Jamaica

Natural Mystic Rainwater Catchment Project - Jamaica

Rainwater Catchment Culvert & Water Tank For Village Of Bob Marley's Birth

Rainwater Catchment Culvert & Water Tank for the Village Of Bob Marley's Birth in the Mountains Of Jamaica!

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION, and is being implemented by Sol Adventurers Foundation.

LocationOn the farm
Natural Mystic Organic Farm & Grass Roots Healing Center
Nine Mile, St Ann’s Parish, Jamaica, West Indies

Community Description
The community of 9 Mile is best known as the birthplace of Bob Marley, and is also home to the Mausoleum where he is entombed.  It is one of the few places in Jamaica, where the village mentality still lives and thrives. Nine mile is up in the hills of the Dry Harbor Mountains (in St. Ann's Parish, Jamaica), where no rivers or springs flow.  The bedrock is made of limestone, so when rain hits, all the water runs straight down to Ocho Rios (large town on the coast), unless you have a means to catch it.  A rainwater catchment is the only way to access water in this region.

Problem Addressed
Due to the lack of rivers or streams in the Dry Harbour Region, and the limestone bedrock causing the rainwater to run straight down to Ocho Rios, water is definitely an issue in this region.  There is a shortage of water in the area, especially when dealing with farming. 

Project Description
This project is to build a large rainwater catchment system to supply the farm, healing center, visitors, and volunteers with fresh, clean water.  A 16 x 16 cement tank will be built to hold the water and a concrete runoff area for the rainwater to run down the hill into the tank.  The filtered catchment will be placed on the organic farm for use as a source for watering the crops, and  by the healing center as well. 

The materials for the project are listed below. The supplies include: concrete blocks, sand, steel beams, cement, wire, plywood and 1 x 3 boards.

600 8 inch blocks     
10 yrd Rough sand     
1/2 ton steel              
5 yrd grit/gravel            
80 bag cement           
50 lb 1/4 wire                
10 lb binding wire           
4 yrd granite sand         
3 lb concrete nail             
10 length of laut                                     

 

Construction Underway in 9 Mile, Jamaica
Community Organization
The Natural Mystic Organic Farm and Grass Roots Healing Center will be working hand in hand with Sol Adventurers Foundation, a 501 (c)(3) based in California working to empower youth globally to discover their gifts and share them with the world. Rosey at the farm in Jamaica

Sol Adventurers is run by Roseanne Ware, who has worked with Water Charity on a number of projects, and has been of great help to the organization for a couple years.

Roxanne Little is the owner of the Natural Mystic Organic Farm and Grass Roots Healing Center.  She is certified in iridology, sclerology, ultrasound physics, cardiovascular and pediatric emergency ultrasound and is the CEO of Loving Care, LLC.  She has been providing much-needed health screenings and medicinal herbs free of charge to neighbors, friends and family throughout Jamaica. 

With a stroke of good fortune, she was able to acquire the same land where she lived and grew with her father as a small child.  She has been developing this farm and retreat center over the last 12 years with her sons.  In addition to the farm and healing center, the property provides community resources for the area iHorse at Natural Mystic Farm & Healing Centerncluding drum & fire pit, hiking trails, bird sanctuary, camping areas and monthly healing circles.

Roxanne and the community are covering labor, delivery and filter costs.  All other costs have been covered by Water Charity. 

Project Impact
This project will directly impact approximately 2,700 individuals, and many others indirectly, who will have access to the produce grown with the water.

Volunteer Directing Project
Roseanne Ware

Monitoring and Maintenance 
A committee will be established to ensure that the rainwater catchment is monitored and maintained on a monthly basis, and collect funds to be used towards maintenance.

Comments
The farm is strictly organic, which is few and far between in Jamaica, where most farmers have the belief that you have to spray (pesticides).  There is a real movement in Jamaica to have access to Organic produce.  You can find some people within the Rastafari community that believe in growing their crops naturally with no pesticides or insecticides, but for the average Jamaican this is hard to find and many don’t even know it exists.  Even in Kingston, there is only one farmer's market on Saturdays where organic produce is available.  In Coronation Market, the biggest farmers market in Kingston, organic produce is nonexistent.

Roseanne Ware has previously done the One Love Children's Home Water Project  in another area of Jamaica.

This project has been funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

Nearby HillOrganic Farm in 9 Mile, Jamaica

 


Dry Harbor Region of the Blue Mountains in Jamaica

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Red Lands Water System Project - Jamaica

Red Lands Water System Project - Jamaica

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Red Lands Water System Project - JamaicaLocation
Red Lands, Clarendon, Jamaica

Community Description
Red Lands, Clarendon, Jamaica is an agricultural based community located near the trigonometric center of Jamaica. Agriculture is responsible for the founding and continued existence of the Red Lands Community. It is also a source of the some of the major challenges the community will face in the nearby future. The primary challenge will likely be increasing their resiliency to the effects of climate change, organizational development, and social issues.

The community of Red Lands has great potential for economic and community development in the future. Human capital and land capital are its greatest assets. The keys to achievement in community development rely on the mobilization of community members and their willingness to invest in themselves and the community to make a change.

Problem Addressed
The Red Lands and Red Hills water supply currently consists of more than 2,000 feet of pipe, 2 water tanks, several stand pipes, and dozens of outlets to individual homes. Although the system has much infrastructure to it already, water reaches less than 10% of the length of the pipe and very few homes due to the deterioration of the system over time, a lack of proper management and finance, and the effects of climate change on rainfall patterns and drought conditions.

The declining condition of the infrastructure has left the system unable to properly store and distribute water. The improper and under- financed management of the water system has allowed it to weaken over time, as well as burden very few people with the work of fixing it when it is not functioning.

Lack of access to pipe water has had a severe negative impact on the Red Lands and Red Hills communities. Many community members undergo financial hardship or loss of economic opportunity due to the need to purchase water or spend time carrying it to their homes. The local primary school also finds itself forced to purchase water to be transported into the community.

A lack of easy access to water has many additional negative effects to the Red Lands and Red Hills Communities including lack of proper sanitation, contributing to students being late to school and more time devoted to water collection, both at school and at home, businesses closing, and overall it makes life more difficult.

Red Lands Water System Project - JamaicaProject Description
This project is to build an effective water supply system in the community.
A concrete water tank will be constructed with interior dimensions of 12’x12’x10’ (LxWxH) for a total volume of 10,772 gallons. The tank will be constructed using 6” concrete blocks, concrete, ½” steel, sand, stone, thinsett sand-dynafloor-300, and 2” PVC SCH40 Pressure Pipe.

One 375 gallon concrete water tank and entombment catchment will be repaired. The bottom of the tank that rides the hillside has washed out. The interior base of the tank will be replaced with solid concrete, complete with a layer of thinsett sand-dynafloor-300.

3,600 feet of 2” PVC SCH40 Pressure Pipe pipeline will be installed (180 20’ lengths). The majority of the pipeline will be new (3,000 feet), extending an already existing pipeline, while the remaining pipeline will replace old degraded pipeline (600 feet).

The new pipeline begins at the newly constructed tank at 2,099 feet elevation, and the old pipeline begins at the tank to be repaired at 1,938 feet elevation, both lines extend down to 1,757 feet elevation. No pumps are required, as this is a gravity feed water system.

Stakeholders in the project include the Clarendon Parish Council Roads and Works Department, the Forestry Department, and Red Hills Primary and Infant School. The project is set to have a profound impact on the Red Lands Community through a more consistent and reliable supply of water to homes, businesses, and churches. The creation and implementation of a management plan will continue to rehabilitate the current water system with aims at eventually providing water to Red Hills and Red Hills Primary and Infant School.

The Project will also train several individuals from the Red Lands community in Project Design and Management, and Grant Writing to equip them with the skills and knowledge to apply for grant funding in the future without the help of Peace Corps, or any other organization.

An improvement and expansion of the current domestic water system will allow community members the ability to spend more time on income-generating activities, like operating small businesses, farming, social activities, such as parenting and community groups, and educational activities, including higher education, assisting with their child’s education, or expanding their education through self-help means.

Red Lands Water System Project - JamaicaEach aspect of the project is being completed by community members including the project design. Project leaders have put in a total of 20 hours of class time per person (140 hours total), to learn project design and management, and to design the project, as well as numerous additional hours to complete a community survey, gathering material invoices, locating and negotiating land for the tank, surveying the current water system, and completing a project plan on their own as a portion of the required coursework.

These same project leaders will be organizing and leading community meetings, designing a management plan for the system, organizing material pick up and work crews, constructing the water tank, pipe installation, doing repair work, carrying out project management and evaluation, as well as continuing their coursework on project design and management.

The community as a whole will contribute to the project through labor, water system installment, providing cooked lunch for workers, as well as their continued involvement in the project as outlined in the water user agreement. The community contribution will account for 26% of the project total.

In order to sufficiently address each component of the project, the following steps will be implemented:

• Hold Community Meeting to Inform Community of Project
• Recruit Interested individuals for Project Design and Management and Grant Writing Course
• Begin Weekly Planning Meetings for Project Design and Management and Grant Writing
• Create Timeline/Action Plan For Project
• Secure Land For Tank Construction
• Water Tank Design and Construction Planning, Tank and Pipeline Rehabilitation Planning
• Household Survey Concerning Water Flow, Quality, Census and Inform Residents of Project
• Gather Quotations on Material/Supplies List From Local Hardware
• Students In Project Design and MGMT Course will complete a rough draft of the Project Application
• Hold Community Meeting to Inform Community of Project, Management Plan, and Water User Agreement
• Elect Water Management Committee, Begin Designing Community Water Management Plan and Water User Agreement
• Consult Trained Workmen and Gather Labor Force for cleaning/brushing work area, and Tank construction
• Schedule and Plan Community Work Days, Including Catering
• Arrange for Collection and Storage of Materials, Including Collection of all receipts
• Begin Installation of 1 Concrete Water Tank
• Begin Repair of 1 Concrete Water Tank
• Begin Installation of 1 Pipeline System
• Continued Monitoring of Project to Keep on Schedule, Make Necessary Adjustments
• Create Map and Schematic of Water System With all Outlets, Label Outlet Destinations
• Hold Community Unveiling Ceremony For New Water System
• Write Appreciation Letters to stakeholders and Contributors
• Complete Final PCPP Evaluation and Submit

Project Impact
259 people will benefit from the project.

Red Lands Water System Project - JamaicaPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Ian Hash

Monitoring and Maintenance
One of the major components of the Red Lands Water System Improvement Project is to ensure the sustainability of the project into the future. The system that is currently in Red Lands has deteriorated over time, to the point that it is hardly functioning by any measure, giving community members a firsthand perspective of why the monitoring and maintenance of the water system is important to sustain it.

In order to appropriately address the issue of sustainability we have measures were taken to form a Community Water Management Committee as well as a Community Water System Management Plan. The management plan will include provisions to monitor the entire system every month, assess maintenance needs, collect monthly fees as a part of the Water User Agreement to cover materials and repairs, as well as outlined steps for the Water Management Committee to take regarding enforcement of all rules associated with the Water User Agreement.

Until the point of project completion, the project will be monitored and evaluated by the Peace Corps Volunteer with the assistance of community members.

Further improvements on the system, as well as other community improvements (community center, technology center, etc.), will be up to the community to pursue with the skills they have gained from their experiences with this project

Fundraising Target
$5,800

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$5,800

Dollar Amount Needed

$0 - This project has been funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

Additional donations will go toward funding other projects in Jamaica.

 

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

House of Love Children's Home Water Project - Jamaica

House of Love Children's Home Water Project - Jamaica

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the Sol Adventurers Foundation.

Location
Rio Bueno, Trelawny Parish, Jamaica, West IndiesYouth at SIster Jackie's House of Love

Community Description
Rio Bueno, a small seaside village located 32 miles (51.5 kilometers) east of Montego Bay on the island of Jamaica on the border between the parishes of St. Ann and Trelawny, owes its importance, history and livelihood to the magnificent Rio Bueno Harbour. The Rio Bueno Harbour is the deepest in Jamaica, perhaps one of the reasons why Columbus dropped anchor there on his first visit to Jamaica.  Trelawny is best known for its sugar estates and sugar cane mills. It had more sugar estates than any other parish, so there was need for a sea coast town to export it.  Trelawny was also home to the largest group of Maroons in the island. 

Trelawny's sources of employment are based on agriculture, manufacturing, and tourism. Rum and sugar are Trelawny's principal products. Other crops include bananas, yams, strawberries, vegetables, pimento, coffee, ginger, and coconut. Though the fishing industry is declining, Trelawny still produces a large amount of fish. Most families in the community do not have running water or electricity.

Likkle JohnThis project is being implemented at a children’s home for children who have lost their parents, or their parents are not able to care for them. The youth range in age from 2 years to 21 years of age. The youth have disorders ranging from spina bifida and cerebral palsy to learning disorders and HIV.  There are also two teenage moms with their babies, and several elders living on the property. Sister Jackie and Brother Delroy own the property, and have been living on the land with the youth for 1 and a half years.  Some of the children go to the public schools, as long as there is funding available and their behavior is appropriate for school; the rest are schooled on the property.

Problem Addressed Children playing at Sister Jackie's House of Love
House of Love Children’s Home in Rio Bueno, Trelawny often runs out of water, making it a challenge to bathe the youth, cook, clean their clothes and stay hydrated.  The water truck comes to fill the tanks with water when they have funds to do so, but the water is very heavily chlorinated often causing diarrhea. The water they get is not potable.

There is a great deal of rain in the area. The home and the youth would benefit greatly from a rainwater catchment and filters. This project would ensure a clean, potable source of water and would allow them to bathe, cook, clean clothes and grow more healthy foods, cutting down on the cost of buying food.   This would also help ensure the youth are eating organic, non-GMO produce.
Sister Jackie in the Ethiopian Orthodox Church
52 youth, elders and staff live at the home on a daily basis. Added to this, there are also approximately 40 additional children that drop in regularly, and an additional 80 that come for summer camp. There is also an Ethiopian Orthodox Church on the property and a Nyabinghi Tabernacle. About 50 people attend several spiritual events on the property. 

Project Description
This project is to build a rainwater catchment and storage system.

Gutters made of 4-inch PVC pipe will be cut in half and attached along the main building.  The rainwater will run through the pipe, covered in netting to filter out debris, and pass through a micron filter into a 1,000-gallon tank, which will be purchased and installed on a base. 

A contactor in the community will donate the labor.  Transport of the supplies will be donated as well.

The plans were developed with a local contractor, in consultation with Mr. Gayle, a water specialist at the Marine Lab.  Mr. Gayle confirmed there were no heavy metals or major contaminant in the local area. He recommended micron filters at the output.
Sister Jackie and Roseanne of Sol Adventurers
Project Impact
This project will impact 222 people, plus visitors, and the number will grow over time..

Volunteer Directing Project
Roseanne Ware

Monitoring and Maintenance
The staff at the House of Love will monitor and maintain the rain catchment pipes, filter and tank.  Sol Adventurers will provide training on maintenance of the rainwater system.

Jackie
Comments

This project is being completed in cooperation with Sol Adventurers Foundation, a nonprofit that empowers orphans and at risk youth globally to discover their gifts, share them with the world and gain strength through reconnecting with their community.  Experiencing music, art, permaculture and exploration of cultural roots all combine to help them unearth their gifts and become sustainable.  Sol Adventurers honors their elders by giving them the opportunity to pass their wisdom, cultural traditions and arts to the youth.  Sol Adventurers Foundation has been offering mentoring and enrichment programs in Jamaica and California for the past 9 years.

Our own Roseanne, aka "Rosey," is Executive Director of Sol Adventurers Foundation, and has also been doing good works and working directy with Water Charity since summer 2015 as an assistant to our CEO JahSun.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.


Dollar Amount of Project
$700

Donations Collected to Date

$700

Dollar Amount Needed

$0 - This project has been funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation, with help from friends of Roseanne Ware.

Additional donations will go toward funding other projects in Jamaica.

 

 

Brother Delroy measuring for rain gutters Sister Jackie and Etch

Sister Jackie on her radio program on Wavez radioBrother Delroy and the contractor measuring for rain gutters

Country: 
Tags: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Belmont Fishing Beach Rainwater Catchment Project - Jamaica

Belmont Fishing Beach Rainwater Catchment Project - Jamaica
Location
Belmont Fishing Beach, Belmont District, Bluefields, Parish of Westmoreland, Jamaica

Community Description
Belmont is a small rural fishing and farming community on the Southwest coast of Jamaica. Belmont is part of Bluefields, a collection of seven communities with a population of approximately 4,000.

Bluefields is located on the Bluefields Bay, an important marine habitat that has recently been designated as a Fish Sanctuary. A significant portion of the population relies on the fishing industry for food and income.

Belmont Fishing Beach Rainwater Catchment Project - Jamaica Unfortunately, in the past few decades a combination of poor fishing methods and overfishing has resulted in a significant decline in the local fishing industry. The Bluefields Bay Fishermen's Friendly Society (BBFFS), led by 57 local fishers, has been working hard over the past five years to combat this problem by educating fishers about sustainable fishing methods, lobbying for and maintaining a Fish Sanctuary to act as a fish nursery, and implementing projects aimed at improving the lives of fishers, their families, and the surrounding community.

Through partnership with Food for the Poor, the BBFFS has provided housing, fishing equipment, and a cold storage unit to fishers and community members. Unfortunately, the cold storage unit is yet to become operational due to concerns with the costs of providing clean water and electricity.

Project Description
This project will establish a rainwater catchment system on the cold storage unit building at the Belmont Fishing Beach. The unit will provide fishers with a 10' x 10' walk-in freezer to store their catch prior to sale. By doing so, the unit will encourage fishers to fish in deeper waters for larger fish, a style of fishing which is much more sustainable than fishing in shallow waters for reef fish.

Belmont Fishing Beach Rainwater Catchment Project - Jamaica The cold storage unit also has the capacity to greatly improve the health and safety of the process of preparing fish for consumption. Currently, fish are cleaned and scaled in a small stream adjacent to the Belmont Fishing Beach.

The stream lies in a basin that serves as the outflow for a watershed that receives sewage from over 35 houses. Recent water tests indicated that fecal coliform levels in the stream were upwards of 180 ppm, which is over 200% higher than the safe drinking level. The cleaning of fish in this stream thus poses a significant health risk to the local community.

The system will be comprised of gutters along both sides (24-feet long) of the tin roof of the cold storage unit building which will feed into a 650-gallon storage tank. The tank will be fitted with a pipe and spigot that will make the water available to the fishers in a designated fish cleaning area. A receptacle will also be constructed to ensure that fish waste is collected and composted to prevent any sanitation issues.

The water catchment system was designed by Patrick Marti, who has a background in chemical engineering, in collaboration with the Executive Board of the BBFFS. The project will be managed by Mr. Livingston Thompson, Vice President of the BBFFS, and Mr. Cavin Lattiebudare, Executive Board Member of the BBFFS, who are both fishermen and active members of the community. They will lead a team of five local fishers who will purchase the storage tank, pipe, spigot, glue, gutters, and waste receptacle materials and then install the system. Both Mr. Thompson and Mr. Lattiebudare have experience in installing similar systems.

Project Impact
50 fishers will directly benefit and approximately 1,000 community members will indirectly benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Patrick Marti

Comments
The water catchment system installed through this project will provide safe, clean rainwater to be used by the fishers for the cleaning of fish. It will also reduce the costs on the already burdened fishers by eliminating the need to purchase treated water, which would be the only other safe alternative. Finally, it will improve the health and safety of the community by reducing the pollution in the stream.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Patrick Marti of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Patrick and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Ewarton Community Centre Rainwater Catchment and Filtration System Project - Jamaica

Ewarton Community Centre Rainwater Catchment and Filtration System Project - JamaicaLocation
Ewarton, St. Catherine, Jamaica

Community Description
Ewarton is a semi-rural community located at the foot of Mt. Rosser in Northwest St. Catherine, Jamaica. The town is approximately 23 miles south of Ocho Rios.

The community has an approximate population of 14,000 people who live in thirteen unique districts. Persons are predominantly involved in agriculture or employed at WINDALCO/Rusal, the local bauxite company. In the center of town is one of the oldest and largest community centres in Jamaica.

For years, the community centre has had piped water from the National Water Commission (NWC). However, due to the world’s harsh economic situation, neither the Ewarton Community Development Action Committee (ECODAC), the local community based organization for Ewarton, nor the centre management committee is able to regularly pay the NWC bill. Currently, service is cut.

Ewarton Community Centre Rainwater Catchment and Filtration System Project - JamaicaA pump station located in the district of Charlton Meadows supplies Ewarton as a whole with NWC water. However, the NWC admitted formally that they do not have enough water to supply Ewarton as a whole.

Water will be used primarily for drinking water with tentative future expansion of the system to collect unfiltered rain water for hand-washing and flushing of toilets.

Project Description
This project is to set up a rainwater catchment and biosand filtration system for drinking water at the Ewarton Community Centre. The hope is to reduce or eliminate the dependence upon and financial burden of the NWC for water.

The project will be carried out by ECODAC and the Ewarton Watershed & Farmers Co-operative Society.

Metal stands for storage tanks and a bio-sand filter will be constructed to create a gravity driven system.

The missing manifold and outlet PVC plumbing will be re-installed on the bio-sand filter created during PCJ's Group 81, Health Initiative, Hub-Based Peace Corps Training in April 2010.

Ewarton Community Centre Rainwater Catchment and Filtration System Project - Jamaica15 feet of 6” PVC gutter will be installed on the SW corner of the main building at the community centre. Then the entire system will be connected together using ½ inch PVC piping.

Funds will be used to purchase 16-gauge metal sheeting, flat iron for cross-bracing, welding rods, and primer for the stands, 15 feet of 6" PVC guttering, joints, and accessories. Glue, PVC joints, PVC caps, PVC valves, and 3 lengths of PVC pipe will be purchased for the manifold re-installation and connecting plumbing.

Anticipated funding from Friends of Jamaica, a U.S. non-profit organization set up by Returned Peace Corps Jamaica Volunteers to support current PCV's, will cover the 2" galvanized piping and initial water quality testing of the filtered water.

In kind contributions of two 650-gallon water tanks, one from ECODAC and one from the Ewarton Watershed & Farmers Co-operative Society, and a bio-sand filter from Peace Corps Jamaica, will be utilized for the project.

The work will be overseen by Brain Perry, Ewarton Watershed & Farmers Co-operative Society Chairman, working with the PCV. Organization members will help with the installation of guttering and provide general assistance.

Construction and welding of the metal stands will be performed by Auto Thomas, Assistant-Treasurer of the Farmers Co-operative and welding expert.

Plumbing assistance will be provided by master plumber, Ken Caldwell, PCV in Falmouth, Trelawny, Jamaica.

After the system has been successfully created, water quality testing of the filtered water will be done by the Scientific Research Council to ensure that the water meets the standards of the Ministry of Health for safe drinking water.

ECODAC will ensure that the water is tested regularly to guarantee that the filter is working properly and effectively.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Mark Bryson

Comments
This project marshals diverse resources to satisfy a crucial need to bring water to the center.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Kathryn Smith of Cheshire, CT, USA.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Mark Bryson of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Mark and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

 

Country: 
Tags: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Refuge Basic School and Community Center Water and Sanitation Project - Jamaica

Rufuge Basic School and Community Center Water and Sanitation Project - JamaicaLocation
Refuge District, Parish of Trelawny, Jamaica

Community Description
Refuge is a poor rural community located in the hills of Trelawny, about 8 miles from Falmouth. It has approximately 130 households, and a population of about 500. Over 40% of the household heads are unemployed.

The Community Center also serves as the Basic School, which has one teacher and 20 students ages 3 to 6. There is no water in the school or the toilet building.

The bathroom building is behind the school, with a pit toilet on the girl’s side and a flush toilet on the boy’s side. There are no sinks in the bathrooms.

Rufuge Basic School and Community Center Water and Sanitation Project - JamaicaThe Ministry of Health has served notice that the school will be shut down unless the sanitation facilities are upgraded by the end of August, 2011.

Project Description
This project is to bring running water to the school, and to upgrade the bathroom facilities with flush toilets and new sinks. The project will be carried out under the direction of the Rufuge Basic School and the Refuge Community Association.

A water line to the toilets and the sinks will be installed and tied into the water line on the street.

On the girl’s side, the old pit toilet will be removed, the floor will be patched with concrete and a new flush toilet and seat will be installed.

On the boy’s side, the old flush toilet will be repaired and a new seat added.

Rufuge Basic School and Community Center Water and Sanitation Project - JamaicaNew hand washing sinks will be installed in both the boy’s and girl’s rooms. Each sink will have a new ½” PVC water line with a shut-off valve and a new 1½” PVC drain. The sinks will drain into an existing storm water concrete drain. Piping the sink water (gray water) into the storm drain will not harm the environment and will avoid filling the pit that the toilets drain into.

Water Charity funds will be used to buy a toilet, 2 sinks, PVC piping, and the necessary valves and fittings.

The work will be done by plumbing students from the vocational training institute located in Falmouth. The plumbing teacher will supervise the project, and is fully supportive because this will provide hands-on plumbing experience to his students.

Project Impact
All 500 residents of Refuge, but especially the students, staff, and parents of the Basic School will benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Mary Lee Caldwell

Comments
This is an example of how the Appropriate Projects concept can react to an emergency situation, and prevent the closure of a school.

The project is basic, and is necessary for the health and wellbeing of the students and community. It is supported by the school and community, and has a good plan for implementation.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Mary Lee Caldwell of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Mary Lee and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Westphalia All Age School Water Project - Jamaica

Westphalia All Age School Water Project - Jamaica

Location
Westphalia District, St. Andrew Parish, Jamaica

Community DescriptionWestphalia All Age School Water Project - JamaicaWestphalia is a very rural community north of Kingston, Jamaica, in the Blue Mountains. It is home to about 500 people who are primarily farmers of the famous Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee.

The community has been largely overlooked in the past 50 years, especially in terms of the water and the road systems. The current water source is a river up in t

he mountains about 1 1/2 miles away.

There is an existing concrete water catchment system. Water is run through an above-ground 3" galvanized pipe to the edge of the community.

A project is already underway to rebuild an old storage tank that is currently inoperable. The water is potable, but there is a currently operable chlorination tank, should the need arise for purification.

Westphalia All Age School serves about 75 children from ages 5 to 15. Currently, the students must carry their drinking water to school from a spring about a half mile down the hillside. By the time the children get to school they are often tired, which interferes with their learning.

There a bathroom and pit latrines at the school. Water is needed for drinking, cooking, flushing the toilet, and washing hands.

Project Description
This project is to bring potable water to the Westphalia All Age School.

Westphalia All Age School Water Project - JamaicaPiping will be run to connect the galvanized pipe at the edge of the community to the school. Trenches will be dug and the pipe will be buried. The system will be gravity fed.

Project funds will be used to purchase 70 lengths of 1" PVC pipe, couplings, and glue.

The owner of the catchment and existing piping has given permission for the use his equipment, and is an active participant in the project.

Community members will provide tools, dig the trench, lay the pipe, and provide transportation of materials. The school will provide the storage of materials.

Westphalia All Age School Water Project - JamaicaThe work will be overseen by an older, well-respected, community member who is a contractor with experience in building water systems.

 

 

Each household in the community will pay a yearly maintenance fee which will support a neighborhood watch type maintenance system.

Project Impact
80 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Elizabeth DiCocco

Comments
This project builds upon the existing infrastructure to bring water to the school. It utilizes the great support of the community and the school to create a cost-effective solution to the needs of the students and faculty.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of Judy and Doug McDonald, of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Elizabeth DiCocco of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Elizabeth and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Aeolus Valley School Water Project – Jamaica

Aeolus Valley School Water Project – JamaicaLocation
Aeolus Valley, St. Thomas, Jamaica

Community Description
Aeolus Valley All Age School is a small rural school nestled in the valleys of the Blue Mountain foothills. The school is approximately seven miles from Yallahs, St. Thomas, and twenty five miles from Kingston.

The school serves eleven surrounding communities, which include: Scotland Gate, Sam’s Mountain, Aeolus Valley, Swamp District, Lloyds, Bransbury District, Logwood, Hampstead, New Land, Yallahs, and Pondside.

The school population is comprised of 194 students: 127 boys and 67 girls across grades one through nine. The school employs eight teachers, one guidance counselor and one acting principal.

Aeolus Valley School Water Project – JamaicaThe school compound consists of three classroom blocks, one principal’s cottage, one canteen, one water tank, and two new flush toilets. The top block contains grades one through three, the middle block contains grades four through six, and the bottom block contains grades seven and grade eight/nine.

Most of the children who attend the school come from families involved in agriculture and quarrying. The majority of the students come from a low socio-economic status. As such, approximately fifty percent of the student body is on the Ministry sponsored PATH Programme and receive free lunch on Tuesdays and Fridays.

Three times per week, students receive a free and nutritious breakfast through the Heart of a Child Foundation. Funding for the organization comes from alumni of the school and other generous benefactors.

Danielle Porreca, PCV – JamaicaAeolus Valley All Age is one of the oldest schools in the area, having been founded in 1926. Yet, its progress has been slow during recent years.

The school was able to install two new flush bathrooms for its students with help from Food for the Poor. However, the students have not been able to use the bathrooms, as there was not a connection to a water supply.

The students are presently forced to revert back to the use of the old pit latrines and one deteriorating pipe for hand washing.

Project Description
This project is to do the work necessary to bring water to the school bathrooms.

A pump will be purchased and installed and connected by piping to the existing storage tank. This will finally allow the students to use their newly installed bathroom

Project Impact
The entire school, consisting of 194 students and 10 faculty members, will benefit from this project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Danielle Porreca

Comments
Upon completion of the project, there will be usable flush toilets and new sinks. The improved sanitation will greatly improve the health conditions at the school.

For a relatively small amount of money, this project adheres to the Appropriate Project standards, which call for utilizing existing improvements and “making them work”.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Danielle Porreca of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Danielle and/or those of his counterpart PCVs in Jamaica.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Redlight Pasture Restroom Project – Jamaica

Redlight Pasture Restroom Project – JamaicaLocation
Redlight, Jamaica

Community Description
Redlight is located about 20 km from, and 3,000 vertical feet above, the capital of Kingston. Residents travel to Kingston for medical facilities, banks and markets.

Redlight largely makes its income through farming, coffee production and tourism that utilizes its unique location nestled in the scenic Blue Mountains. Close proximity to Kingston offers access job and schooling opportunities.

Redlight Pasture Restroom Project – JamaicaRedlight is one of three adjoining communities, which include Middleton to the north and Irish Town to the south, with a population of about 3,000.

The communities have long expressed a desire for community improvement. A spirit of volunteerism is ingrained in the community members, as exemplified by the many collaborative groups striving to further social and educational development. These include a farmers group, learning centre, sports clubs and a senior citizens dance troupe.

Ena's Haven is a not for profit community providing services at a 10 acre pasture located 2 kilometers from the main road running through the three adjoining communities.

Redlight Pasture Restroom Project – JamaicaEna’s Haven provides Hippotherapy and Equine Assisted Psychotherapy (EAP) to children from all over Jamaica. Hippotherapy is a technique that employs the movement of a horse to stimulate muscle and brain development in autistic children.

Ena's Haven uses EAP to promote leadership and problem solving ability development in at-risk youths. These youngsters are able to work with the horses in these therapy sessions in a remote setting

Public facilities are not available to the children or parents that attend the sessions, and many times sessions are interrupted to allow for restroom needs.

Emily Van Mourick, PCV – JamaicaProject Description
This project will provide public restroom facilities at Ena’s Haven.

Two separate restrooms will be constructed, one for males and one for females, built to accomodate special needs children. They will be soak pit latrines, constructed of block to withstand the harsh hurricane weather Jamaica endures.

Project Impact
This project will benefit 100 at-risk youths, 30 children (including autistic children and those with muscular/motor function disabilities), 50 parents, and 20 staff (including physical therapists and psychotherapists).

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily Van Mourick

Comments
This is a needed project for an under-served segment of the population that receives substantial benefit from the services provided by this facility.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of James Berg, of Scottsdale, AZ, USA, with the following dedication:

This donation is made in the name of the Martin Guy Family: Martin, Norine, Harland, Edy, Loren and Aja.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Emily of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Emily and/or those of other PCVs in Jamaica.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Stonehenge Water Project – Jamaica

Water Tank - JamaicaLocation
Stonehenge, Jamaica

Community Description
Stonehenge is a very remote community that once was a major stop on the railway line that connected Jamaica’s capitol Kingston with Montego Bay. When the train line was decommissioned in 1993 Stonehenge’s economy was devastated. Today, the majority of the remaining Stonehenge residents are small scale farmers and wood carvers who live well below the poverty line.

Stonehenge is blessed with many springs that dot the hillsides and infrastructure to supply water to its residents. However, the local pump only supplies water once every two weeks and the springs are located in thick brush and jungle that makes accessing them difficult.

Trail - JamaicaTo cope with these difficulties residents have saved and invested large portions of their low incomes for large water tanks to harvest rainwater and to store the piped water.

Unfortunately, because many residents don’t pay for their piped water and cannot afford the necessary lock off devices they leave their water taps always open so they do not miss the opportunity to fill their tanks. This causes large volumes of piped water to overflow when tanks are full. Furthermore, water often does not reach several outlying homes.

In addition, the students of Orange Hill All Age School often have no drinking water, no water to wash their hands, and no lunch because there is no water to cook meals. Students are sometimes sent home when they need to use the bathroom.

Project Description
This project will double the water storage capacity at the Orange Hill All Age School, and also improve the management of water in the community.

First, Orange Hill All Age School will double the size of its current water storage capacity with a 1,000 gallon tank. This will ensure that students have drinking and cooking water during times that water is not pumped.

Gavin Finnegan, Peace Corps Volunteer - JamaicaSecond, with the donated labor of the community, Orange Hill All Age School will relay PVC pipe so that harvested rain water is used to flush the schools toilets thus conserving limited piped water.

Third, float style water lock off valves (like in a toilet) will be installed in water storage tanks at the school and the homes of 10 needy residents who do not pay for their water. This measure will increase awareness of the importance of conserving water, increase the length of time water is in the pipe, increase the distance water can be pumped, and ensure that residents do not miss the opportunity to fill their tanks.

Project Impact
This project will benefit 79 students, 5 school staff members and 200 households.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Gavin Finnegan

Comments
The lack of a reliable source of water at Orange Hill All Age School has been a major health and safety concern. In addition, the current system has caused water to be wasted and many households to remain unserved. This comprehensive project arose from the needs of the community, and addresses all of the outstanding water issues.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

An additional donation of $500 was made by James Berg, of Scottsdale, AZ, USA, to be used to fund the next project by Gavin and/or those of other PCVs in Jamaica.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Jamaica

Follow Us

Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google+ icon
YouTube icon
RSS icon


Donate $25 or more for Water Charity projects.

SiteLock

GlobalGiving vetted Organization 2016

***  Copyright 2017 ©  -  Water Charity is a 501(c)(3) non-profit (DLN 17053217312048) based in California & operating Worldwide  ***

 
 
Support Us