Dominican Republic

Bahoruco Province Latrine Project - Dominican Republic

Bahoruco Province Latrine Project - Dominican Republic

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Bahoruco Province Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxx Xxxx, Bahoruco Province, Dominican Republic

Community Description
The community of Xxx Xxxx is located in the southwest of Dominican Republic, near the border with Haiti. The region is called Bahoruco and it is one of the poorest regions in the country. Its population is a little over 10,000 people. Residents are approximately 70% Dominican-born Dominicans, 15% Dominicans of Haitian descent, and 15% migrant workers from Haiti who come for seasonal agricultural work.

Most family income is from foreign remittances from Spain and the U.S. There are some local jobs in agriculture, mostly plantain, bananas and coffee plantations in the mountains, transport (for example local motorcycle taxis), and small food businesses on the main road.

There is one high school and three primary schools. There is a small 20-bed hospital with emergency room and 2 local government clinics in town, all which constantly suffer from lack of supplies and resources. There is a firefighter station and police station in town as well.

The majority of houses are made of wood with zinc roofs. Others are all concrete with zinc roofs, some made entirely of zinc.

Problem Addressed
This community is built on an incline. The highest point of the incline is the Neiba mountain range and at its lowest point is Lago Enriquillo, the deepest point in the Caribbean. The main source of water comes from the mountains and flows down into town through a series of manmade canals. The majority of residents use these canals as their principal source of water. This becomes problematic with increasing water contamination that takes place.

Many residents in the poorest barrios of town, which happen to be located at higher points on the incline, openly defecate on their land, as they do not have any access to sanitation in the home.

When it rains, waste often gets washed down and enters the canals, which in turn contaminates the water of not only the poorest barrios, but all the barrios located at lower parts of the incline as well.

Residents use this water to bathe and clean the home. Sometimes it is used to drink, although it is looked down upon. This results in high incidences of waterborne and fecal-orally transmitted illnesses in the community, especially among children.

To combat this issue of contaminated water in the community, community leaders have decided it is best to focus on the poorest barrios in the community called El Zero (subsector Los Guandules). These poor barrios seem to be the source of the problem, as they have the largest population of residents without any access to sanitation.

Bahoruco Province Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicProject Description
This project is to build 4 additional latrines.

The barrio has an established neighborhood association, consisting almost entirely of women, who are the individuals leading and requesting the funds for this project. They have experience carrying out community projects in the past and working with the local Peace Corps Volunteer, including on a home gardening project, an income generation project making floor cleaner and a previous latrines project.

Earlier this year this neighborhood association successfully carried out a latrines project with the support of the local PCV. They conducted interviews for all potential beneficiaries and carried out a required health and hygiene course with support of the local doctor and PCV. They also capacitated beneficiary family members alongside a professional latrine mason so that they gained skills in constructing latrines, potentially helping them to find work in the future and giving family members reason to take good care of the latrine knowing they participated in constructing the latrine themselves.

Fifteen families were able to participate in the project earlier this year, which was funded by Friends of the DR. Originally more families had wanted to participate, but were not selected for the construction phase of the project due to all funds being used.

There are 4 families that had optionally participated in the health, hygiene and latrine maintenance course but they could not be assisted with the construction of the latrine in the home. These families have already made their hole for the latrine, and some have started collecting local free materials in hopes of being funded for the remaining materials. Sand, for example, is naturally present in parts of the community and can be collected by the families, counting as contribution to the project.

The families, who pay for the mason themselves, or use a trained family member, if one is present, are the ones who will do the work.

With the funds of Water Charity, the remaining materials, including zinc, wood, and nails, will be purchased for these families to finish their latrines.

The beneficiaries will also receive a refresher health and hygiene review course with doctor/health promoter and peace corps volunteer. The neighborhood association is responsible for the project, alongside with the PCV, and will be carrying out all of these duties, led by the neighborhood association president.

Project Impact
110 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
E. Mendelson

Bahoruco Province Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicBahoruco Province Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicMonitoring and Maintenance
Multiple visits are carried out during the construction phase.

To monitor the impact of the project, the Junta de Vecinos does follow up visits with the beneficiary families. They are required after the first 6 months after latrine construction is completed and after 1 year of its construction as well.

The families have already received a session with a trained mason on the construction and maintenance of a latrine as well as the health and hygiene course (they participated in hopes of receiving a latrine, after being cleared in the eligibility interview, but knew a latrine was not guaranteed). They will be provided a refresher course to insure they remember best practices for maintaining their latrine and health and hygiene basics.

Having a mandatory educational component, with principal educators being locals, helps to drive home the idea that learning increases the likelihood of behavior change more so than simply dropping off a tool without showing individuals how to use it.

In addition, the latrine superstructure is made of zinc. This helps in the future because when the latrine hole eventually fills up, the upper covering part can easily be moved to another hole (as opposed to a cemented structure latrine which couldn’t be relocated after the hole fills up).

Masons use the VIP (ventilation improved pit) construction method as they have had successful experiences using this model, experience in this construction method, and proven decrease in flies which are the most common vectors of fecal-orally transmitted disease.

Comments
The main reason this project is sustainable is because it is carried out by a local association who have close ties to the community (they live in the very same barrio) and have experience carrying out such projects. Giving these women leaders the experience of bringing development projects to their town provides them with more credibility in town and reason to continue carrying out similar development projects of great need.

Funding
This project has been funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Peralvillo Latrine Project - Dominican Republic

Peralvillo Latrine Project - Dominican Republic

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Peralvillo Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xx Xxxxxxx, Peralvillo municipality, Monte Plata province, Dominican Republic

Community Description
The rural community of Xx Xxxxxxx is comprised of 4 smaller communities or sectors: Centro Xxxxxxx, Los Ferreles, Pekin, and Barrio Nuevo. All communities, with the exception of Centro Xxxxxxx, are of very low-income status, as indicated by the survey conducted by health promoters and the Peace Corps Volunteer.

The majority of the 24 families participating in this project reside in a small community across the river, effectively cut off from the other communities during rainy season. There is little access to resources, such as trash removal, health services, and colamados (local general stores), and all houses, with the exception of one, are wood and zinc constructions.

The community borders a river and cacao trees like many of the other communities. Furthermore, 92% of the people living there are illiterate and have no steady form of income, with income relying heavily on cacao harvests. Years ago, the community was known for prostitution, and as such still carries the stigma.

Many families have little to no form of education, and still practice unsafe WASH practices, such as drinking river water, not using chlorine to sanitize their water, not washing their hands, and using nearby brush and river areas for a bathroom.

Problem Addressed
This project will be carried out in a low-income rural community, with a population of 800, where the residents have very limited access to latrines.

Peralvillo Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicFor this project, the committee has selected 24 families, who are dedicated to the project, and are actively participating in the community meetings.

All 24 families have no form of a bathroom, with 96% of the families having children <5 years in the house, and latrine construction is a top priority.

Project Description
This project is to build 24 new Ventilated Pit Latrines in order to increase the hygiene and sanitation health of the community. The latrine design consists of a concrete floor over a pit, with a wood and zinc structure on top for privacy.

The “Comité de Sanitarios” or “Latrine Committee” of 4 community health promoters and three community members will work to construct the latrines.

The committee will be responsible for the logistics and coordination of the project, with the community members that represent each sector of the community having the responsibility of communication to families and scheduling of construction for the local mason.

Each family will construct its own pits for the latrine, along with providing food for all construction days and the cost for manual labor for the mason.

Water Charity funding will be used for buying all necessary materials and equipment to build the latrines.

The health promoters have been holding group meetings in each community where they have made attendance mandatory for all families interested in the project. At these meetings, the health promoters are giving educational health trainings to the families to further educate them on health promotion and disease prevention, as well as how to prepare for the project.

Peralvillo Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicProject Impact
137 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
B. Bidwell

Monitoring and Maintenance
Through the training of the contractors and community members, the community will be able to continue constructing latrines for decades to come. Also, the experience the committee and community members gain from the project will allow them to lead future projects.

In addition, the mason and trained community members will be able to conduct repairs to the latrines, if needed in the future, thereby increasing their longevity for the families.

Finally, through the educational health trainings facilitated by the health promoters, they are teaching healthy practices that can be carried out by the families and will be continually taught to the next generation, further contributing to a reduction of disease transmission and increasing the sustainability and long-lasting effects of this project.

The health promoters will be conducting monthly checkups and assisting families with any problems, concerns, and further education at monthly meetings in the community.

Comments
A sanitary bathroom is not only a vital need, but also a basic amenity everyone should have the right to. With a proper bathroom, fecal oral transmission can be drastically reduced, preventing diseases such as diarrhea and cholera, which can be dangerous to children and the elderly.

This project will have a long-lasting impact in the community by helping to combat diarrhea and increase the overall health and sanitation in the community. For many families that do not have a sanitary bathroom, this project will greatly increase the overall health and wellbeing of the families.

In addition, the project will provide leadership opportunities for community members and further skills development for the health promoters through the educational trainings and demonstrations they prepare and give.

Funding
This project has been funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Dajabon Latrine Project - Dominican Republic

Dajabon Latrine Project - Dominican Republic

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Dajabon Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, Dajabon, Dominican Republic

Community Description
Xxxxxx is a small rural community of around 230 families (750 individuals) located in the province of Dajabon on the Northwest of the Dominican Republic. The climate is very dry and rainwater is a rare occurrence. Regardless, many animals are found within the community such as cows, pigs, sheep, chickens, ducks, dogs, among others. As an agricultural community, the majority of jobs consists of dairy farming, teaching at public schools, or owning a bodega in the community. Many families rely on cows for their livelihood, either by selling the milk or meat or keeping the cow for themselves to feed the family.

The education system is quite poor and many students drop out of school to work as a dairy farmer to help their families. The graduation rate in the community is quite low because there is no motivation to continue to study.

The individuals are very religious and many attend church regularly on Wednesdays and Sundays. Pastimes in the community include, playing dominos, dancing bachata or merengue, and playing baseball. Dominicans like to have a good time and always find a way to brighten their day through social activities.

Dajabon Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicMany Haitian immigrants enter the community to find a job and these individuals are the most vulnerable in the population. The changes that the community will most like to see are: (1) more water running throughout the community, (2) receiving a garbage truck to pick up all the waste, and (3) having a better healthcare system.

Problem Addressed
Due to the lack of, or poor, conditions of many latrines in this small rural community, many individuals from families of low socioeconomic status defecate in their backyard, causing damage to the environment and to the community.

With the help of many donations, 21 new latrines were built in the community in the Winter of 2016. There is, however, still great need. In a primary community diagnostic, 221 homes were surveyed and 86% of homes were found to use latrines. Of these, 37% of latrines were found to be in poor condition and 10% were found to be shared among family members or neighbors.

Project Description
This project is to build 32 latrines in the community.

Help with a latrine project has been the priority of the community since soliciting a PC volunteer in the summer of 2015, and one project of 21 latrines has now been completed. This new project aims to help additional families with need, selected by the Latrine Committee.

The Latrine Committee was created during the previous project, consisting of the Peace Corps volunteer and health promoters of Centro de Madres. The committee is excited to continue working with a second stage and has already determined and selected the beneficiaries most in need. The criteria used to select individuals included: families who lack a latrine, the number of family members within a family, the number of children in the family, and the health situation of each family. Other responsibilities of the Latrine Committee will include educating families through a health and hygiene course, soliciting possible donations, and contacting the previous local mason to begin work.

As for the families who will receive the latrines, they will have to participate in and graduate from a health training and latrine maintenance course taught by the health promoters of Centro de Madres. The families will also be involved specifically through financial donations to the project including providing materials, labor, food and the mason's pay.

As for the construction process, the latrines will be built by the local mason who has built these exact latrines in the community during the first latrine project. With such experience, the masons will construct efficient and suitable latrines for each of the 32 families.

The educational component will allow 70 individuals (approximately 2-3 people per family) to be trained on topics such as personal hygiene and how to take care of and properly maintain a latrine. The outcome is to help mitigate sanitation and health problems to allow families to maintain safe and sanitary latrines, and to increase overall quality of life.

In order for this project to be a success, these specific steps are to be taken:

-First, there is the implementation of educational component on the use and importance of latrines.

-Then, once funds arrive, the Latrine Committee will notify the families already selected to receive a latrine and the mason. The funds will specifically be used to purchase materials for the latrines.

-Then the construction of the latrines will begin. The process will take around 2-3 weeks, depending on the flexibility of the mason.

-Once all the latrines are built, there will be the assessment of correct use and maintenance of the improvements.

Dajabon Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicProject Impact
110 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
R. Wright

Monitoring and Maintenance
Education, capacity building, and community involvement are the key to the sustainability of the project. At least one family member from each beneficiary family will have knowledge in latrine construction and maintenance, thus will be able to repair and care for the family latrine without seeking outside assistance. Moreover, after the project ends, families will be able to spread the knowledge and skills gained from the training to practice healthy behaviors.

The women from the Latrine Committee will visit all beneficiary families after two months to see whether families are using the new latrines, are implementing healthy practices, and are retaining health knowledge. In addition, a pre- and post-test will be given out to the families to make sure that health educational component was delivered in a sustainable manner.

Lastly, the project can continue since the Latrine Committee members, the masons, and the beneficiary families will have skills to move forward with designing implementing and evaluating future community-based projects.

Fundraising Target
$4,300

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,300

Dajabon Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicDajabon Latrine Project - Dominican Republic

Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Rincon Claro Latrine Project - Dominican Republic

Rincon Claro Latrine Project - Dominican Republic

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Rincon Claro Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicLocation
Rincon Claro, Sabana Grande de Boya, Monte Plata, Dominican Republic

Community Description
Rincon Claro is an isolated, rural community in northern Monte Plata and is 23 kilometers away from the closest hospital. Monte Plata is one of the 5 poorest provinces in the Dominican Republic, and the community is in one of the furthest, most hard to reach corners of the province.

The land is flat and has surrounding mountains. It rains often and makes access in and out of the community very complicated. The area is surrounded by former “bateyes,” which were communities where Haitians were brought to cut the surrounding sugar cane. The descendants of these sugar cane cutters still live in these rural, largely isolated communities.

The land is now used for agriculture and cattle raising and the people living in the communities tend to the land, when it is available to them. The majority of local residents work on farms and sustain just enough income to take care of family expenses such as food, water, and travel to the farm fields where they work.

Rincon Claro Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicThe community has a small rural clinic, and a very motivated doctor who lives in the community. There are also a few local health promoters, who are also community leaders. Finally the community also has a school that goes up to eighth grade.

Problem Addressed
In a community diagnostic done by the local clinic of all 400 homes of the area, 44 homes were identified as not having latrines. Reasons for living under these conditions include lack of funds or assistance to build new latrines.

Project Description
This project is to build 16 ventilated pit latrines in the community.

Due to soft terrain, the latrines will be built on a base of cement block (2 lines of block). The holes will be 3 meters deep, and lined with rock to at least 1 meter, and the concrete plates will be made with a local mold. The latrine itself will be 1 square meter, and the walls will be made of zinc, with a wooden frame.

There will be some modification to the construction of the individual latrines based on the terrain. Care will be taken to avoid contamination of the groundwater by ensuring that the pit is at least two meters above the water table.

The Health Committee has conducted several meetings regarding issues such as hygiene, sanitation, and sexual health. Recently, a Latrine Committee was created, consisting of the Volunteer and 4 active health promoters, and the local doctor.

Rincon Claro Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicThe Latrine Committee will survey all 44 families in need and will make a list that selects and prioritizes the 16 who would benefit most from the assistance. The committee will use an assessment survey (created by the Volunteer and edited by the committee) to conduct home visits. Homes without latrines and mothers with children under the age of 5 (13%) will be given priority.

Before starting the project, the 16 beneficiary families will participate in and graduate from both a health training and latrine maintenance course, taught by the health promoters of the latrine committee.

The families will be responsible for paying the mason directly for his labor and providing someone in the family to assist the mason in construction. This laborer will learn the skills required to construct and maintain a latrine. In conjunction with the latrine committee, the families will be responsible for preparing and storing certain materials for construction and providing food and water for the all laborers.

Project Impact
80 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Hope Tambala

Sustainability, Monitoring and Maintenance
This community-driven project has a strong sustainable foundation. Since the families must provide their own labor and obtain a mason for the entire project, the physical work involved with the project stays in-house and the community laborers involved learn latrine construction skills that will benefit them in future projects.

Since the local clinic staff is involved, this project will have institutional support along the way and will be able to function once the Volunteer leaves.

All of Rincon Claro will be involved and demonstrate their accountability and desire to complete the project due to a desire to do another project of this magnitude in the future. This project could be the first of many community-driven initiatives, and the skills and knowledge acquired through this process (budgeting of grant funds, physical labor during the construction, and organization of materials) will help the community in potential future projects.

The community will take pride over the project and the local clinic will be active in its sustainability. Additionally, the appropriate use and maintenance of the latrines by the recipients will be monitored continuously every 3 months by the local health promoters, local doctor, and the volunteer.

The participation by Water Charity in this project has been fully funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Ranchito de los Peralta Water System Project - Dominican Republic

Francia filling her water jugs

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the National Peace Corps Association.
 

Gathering water from the riverLocation
Ranchito de los Peralta, Region of Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

Community Description
Ranchito de los Peralta is a low-income agricultural community in the region of Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. All crops are cultivated for family consumption. There are approximately 450 people in the community, living in 70 homes.

The community is situated on the Caonao River, on a road of 13 kilometers. It is divided into an upper and lower, and spans approximately 3 kilometers. There are homes that sit on both sides of the river.   About 80% of families still carry water from the river to use for household uses, including drinking, hygiene, sanitation, washing clothes, and gardening. Other families have private pump systems that bring water up through small pipes to their homes.
 

Problem Addressed
The community suffers from lack of accessible, potable water. The main water source is the Guananico River, and it is unprotected and contaminated. The river serves approximately 3,000 in the surrounding areas.  It is used for livestock, washing motorcycles, garbage dumping, bathing, and collecting water. During the rainy seasons, the river level rises into flood plains causing the water to be too dirty to be collected.

Families carry the water straight from the river or from a shallow river hole. Rain water is collected from unclean rooftops and is dependent on rain. The families that can afford it buy bottled water, but are dependent on the water truck which frequently takes days to replenish the stock. There are nineteen families with water-filters, yet still must carry the water from the river.

Carrying water back homeThe river is a 5-15 minute walk from most homes.  Mainly women and children are in charge of gathering water, by hand or on pack animals. Daily, 2-3 hours are spent collecting water for household needs.

Since there is no local clinic, it is hard to know the health effects that are caused from lack of clean water, but one can only assume that most cases of diahrrhea (for instance) are caused by the poor quality of the local water.

Project Description
The project is to dig a well, install an electric pump, and build a storage tank on high ground.  The water will be fed by gravity and distributed to the community through a system of piping.

The well will be constructed by a drilling company in Puerto Plata. The ferro-cement storage tank, holding 12,000 gallons, wil be 451 meters above the well and 34.9 meters above the community.

The electrical source is 25 meters from the well location. Piping will distribute the water throughout the community, a total distance of 3.74 km. Homes that are located on five side streets, and homes that are located on the other side of a small river are also included.  Everyone in the community will have direct home acces to a gravity fed water tap

The Peace Corps volunteer will support the Water Committee in the administration of their tasks, including collecting the monthly and subscription quota, clarifying/publicizing the work commitment of and to the community, and organizing and overseeing the work brigades.

UNFPA (United Nations Population Fund) will come to train the local women’s health promoter group, Hogares Saludables (Healthy Homes), who will educate the community on water hygiene, food sanitation and water conservation.

The  project is estimated to be completed 2 months after it is started

Orlaini collecting waterProject Impact
450 people will be directly served, and over 3,000 who use the river will benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Rivkah Cohen

Monitoring and Maintenance
The project will be organized and managed by the local Water Committee, the local health promoter group, Hogares Saludables, Peace Corps, and Caritas in Puerto Plata.

The Water Charity funds will accomplish the initial construction, including the well drilling, land preparation, construction of the tank, and water quality testing. Caritas will fund the engineer/technical labor, piping and distribution materials and installation, and electrical equipment.

The community will fund future repairs, transportation costs of the solicitation process, labor and meal costs. 

Caritas will train a team of technicians from the community for system maintenance and repairs, continue to evaluate the project and assess community involvement, support and satisfaction, and visit the community regularly.

Hogares Saludables is fully committed to the sustainability of the project. After Hogares Saludable's initial capacitation of the community, the Peace Corps Volunteer will work with the group to create a work plan for future house visits and campaigns on water hygiene and water conservation. The group will be supported by local NGO Fundacion de Salud y Progreso del Norte (Health and Northern Advancement Foundation).

The Water Committee is also fully committed to sustainability. They will continue to meet bi-monthly, and collect the community monthly fee. The community fund will pay for future repairs.

Francia carrying water

 

Dollar Amount of Project
$5,500

Donations Collected to Date
$50

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,450

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

 

Cooling offElaeni
Daniel on the bridge after heavy rainRunning Errands DR style
 

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Funds Needed : 
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San Juan Water Filter Project - Dominican Republic

San Juan Water Filter Project - Dominican Republic

Location
16 communities in the San Juan Province, Dominican Republic, as set forth below

Community Description
San Juan is a Dominican province, in the western part of the Dominican Republic with a population of over 232,000. San Juan de la Maguana is the capital city and the largest city in the province, with a population of over 169,000, and is the 10th largest city in the country.

San Juan Water Filter Project - Dominican Republic

Problem Addressed
The Dominican Republic is one of the highest consumers per capita of bottled water in the world, where people depend solely on bottled water for their drinking water consumption. In areas where there is no bottled water people drink “raw” untreated water.

For several years there have been attempts to provide safe drinking water to people in rural communities in the Dominican Republic using filters that range from slow sand filters to ceramic filters lined with a colloidal silver coating. In most cases these filters have been very successful and have had an impact in reducing the gastrointestinal diseases caused by contaminated water. However, these filters use technologies that are often ineffective in removing all contaminants, may be difficult to install in isolated areas, are subject to breakage during transportation, have a limited service life, and require difficult maintenance.

Project Description
This project is to implement a clean drinking water filter project, to reduce gastrointestinal illness, in ten communities in the Dominican Republic. Fifty Sawyer PointONE filters will be installed to start the program.

Sawyer Products, Inc. has developed an innovative water filter that uses blood dialysis technology to filter water. They produce several models of which two in particular could provide a low cost, dependable and sustainable solution for filtering water for drinking purposes; the Sawyer Point ZeroTWO and the PointONE Bucket Purifier Assembly Kits.

Both kits come with the filter and accessories to install a system in a five gallon bucket. They also include a syringe that serves to back flush the filter when it clogs up. The filter can provide 170 gallons (560 liters) of drinkable water a day. It is expected to last ten years with proper back flushing.

There are two organizations (among others) in the Dominican Republic that have been working for more than 30 years with water programs in rural communities, MUDE (Mujeres en Desarrollo), and INAPA (Instituto Nacional de Agua Potable y Alcantarillado).

MUDE is a private very reputable NGO that has been working in the rural areas of the Dominican Republic for the past 33 years. They work in promoting women’s sustainability projects such as micro financing, health, water sanitation, and income generating activities. They have a regional office where the filter project will take place.

MUDE’s role in the project will be to select the communities, the potential beneficiaries, collect an initial onetime fee, purchase the five gallon buckets, deliver them to the communities, teach beneficiaries on how to put the valve on, and do the follow up for each filter.

INAPA is a government agency that manages most of the rural water systems in the Dominican Republic. With their main office in Santo Domingo, they have regional offices that provide technical support throughout the area.

INAPA’s role in the project will be to provide the laboratory facilities to test the water going into the filters as well as the filtered water. By having the INAPA monitor the filters, they will validate them to be used in future projects in the Dominican Republic.

Both organizations have development promoters living in communities throughout the country and have the infrastructure and logistics to implement and support the project.

Both organizations will select 10 communities where the drinking water quality is deficient or not available from the following 1ist of 16 communities:

San Juan Water Filter Project - Dominican RepublicCanoa, Los Bancos, Cayucal, Sabana Alta, Guanito, La Zanja, El Cacheo, Hato del Padre, Punta de Caña, Arroyo Loro, Loma de Babor, Babor, El Hato, Cuenda, La Culata, and Perpetuo Socorro

In each one of those communities they will install one filter in the local hospital or health post, two filters in the local schools, and two filters at a private family level.

After installation, the project will be evaluated to ascertain how the beneficiaries are using the filters during a three-month period, determine the quantity of water being filtered, the care and maintenance they provide to the unit, the effects in reducing gastrointestinal illness, and the potential the communities have to be self-sustainable in managing a larger project if it would be implemented.

To participate in the project each beneficiary will need to provide a onetime fee of $US 5 (RD$ 210), which will cover the purchase of a 5-gallon bucket, initial training costs, and follow up.

The project is being implemented as part of Water Charity’s Filters for Life Program – Worldwide. Water Charity is providing the filters, delivered in Santo Domingo.

Project Impact
The project will benefit over 500 people.

Project Director
Timothy McFarren will manage this project. Tim has previously worked with Water Charity in his former position as Associate Peace Corps Director in both Bolivia and the Dominican Republic. He was instrumental in the implementation of the Ferro-Cement Tanks for the Dominican Republic and Haiti Program.

Comments
This is an excellent project to address the health problems of 10 communities caused by contaminated water. It embodies state-of-the-art technology with ease of installation, long-lasting benefits, and ease of maintenance.  This project falls under our ongoing Filters For Life Program - Worldwide, in which we are trying to make sure these high quality Sawyer filters make their way into as many hands as humanly possible.  While not as flashy as drilling wells, water filters are probably the single most effective way to prevent death and unnecessary suffereing due to unpotable drinking water (the leading cause of preventable death worldwide).

The project is carried out by two respected local organizations, and incorporates a detailed evaluation process. In the event beneficial results are achieved, it can serve as a model to be replicated.

Dollar Amount of Project
$3,000

Donations Collected to Date
$3,000

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Michael and Carla Boyle of Nelsonville, OH, USA.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify the Program Director, Timothy McFarren of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next projecst in the Dominican Republic.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Loma Atravesada Water and Sanitation Project - Dominican Republic

Loma Atravesada Water and Sanitation Project - Dominican Republic
Location
Loma Atravesada, Monte Cristi Province, Dominican Republic

Community Description
Loma Atravesada is a small, rural community located in the province of Monte Cristi in the northwest corner of the Dominican Republic. The economy is based around fishing and the harvesting of tobacco. Marginal economic gains are made in animal breeding, hunting, and the cultivation of minor crops.

Loma Atravesada Water and Sanitation Project - Dominican Republic

Locals spend their free time visiting one another’s homes, going to the local church, playing dominos, and attending biweekly community meetings.

Problem Addressed
Loma Atravesada is a place plagued by lack of access to an aqueduct or other water source. This problem, the principal challenge of the community, is compounded by the aridness of the region, which receives some of the lightest amounts of precipitation in the country.

Without any system of water service, citizens rely on the light rainfall which they collect from their zinc roofs, and at times from somewhat reliable water trucks which arrive to pump water into above-ground cisterns or storage tanks.

Furthermore, not all homes in the community have access to their own bathroom.

Project Description
This project is to help the most disadvantaged homes in the community to obtain basic PVC water catchment systems on their roofs, repair leaking water storage tanks, and provide basic sanitation through the construction of private latrines.

Under the direction of Las Mujeres Unidas (The United Women), two local, experienced masons will work with participating homes to provide the skilled labor associated with latrine construction and the repairing of large cement cisterns.

Beneficiaries will be responsible for labor associated with installing tubing to the sides of their roofs, prepping cisterns for repair, and digging 2-3 meter pits for latrines. These families will also contribute an unpaid assistant to work with local masons as well as to provide meals to workers during all days of construction.

This project involves working with the neediest families in the community who are deemed unable to obtain PVC tubing to collect rainwater, bags of cement to repair their broken cisterns, or the materials needed to construct an outdoor latrine. Consequently, Water Charity funds will be used to obtain construction materials, including bags of cement, sheets of zinc, wood, nails, sand/gravel, PVC tubing, and also to pay the local masons for their work.

Project Impact
21 people will benefit from the project.

Loma Atravesada Water and Sanitation Project - Dominican RepublicPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Thomas Betts

Comments
Participants will be afforded an increased capacity to store rain and imported truck water for basic hygiene, bathing, dish and clothes washing, cleaning, and drinking purposes. In addition, the project will ensure that 100% of homes in the community have access to their own latrine, providing privacy and convenience, as well as protecting the village from dangerous diseases, such as cholera.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.12

Donations Collected to Date
$555.12

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the Cristopher Lin, of Diamond Bar, CA, USA.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Thomas Betts of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Thomas and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Mano Juan Primary School Composting Latrine Project - Dominican Republic

Mano Juan Primary School Composting Latrine Project - Dominican Republic

Location
Isla Saona, Altagracia Province, Dominican Republic

Community Description
The island of Saona is located off the South East point of the Dominican Republic. The island is a part of the Dominican Republic National Park system, Parque National del Este.

Mano Juan, located one hour by boat from the port of Bayahibe, is the larger of two coastal communities located on the island. It has a population is 230 people, 28% of whom are youth under the age of 18.

People living in Mano Juan are financially dependent on the tourism industry, with a minority depending on fisheries.

 Mano Juan does not have a potable water system. Therefore, individual homes collect rainwater, which they chlorinate and use for drinking.

Over half of the families in Mano Juan lack a sanitation facility, and the residents utilize the beach or forest for their needs, thus creating environmental and health problems.

The Mano Juan Primary School is located in the community, and teaches through the 8th grade.

Project Description
This project is to construct two EcoBaños (ecological bathrooms or composting latrines) at the school.

 The Pro Desarrollo Comunitario de Mano Juan committee, with assistance from the Peace Corps environmental volunteer, has planned this as a pilot project. The ultimate goal is for every house in Mano Juan to have a proper sanitation facility within the next 2 years.Mano Juan Primary School Composting Latrine Project - Dominican Republic

The design provides for the capture of the waste above the ground, thus eliminating the possibility that the groundwater will be polluted.

The cement double-vault latrines will be constructed of steel-reinforced concrete. The concrete is made by mixing cement, sand, and gravel.

The “toilet” portion is made from a specific mold that allows for the separation of the urine and fecal matter. Urine exits through a tube, and the fecal material is left to dry. The composted material can then be safely removed and used as fertilizer.

The base has two compartments. The first compartment will be used until full, an average of 6 months. That compartment will then be capped, and the second compartment will be used.

Trained Health Promoters will visit the school and cover different topics ranging from health risks to parts of the latrine. A local mason has attended an EcoBaño training, and will construct the latrines, with construction time projected to be 2 ½ weeks.

Community participation includes manual labor volunteers for every work day for 7 days, and breakfast and lunch for the laborers. Transportation from port to island has been donated by the local Ministry of Environment office.

Community members will transport materials from the community dock to the storage location at the school. The community solicited the donation of materials, including the zinc needed for the structure.

Student groups have raised funds through various community events to buy paint, with which students will paint an educational mural upon completion of project.

Mano Juan Primary School Composting Latrine Project - Dominican RepublicProject funds will be used to buy the remaining materials. In addition, they will pay for the labor of the mason and some transport costs.

The Health Promoter will continue with education during and after the construction to ensure that the latrine is maintained properly.

Project Impact
230 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Colleen Ferris

Comments
The project will provide appropriate sanitation facilities for the school, and also serve as an educational and motivational tool to demonstrate the composting latrine technology for proper waste management.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project was fully funded through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation together friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteers Colleen Ferris. The project became infeasible, and the project was cancelled, with no expenditure of funds. The funds have been allocated for other projects in the Dominican Republic.

Tags: 

La Penda Water Filter Project – Dominican Republic

La Penda Water Filter Project – Dominican Republic

Location
La Penda, Blanco Arriba Municipality, Hermanas Mirabal Province, Dominican Republic

Community Description
Located in the Cordillera Septentrional mountain range, La Penda is predominately a farming community consisting of 96 homes and 373 residents set along a two-mile dilapidated dirt and rock road.

La Penda Water Filter Project – Dominican Republic

The majority of houses are constructed of a three foot high concrete base with the remaining wall constructed of palm wood and a roof of zinc.

 

Internal commerce is limited to small stores which sell basic necessities, such as rice, beans, soap and toilet paper.

Illiteracy within the community stands at 18%, while the percentage of adults not completing a fifth grade education is 41%, with another 22% not having attained an eighth grade education.

The community is connected to the country’s electrical grid and receives electricity for 40% of the day.

Two aqueducts service the community supplying water to 73% of houses directly and 15% of houses indirectly with the remaining 12% relying on river or rainwater.

Project Description
This project is to provide 28 water filters for families in the community without access to safe water.

The project is being implemented under the direction of the La Penda Neighborhood Association and their Health Committee. Filters are being purchased through Filter Pure, a non-profit organization that through their distribution of filters supports local economies.

La Penda Water Filter Project – Dominican RepublicParticipating families initially attended 3 health-related presentations organized by the Health Committee. Upon receipt of the filters, families will attend an educational workshop which will include instructions on the simple usage and maintenance of the filter. This workshop will be coordinated by the Health Committee who received facilitator training from Filter Pure and will be a hands-on demonstration in which each family will clean their filter. The Health Committee will also conduct a follow-up visit with the families to ensure that maintenance of the filters is being completed according to schedule. When replacement ceramic pot filtration components are needed, the Health Committee will also work with each family in order to save the necessary funds.

The ceramic pot filter is formed from a mixture of clay, a combustible material (sawdust or rice husks), and colloidal silver. The pot is then kiln fired, leaving about half an inch of activated charcoal within the filter and burning out the combustible material thus creating micro pores (1.3 microns) coated with the silver. The pores filter out turbidity, bacteria and protozoa; and any bacteria that does pass through the pores is rendered ineffective by the colloidal silver while the activated charcoal improves the odor, taste and color of the water. The filter removes 99.99% of pathogenic bacteria and oocytes while retaining healthy, naturally-occurring minerals.

The filter, which is designed with a rim, is placed on a five gallon plastic storage bucket with a spigot at the bottom for dispensing. A lid is placed on the filter to prevent contamination. Water is poured through the ceramic pot and filtered into the receptacle bucket. The filters are capable of purifying water from any source, including aqueducts, rivers, wells and rainwater. The flow rate of the filter ranges from 20 to 30 liters per day depending upon how often the filter is refilled.

Filters are cleaned by lightly scrubbing the surface when flow rate is reduced, and it is recommended that the filter is boiled every three months to insure optimum effectiveness. The effective useful life of the ceramic pot is at least 5 years.

Project Impact
112 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Bob Tuttle

Comments
Clean water will result in a reduction of school and work absences due to stomach and intestinal illnesses. The educational component will ensure compliance in the use and maintenance of the filters. Sustainability is built into the project with the saving of money for the purchase of replacement components when needed.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation together friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Bob Tuttle.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Bob of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by him and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

La Colorada Arriba Water System Tank Project - Dominican Republic

La Colorada Arriba Water System Project - Dominican RepublicThis project is the third project to be implemented under the Water Charity Ferro-Cement Tanks for the Dominican Republic and Haiti Program. It calls for the construction of a 50,000 liter ferro-cement tank for water storage to serve the community of La Colorada Arriba, Dominican Republic. It is the largest and most ambitious undertaking, and offers significant economies of scale as a result.

The project is under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer and Engineer Sarah Casey as part of a larger plan for a comprehensive water system for the community.

La Colorada Arriba is a rural community of almost 900 people, living without access to potable water. To meet their daily needs, families are left with no choice but to buy river water contaminated with diarrhea-causing parasites from passing trucks. Particularly in young children and the elderly, diarrhea can lead to serious health complications, including dehydration and malnutrition, or even death.

Community members, well aware of their need for potable water, have identified a sustainable solution—a water distribution system powered by a centrifugal pump. Water will be pumped from a protected spring to a storage tank located above the community. From there water will travel completely by gravity to the community below. The spring, with almost a liter per second of flow, provides sufficient water to meet the residents’ demands as well as those of the community centers: a schoolhouse and three community churches.

To ensure sustainability, the community has formed a water committee to manage the project through all stages: planning, construction, and maintenance. The residents of La Colorada Arriba will supply all necessary labor for construction as well as a monthly quota towards future system upkeep.

Additionally, each family is contributing $35 towards the purchase of materials. While the community is contributing in kind a large percentage of the overall project cost, they do not have the financial means to purchase the majority of the La Colorada Arriba Water System Project - Dominican Republicmaterials.

A significant part of the overall project is the construction of the storage tank, which will use the proven ferro-cement tank technology. The tank will have sufficient capacity to provide water on demand for the community during all seasons of the year and all hours of the day.

Project funds will be used to purchase materials, including rebar, wire mesh, cement, sand, gravel, wire, aluminum lids, plywood, tarp, paint and plumbing fixtures.

As part of the overall program, the construction of this tank will include the training of several Haitians who, immediately after completion of training, will go to Haiti to build additional tanks. As this is the third tank in the process, they have already gained substantial proficiency, and this construction of a larger tank will provide needed additional experience.

The construction of this tank is underway, and expected to take a week or so to complete.

To indicate your desire for your contribution to be allocated toward this project, please click the Donate button below.

The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust has graciously offered to provide matching funds for donations contributed for this project.

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion of this project, CLICK HERE.

Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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