Refugee

Nyiragongo Water Filter Training Project - Democratic Republic of Congo

Bio-Sand Filter Congo

Another Huge Water Filter Training for the DRC!

Location
Nyiragongo, DRC

Water Line DRCMuja group; including the Territory of Nyiragongo and the Territory of Masisi. The training will take place in the city of Rubaya in Masisi region nearby. Both territories are in North Kivu Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and the women will come from 200+ villages around Nyiragongo.

Community Description
The territory of Nyiragongo and Masisi are entities of the North Kivu province. Nyiragongo is not far from the city of Goma, and has a volcanic environment. They are poor, in part, because of a government that has completely ignored the needs of the population.   

The land is fertile, but the water sources are few. The population waits for the rainy season to dig shallow holes and collect rainwater. Those who have the means walk 10 km or more to the city of Goma or Rubaya to get water. Sadly, the area is surrounded by mines.

The few water resources that do exist are heavily used in the extraction of minerals. Communities use dirty water coming from the quarries. The presence of rare earth minerals like coltan and beryllium have led to decades of conflict. While some foreign companies have grown rich on these resources, having a large amount of the most valuable elements on Earth hasn't benefited the local population... but on the contrary has made their lives a living hell on occasion, as various militias, armies and mercenary groups come through the area and ravage the land, kill people, rape the women and pillage the resources.

Now, at this point, the hundreds of villages in the area are nearly depleted of adult men, and are composed almost entirely of women, children and the elderly.  The men have either fled, been conscripted into government or rebel armies, or been killed.

Women of the MUSOsThe women of the region, against all odds, have banded together to form collective groups that are working to raise up this area, and have been very successful in providing for their own needs... serving the functions that governments usually serve in most countries. They have banded together in what are known as MUSOs (Mutual Use Sustainability Organizations), and created one of the largest and most successful self-help communities going in the world now. They have built health clinics, hired doctors and surgeons, kept up vital infrastructure, and now want to deal with their water issues!

This training project is being done with the Peace Center for Healing and the Reconstruction of Community Foundations (CPGRBC is the French acronym). This Congolese NGO is trying to help the people of the region in a number of ways. The CPGRBC today works in the field of rebuilding communities in Masisi, Walikale and Nyiragongo that have been long torn by armed and ethnic conflicts. It has implemented more than 120 peace committees, which are local structures of peace who work in their communities towards reconciliation and solidarity.  It has established 50 groups of women working in micro-credit. Also, the CPGRBC is working on a trauma healing program in the fight against neglected tropical diseases by assisting vulnerable people in Nyiragongo eradicate chiggers and waterborne diseases. 

Household in NyiragongoProblem Addressed
The lack of water in this area around the volcanoes, and the pollution that has engulfed the rivers used since ancient times, creates the current situation that the population her lives in water scarcity and is suffering from many different kinds of diseases. A major problem in the area is waterborne diseases due to water scarcity and consumption of unsafe water. Support these communities in their effort to drink clean water would help improve their health tremendously.

CPGRBC approached our friends at Friendly Water with the desire fight against diseases related to the consumption of unsafe water by providing opportunities for communities to obtain, make and distribute bio-sand filters. Water Charity was thrilled to be able to lend aid for this worthy goal, and decided to fund the entire effort.

Project Description
This project will consist of a series of 6-day trainings for a couple hundred women in the manufacture, use and upkeep of cement bio-sand water filters. The women will receive molds, tools and materials to make their first filters and will be trained on ways to turn all of this into small businesses for themselves, their MUSOs and their communities. Manuals and printed training materials will be given out in Swahili, English, French, Kinyarwanda, and a light lunch and tea for all participants will be provided every day.

Training women in DRC

The training will be conducted by Aristotle Lubao Mbairwe (Trainer with FW & CPGRBC), Zawadi Nikuze (CPGRBC leader), and Zawadi Mburano (also of CPGRBC). The training is in concert with Dr. Kambale Musubao (FW medical officer) and MUSO organizers.  CPGRBC and the MUSOs themselves are even coming up with a decent portion of the costs for this training.

The women who receive this training will go home with a functioning filter, but will also have the molds and designs to make as many as they can. They will be instructed in techniques to sell filters they make, sell clean water that they generate with their filters, and to proliferate the technology to others.

The profits made from some of the sales will go towards procuring more materials and molds. In this way, the projects are infinitely sustainable, generate income for these women, and can potentially reach and assist all the women in these villages via the MUSO system and the help of the CPGRBC.  FW & WC are proud to be able to create such a large and beneficial "ripple effect" with this project.

Project Impact
All residents of the 200+ villages in the region will benefit from this work.  In time, as many as 300,000 people could profit, as clean water, water filters, and the knowledge of how to make more disperses in these MUSO communities that are dedicated to sharing and mutual solidarity.
 
Kambale and WomenVolunteer Directing Project
Zawadi Nikuze is directing this project on the ground, and management is under the direction of David Albert, Board Chairman of Friendly Water for the World, with Water Charity overseeing.  See below for Zawadi's story.

Monitoring and Maintenance
CPGRBC and FW representatives will monitor the project and forward its objectives, but its maintenance will fall mainly to the women themselves and the MUSOs they belong to.  Given how self-motivated these remarkable women are, and have proven themselves to be in the face of all manner of adversity, we have no doubt that they will bring this raw strength and ability to bear on solving their water quality issues, and eradicate the scourge of waterborne illnesses from their lives entirely.
 

Comments
This project is part of our Training and Support Initiative, and is a sister project to our Minova Water Filter Training Project.

In the past, the ongoing war in Goma prevented training activities, and the general situation in the DRC kept WC from operating there due to our model of helping people efficiently as possible and never asking our volunteers to put themselves in harm's way.  We are extremely happy now, however, to be able to render aid in such a needy area, and in such a sustainable way.

     History and the present:

•    In late 2007-early 2008, a new phase of the Congolese war resulted in hundreds of thousands of people streaming out of the countryside toward the city of Goma.
•    Without any preparation or permission, they set up their own makeshift refugee camp southwest of the city. It is said to have grown quickly to almost 200,000 people.
•    Some international organizations attempted to provide material assistance there.
Zawadi Nikuze•    A small group of Quakers led by Zawadi Nikuze, a Quaker social worker, worked in the camp. The main work that the Quakers were involved in was trauma healing and reconciliation efforts, especially trying to prevent conflicts within the camp from erupting into violence.
•    In 2009, the government decided they did not want a refugee camp there, and sent troops to oust people from the camp. They sent tens of thousands of people out into the countryside, to “return to their homes” (but most of their homes had been destroyed). Thousands are said to have died of starvation, exposure, and in the ongoing military conflict.
•    Some 200 women, many with young children, refused to go, even at gunpoint. These women were survivors of rape, and had been rejected by their families and could not thus not even join the diaspora. 
•    Zawadi began working with these women, found primitive places for them to stay in Goma, and to provide them with minimum support.
•    Zawadi’s organization became one of “participatory development” alongside its trauma healing and peacebuilding activities. It is non-sectarian.
•    Zawadi came on three speaking tours to the U.S.
•    Zawadi was trained by Friendly Water in Newberg, Oregon in October 2013. (She was 8 months pregnant at the time.)
•    In March 2014, Friendly Water for the World held a training in Goma, Congo, which spawned three new groups: one associated with Dr. Kambale Musubao and the MUSO groups; one associated with Zawadi and CPGRBC; and God in Us-Africa, in Gisenyi, Rwanda. All three became hugely successful.
•    The women rape survivor affiliated with CPGRBC built and installed the first Filters in the 26 Goma orphanage, and later formed a major part of the program that eliminated cholera in all of them.
•    CPGRBC has expanded to encompass some 120 local peace committees and 50 groups of women. Most are working on trauma healing and reconciliation activities.
•    Later, it is hoped that members of CPGRBC will receive training in the fabrication of rainwater catchment systems/ferro-cement tanks, so that the open cisterns will no longer be able to spread disease. WC is happy to support them in this.

This project has been fully funded by a donor who wishes to remain anonymous.  If you would like to see us expand, scale up and do more projects like this one, use the DONATE button below, and your donation will go to more training projects like this one.  

 

Women of Nyiragongo
Manager and Orphanage in Goma
Sand Making
Ndosho Orphanage
 

 

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Refugee Aid Initiative - Worldwide

UNHCR Camp for Syrian Refugees

WATER CHARITY INITIATIVE TO HELP REFUGEES WORLDWIDE

​A large percentage of Water Charity projects help refugees and internally displaced people. Our typical projects often make a huge difference for people contemplating leaving their homes. Having clean water can be a major factor in deciding not to flee your home to begin with.

And, we have done a good number of projects that have explicit refugee components to them over the years. Click Here to see some of our projects with major refugee elements.

Now, in this time, we are seeing an unprecendented number of people risking their lives with only a thin hope of making it somewhere they imagine to be better. People are setting out on rigorous, potentially deadly journies with nothing but what they can carry, crossing deserts, risking drowning at sea, finding themselves at the mercy of human traffickers, and there are many casualties in this humanitarian crisis. A growing number of these people are "climate refugees" who leave their homes (at least in part) due to changes in the climate making their homes unlivable.Massive Refugee Camp

In addition to our normal work, Water Charity is attempting to provide assistance to these displaced people on a greater scale.  We are setting up projects now to deliver direct assistance at refugee camps where possible.

We all know that life in a refugee camp is no vacation. People who have already suffered trauma, atrocities, abuse and victimization find themselves, at the end of a long and difficult exodus... in a place that is often deplorable and depressing. Furthermore, many refugees are doomed to stay in these places for interminable amounts of time, with little hope of ever getting out and restarting their interrupted lives.

What to do about this is beyond the scope of what Water Charity can deal with at this time... but we CAN commit to trying to make the conditions in these camps better.  

As such, we are pleased to be expanding this initiative designed to create water, sanitation, public health, and solar lamp programs for refugee camps around the world. The inspiration for this effort was seeing the situation at the Eritrean refugee camps in the Tigray region of Ethiopia.

In case you didn't know, an amazing diaspora of Eritreans have fled the small nation in northeastern Africa... many of them unaccompanied children of 10-12 years of age. (In fact, 51% of refugees worldwide are children.)

Ethiopia

Ethiopia is unable to extend much help to their displaced neighbors, as their own citizenry are dealing with droughts, famine, uprisings, and severe water crises.  While not completely forgotten, these refugees are forced to depend on whatever the UNHCR (UN Refugee Agency), and a small group of NGO's can muster to give them. They have severe shortages of many things we take for granted... including space to lay their heads, proper sanitation facilities, and lighting in their dwellings.

These are not problems restricted to the camps in Ethiopia, though.  Many areas of the world have tragic, sprawling encampments of people displaced for a wide variety of reasons, often in a political limbo where they can't go home, can't settle in the host country, and have little or no way to leave.

In addition to helping out with water filtration, water storage, hygiene facilities, and the like, we are also engaged in distributing solar lamps.  While many refugees are able to receive some education in these camps, they are unable to read or study at night if they can't afford a kerosene lamp or some other smoky, air-polluting device that brings with it long-term health issues. While seemingly not directly tied to our water & sanitation mission on the surface, having a safe, dependable light source leads to increased personal health and security. Having a solar lamp available to them makes it easier to find and use restroom facilities in the dark. 

The ability to read after dark, ties in with our global "Let Girls Learn" campaign as well.

Eritrean Refugee KidsWe are hoping this initiative will spawn many programs, and allow us to bring aid to camps across the globe. Sadly, there is no lack of people needing help... and the number of displaced peoples is reaching new records. According to the UNHCR, there were at least 65 million refugees last year... the first time we have crossed the 60 million mark on record. And if anything, this year has only been worse.

Measured against Earth’s 7.5 billion population, these numbers mean that 1 in every 115 people globally is now either an asylum-seeker, internally displaced, or a refugee – a level of risk for which UNHCR knows no precedent. In all, there are more forcibly displaced people today than the populations of the United Kingdom, France or Italy.

Please support this initiative to help us start as many programs and campaigns in as many refugee camps as possible.  As they are implemented, you will be able to donate directly to each of our individual efforts.  You can expect the same level of transparency and reporting that we are famous for.  Every project we do is posted on our site in a timely manner with photos, video (where possible), updates (when needed), and conclusion reports upon completion. We bring to this endeavor our stellar track record of succesful and sustainable, low-cost WASH development work.  Our field-leading efficiency, due to our unique model, will ensure that we get the most bang for our buck... and that the largest amount of people possible will be served.

It is hard enough being a refugee, without a home, stateless and overlooked... the least we can do is make sure they have clean water to drink, a safe place to defecate, and the ability to wash themselves. And if, due to our relations with the manufacturer of the wonderful d.light, we can provide a little bit of extra light along the way, so much the better.

For more insight into this issue, consider watching our friend and filmmaker Chris Cotter's "The Eritrean Exodus: Refugee" after watching the trailer below. It is a great film, and is available on iTunes and other such services.
 

www.theeritreanexodus.com

 

This initiative is being carried out in conjunction with our partners, the National Peace Corps Association. NPCA & WC Logos

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South Sudan Well Rehab Program

Villagers waiting for water

Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association are pleased to announce a new program designed to help the people of South Sudan by rebuilding and restoring wells across the country.  The program began with the ten wells you will find listed below, which are already completed, as PHASE 1 in the Tore region. We plan on completing as many more well rehabs as we can get funding for. To this end, we have already begun with PHASE 2 in the neighboring region of Yei (more info below).

This is a country that we have wanted to work in for some time, but until now we had found it too difficult... especially in light of the fact that our normal partners, the Peace Corps, have no presence there.

South Sudan is not only the "newest" nation in the world (having broken off from Sudan after a long and bloody civil war that ended in 2005 and saw them achieve independence in 2011), but it is also among the very poorest.  Water issues in the entire region are critical, and the people of rural South Sudan often have to wait in line for water with their Jerry Cans for days when water shortages are most extreme. This is a situation which has led to the breakup of many marriages, due to husbands not understanding why their wives have to be gone so long just to get water, and assume them to be unfaithful.

South Sudan has suffered a lot of internal conflict since its independence; it now has the highest score on the Fragile States Index (formerly the Failed States index).

The Honorable Bidali Cosmas Wori-Koji, Commissioner of Yei River County has given Water Charity permission for drilling and rehabilitation of boreholes in Yei River County, South Sudan.

Well Rehabilitation details:

Well #

Community Name

Boma

Payam

Household Served

Static/ Well Depth

1

Do’bo Area

Baka

Tore

30

55m

2

Mukpara P/School

Baka

Tore

70

60m

3

Munze Community

Baka

Tore

40

65m

4

Hai Mundari

Baka

Tore

32

68m

5

Kuronyangi Area

Avokaya

Tore

50

45m

6

Purini Area

Avokaya

Tore

50

65m

7

Tore Centre

Avokaya

Tore

50

60m

8

Ramba Area

Avokaya

Tore

60

65m

9

Prokele Community

Mundu

Tore

55

65m

10

Bandame Community

Mundu

Tore

60

70m

           

Each of the villages delineated above will be a separate project under this program.  Furthermore, after these ten communities in the Tore area are served, Water Charity intends to continueboy getting water from the well the program in other needy locations. Water is, and remains, one of the most crucial issues of concern for South Sudan.  People resort to drawing water from muddy pits, and are subject to a large variety of waterborne illnesses.

Eighty percent of people in South Sudan’s hospitals are sick from drinking dirty water. According to the United Nations, waterborne diseases kill four children worldwide per minute.  Women and children are the most vulnerable. According to USAID, one in every four children born in South Sudan dies before the age of five! Half of those deaths are from water-related illnesses that are easily preventable.  Every day, Sudanese women and children spend hours bringing water to their families. Some are attacked by wild animals on their journeys, while others are robbed or raped. Time spent hauling water robs children of formal schooling while increased rates of malnutrition, anemia, and scoliosis rob them of their health.

South Sudan is a broken country. The infant mortality rate is 136.3 per 1,000, and maternal mortality is the highest in the world (South Sudan Medical Journal). It has the highest malaria burden in sub-Saharan Africa (Malaria Journal). South Sudanese live on less than $1 a day.

Gathering Water In YeiThere has only been ten years of peace in the region since 1956, which has resulted in a lack of infrastructure. More than 2 million people have died, and more than 4 million have become displaced or refugees. In 2014, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights reported that more than 9,000 child soldiers have fought in South Sudan’s current civil war... to say nothing of the hundreds of thousands that have been forced to fight before Independence.  Prior to the 2005 peace, the world watched as Sudan's Muslim north waged a genocide in the region of Darfur, a predominantly Christian region north of the current border.  Many of the refugees from this crisis fled south into what has now become the sovereign, predominantly Christian nation of South Sudan. Darfur remains part of Sudan, but the world's attention has faded from the region, and most people have little idea of what is happening in Sudan or South Sudan anymore.

The current political crises in South Sudan (since 2014) has cost 10,000 lives and displaced 1.5 million people who are now dependent on streams, rivers and puddles for their daily water supply. More than 2.5 million people are in need of urgent help with their water situation.

Water Charity Gets Involved:
With this program, ten existing wells that are currently nonfunctioning will be rehabilitated.  Each of the wells will have their own project and conclusion pages, which you will find below as they are ready. 

The objective of well rehabilitation is to improve well performance, increase well capacity, clear silt deposits built up in the well, remove mineral build up encrusted on the pump screen, and repair or replace existing pumps.  This is a way of utilizing work already done in order to provide clean water at a lower cost.  By repairing or replacing hand pumps, we can serve as many people as a new well would at a fraction of the cost.

dirty waterFor this project, Water Charity is partnering with Water is Basic, a U.S. based 501(c)(3) organization that is also a South Sudan based nonprofit run by South Sudanese.  The South Sudanese Water is Basic is a borehole drilling organization in the Republic of South Sudan birthed and led by Sudanese religious leaders in response to the Country’s water crises. It is a Sudanese solution to a Sudanese problem.  It is everyone's vision that every person in South Sudan has access to clean, safe water. 

There is a need for, and capacity to do, as many as 100 well restorations per year... or more.  South Sudan is Water Charity's 66th country of operation, and is a very important milestone for us.  Being able to do meaningful work here, in what is clearly one of the most needy places on Earth, means a lot to us.

Water changes everything. As the Sudanese people are able to access clean water, they have witnessed a transformation of health. Death rates fall.  Education rates rise. Access to food is increased, and local economies grow.  Ancient conflicts over water rights and access become obsolete. Peace sweeps through areas where water shortages once caused civil war and conflict.Young boy carrying water jugs

Phase 1 - TORE Region Highlights:
• Will reach 497 households, nearly 5,000 people that will have access to clean water
• Restoring 10 wells and replacing the broken hand pumps
• Holding a 5-day workshop training 48 water committee members on borehole operation and maintenance

Bonus:
• 3 additional well hand pumps will be repaired with local South Sudanese project funds helping an additional 150+ households access clean water.

Program History:
In August of 2015, Water is Basic funded a well hand pump repair workshop in Tore Payam of Yei River County of Central Equatorial State, South Sudan. This project aimed to train/retrain hand pump mechanics, educate water user committee members, and repair10 broken hand pump/wells. There were 7 total participants. The first 2 days were devoted to hand pump repair classroom held at Tore Catholic church Tore Payam.  Lessons included hand pump parts/functions, proper tool/procedures, troubleshooting, and well maintenance. The teachings were fun and interactive; there are mixtures of new and returning participants. The next one day was perhaps the most important addressing the “software” They focused on borehole management, covering topics such as community ownership, source protection, and managing finances. This included each borehole’s own water user committee, usually consisting of seven or nine members each. All water users’ committee members made their own by –laws and set household water user fees, usually about $0.10 (35 SSP) per month.

wellThe remaining 3 days were all spent in the field, repairing the hand pumps and promoting proper hygiene. The participants were very eager to get real experiences to develop skills that complement their new knowledge. On the areas of hygiene promotion the participants are trained on the mode of diseases transmission, washing hands with soap or ashes, and clean water storage. All activity created quite a buzz, with decent sized crowds watching the technicians work, listening to the hygiene promotion, and performing tasks needed for the well (like cleaning the surrounding grass, picking up trash, and fencing the building sites).

The most common mechanical problems were worn out cylinders, pipes and rods.  Other problems included broken handles, chains, pump heads and concrete pad repair.  The participants had a chance to practice a wide variety of repair techniques during the workshop.  The whole workshop ended with successfully repairing all 10 hand pumps and equipping their water user committee with the knowledge to operate and maintain them. As a result, an estimated 760 households in Morobo County now have access to clean water. Also 9 hand pump repair technicians have built both hardware and software skills to make a difference in the Payam (county).

Summary of Program Objectives:
Water Charity intends to expand on the capacity to do good work that our friends Steven Roese and WIB have managed to achieve with this training and well rehabilitation model.  It appeals to our innate sense of economy of scale, efficiency, and high "bang for buck."  We sincerely hope that via this partnership, we can change the lives of many people struggling in this newest nation on Earth.  At the very least, we can remove extreme water and sanitation issues from among their problems.

villagers around the wellBeing a new nation, born of war and strife, the resilient and proud people of South Sudan have a lot of work ahead of them to catch up to their neighboring nations like Ethiopia and Uganda. Many of the people in South Sudan even share cultural and linguistic ties to their neighbors... countries where Water Charity has already done a significant amount of work.  We even have a similar program going in Ethiopia at this time, the Ethiopia Well Rehab Program, which we are confident that this program can replicate.  In time we would like to replicate the successful borehole drilling operations we are doing in the Ethiopia Borehole Program in South Sudan as well.  All this takes is funding.  Please consider helping us with this very important work by clicking the donate button below.

UPDATE:

Water Charity is pleased to announce that PHASE 1 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program, has been successfully completed... and all 10 wells rehabilitated, plus the bonus 3 for a total of 13 wells repaired!  This program began with the region of TORE, in the Central Equatorial State where renewed violence has made it difficult for us to chek up on the communities.  When the security situation is better, we will get back to these sites, and post updates.  Meanwhile, we are continuing with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last 2 years of violence in Unity and Jonglei States. The next 10 well rehabs under the program will be in Yei, where the situation is currently safer, and closer to the base of WIB operations. 

Read about PHASE 1 by CLICKING HERE.

PHASE 2 - Yei Region

Phase 2 has begun and is underway in the Yei Region of South Sudan, along the Yei River.  Water Charity and Water Is Basic have decided to focus on this region of relative stability while the Tore region of Phase 1 remains inaccessible due to civil war outbreaks.

Phase 2 is already doubling the size of the program, and we hope to do many more projects as they are feasible.  The rehabs there are being done as they come, and can be followed by clicking the individual well rehab links below.  All projects following the PHASE 1 link, are all part of PHASE 2.  At present we have initiated projects to repair wells in Abei, Lomulule, Bor Dinka, Loggo II, Illimoko, NTC, San-ji-Sari, Zezira II, and 2 wells in Marakonye​.

​We are happy to report that all 10 of these wells have been repaired now.  We will be posting conclusion reports for them as we are able to gather the data, and sort through the pictures etc.  Check back soon.

We would like to expand on the success of Phase 1 & Phase 2 by expanding this program three or four times larger if possible.  Please help us do as many well rehabs as we humanly can by contributing to this program. 

NPCA & WC LOGOS

This program is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

 

Village woman near the waterholewater committee

Villagers village children near the well

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Gisenyi Rainwater Catchment System & Ferro-Cement Tank Training Program - Rwanda

Gisenyi Rainwater Catchment System & Ferro-Cement Tank Training Program - Rwanda

Water Charity will be joining with Friendly Water for the World to put on a 9-day training program and conference in Gisenyi, Rwanda in January, 2017. The technology to be taught is the construction and maintenance of rainwater catchment systems, with a focus on ferro-cement tanks.

This program will proliferate the technology through 7 countries (Rwanda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Burundi, and Ethiopia), and will focus on “training the trainers”. Water Charity will provide additional funding for the new projects that are spawned by the process.

During the week, two teams, of six Rwandans each, will be trained. They have among them proficiency in English, Swahili, and French in addition to Kinyarwanda. They will set up cooperative businesses, and proceed to train others, while they build systems throughout the country. They will be available to train serving Peace Corps Volunteers in and around the communities where they live and work. They already have orders for 50 tanks.

Representatives of several local NGOs will be trained as well. All told, more than 80 people will attend the training, and most of them will go back to their agencies, villages, communities to build catchment systems, construct tanks, train others, and incorporate the technology into their operations.

The training will be led by Friendly Water’s Uganda Representative Richard Kyambadde, who is Africa Representative to the American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association, and a three-person team from Uganda with which he works.

Averill Strasser, Water Charity’s Co-Founder and COO, and Beverly Rouse, its Executive Director will be at the training, providing support, and lining up new projects in Rwanda, as well as the rest of East and Central Africa.

Participants will learn to make three types of systems:Gisenyi Rainwater Catchment System & Ferro-Cement Tank Training Program - Rwanda

(1) Larger 5,000-20,000-liter free-standing tanks,
(2) 2,000-3,000-liter tanks made with wooden molds, and
(3) 1,000 liter "waterhives", which are semi-prefabbed.

Aside from the hands-on work, there will be meetings to teach the determination of the optimal type and size of units under differing conditions. There will be a focus on the continuing training and production of systems in a way that it is self-supporting in the community, eliminating the need of further assistance.

This is the implementation of a bold new concept to provide needed improvements while also creating business and employment opportunities. It is a part of the Water Charity Training and Support Initiative.  In addition, since the benefits will accrue to displaced persons in 6 countries, it is included under our Refugee Aid Initiative - Worldwide.

Water Charity has contributed all the costs for this conference and training through the generosity of an Anonymous donor.  Any further donations to the effort will be used to fund the various projects that arise from this training.  As we anticipate this to be quite a few, we ask that give what you can.  We hope to expand our highly sucessful training efforts dramatically in the new year!

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

Catchment tank

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Zezira II Well Renewal - South Sudan

Zezira II Community

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace CorpsNPC & WC Logos Association, working with Water is Basic.

This is Project 10 of Phase 2 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program. Phase 1 of the program began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These Phase 2 projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.Boys Moulding Bricks

Location
Zezira II, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan

Community Description
With hands drenched in mud, a group of young Zezira II residents shape one brick, and then another. The community is large, the largest and most diverse in the county, with 2,000 residents having come together from multiple local tribes and wandering from war-waged displacement. During the dry season, the sight of many people elbow-deep in mud is a common sight. This is the community’s only economic addition to their typical dependence on a produce-agriculture livelihood. 

A few families are lucky enough to own a shop, acting as the central points in trading, and the only hope in economic expansion. These families are able to own homes with iron roofs, the few between the many grass-thatched roofs that line the streets of Zezira II, a town a half-mile outside the main city of Yei Town. 

Water jugsProblem Addressed
While the borehole has served the community well since it was first drilled in 1982, the overuse of 30+ years has caused the well to turn from a gushing relief to a trickling disaster.  Many women in the area, are responsible for water collection, fight amongst each other as tensions grow daily amidst hours and hours of waiting in line. 

Many families cannot afford to have their wives and mothers travelling long distances to clean boreholes, so the women are forced, instead, to use the nearby river for water collection. However, the waterborne illnesses, contracted from the contaminated, low water, are exponential and cause up to 40% of children to pass away before they even reach their fifth year.

Lona Poniis is one of the many women suffering from having to trek to the river outside of the village for water, for herself and her six children. As a member of the borehole committee, Lona experiences the daily problems of the borehole’s lack of pressure.  For 38 years she has grown up with the borehole, in the community.  Nowadays, though, she is forced to wake up at five in the morning to make it back and forth enough times with water to provide bathing and drinking water for every family member, throughout the day.  Despite being 38-years-old, Lona has been getting sick from the lack of sleep and the morning dew soaking her body and feet, keeping her wet and cold all day long.  Her greatest fear is being bitten by a snake or taken by a crocodile in the river that she gathers her water from.

Project DescriptionMom and youth at the stream
This project will be in collaboration with Water is Basic, a locally owned and operated water drilling company. Over the last 8 years Water is Basic has been a reliable company in South Sudan, drilling and rehabilitating since 2008. This project should only take 1-2 days to complete.

The Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart and removie all the pipes The well will be deepened and the 8 pipes replaced as necessary, and the pump will be repaired.

Problem Impact
This project will provide water for all 2,000 residents. 

Project Manager
Steve Roese 

Monitoring & Maintenance
The Zezira II community is proud of their 5-member borehole committee. They are focused on monitoring water usage and cleanliness standards to ensure the borehole’s sustainability. As a typical lifespan of a borehole is 25 years old, the community has gone above and beyond to ensure this borehole has impacted the community as long as it could. The committee and community are dedicated to repeating the longevity of the borehole once it is repaired.

Comments
Quelling fear for their lives and the health of their families, every woman in the community will be empowered with a sense of security and assurance that they will be able to provide clean water for their families daily.

While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it is in keeping with the goals and objectives of that program, and, as such, falls under Water Charity's own Let Girls Learn + heading.  Since it provides benefit to displaced persons, we have also added our Refugee tag.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  If you wish to see more great projects like this one, please contribute to our South Sudan Well Rehab Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

 
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Marakonye Community Well Rehab - South Sudan

Marakonye Community Well Rehab - South Sudan

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps NPC & WC LogosAssociation, working with Water is Basic.

This is Project 9 of Phase 2 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program. Phase 1 of the program began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These Phase 2 projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.

New Church

Location
Marakonye, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan

Community Description
The community of Marakonye has been around since the 1920s. The village is mostly comprised of Kakwa descendants and is based in Yei's large teak forest.  Since its conception, Marakonye has based its livelihood on agriculture.  Many of the indigenous members grow sorghum, millet and cassava, in the forest.  Lack of education and the dangerous, long trek to the nearest water source are the community’s greatest fears.

Problem Addressed
Cox Wai-Wai, the 56-year old chairperson for the Marakonye Primary School Parent Teachers’ Association (PTA), is married to Lona Monday. The parents, whose ten children range in age and attend the nursery school and the secondary school, are the honorary counselors of Yei Municipality.  Cox Wai-wai

Since the borehole broke two and a half years ago, the families have had to walk three miles to and from the nearest water source, forcing most of their children to be late to school or leave school midday because they are so desperate for hydration. 

Viola is a young girl who faces problems similar to Cox’s children. The 15-year-old lives with her family and is responsible for gathering water for herself, her four siblings, and her parents.  Before the borehole broke, she was easily able to get up at 6:30 am; since the borehole broke down, Viola has had to get up an extra hour and a half earlier to reach water a few miles away, in time to make it back for school. With her focus on gathering water, rather than her education, Viola has struggled to keep up in school and is worried about not making it to the next grade.  Vaila

Ross Tabuis, a recent transplant to the area, is living hours away from his wife and two children in order to take care of his elderly parents in Marakonye. The borehole has been broken for two years and Ross’s parents have had to trek the long distance, a dangerous walk through the forest, to the only other available water in the area. Concerned for his parents’ safety, Ross has returned and begun purchasing water from a private borehole, a mile closer to his parents’ home. However, the owner of the borehole charges Ross 20ssp per month, this amount is four times the average amount for an entire household’s usage of the local, community borehole. 

Project Description
Water is Basic, a locally run drilling company, will be in charge of repairing the borehole. The process will include removing the borehole head and dissecting every pipe and part to determine where the problem lies. The pipes that are rusted or broken will be replaced, and the WIB team will monitor the fix closely to better supply proactive problem solving.

The repair of the Marakonye borehole will help residents' money stay within the local economy.  With monthly water usage fees, the local families will be able to create a savings for future borehole repairs. Furthermore, the repair will help every child in the village refocus his or her attention onto their school work, instead of the dehydration they have been recently struggling to combat.

Project Impact
This project will impact 600 people.

Ross TabuisVolunteer Directing Project
Steve Roese

Steve is President of Water is Basic U.S. An entrepreneur and pastor, Steve has been involved in South Sudan since 2004 where he has fought alongside his brothers and sisters for peace and opportunity. His motto is “whatever it takes” and he means it when it comes to building the new nation of the Republic of South Sudan.  

Monitoring & Maintenance
The creation of a water committee is central to all of these projects, and it educates and empowers the community by helping them learn the importance of diverse and equal organization. The water committee becomes a reconciliation tool as mixed genders, tribes and religions work together to manage the community well. By aiding the village in developing a committee, and managing and maintaining their well, the village is able to collect and save money to dedicate to future repairs.

Comments
Water is Basic is a borehole drilling organization in the Republic of South Sudan. This organization is a Sudanese solution to a Sudanese problem, birthed and led by many of the religious Sudanese leaders in response to the country’s water crises.  

Water is Basic operates an internship program where local, promising secondary school graduates manage our projects for one year. In exchange, they are given access to distance learning courses and then assisted in applying for and attending university. 

While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it is in keeping with the goals and objectives of that program, and, as such, falls under Water Charity's own Let Girls Learn + heading.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  If you wish to see more great projects like this one, please contribute to our South Sudan Well Rehab Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

 
Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

San-Ji-Sari Well Rehab Project - South Sudan

Lady drinking from the stream

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps NPC & WC LogosAssociation, working with Water is Basic.

This is Project 8 of Phase 2 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program. Phase 1 of the program began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These Phase 2 projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.

LocationWomen of the Community
San-Ji-Sari, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan

Community Description
San-Ji-Sari resides four miles Southwest of Yei Town. The borehole was originally drilled for refugees, in 1975, along the main road of the village.  San-Ji-Sari still mainly consists of refugees and others displaced from a variety of tribes. The community was formed as a result of the first civil wars of Sudan and South Sudan, in 1982. As the wars broke out the community became strictly dependent on farming and hunting. 

Problem Addressed
When an orphanage was built in the village, the community’s focus shifted and the main borehole was forgotten.  Now that the orphanage has its own borehole, the community is back to focusing on the area’s original borehole.  The borehole was immediately overused, and lacked Walk to the Streama committee to collect and manage funds for the inevitable borehole breakdown.  With many residents relying on farming as their only means for financial gain, very few have had the time to commit to being a part of a committee.  Right before the borehole broke; the community finally agreed upon necessary terms for the borehole and formed a committee.  Less than a month later, the borehole broke down, and has been in disrepair for the past year and a half.
 

Mary Bannia has been a member of the community for four years. She is a wife and a mother to two boys and two girls. She used to fetch water from the local, community borehole, which was close to her home. When the borehole broke, she was forced to move closer to available water, which still puts her a mile away from the closest stream or shallow well.  No matter where Mary goes, the water she gathers for her family is stagnant and contaminated. With carrying water on her head and a baby on her back, Mary has begun to suffer from severe pains in her back and legs, as well.

Daniel Malishis the son of divorced parents, and the brother to five siblings. Now living with his mother, Daniel struggles without his father Childpresent.  The 14-year-old attends the Lutaya Primary School three miles away.  He is hoping to move on to seventh grade next year. However, the broken borehole has forced him to wake up two hours earlier than he is used to in order to fetch water for his entire family. Since his father left, his mother is busy attending to the family farm so that she can afford Daniel’s schooling. But with the extended time it takes to gather water for his family, Daniel has been missing his morning classes, decreasing his chances of advancing to the next grade. 

Project Description
This project will be in collaboration with Water is Basic, a locally owned and operated water drilling company. Over the last 8 years Water is Basic has been a reliable company in South Sudan, drilling and rehabilitating since 2008. This project should only take days to complete.

Stream

First, the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. The project will restore the pipes and the head of the borehole to reliable and working order. 

Problem Impact
More than 500 people will benefit.

Peace Corp Volunteer Directing Project
Steve Roese  

Monitoring & Maintenance
Water Is Basic educates and empowers the community by helping them learn the importance of diverse and equal organization. The water committee becomes a reconciliation tool as mixed genders, tribes and religions work together to manage the community well. By aiding the village in developing a committee, and managing and maintaining their well, the village is able to collect and save money to dedicate to future Committeerepairs.

Comments
After the last war ended in 2011, many refugees returning to South Sudan landed in this particular region of Yei. Because of this, farming became one of the main forms of economic prosperity. With local boreholes, communities are able to provide clean water for domestic use and their crops. Clean water nearby also helps children, who are responsible for gathering the water for their families, stay on track in school instead of spending their time searching for alternative water sources.

Water is Basic is a borehole drilling organization in the Republic of South Sudan. This organization is a Sudanese solution to a Sudanese problem, birthed and led by many of the religious-Sudanese leaders in response to the country’s water crises.  All of the projects in this program are designed to develop self-sustaining water systems. Further, these systems are managed and operated by local villages. It is our mission to build communities and empower the Sudanese to implement solutions to their own crises

While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it is in keeping with the goals and objectives of that program, and, as such, falls under Water Charity's own Let Girls Learn + heading.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  If you wish to see more great projects like this one, please contribute to our South Sudan Well Rehab Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

 

Young Boy at the churchTomaluEdina TabuYouth carrying water from the Stream

The Village

 
 

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NTC Well Rehab - South Sudan

NTC Youth

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps NPC & WC LogosAssociation, working with Water is Basic.

This is Project 7 of Phase 2 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program. Phase 1 of the program began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These Phase 2 projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.The Village

Location
NTC, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan    

Community Description
NTC is largely comprised of military personal, and civilians who depend on farming, hunting, and animal rearing. Five miles away from the main city, Yei Town, NTC stands strong and united despite its diversity. The 300 household region had originally formed a committee to manage and maintain the borehole. However, the committee struggled and couldn’t endure.

Problem Addressed
Mary Gamba is a mother of seven with her youngest only 6 weeks old. Having a new born, on top of her already demanding family, has made gathering water an extremely complicated task since the borehole broke (over six months ago).  SMarry Gambaince the well broke, Mary has had to wake up at four in the morning to fetch water from the next available well, a 3 mile round trip, to avoid the overuse of the shallow well in the mornings. However, if she arrives too late, she has to gather water that has been stirred up with the excess particles at the bottom. 


Sebit Malish, a member of the disseminated committee, had tried to collect the monthly household fees for the borehole when the committee was still in session. The village has one of the lowest fees in the region for borehole use, only 2ssp.  Many of the military personal are responsible for the loss in payment, refusing to pay Sebit some days. Other days, the soldiers forced his family to use the shallow well multiple miles away to keep the clean borehole water to themselves. Focused on what’s best for the community, Sebit knows they may need to gather more money from the families every month to keep the borehole open and consistently maintained. 


Betty MeniallaBetty Menialla is another female resident, in NTC.  She is responsible for many of the domestic care activities in her family. At 17, it is becoming too difficult for Betty to find the time to finish her schoolwork every day as she becomes increasingly needed by her family, as her parents age.  She talks about her time in primary school when she was able to keep up with her studies and the education that the boys in her community were earning.  As Betty grew up and graduated to secondary school, the boys continued their education while Betty was required to spend more and more time helping with her family.  Among many other tasks, gathering water has become her sole responsibility.  With the borehole broken, fetching water has taken over the majority of Betty’s time while her studies have fallen behind.

Project Description
This project is to rehabilitate the well. It is being implemented in collaboration with Water is Basic, a locally owned and operated water drilling company. Over the last 8 years Water is Basic has been a reliable company in South Sudan, drilling and rehabilitating boreholes.

BoreholeFirst, the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. We believe that the problem is a pipe that is rusted through, but sometimes it is hard to be sure before taking the pump apart. The project will restore the GI pipes and the head of the borehole to reliable and working order. 

Problem Impact
This project will impact 300 people.

Volunteer Directing Project
Steve Roese.  Steve has been involved in South Sudan since 2004.  

Monitoring & MaintenanceThe Borehole
Water Is Basic educates and empowers the community by helping them learn the importance of diverse and equal organization. The water committee becomes a reconciliation tool as mixed genders, tribes and religions work together to manage the community well. By aiding the village in developing a committee, and managing and maintaining their well, the village is able to collect and save money to dedicate to future repairs.

Comments
Funds to repair the borehole and educate the local community provides empowerment for many who have felt defeated by local military personnel. Supplying the community with a repaired borehole and the education to implement solutions if problems arise, ensures that there is enough savings and knowledge to repair the borehole during potential future breakdowns.

While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it is in keeping with the goals and objectives of that program, and, as such, falls under Water Charity's own Let Girls Learn + heading.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  If you wish to see more great projects like this one, please contribute to our South Sudan Well Rehab Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

 

Children of the VillageMalishShallow wellFields

 

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Funds Needed : 
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Lomulule Well Rehab - South Sudan

Woman from the well

NPC & WC LOGO

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

This is part of Phase 2 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program.  The program began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These new projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.

LocationCommunity Youth
Lomulule, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan

Community Description
The Lomulule village is a small village comprised of 45 households, home to 305 multi-ethnic people. The families mainly consist of Kakwa’s. When you leave Yei Town and head west down the main road to Meridi, you’ll find Lomulule.  It is a village surrounded by maize, cassava, sorghum, millet, and trees that drop ground nuts for harvesting. Even with the produce-agricultural roots, many of the youth in the community hunt to make up for the crops that wilt when the wet season ends.

Most of the community are youth, focused on improving every aspect of their village, despite the political and economic crises waging around them. Hard working, many of the residents continue to add to their work load by owning small scale shops to encourage trading in the area. While many residents are forward-thinking in economic growth, they are still struggling financially, living in small mud huts with hand woven grass roofs. 

Problem Addressed
With only one borehole to provide for all 305 community members, the clean, deep well has broken and created a strenuous burden for the village for the past three months. Now, the residents are forced to find their water from the unreliable streams and contaminated shallow wells far outside the village. 

JoiceWorn down by age and lack of help, Joice Moriba spends an hour walking, to and fro from the nearest well, to supply water for herself and her four children.  A single mother, the Lomulule resident has only her daughter to help her. However, her daughter is the youngest of the four and requires the most care. Even then, as her daughter grows older, she will be forced to miss out on receiving an education in order to help her aging mother with time-heavy tasks, such as gathering water. 

Project Description
Water is Basic, a locally run drilling company, will be in charge of repairing the borehole. The process will include removing the borehole head and dissecting every pipe and part to determine where the problem lies. The pipes that are rusted or broken will be replaced, and the WIB team will monitor the fix closely to better supply proactive problem solving. 

Project Impact
This project will impact at least 305 people, plus all the visitors to the area.

Volunteer Directing Project
Steve RoeseWell

Monitoring and maintenance
This borehole has a committee that consists of ten members:  a chairperson and vice chairperson, a secretary and vice secretary, a treasurer and vice treasurer, a time keeper, and three advisors. Together, the members have introduced regular fees to build a savings for future well improvements.

Focused on longevity, the borehole will be cleaned every morning before it is opened to the rest of the village.  Controlling the usage of the borehole, with availability being a maximum of 8 hours per day, is essential for the borehole to prosper in Lomulule. 

Comments
With so many youths in the village, the choice between hydration and education is a choice that is regularly being made. Gaining an education will not only teach factual knowledge necessary to sustain modern and healthy amenities, such as a borehole, but the learning will also provide a chance to understand empathy, teaching the emotional skills necessary to collaborate and stay focused on managing the borehole, as a community. 

Boy drinking waterWater Is Basic operates an internship program where local, promising secondary school graduates manage our projects for one year. Two recent graduates from Nehemiah Gateway University, in Albania, oversaw interns and the projects the interns were directing. In exchange for their work, the interns are given access to distance learning courses and are then assisted in applying for, and attending, their university of choice. 

While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it is in keeping with the goals and objectives of that program, and, as such, falls under Water Charity's own Let Girls Learn + heading.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  If you wish to see more great projects like this one, please contribute to our South Sudan Well Rehab Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

 


Students in the School yardStudent raising the flag

 

JoiceWellwellBoy carrying water

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Funds Needed : 
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Bor Dinka Congregation Well Renewal - South Sudan

Working on the Well

NPCA & WC LOGOThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association, in coordination with Water is Basic.

This project is Project 4 of Phase 2 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program. The program's Phase 1 began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These new projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. The CommunityWe continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.

Location
Yei Town, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan 

Community Description
The Dinka congregation is inside Yei Town, with a robust and passionate congregation of 2,500 members. After South Sudan declared itself the newest nation in the world, the refugees who had fled into Uganda and the Congo returned, many stopping and staying in Yei rather than travelling farther back to their war-destroyed territories. Because of this, over half of the community is a diverse group of citizens with few original residents scattered amongst them. Many of the men are soldiers for the SPLA (Sudan People's Liberation Army), the army of the Republic of South Sudan, which was founded as a guerrilla movement in 1983 and was a key participant of the Second Sudanese Civil War.

The rest of the community makes their livelihood from small businesses, selling anything they can scavenge, make, or grow. Since the population’s dramatic population increase, the density has forced many to live exceptionally close, making it difficult for sanitation to stay a top priority. Church YouthThis, atop of the lack of clean water, has had significant effects on the mortality rate of local children.

Problem Addressed
The borehole was originally drilled next to the Dinka Congregation site to help hydrate the construction workers during the Church’s construction.  However, with such a large population using the clean water as well, the borehole ended up breaking 18 months ago, leaving the community in dire need again, and forcing the construction crews to halt work on the new church. 

The Church is being paid for solely with tithes that the congregation has slowly been saving, over the past years. Along with lack of clean water, the current devaluation of the South Sudanese pound has also become a factor in the building process.

Being in the center of town has its advantages, but it also has its disadvantages, such as long distances to the edge of town and beyond to the next available water source, although not even a clean one. Church youthEven with boreholes half a mile away, the waits are extraordinary, some days over three hours long. The women of this community spend many hours a day just waiting in line, plus they have to pay an extra 5SSP a month (compared to those living closer to the boreholes), making it more difficult to afford the water while attempting to raise funds to fix their local borehole. 

Single mothers struggle most in this situation, forced to bring all their children with them just to fetch water, keeping these children from school or keeping themselves from the further necessary house work or farming to provide for their family’s food and education. With added prices onto the water that already takes more of their time to gather, many mothers find themselves forced to make a choice between their child’s health or education, and hydration or solid sustenance. 

Project Description
This project will be in collaboration with Water is Basic, a locally owned and operated water drilling company tied to a U.S. based ministry.

Church youthFirst the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. The problem may be rusted pipes, but sometimes it’s hard to be sure before taking the pump apart. Once the problem is zeroed in on, the crew will go to work replacing the parts needed.

Once the pipes are replaced and back in place, the pump head will be attached and checked. If everything is working properly the last step is to check the water flow rate to make sure the borehole has been drilled deep enough and the pressure is high enough. 

Project Impact
This project will benefit 2,500 people in the community.

Project Manager
Steve Roese is President of Water is Basic U.S., an entrepreneur and pastor, Steve has been involved in South Sudan since 2004 where he has fought alongside his brothers and sisters for peace and opportunity. Rehabbing the wellHis motto is “whatever it takes” and he means it when it comes to building the new nation of the Republic of South Sudan.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The church leaders and surrounding communities will be involved in every step of this project. It is a long-held belief that development without community engagement is not sustainable. It is the hope of many that the community will sustain their borehole for the well’s longevity with this dedicated and passionate support.

Comments
Water Is Basic operates an internship program where local, promising secondary school graduates manage the projects for one year. Two recent graduates from Nehemiah Gateway University, in Albania, oversaw interns and the projects the interns were directing. In exchange for their work, the interns are given access to distance learning courses and are then assisted in applying for, and attending, their university of choice.

While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it is in keeping with the goals and objectives of that program, and, as such, falls under Water Charity's own Let Girls Learn + heading.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  If you wish to see more great projects like this one, please contribute to our South Sudan Well Rehab Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

 

 

Finished Well with fencing

Laying pipesChurch congregatesFixing the Well

Workers rehabbing the well

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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