, information packets, and strategically-placed posters.

Project Impact
300,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Astara Maiure

Monitoring and Maintenance
CSA will maintain and grow the operation of the tree nursery.

Comments
This project will provide solutions to many problems in the region. Environmental protection is essential for the wellbeing of the Malagasy way of life. Whether it is clean water, a source of fuel, or increased income through fruit sales, the benefits of planting trees are endless.

Mandritsara Tree Nursery Project - MadagascarTrees play an important role in the water cycle. Their canopies provide shade to slow evaporation, and their root structures capture and hold the rainwater. The water then trickles down to the water table where it is available for use. Erosion from runoff, washing contaminants into the lakes, rivers, and streams, is controlled.

While other solutions are being implemented to prevent further cutting of the forests for fuel, this project at least serves to replenish to wood that is taken.

While thousands of trees are being planted each year, sustainable income-generating activities are being fostered.

This project is part of our East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

Fundraising Target
$1,400

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$1,400

Dollar Amount Needed

$0 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the Robert Victor Sager and Beatrice Mintz Sager Foundation.

Additional donations will be used for other projects in Madagascar.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Mandritsara Tree Nursery Project - MadagascarMandritsara Tree Nursery Project - Madagascar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mandritsara Tree Nursery Project - MadagascarMandritsara Tree Nursery Project - Madagascar

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Ambatomainty Water Project - Madagascar

Ambatomainty Water Project - Madagascar

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Ambatomainty, Amparafaravola district, Alaotra Mangoro region, Toamasina province, Madagascar

Ambatomainty Water Project - MadagascarCommunity Description
Ambatomainty is a rural community of about 14,000 people located in the Alaotra Mangoro region, also known as the 'rice basket' of Madagascar. Rice farming and animal husbandry are the primary vocations of the Sihanaka people. There are six interconnected villages that share one main market. The community has two public borehole wells and two public open wells, located in the market and at the community hospital, all of which are in need of maintenance. Three of the wells are currently unusable. Many in the community depend on these wells as their primary source of water.

Problem Addressed
There is a lack of access to public clean water sources in Ambatomainty. This forces families to rely on a river that has turned red from mud and erosion. And because of this there is a high prevalence of bacterial diarrheal disease in the community, which is the number one leading cause of death in Madagascar for children under 5 years of age. As the average daily income in Madagascar is around $1 per day, the people of this community do not have the funds to purchase materials to fix public water sources.

Project Description
This project is to renovate four water sources, consisting of two pumps (borehole with a pump on it), and two open wells as set forth below.

Borehole #1 is located in the village of Ambatomainty.

Borehole #2 is located in the village of Amparamanina.

Ambatomainty Water Project - MadagascarFor both boreholes, community members will dig trenches around the pumps to control the flow of water. They will also build a fence around each well to prevent contamination of the water source. Technicians from Ambatondrazaka will replace broken pieces inside the well pipes. Technicians will also train community members on pump maintenance.

Well #1: Community members will hand dig a well in the central market. They will reinforce the well with an inner brick and cement infrastructure. They will also add a cement base and opening to the well, in addition to a wooden well door. The addition of a brick fence will prevent contamination and increase the lifespan. Community members will also construct a metal pulley system to increase accessibility.

Well #2: The second well is located at the hospital. The infrastructure is already in place, but community members will build a metal pulley system over the well to make access easier.

The community has been the driving force behind this project from the beginning, as the project will benefit a large portion of the population. The presidents of the villages and the community health workers have already established water committees at each location who will be responsible for the acquisition, transportation, and storage of materials. The water committees will also inspect the water sources quarterly and collect dues in order to pay for future repairs.

Before the repairs begin, community health workers will educate members of the community about safe water treatment and storage, and diarrheal disease in children under 5 years of age. Village presidents will oversee the preparation and construction of the sites. The technicians will train local water committee members on well repair and maintenance.

BushProof, a Madagascar-based enterprise, specializing in cost-effective water supply technologies for remote areas, will test the wells and verify that they meet all Peace Corps and governmental standards.

Project Impact
Approximately 10,000 local residents will benefit from these repairs.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Katie Micek

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community water committees will be responsible for construction and repair oversight. Once repairs are complete, the committees will be responsible for collecting dues to fix or replace parts in the future, and to inspect the pumps and wells on a quarterly basis.

Comments
This project will provide an ample supply of safe water for the entire community during the entire year.

Fundraising Target
$2,700

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$2,700

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been fully funded by friends and family of PCV Katie Micek and an anonymous donor.

Ambatomainty Water Project - MadagascarAmbatomainty Water Project - Madagascar

Ambatomainty Water Project - MadagascarAmbatomainty Water Project - Madagascar

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Mahajoarivo Well Project - Madagascar

Mahajoanivo

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location
Mahajoanivo, Arivonomamo District, Itasy Region, Madagascar

MahajoanivoCommunity Description
Mahajoanivo is a small rural village in the Central Highlands of Madagascar. Mahajoanivo has 211 residents; most are farmers.

Problem Addressed
From July to November the community of Mahajoanivo faces severe water shortages. They resort to fetching water where cows graze, which negatively affects the health and well-being of community members.

Project Description
This project is to deepen and refurbish an old and non-functional well. It will be outfitted with a sturdy handpump, and should provide adequate water to the entire village year-round. Two concreted culverts will protect the wall of the well.

A Water Committee will be established to direct the digging of the community water well, maintain the well, and educate the other community members on the importance of proper hygiene practices.
 
Community members will assist in construction, maintenance, and sustainability of the well. These volunteers will educate the community on water and sanitation issues and will establish good working relationships with local stakeholders. The volunteers will be taught well building and maintenance techniques to ensure the continued functioning of the Mahajoanivo well.
 
Funds from Water Charity will be used to deepen, condition, and line the well walls, and install a hand pump system on the existing well.  The water displacement has been surveyed by a water engineer.
 
In addition, Water Charity funds will cover transportation and other well-related costs.
 
The construction and deepening of the well will be done by a small water well building firm based in Antananarivo and volunteers from Mahajoanivo. 
     
Mahajoanivo
The following steps will be taken to ensure a successful execution:
 
      1.        Meet with community of Mahajoanivo to discuss their water issues.
      2.        The community of Mahajoanivo creates a water committee to oversee the construction and long term maintenance of the project.
      3.        A water engineer is brought to Mahajoanivo to survey the conditions and makes his recommendations on the construction of the well.
      4.        The community of Mahajoanivo will be trained on well construction and proper water and sanitation practices by a Health Peace Corps Volunteer.
      5.        The materials required for the project will be locally purchased and assembled.
      6.        The community along with the water engineer’s team will begin and complete all work on the well.
      7.        The water committee and the community at large will be trained on proper water well maintenance techniques by the water engineering team.
      8.        The community of Mahajoanivo will be retrained by a second Peace Corps Volunteer on proper water and sanitation practices.
      9.        The Water committee will meet quarterly to inspect the water well to ensure its’ maintenance, indefinitely.
 
The project will include water testing and analysis by BushProof to meet all Peace Corps and governmental standards, and to ensure sustainability.
 
This project will certainly help to mitigate the spread of water-borne diseases and increase living standards in the community.


Project Impact
211 people
will benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Cesar Murillo

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Mahajoanivo Water Committee will be responsible for inspecting the water well on a quarterly basis.

Comments
This project falls under our East Africa Water & Sanitation Program, as well as our Training & Support Initiative.  We would like thank RPCV Maya Rao for her assistance in getting this project ready.  RPCV Averill Strasser (and Water Charity COO) also assisted in refining and focusing the proposal for this project.

This project has been fully funded by the generosity of a donor who wishes to remain anonymous.  

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

Host Family

 

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Anketrakabe Pump Project - Madagascar

Anketrakabe Pump Project - Madagascar

Location
Anketrakabe, Diana II, Madagascar

Community Description
Anketrakabe is a fokontony (village organization) located 47 km from Diego, with about 10 other communes connected. Anketrakabe has the biggest population of about 995 to 1,200 people, including small children and new babies.

Founded in 1916, Anketrakabe is known in the region of Diana II for farming corn.

Market is held in the village every Thursday, but there are rarely vegetables. When there are vegetables offered, they are overpriced and/or spoiled from transport.

Anketrakabe Pump Project - Madagascar

Problem Addressed
The village has the soil and the means to farm its own vegetables, but the issue that keeps them from having a healthy variety of food is the lack of nearby water sources.

For two months each year the village rations the water, allowing it to be accessed for only two 4-hour periods each day.

Men and women carry jugs of water almost a mile just to water three bushels of tomatoes; then they have to walk to the stream and do it again.

Project Description
This project is to install 6 pumps for the use of 6 fikambananas (cooperatives), including the rice cooperative, garden cooperative, and women’s gardening group, to irrigate their crops.

The W~3~W (Water 3rd World), a company working through Madeole, is providing the water pumps, which will be used to transport water from far-away streams.

The pumps are made of cement and have wooden handles. They weigh about 17 kg each, with two holes at the top. When the pedals are in motion, water is released.

The pumps are placed about 10 ft off the ground (to provide pressure) and held in place by wooden poles and boards. A hose connects to the pump from the back end and draws the water from the 2 ft-deep streams. It then runs into a 200 L barrel which is connected to PVC pipes to transport it to the fields.

The cooperatives will supply the cement and sand, and the pumps will be transported to Anketrakabe. With the help of the W~3~W workers the pumps will be put in place within two days.

Anketrakabe Pump Project - MadagascarEach of the cooperatives will sell 25% or more of its yield for low prices within the village.

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for equipment and materials.

Project Impact
995 people will benefit from the project.

Sustainability
The village will check the pumps regularly and maintain them as needed. Money will be set aside every month for maintenance and anticipated replacement. Similar pumps in other areas have been working regularly for over 3 years.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Case Santos

Comments
This project will substantially increase the crop yields in the community, leading to health improvements from better nutrition. It will improve food security, increase income for the participants, and make the village more self-sufficient.

Dollar Amount of Project
$ 1,702.95

Donations Collected to Date
$50.00

This project has been concluded.

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,652.95

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CATJA Water Project - Madagascar

CATJA Water Project - Madagascar
Location
Mananjary commune, Manakara District, Madagascar

Community Description
Mananjary is a seaside town in southeast Madagascar that is home to nearly 30,000 Malagasy whose livelihoods are very much integrated with their natural surroundings. The area is awash with fishermen while the market displays the daily catches and the usual offerings of indigenous fruits, vegetables, legumes and non-food stuffs.

On the northern edge of the town is a marvelous plantation that is home to Le Centre d'Accueil et de Transit des Jumeaux Abandonné (CATJA), an orphanage for abandoned twin children.

The dominant ethnic group in the region has a long-standing, yet not universally-held, belief that the birth of twin children will beget a life of torment and ailments on both the children and their mother. Thus, upon birth, some children are either abandoned, while the more lucky ones are brought to Mdme. Julie Rasoarinanana, the director and overseer of nearly 100 children currently.

Run as a non-governmental, non-profit agency for the care and adoption of Malagasy children, the center is a model of love and care that is so profoundly witnessed in Madagascar. In addition to the 92 children in their care, CATJA boasts a staff of 25, consisting of caregivers, infant and toddler specialists, support staff, and even a number of agricultural experts who care for their expansive sustenance garden and five acres of rice fields.

Problem Addressed
Mananjary, like most coastal regions of Madagascar, is prone to a hot, rainy season from October to March followed by a dry, cooler season that is witness to very little rainfall. The need to secure and allocate the natural resources at their disposal has led to an extensive rice-farming plot and a garden that provides nourishment for the children.CATJA Water Project - Madagascar

Torrential rains are frequent during the warmer months, causing water runoff from buildings across the over-saturated ground.

The newest dormitory, completed in 2009 by an Italian builder, contains a slant tin roof that catches rainwater into a gutter system that dispenses of the water at the rear base of the building. The rains have created an extensive sinkhole that is creeping towards the footings of the building itself. Moreover, two other dormitories also have a type of water diversion structure at their roof edge, although the precipitate is simply diverted to the surrounding sandy soils, which have a very high saturation point.

Project Description
This project is to build a rainwater harvesting system, and to remediate flooding problems, for the three largest dormitories on the CATJA complex.

The diversion systems of the three buildings will be modified to include a rainwater harvesting system employed at each of the downspouts currently in use. While all buildings will require a retrofit of the existing collection system, one building will require extensive reconstruction of the gutter system that is currently in a state of disrepair.

Eight drums for the collection of rainwater will be purchased and installed, along with the necessary PVC piping and connections to ensure a simple filter system at the drum supply, and the required components for a threaded-connection tap at the base of each unit for the use of the stored water.

Water Charity funds will pay for the drums, hardware, materials, and a few necessary tools (hand saw, hand drill for the tap).

CATJA will manage and pay for the installation of the system by a field staff of three constructors, as well as oversee the bidding and purchasing of the materials from local vendors, and the maintenance of the system.

Project Impact
125 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Patrick Spencer

Comments
This is an important infrastructure project for the orphanage. It will result in a new and reliable water source, as well as establish a rainwater management system that eliminates adverse impact on the buildings and their surroundings.

DCATJA Water Project - Madagascarollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$310.00

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT NEEDED BELOW

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

Dollar Amount Needed
$190.00

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Tsivangiana Well Improvement Project - Madagascar

Tsivangiana Well Improvement Project - MadagascarLocation
Tsivangiana fokontany, Tsivangiana commune, Vatomandry district, Antsinanana region, Madagascar

Community Description
The people of Tsivangiana live along the east coast of Madagascar, separated from the Indian Ocean by about 20 kilometers of degraded rainforest. Most farm rice or fish in nearby streams. The wood huts and thatch roofs catch fire quite easily, and the community has been ravaged by two large fires in recent months.

There are two neighborhood groups looking to improve their water supplies. The first neighborhood is located along Tsivangiana’s largest stream (about 40 feet wide), where everyone bathes, washes clothes, and uses the restroom. The neighborhood well broke in 2010, so for the past three years the people have been fetching water from the stream. This is a major risk to their health and has led to innumerable illnesses.

The second neighborhood, located across town, uses a well whose poor design causes the water to be contaminated and those who fetch the water to be at risk of falling in.

Tsivangiana Well Improvement Project - MadagascarProject Description
This project is to improve two wells in the Tsivangiana fokontany.

Each neighborhood has decided on a course of action. In the first, the well water is dirty because the drainage apron cracked, allowing in all sorts of ground-level filth. However, below ground the well is quite well built: it is plenty deep, bringing water year round, and its molded concrete rings are solid.

To fix the problem, the men will remove the current wellhead and drainage apron, descend into the well to clean out as much of the trash and contamination as possible, and build a new, sturdier wellhead and drainage apron.

The wellhead will be covered with a sliding cover, to protect against contaminants. The drainage apron will have a 3-meter diameter with a canal on its outer edge to collect all water and funnel it towards a rubble-filled soak-away pit, all of which will be enclosed in a fence built with wood from local eucalyptus trees.

The neighborhood group will provide all labor and all materials that are available locally, such as sand, wood, and rocks. They have chosen a foreman and team to carry out the work.

Tsivangiana Well Improvement Project - MadagascarWater Charity funds will pay for materials, including cement, reinforcing iron rods, gravel, and 4/7 stones.

Likewise with the second group, whose material requests are similar in spite of some differences in the work to be carried out. This group is led by Donat, the same carpenter who built the hospital latrine in partnership with Water Charity.

Because the people nearby have no better options, this second well is already in use. However, its wellhead rises only 50 centimeters above the ground and has no cover, and there is no drainage apron. These deficiencies allow contaminants to enter the well both at and below ground level. Also, people fetching water – especially the children who are often sent to do so - are at risk of falling in; some even stand on the well’s headwall!

The group plans to raise the wellhead and add a cover, and then, like the other group, add a drainage apron, soak away pit, and fence.

Project Impact
1,000 people will benefit from the project, consisting of 500 people in each neighborhood.

 

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Eddie Carver

Comments
The renovation of the wells is a cost-efficient to continue the use of the existing resources, turning them into safe water supplies for the community.

Eddie previously completed the Tsivangiana Composting Latrine Project – Madagascar.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of Michael and Carla Boyle, of Nelsonville, OH, USA.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Ambavala Well Project – Madagascar

Ambavala Well Project – MadagascarLocation
Ambavala, Fenerive-Est District, Toamasina Province, Madagascar

Community Description
The village of Ambavala is located on the tropical and beautiful northeast coast of the island nation of Madagascar, about six miles north of the nearest town, Fenerive-Est, and just a short walk from the edge of the Indian Ocean. The name translates to “at the mouth of the forest,” and it borders one of the last remaining stretches of rare coastal rainforest on the island. Fishing is one of the primary sources of income in the area, along with weaving baskets, farming rice, and the yearly harvests of litchis and cloves.

While water shortages are not usually characteristic of the rainy east coast, this rather large village of nearly 300 people depends on only one well for all of their daily water needs. Not only is it unable to support that many, its distance from households on the far side of the village makes the three-times-daily chore of fetching water both time consuming and difficult, and even prohibitive.

A large number of people still get their drinking and cooking water at streams nearby that are fed by muddy rice fields and where other community members bathe, wash clothes, and even bring their small herds of cattle to drink and cool off. During the short dry season that accompanies the hottest months of the year, the water level of the well drops significantly, forcing even more households to use those alternative sources of water.

Ambavala Well Project – MadagascarBuilding wells in the area can be costly, and for this reason cheaper hand pumps have been installed over the years in various locations throughout village. However, the mechanisms on the pumps break easily and the underground pipe needs to be replaced every few years, at costs too high for the residents.

Only one of these pumps still work, located near the local elementary school on a far side of the village, but the water is so brown that residents still choose the polluted streams and teachers at the school send students all the way to the well for water needed during the school day.

Project Description
This project is to build a long-lasting, professionally-built concrete well in Ambavala.

The well will follow the model of the one built in 2006, which has only needed minor repairs, which can easily be taken care of by members of the community.

Water Charity funds will be used to hire the same well-builder, who has agreed to work on the project, and buy the materials.

The well will be built at a depth of 7 meters, similar to the current well’s 6 meters, and will be lined with concrete rings, sealed together with concrete.

The top will be a meter-high concrete structure, complete with a metal lid.

Ambavala Well Project – MadagascarThe new well will be built near one of the broken water pumps, in a location agreed upon by the community as centrally located among the households, on the side of the village furthest from the existing well.

Additional paths will be built to ensure it is easily accessible from all sides and to all households.

A protective structure will be built around the well out of local materials by members of the community.

Project Impact
At least 350 people, including students at the elementary school and members of the village, will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Brynna Hoggard

Comments
This is an important infrastructure project for the community. It will improve the daily lives of the villagers by providing a convenient and reliable source of safe water.

 

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Brynna Hoggard.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Brynna of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Brynna and/or those of other PCVs in the country.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Mitsinjo Bathroom Project - Madagascar

Mitsinjo Bathroom Project - Madagascar
Location
Andasibe, Moramanga district, Alaotra Mangoro region, Madagascar

Community Description
Association Mitsinjo started in 1999 as an association of local guides. It has since grown into an association that works in 4 primary areas – Ecotourism, Conservation, Research, and Development.

Andasibe is only 135 km from Antananarivo, the capital of Madagascar, and the road is paved. This, combined with an incredible forest and unique animal life, puts Association Mitsinjo on the map for many tourists. Staying true to their local roots, the revenue from ecotourism is returned to the community by way of various development activities in the community.

Mitsinjo Bathroom Project - Madagascar

Mitsinjo is located 2 km from the village of Andasibe, but its impact zone is much larger. It is the manager of the Torotorofotsy wetlands, a Ramsar site, as well as the Analamazaotra forest station. While their tourism is primarily based in Analamazaotra, their development activities benefit villages throughout the entire commune of Andasibe, impacting more than 400 households in villages close to protected areas.

Mitsinjo’s development activities include:

- Public Health initiatives: a health clinic has been built in a rural village, they have distributed bednets and taught about Malaria prevention, water sanitation, nutrition, family planning and sex-education.
- Improved agricultural techniques: they have worked with local farmers groups in the area to increase vegetable production, and now work in partnership with a PCV to teach improved rice and vegetable farming techniques.
- Environmental education: a recently launched program targets all seven of the local primary schools, educating the children about the unique environment they live in and instilling a love of nature.

Because of the accessibility of Andasibe from the major town of Moramanga and the capital Antananarivo, Mitsinjo frequently hosts groups of Malagasy students and researchers. These student groups come to learn about sustainable development, ecotourism, and conservation, as well as to visit the park and see the famous Indri Indri lemur and other animals.

Mitsinjo has worked for years in many areas of community development, but they want to increase their work in Health, Agriculture, and Environmental Education. Their ecotourism is the primary money-maker for all of those activities. They want to improve their facilities to better compete with the better-funded parks in the area, drawing more and larger groups of tourists.

Mitsinjo is known for high-quality guides and as a local organization that gives back to the community, but their facilities are inadequate.

Mitsinjo Bathroom Project - MadagascarAs of now, they have one pit-latrine for all of the 3,000+ tourists that visit annually. They have identified it as a priority to finish the facility before the tourist season begins this May.

Project Description
This project will build a bathroom facility with 3 toilets, 3 urinals, and 3 sinks. It will be built at the entrance to the park, near the meeting room and reception office. These toilets will be connected to a concrete septic tank, and barrels on the roof will be connected to running water from the nearby Amphibian Research Facility. The building will be brick with a cement floor, and a tin roof.

The association’s carpenter and mason will provide the labor. The bricks, gravel, and wood are already in place, and association members have cleared site of brush and trees. When funding is received, the Mitsinjo treasurer will go with the Peace Corps Volunteer to buy all the needed materials. Once Mitsinjo receives the remaining materials, work will begin immediately.

Mitsinjo will provide all of the locally available materials - labor, wood, gravel, and bricks – as well as the water barrels, cement, and nails.

Water Charity funding will buy the tin roof, toilets, wash-basins, piping, and tiles.

Project Impact
3,000+ visitors per year will benefit from the project, including tourists, researchers and students.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Elsie Black

Comments
This project is a part of Mitsinjo’s plan to put a major emphasis on ecotourism, which has the end goal of dramatically expanding their development and conservation efforts.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Elsie Black of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Elsie and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Analalava Special Community Reserve Well Project - Madagascar

Andrew Bourret – Madagascar - Analalava Well
Location
Morarano, Foulpointe, Tamatave Region, Atsinanana Province, Madagascar

Community Description
The Special Community Reserve of Analalava (Velonala and Missouri Botanical Gardens) is a protected rainforest on the east coast of Madagascar, owned by the local community, and managed by the forest association Velonala with the assistance of Missouri Botanical Gardens. It is home to five species of lemur, three species of flying fox, fifty bird species, chameleons, frogs, and 353 plant species (including 10 found nowhere else in the world). In spite of its biodiversity and close proximity to a popular beach destination, the reserve currently receives only a few dozen tourists annually on account of it still being rather new and underdeveloped.

There is hope within the community that an increase in ecotourism will be an economic boon for local people, most of whom earn just over a dollar a day. Improving facilities and staff capacity at the reserve has become the primary concern of the Peace Corps Volunteer at the site, who is working to train guides from local villages, fix trails, and build housing for visitors. A Peace Corps Partnership project with these objectives is currently underway.

The hand pump at the reserve breaks often, does not provide enough water, and brings up residual iron material from the pipe. Andrew Bourret – Madagascar - Analalava Well

Project Description
This project is to replace a broken hand pump at the site with a sealed well lined with concrete rings, and an electronic pump.

The well will be dug to a depth of 4.5 m where water is plentiful (very high water table on the east coast of Madagascar). Reserve staff and community members will dig the rings into the ground by digging inside a ring so that it descends gradually as earth is removed. Once a ring is flush with ground level, another ring will be added and the two will be fused together with cement. This process will continue until the well is finished. At this point, the well will be emptied entirely and a sand and gravel filter will be added to discourage silt and other material from entering the well.

The concrete rings (10 cm thick, 1 m in height, 80 cm in diameter) will be made in a nearby larger town, 7 km away, and driven by truck to the site. This is more economically efficient than transporting individual materials and a mold to the site. Sand left over from other community projects will be used to make the cement that will seal the rings together.

While there is no electricity on site, the electronic pump will be powered by an on-site generator which will be turned on for a few minutes once a day. Water will be drawn through a pipe up to an existing tower where two 200 L barrels sit and feed water to the various facilities around the site.

Water Charity funds will be used to buy and transport 5 concrete rings, a thick cement cover, buckets and rope, and piping. Any money left over will be contributed toward the purchase of the electronic pump. The Reserve's partner NGO already agreed to cover the remaining cost of the electronic pump.

Andrew Bourret – Madagascar - Analalava WellProject Impact
This project will immediately benefit 150+ people. It has the potential to benefit thousands of tourists in the future.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Andrew Bourret

Comments
The project will provide staff and visitors with a clean water source. It is essential to the future of the reserve, as tourists will come and stay if the facilities are up to the same standards as hotels in the nearby beach town.

Andrew previously completed the Morarano Well Project – Madagascar, which is very similar to the instant project, and the Morarano Public Latrine Project – Madagascar.

Dollar Amount of Project
$550.00

Donations Collected to Date
$550.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Andrew Bourret.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Andrew of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Andrew and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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