Let Girls Learn

Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

Let Girls LearnNPCA & WC LOGOS


First Lady Michelle Obama, in concert with the State Department, USAID, and the Peace Corps, has formed a powerful collaboration, Let Girls Learn (LGL), to expand access to education for adolescent girls around the world. The program aims to improve opportunities for the 62 million girls around the world who are not able to remain in school each year. The goal is to implement community-based projects, funded with donations from non-Federal entities, and was announced with fanfare by Michelle, President Barack Obama, and Peace Corps Director Carrie Hessler-Radelet.Let Girls Learn with Michelle

Water Charity is proud to be intimately involved in this program, not only doing the very first LGL project, but committing to do hundreds more.  We are raising money specifically for these projects, thus enabling the government agencies to direct the funds they are able to raise towards other projects, and have the entire program go further, and reach more people.  We already have dozens of these projects underway, and many more coming through every day!  This promises to be a hugely impactful program.

Water Charity's take on the LGL theme involves building bathrooms and bringing running water to schools that often have neither, as well as other water system projects that save girls from having to fetch water, and eliminate school days lost to waterborne illness.  With all the other pressures that might serve to keep girls from going to, or staying in school, we feel the last thing should be lack of access to sanitation and proper hygiene.  In many parts of the world, young girls drop out of school when they get their menses. Aside from pressure to start families at this age, the lack of clean bathrooms, proper toilets with doors, and running water are major factors in the high drop out rate.  Some girls simply miss school for their entire period every month... many never return.

The program was announced to target Albania, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Georgia, Ghana, Moldova, Mongolia, Mozambique, Togo and Uganda, with Thailand, The Gambia, and Ethiopia under consideration. 62 Million Girls Each YearAll of these countries are now involved in LGL projects, and later this year, the program will expand to include all of the countries where Peace Corps operates.  We here at Water Charity will be funding PCV led projects in as many of these places as we can, and have already hit the ground running.

Through our partnership with the National Peace Corps Association (NPCA), Water Charity has committed to the implementation of projects to build and improve 100 bathrooms, and install water systems, at schools in Albania, as well as another 100 such projects worldwide in the designated LGL countries. We are already on pace to supersede those figures.

In addition, we will continue to enable similar PCV projects in other countries, and implement RPCV projects that are in the spirit of and in support of the LGL mission.  These projects that are in the spirit of LGL, but not officially part of the program, we designate LGL+.  By clicking that link you can see those projects, while the full Let Girls Learn tag is applied to projects within the program, and can be perused seperately.  Both types will fall under this Water Charity Let Girls Learn Initiative, and can be followed from this page.  Projects with an arrow next to them have been completed and have conclusion pages up already.  Those with circles next to them are still underway.Carrie Hessler-Radelet

Access to a clean and safe bathroom is crucial for all children, but is especially important for young girls as they reach adolescence. NPCA and Water Charity helped develop, and provided the funding for, the first LGL project, the Svey Leu High School Latrine Project - Cambodia. That project, which has been completed, exemplifies the need for dedicated bathroom facilities and water systems that provide hygienic and sanitary conditions as well as privacy, safety, and dignity.

Male or female, no student should have to defecate in the open, or attend a school without proper bathrooms and running water. While our focus here is on the needs of the girls, all of our projects also include comparable facilities for the boys, teachers and parents as well.

We hope you will support us in this effort.  Donations can be made on the individual project and program pages. (Links to them are below) Our programs are collections of projects in their own right, as typified by our 100 Water Projects Program - Albania which, alone, will have 100 projects under it.

Donation to our projects go towards recouping the funds we have spent already on that project, as WC pre-funds all of our projects out of pocket and allows people to adopt them, in whole or in part, after they are already begun. The efficiency and agility of this methodology should be obvious, and, in this way, we never ask people to donate to projects that aren't already a reality--as is common in most philanthropy--but to support ongoing, proven, and even successfully completed projects with the knowledge that time is of the essence where water is concerned.

HERE the FLOTUS acknowledges our commitment to LGL. We thank her and her staff for the full paragraph about us on the .gov website (the 5th new announcement)!  And HERE, the Washington Post reports on it (end of 3rd paragraph).

This program is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

USAID LGL Ad

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100 Water Projects Program - Albania

100 Water Projects Program - Albania

This is an effort under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama & Peace Corps, to expand access to education for girls around the world!NPCA & WC LOGOS

100 Water Projects For Albanian Girls!


Water Charity is proud to announce that we have crafted a program to do 100 water projects in Albania over the next year. Due in large part to the vision of Teresa and Graham Anderson, the PCVs spearheading this effort, we have scaled up what would have been 10 school bathroom projects, into a major program to deal with the poor sanitation conditions in schools all around Albania. This ambitious goal is already underway in a dozen schools, and will likely surpass even our lofty goal of 100 projects.

Santa_Maria_Apollonia

This entire program falls under our Let Girls Learn Initiative. This is an effort on our part to step up, and pick up the gauntlet thrown by the First Lady in her call to further girls education around the world. Water Charity did the very first LGL project in Cambodia earlier this year, and aims to do a couple hundred more water projects that expressly aim to empower young women, and allow girls the myriad opportunities that an education can bestow.

NPCA and Water Charity have already helped develop, and provide funding for, a number of great water system projects that exemplify the need for programs like this. It is hard to overestimate the value of clean, functional, dedicated bathroom facilities.  They not only provide hygienic and sanitary conditions, but privacy, safety, and dignity as well.

Lack of proper sanitation facilities at a school contributes greatly to the drop out rate among adolescent women. Upon reaching their menses, many girls simply leave school, and others struggle on while missing a whole week out of every month. Most of them endure a lot of pressure to drop out of school to get married and start families.

Dancing girlsAlbania, as one of only two majority Muslim countries in Europe, has cultural attitudes towards women and their education that influence many Albanian women to give up on the idea of education completely.

Our goal with this program is to work with the schools to create an environment conducive to young women remaining in school.

The majority of these schools lack running water, and many have no functional bathroom facilities whatsoever at the moment.  Even where they do have toilets, they are often in horrible disrepair, or are not useable because there is no running water to flush them... and they are not connected to sewer pipes.

Thus, a large portion of these projects will be to refurbish or build new toilet facilities, complete with running water. We will not stop there, however. Water Charity intends to go on and support a large variety of projects that have LGL impact. As most people know, lack of clean water and adequate sanitation can make people susceptible to frequent waterborne illnesses, and being sick with such sicknesses, keep children out of school... not to mention threatening their very lives.

We hope you will support us in this effort to make a meaningful difference in this beautiful Mediterranean nation. Check out the various projects in the program below, and don't hesitate to donate to any projects that seem worthy to you. We are looking for a large donor to adopt this entire program as well, so contact us if you are interested.
This program is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.
Turkish toiletMoschee Vloraschool

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Upper Fulladu District Water Extension Project - The Gambia

Upper Fulladu District Water Extension Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Upper Fulladu District Water Extension Project - The GambiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, Upper Fulladu District, Central River Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Xxxxxx is located in the Upper Fulladu West district of the Central River Region of The Gambia on the west coast of Africa. The village is ethnically Fula, with a couple of Wolof and Mandinka tribe compounds. The village has 20 compounds, about 26 tax-paying households, with a population between 250-400 depending on the time of year.

The major income generation comes from farming season, between the months of June to January, with all members of the household being extensively involved in all stages of agriculture from preparing the fields to harvesting. The majority of farmers employ subsistence-farming techniques with no modern equipment, and the scant surplus of crop that is not used for sustenance is usually sold for a small profit.

Xxxxxx has a large basic cycle school (early development care or nursery school through grade nine). The school services students from villages up to 5 kilometers away, and employs about 30 staff including administration, teachers, cooking, cleaning, and laundering staff, security, and local food vendors.

Upper Fulladu District Water Extension Project - The GambiaProblem Addressed
The only clean water source in Xxxxxx is a closed hand pump in the center of the village. However, it is also a popular clean water source for many people living outside the village, frequented by workers at the Bansang Hospital and Regional Health Team, students from the Sololo Basic Cycle School, and Bansang locals. All these groups have expressed that the water in Xxxxxx is the best quality and worth the few kilometers just to fill up a couple of bidongs (local plastic water jugs). Pickup trucks and ambulances come daily to fill up a few bidongs for drinking water.

For this reason, community members spend a lot of time waiting to fetch water for their own compounds and families. At peak hours in the early morning and late afternoon, women often wait to pump water for up to 30 minutes to fetch a small bucket, not nearly enough water to cook, clean, and launder for a whole family.

Additionally, during the PCV baseline health survey of the village, people expressed that environmental sanitation and malaria were prevalent health problems facing the village. Only 1/20 compounds contained a tippy tap or pre-made hand washing station and upon observation, and only 4/20 male heads of compounds could list the four critical hand washing.

The local community health nurse works mostly with primary healthcare (PHC) villages, larger villages of more than 30 compounds that have a health clinic in the vicinity, and often small non-PHC villages such as Xxxxxx are neglected.

Project Description
This project is to extend the only current closed pump in the village of Sololo through an extensive pipe network to new taps in various locations around the village.

Water will be pumped from the current well to a 4,000 L above-ground water tank and distributed throughout the village through a pipeline network that will exit through taps closer to compounds on the outskirts of the village.

Able bodied men and members of the youth group will help with the manual labor part of the project, which will be factored into their contribution.

Once the taps are constructed, the water committee and compounds immediately surrounding the taps will attend two meetings: (1) a training implemented by Water Point, a local Public Health Officer, and the PCV on tap usage, and (2) a training for the compound heads to work on a system of payments for their local tap.

Upper Fulladu District Water Extension Project - The GambiaAfter the construction of the tap system, the construction of a health corner, to serve as an educational center, will begin. A health mural will be painted on a wall facing the center of the village, and the station will be properly fenced to keep out livestock and reduce the amount of standing water.

Once all construction and labor has finished, the committees (VDC, water, youth) will have monthly meetings to continue the development of the village.

Project Impact
1,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
B. Hu

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV and counterparts will use the project logic model of intervention to monitor the implementation of the project activities and to track project performance. Similarly, the model will be used to evaluate the immediate outcomes (impacts) of the project as well as the long-term impact whether the intervention has achieved the expected objectives and goal of the project. The PCV and counterparts will use Peace Corps water, sanitation, and hygiene data collection tools to collect the relevant figures during the project implementation.

Comments
The specific objectives of this project include contributing toward improved access to education for girls in the community, improving health care status of members of the community, and improving health care knowledge of the members of the community. This project will impact all members of the village and members of the greater community, who travel lengthy kilometers to pump drinking water.

Let Girls Learn
This project qualifies as a Let Girls Learn project because it reduces the burden on girls to collect water, thereby making it easier for them to remain in school. It is a part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

The Water Charity participation in this project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

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Bantunding Water System Project - The Gambia

Bantunding Water System Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Bantunding Water System Project - The GambiaLocation
Bantunding, Wuli East, Upper River Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Bantunding is a village located in the Wuli East District of the Upper River Region in The Gambia. The population is approximately 1,500, with currently 65 compounds. Its inhabitants are all from the ethnic group, Mandinka, and farming is the main source of livelihood.

The agricultural system is based on subsistence methods with limited use of modern technology and family farming major practices in this community. Groundnut is the main cash crop and coos, and rice are the major staple crops. The Gambia has a six-month farming season (the first three months include their rainy season) where the entire family assists in preparing the fields, planting, growing, and harvesting their crops. Every family in the village owns farms and participates in the process. Their farms are mainly sustenance, with the sparse surplus being sold for a profit.

Bantunding has a two-classroom lower basic school with Grades 1-3. This year they began an Early Childhood Development Class (ECD) in a straw hut with more than 50 kids coming per day.

Bantunding Water System Project - The GambiaThe neighboring village, Baja Kunda, has a full basic cycle school and senior secondary school (Grades 1-12). The school is about four kilometers away, and by the time the students reach Grade 9, it is approximately the ratio of three boys to one girl. The girls often drop out of school earlier to stay to help their mothers at home, and get married. Of the 22 compounds surveyed, there was an average of 18 children per compound and 4.3 women of child-bearing age.

Problem Addressed
Bantunding has only one clean source of water, a hand pump located in a corner of the town, with the farthest compound a quarter mile away.

Since there is only one source of clean water, and its location is inconvenient, this result in at least 1/3 of the compounds are drinking out of open wells or inconsistently using the hand pump. Since drawing water is mainly a girls’ chore, there is a lot of time spent waiting to draw water, when they could be using the time to be in school, studying, or completing other chores.

Another problem is the high frequency of diarrhea in village. In an initial study, 20 out 22 compounds stated that their children had diarrhea in the past three months. The information collected from the nearby Health Center l (4 km away) also confirmed that the top three health concerns among kids from Bantunding were: diarrhea, malnutrition and malaria.

Bantunding Water System Project - The GambiaProject Description
This project is to complete the work implemented by the community and already underway to drill a borehole, install a pump, powered by 6 solar panels, and build a piping system, with 15 taps.

The main components of the project activities include: digging a borehole using modern equipment, installing 6 solar panels that will run the pump to draw water up, adding two 2,000-liter water tanks for storage, and laying pipe to connect 15 taps at major junctions throughout the village.

Through subscriptions and donations from relatives working abroad and in other areas of the country, Bantunding has raised over $6,000 USD for the project. The funds were used to dig the borehole and lay 660 meters of pipe for the network, and install seven taps to be connected to the tanks.

The BajaKunda Ward Development Program gave $5,000.00 USD of the 2014 and 2015 tax revenue to aid this project. The village is providing all unskilled labor from their men.

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the following: (i) to complete 660-meter pipe network (ii) to purchase and fix seven additional taps, (iii) to set up the solar panels, (iv) to erect and install the water tanks, and (v) to complete the system by adding in the pump.

The PCV and her counterpart will conduct water hygiene and quality management training for the community members, and water committee members will be trained on institutional management, resource mobilization and management as well as basic maintenance of the water system by the Regional Water Resources team base in the Regional capital (Basse) to enhance sustainability of this project beyond the grant life cycle.

The PCV and her counterpart will be working with Village Development Committee (VDC). A village base Community Base Organization legally registered to facilitate and manage local development activities of Bantunding. This body has led the design of the project, will facilitate the implementation of the project activities as well as manage the operation and maintenance of the project.

The VDC, headed by the Chairman, will serve as the contracting authority for the contract to deliver the project. Similarly, the VDC will be responsible for mobilizing both local and external resources to successfully execute the project activities, as well ensuring the sustainability of the project after the grant funding.

Project Impact
1,500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Alicia Vander Wal

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV and counterpart will continually monitor the implementation of the project activities to ensure the design is being followed correctly. They will also use data provided by the school and the nearby hospital, as well as Peace Corps’ own collection tools, to monitor whether the project and planned interventions are meeting the short-term and long-term outcomes of this project.

The PCV, counterpart, and community health nurse (CHN), will conduct teachings at the school and different groups of the community, as well as going compound-to-compound as necessary, to provide education regarding safe water storage vessels, hand hygiene, and how to prevent diarrheal diseases.

The water committee will be trained, with the help of the contractor, as well as Regional Water Resources team, on maintaining the tap system, collecting monthly dues from the compound, and possibly extending the project as deemed necessary. The committee will also be trained by the PCV and counterpart on basic financial record keeping to ensure fees are being paid, funds are available, cost of repairs, and that the committee is being accountable with the money.

Comments
Project objectives include: i) improved health of children, especially school-aged and those under five, due to a decrease in diarrheal diseases, ii) decrease in rates of diarrheal diseases based on education provided regarding handwashing and proper water storage vessels.

Expected outcomes include but are not limited to: i) a decrease in time spent collecting water by women and girls ii) increase in time spent studying and attending school for the girls iii) improved school attendance rates due to less sick days taken.

Let Girls Learn
This project qualifies as an official Let Girls Learn project, as it provides resources that accrue to the benefit of adolescent girls. As they are largely relieved of the arduous and time-consuming responsibility of waiting at the single nearby location or retrieving water from distant locations each day, they are able to attend and remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$4,100

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$470

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,630

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Frumuşica High School Well Project - Moldova

Frumuşica High School Well Project - Moldova

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Frumușica, Florești, Republic of Moldova

Frumuşica High School Well Project - MoldovaCommunity Description
Frumușica is a small village in the district of Florești, in Northern Moldova. The village consists of around 900 locals, the majority of them being children or the elderly. It is very common for early-20s to late-50s adults to work and live abroad, sending home money for their children and elderly parents.

The village consists of an Eastern Orthodox church, the mayor's office/post office, the sector police station, the club house, a pharmacy, a kindergarten, a small clinic, a handful of small convenience stores, and the local high school.

Frumușica High School is the home to 157 students and 31 school employees from 6 neighboring villages including Frumușica, Căinarii Vechi, Scăieni, Izvoare, Trifanești, and Alexandrovca. The students range from grades 1st - 12th with ages 7 - 18 years old. It is the biggest school in the area, and plays a vital part in the community.

Problem Addressed
There has been a high number of cases of hepatitis A, along with diarrhea, among the students and staff at the high school. This is due to the fact that the school lacks access to clean, filtered, and consistent running water.

With unstable running water, they cannot consistently wash their hands, use the restrooms, cook, prepare meals, or even clean efficiently - which ultimately halts their progress toward a healthier lifestyle.

From observations, surveys and open discussion, students stated when the water is low or abruptly stops running, which it often does (no water for a week out of a month), they cannot use the sinks to wash their hands before meals or after using the restroom. In fact, they are forced to use the unsanitary outdoor toilets.

The cooking staff cannot properly prepare meals for the primary school and the high school students and staff without running water. They are forced to go to the nearby uncovered well which is a 3-5-minute walk.

The cleaning staff, all over the age 50, have to fetch buckets of water from the wells throughout the day to clean and maintain the school. The service staff mention that during the cold season, water is used to fill the heating system throughout the school, and without water, the school does not sufficiently heat up.

The school had its own water well system. However, in 1995 the well dried up and the school had to find an alternative water source. The school brought water from other wells in cleaning tanks and stored them in large barrels. This did not meet the sanitary and health requirements.

In 2014, Frumuşica High School tried another alternate source for water. However, they ran into the same problems, with the prices being extremely high and constant interruptions.

Without running water, there is a high risk of spreading transmittable diseases, especially if the students and staff cannot wash their hands properly, use the restroom appropriately, and prepare or eat a meal at school correctly.

In the Florești area, there have been outbreaks of hepatitis A. According to the public medical center, the 11 villages sector (including Frumușica, Trifanești, Izvoare, Scăieni, Căinari Vechi, Alexandrovca) have a total of 176 registered cases of hepatitis (A, B, C) with 21 of them being children. The total registered cases of hepatitis (A, B, C) in Frumușica is 34, with 5 of them children.

Project Description
This project is to build a well to provide for the water needs of the school.

The well is designed to connect to the school waterline and provide water to the cafeteria, sinks, indoor restrooms and faucets. The school will use a water pump, generator and water filtration system to provide clean, filtered running water.

The school director, groundskeepers and some of the men in the community will help with the purchasing of the materials and the construction of the well.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the necessary materials to dig, clean and build the well, and to compensate those who work on the construction and installation of the project.

The community will contribute 25% of the overall project budget, paying for gas, electricity, transportation, transportation rentals, and work.

Project Impact
188 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Aana Barabas

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school's groundskeepers and maintenance team will be responsible for monitoring and maintaining the water pump and pipes. As they will be involved with the construction and installation of the well, they will have the knowledge to properly replace or fix any problems that arise. The school and parent association will replace the water filter, every 3 to 5 years as needed.

Comments
With the construction of this well and access to clean, reliable water, the students and staff at Frumuşica High School will have several benefits, namely:

1. The renovated sinks can be used for handwashing on a regular basis.
2. The indoor restrooms will be available and in use for the students and staff.
3. The school cafeteria can operate and serve lunch to the students in a hygienic manner.
4. The cleaning staff can clean in sanitary comfort with adequate supply to water.
5. The school can properly be heated during the cold season with the water-fueled heating system.
6. The students will have a reliable and consistent source of pure drinking water.
7. The female students and staff can safely and comfortably use the restroom facility during their menstrual cycle.

Frumuşica High School Well Project - MoldovaLet Girls Learn
This is an official Let Girls Learn project, being implemented pursuant to the partnership between the Office of the First Lady and Peace Corps.

It is important to note that 55% of the students are girls and 77% of the school employees are women. The lack of water greatly affects the female populations, especially those who are of menstruating age. Most females feel so uncomfortable with the unsanitary conditions that they stay home from school or go home early.

As part of the project, the health teachers and health club have all already conducted a menstrual/reproductive health seminar and invited all the female students in grades 4th-12th, along with the staff members.

Fundraising Target
$1,700

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$1,000

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$700

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

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Zall Shoshaj School Bathroom Project - Albania

Zall Shoshaj School Bathroom Project - Albania

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.
This is a project under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama and the Peace Corps to expand access to education for girls around the world!
 

Zall Shoshaj School Bathroom Project - AlbaniaLocation
Zall Shoshaj, Mat, Albania E SHKOLLES ZALL-SHOSHAJ, (Anex) Komsi

Community Description
Bashkia Mat, previously Bashkia Burrel, has recently assumed the responsibility for the school buildings in the villages that are within the Mat region. These school buildings are in addition to the schools within the city of Burrel, which they had always been responsible for. This is part of Albania’s Decentralization process that is currently being implemented. Bashkia Mat received notification of four school buildings that should not be opened on the September 14, 2015 opening day due to bathrooms that are non-functioning.

Zall-Shoshaj school is a K-2nd grade school in an annex of the community of Komsi. Komsi is a village and a former municipality in the Dibër County, northern Albania. At the 2015 local government reform it became a subdivision of the municipality Mat. The population at the 2011 census was 4,283. The seat of the municipality now is the town Burrel. Baskia Mat now represents the region of approximately 30,000 people.

Zall Shoshaj School Bathroom Project - AlbaniaProblem Addressed
The “Queen Geraldine Foundation” recently provided the school with the reconstruction of the Kindergarten classroom and the other two-class rooms have been freshened up with cleaning and paint. However, the bathrooms have not been attended to and continue to be open-air, and without functioning toilets or water.

The children have no facilities for simple hygiene, and the teachers lack facilities to clean the younger children.

Project Description
This project is to rebuild the two-toilet bathroom at the school.

The project will completely reconstruct the bathrooms and bring a water source to them.

The work will be done by school staff, parents, and local craftsmen.

The Municipality of Mat will contribute 33% of the construction costs in the form of labor and some materials. Water Charity funds will pay for the remaining expenses.

Zall Shoshaj School Bathroom Project - AlbaniaProject Impact
48 students will benefit from the project, consisting of 22 Kindergarten students and 26 students in grades 1 and 2.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
This project will be implemented by Barbara Richardson, who previously completed the 31 Korrik 9 Vjecare School Bathroom and Water Project - Albania 

Monitoring and Maintenance
Upon completion, the school will provide all monitoring and maintenance of the bathroom

Let Girls Learn
The lack of bathroom facilities is a significant problem for the children, most of whom are girls, who have no means of attending to personal hygiene. This sometimes results in children not going to school when such needs are required.

This project is part of the Let Girls Lean Program, a powerful collaboration between First Lady Michelle Obama and the Peace Corps which was formed to expand access to education for adolescent girls around the world. https://letgirlslearn.peacecorps.gov/.  Lack of clean facilities is a leading cause of women dropping out of school. Water Charity is proud to have sponsored the very first LGL project, and continues to be a leading contributor to the program, as evidenced by projects like this one.

As an LGL project, this falls under our 100 Water Projects Program - Albania as well as our larger Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide.
 

Fundraising Target
$1,400

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$1,400

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been fully funded by friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Barbara Richardson.  Additional amounts will be allocated to other projects in Albania.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

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Mtambula Well Repair Project - Tanzania

Mtambula Well Repair Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Mtambula Village in Iringa Region, TanzaniaLocation
Mtambula Village in Iringa Region, Tanzania

Community Description
Mtambula is a farming community located in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania in the Iringa region. With roughly 4,000 community members, there are always events happening at one of the schools, community centers or shopping locations. Half of the year is in the "rainy season," from January to May. The other half is the "dry season," making it difficult to continue agriculture programs.

Living in Mtambula is different every day. There is a maternal health clinic that is short-staffed, many schools, and over half the population is school-aged youth! Mtambula is a large community with a large youth population, and will continue to grow in the coming years.

Problem Addressed
Currently, many community members are required to walk several kilometers to retrieve water, taking up time that could otherwise be spent elsewhere. The lack of available water leads to issues of sustainability, taking away precious time from income generation, learning, and food growth.

The only sources of water other than the two working wells are two rivers. During the rainy season, it is possible to retrieve water from these locations. However, the water is unsanitary.

Mtambula Village in Iringa Region, TanzaniaVillage law states that people must use a water source within one hundred meters of their home. With the amount of wells in need of repair, that is impossible for a large amount of the community.

The village of Mtambula, found in the Southern Highlands of Iringa, Tanzania, has had difficulty in fulfilling the community water needs. There are two highly trafficked wells, a few scattered private wells, and many non-functioning water sources.

The strain of access to water makes it difficult to keep students in class, for community members to provide basic food and sanitation needs at home, and for the two already busy nurses at the local maternal health clinic to keep up with the many women the clinic serves daily.

79% (3,284) of the population is under the age of eighteen, many of which are students at the primary and secondary school. Lack of water availability forces students out of class to fetch water daily. 2,194 women live in Mtambula, many of which frequent the farms and maternal health clinic.

Previously, the Water Committee of Mtambula has constructed additional wells to fight the water issue. The correct training was not used after construction, leading to more broken wells. A village of 4,167 people cannot sustain on two public wells which risk being broken from over-use if other community water sources are not repaired.

Project Description
This project is to repair twelve non-functional wells in the village of Mtambula, both reducing the strain of two working wells and to provide access to water closer to homes.

Mtambula Village in Iringa Region, TanzaniaThe work will be done by members of the Water Committee, with some responsible for purchasing the materials and others performing the repairs.

Standard pumps will be purchased and used at the existing wells. All broken piping will be replaced.

Water Charity funds will pay for the materials.

The community will contribute over 25% of the project costs in the form of local materials, labor, and cash.

Each member of the Well Committee, Water Committee and Village Committee will go door to door in their designated sub-villages, explaining the well repairs and that education will be provided at upcoming meetings that are required to use the repaired structures. To ensure people attend one of the meetings to learn about the new wells, fliers will also be handed out to all local businesses, including local shops, the clinic and the schools.

Project Impact
4,167 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Dennis Smith

Monitoring and Maintenance
Wells will be checked at June 30th, 2016. By July 15th, 2016, community members will be educated and given a test on proper well use.

Mtambula Well Repair Project - TanzaniaSmall amounts will be collected from users to ensure that future repairs can be made as needed.

Long-term, fixing the wells will give members of the community the knowledge of how to use them efficiently, know the signs of when to stop using a well, and prevent wells from breaking in the future. If a well does happen to break, members of the community will also have the knowledge to fix them.

Comments
By repairing twelve wells around the village and educating on proper use, access to water will be closer and more reliable to community members. The nurses will have access to water at the maternal health clinic, shop owners will not have to walk over one hundred meters to fetch water to cook, and homes will have access for many domestic needs.

Fundraising Target
$3,200

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,200

 

 
 
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Tchore Borehole Project - Togo

Tchore Borehole Project - Togo

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Tchore Borehole Project - TogoLocation
Tchore Center, Canton of Tchore, Kara Region, Togo

Community Description
This community received its political autonomy in 2012. The village is the seat of the regional chief, and all disputes or social affairs take place in his courtyard. There is a small clinic which provides first-aid, medicine and midwife services. This clinic services the seven surrounding villages which make up the political limits.

The market in the center of town goes from morning to night every Tuesday, with plenty of local beer and fried doughnuts. Next to the market is the elementary school, with a kindergarten. The pace of life is very slow, but not boring.

Problem Addressed
The most fundamental problem of the community is the scarcity of water. The rains stop in mid-November and do not begin again until May. During this seven- month interval, the river dries up and so do the three wells. The only water to be found comes from holes in the ground, which is hardly enough to sustain life.

The mid-wife at the hospital uses dirty groundwater to wash newborn babies and to clean the vaginal tracts of new mothers. The use of dirty water leads to elevated rates of dermatologic and infectious diseases.

Women and girls are exhausted by the competition for resources because they have to wake up early and go far to fetch water. Many women spend their whole day trying to accumulate enough water for their families.

A main source of income for women is the preparation of local sorghum beer, but women use dirty water and the community often suffers from intestinal worms and parasites.

Tchore Borehole Project - Togo

 

Project Description
This project is to build a borehole with a hand pump in proximity to the community hospital and elementary school.

The well will be dug to about 40-60 meters and be enclosed by a cement wall. After the technical work, the community will plant trees around the pump in the hopes of retaining water and beautifying the environment around the well.

An open community meeting will be held to choose a water committee to oversee the management of the well. This committee will decide the method of payment for water, and how to collect this money. There will be members designated as daily maintenance agents and several women will be trained by the pump technicians on preventative maintenance and small repairs.

Water Charity funds will go to renting heavy machinery, drilling the well, purchasing the materials (such as pipes, pump hardware, cement) and the paying of skilled labor.

The community will add approximately $2,000 to the project's total funds, along with sand, gravel, manual labor and lodging of the skilled laborers.

The company contracted to perform the work is E-Forage Togo, a local business based in Kara.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from the project.

Let Girls Learn
This project will allow girls to stay in school because it brings water closer to them, reducing the amount of time it takes for them to retrieve water for the daily needs of their families.

In addition, clean water will reduce illness, allowing them to devote more energy to their studies and attend school more regularly.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Riley Pavelich

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community has formed a committee for monitoring and maintaining the pump. Members of this committee have been designated for cleaning and upkeep, collecting fees, and repairing breakdowns quickly.

People wishing to use the pump will have to pay a nominal fee, and the money raised will go into a specific bank account. The company installing the well will train a group of women to make small repairs and to service the pump regularly to prevent eventual problems.

Comments
Riley notes:
“This project is possible through the participation of Water Charity and two generations of Peace Corps Volunteers. As the current volunteer, I see the desperate need for a protected source of water. The previous volunteer, once home in the US, fund-raised more than $2,000 and sent it to the president of the Village Development Committee (who is a good friend of his).”

This project is being paid for through the generosity of an anonymous donor. If you would like to support additional great projects such as this one, please contribute to our Western Africa Water and Sanitation Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

Tchore Borehole Project - TogoTchore Borehole Project - Togo

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Meanchey Middle School Water Project - Cambodia

School girls from Meanchey Middle School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Meanchey Middle School, Roneam Village, Meanchey Commune, Sandan District, Kampong Thom Province, Cambodia

Community Description
Meanchey is a farming commune located in rural Kampong Thom, Cambodia. The Meanchey Middle School is the only middle school in a commune of over 3,400 people. Fifteen teachers educate 284 students age 11 to 18 years old. A large majority of people in Meanchey are farmers and usually have one or two additional jobs such as teaching or selling produce at the market in order to support their families. Many families don't have access to clean water and use the local river for showering and washing their clothes. Although people in this community face many challenges, you will rarely see them without a smile on their face. They know how to find happiness in simple things, and tend to work together to solve common problems.

Problem Addressed
A challenge the school faces is the lack of access to clean water. For years the school has depended on rainwater and a broken well as their primary sources of water for basic needs. Rainwater is not a dependable source in Cambodia, especially during the dry season. The old well stopped working after a big flood in the area in 2004 and now only produces dirty water. 

The school has no history of securing an adequate, uncontaminated water supply. Sanitation is also lacking in the school. Since there are few waste bins and no recycling bins, students throw trash on the ground and do a poor job of cleaning it up once a week. The school director and teachers have communicated their concern regarding the health of their students due to the lack of safe drinking water and uncleanliness of the school. The consequences are diarrhea, skin disease, respiratory illnesses, intestinal and other waterborne diseases.  These diseases decrease the amount of time children are in school. The school has expressed interest in a well, a hand washing station, water filters and waste/ recycling bins.  They also have a request to provide education on proper hand washing, drinking safe water and the importance of maintaining a clean environment.

Boys at the schoolProject Description
Local construction workers will construct a well at the Meanchey Middle School.  

A hole will be dug 45 meters deep using safe techniques.  A 3 x 4 meter area outside of the well will be cemented. A motor will be used to pump water out of the well and into the latrines and hand washing stations.

A hand washing station will be built next to the latrines on the right side of the school near the 8th and 9th grade classrooms and another will be repaired next to latrines on the left side of the school by the 7th grade classrooms. Locally purchased waste and recycling bins will be placed throughout the school.
 
School teachers and the Peace Corps volunteer will conduct a two-hour session to promote proper hand washing techniques, the advantages of drinking safe water and the importance of maintaining a clean environment for each of the seven classrooms in the school, educating all 284 students over the course of three days. Students will volunteer to be peer educators and pass on the information they have learned to elementary school students, demonstrating they have understood the material and are reinforcing it by teaching it to others.

The school will provide bars of soap to the hand washing stations at all times. Each of the seven classrooms will be supplied with low-maintenance, portable and effective ceramic water purifiers to provide safe drinking water for students.

Project Impact Trash outside of the school
This project will impact 299 people; 284 students and 15 teachers will benefit from this project.  Future students and visitors will benefit as well.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Valerie Rojas     

Monitoring and Maintenance 
Students in the school’s youth group will monitor the new facilities and notify the director when repairs are needed or they are out of soap for hand washing. The school director has committed to repairing or making necessary adjustments within a month of receiving notice. The PCV will monitor behavior change in the school such as students washing their hands appropriately and disposing of trash in bins and recycling.  The PCV will also provide additional education or reminders as needed.

Comments
The community organization involved with this project is the Meanchey Middle School Teachers. The project is part of Water Charity's ongoing Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide.
 
Let Girls Learn: Lack of clean facilities is a leading cause of girls dropping out of school. Girls often miss school throughout the duration of their period every month because the bathrooms have no water or waste bins to allow for sanitary pad disposal or hand washing. Many of them never go back. The lack of clean water also adds to unsanitary conditions in the bathrooms which is harder on the girls since the boys are able to use the bathroom outdoors. 
The Bathrooms

This project will ensure girls access to clean bathrooms and therefore lower the amount of drop outs among girls.  Sustainable improvements in hygiene behavior patterns require more than education activities and, at the same time, facilities are not sufficient on their own to improve health. A holistic approach that combines the promotion of behavior change and the provision of facilities will lead to a sustainable outcome for the school.

Building the capacity of the middle school staff will be an integral part in the sustainability of managing and sustaining hygiene, water and sanitation programs for long-term success. The Peace Corps volunteer will work with the school to enable the school environment as well as promote community-based management to ensure the effectiveness and sustainability of all water, sanitation and hygiene efforts.

The director and teachers are equipped with the knowledge and skills to effectively manage their own facilities and have advocated for the basic right to safe water. The attainability of their own water source instead of dependency on unreliable sources will lead to empowerment and participatory approaches i.e. community-led hand washing demonstrations for a healthier learning environment.

The water source and the environmental component will promote key hygiene behaviors such as hand washing with soap, using clean toilets, treating and drinking safe water and protecting the environment which once learned will remain a part of their lifestyles. 

Dollar Amount of Project
$1,800

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed

$1,800

 

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Old Well

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Boti Primary School Bore Hole Project - Ghana

Boti, Ghana

 

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.WC & NPC Logos

Location

Boti, Eastern Region, Ghana

Community Description
Boti is a community of just under one thousand people, though it's easy to learn most of their names.  The tight-knit community revolves around personal interactions of meal times or a calabash of palm wine. Boti parallels a two-mile stretch of the Pompom River that eventually is the source of the Boti Falls tourist attraction a few miles downstream.  The beauty of the green lush jungles is breathtaking.  Four months of the year, however, dry season comes and the Pompom turns to sand, and the jungle browns and decays.Water hole
      
The Town is the epicenter for the communities around it, hosting a primary school, junior high school and clinic for up to six surrounding villages. Many people come to Boti for its resources; however, access to clean water is not one of Boti's strengths, with only one bore hole for its residents.

Problem Addressed
Four months of the year, the problem is comparitively small.  The biggest issue that faces residents of Boti in the rainy season is pollution and contaminated water. When the Pompom flows most of the village gets their water from the river.  However all along the river as well as upstream, people wash cloths, wash themselves, and often, pollute their river with trash and human waste.  Even when the river is roaring, there isn't a safe drop to drink.  

In the dry season, there is virtually no water around.  The single borehole has long lines and often has to be left to sit to recharge before more water can be taken.  The water once taken from the Pompom for all the activities that don't involve drinking, becomes unavailable.
      
Community health and hygiene is affected.  The schools and clinics suffer particularly in the dry season as the water is needed for patient and students, and often things as simple as hand washing are ignored to conserve the water to drink.

Woman carrying waterProject Description
This project is to build a borehole near the primary school in Boti.  

The location is in the central of a heavily-populated part of town and will provide access to water for all the students in the primary school.  The project will be constructed using the most up-to- date borehole and pump technology available in Ghana.  The majority of the funds will be provided to the contractor for the classes, pipe assembly and actual digging.  

The community, will donate skilled labor to building a concrete apron around the bore hole to ensure cleanliness of the area and longevity of the bore hole. 

Project Impact
This project will benefit at least 300 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Topher Mongeon

Monitoring and Maintenance 
The water sanitation committee will monitor the construction of the bore hole done by the contractor.  They will help manage the process and funds, seeking assistance as needed from PC volunteers and staff.  At the end of the construction the water sanitation committee will attend basic maintenance classes to ensure the longevity of the bore hole.

Comments
The community organization involved in this project is the Boti Water Sanitation Committee.Dry well

In the Boti community, much like most communities in Ghana, men never fetch water.  Although they drink it, bathe with it, wear clean clothes and eat fufu and stew (the national cuisine), men never fetch water.  It's a woman's role.

And of the women, it's usually females of a student’s age that are fetching water.  Often times those that are older are pregnant, watching children or simply an elder.  However it is female students that carry most of the water for the community.  When the school is out of water the teacher sends the girls out of class to let girls fetch.  When they arrive home, rather than homework, the families will have girls fetch.  A bore hole will decrease time and energy devoted to fetching water and allow girls to reain in school  

PCVs live in their communities for two years.  They get to know the people, the culture and the struggle.  they eat like Ghanaians, travel like Ghanaians, sweat like Ghanaians, but they don't suffer like Ghanaians.  Peace Corps won't let them live without clean drinking water, but the kids, the elderly, the crooked backed farmers live without clean water, sometimes without water at all.  Kids look at pure water sachets (Ghana's version of bottled water) like candy or a treat, because of the rarity it is that they may be guaranteed clean water.  

Topher states that, “I joined PC to realize some of the struggle the global communities have, but to also alleviate that suffering if possible.”

This bore hole will help students learn more in school by staying healthy and not fetching water during class times.  It'll keep breastfeeding mothers healthier, it'll give women more time to spend with their children or working on small income generating activities.  It can increase small animal husbandry and micro gardens filled with veggies that families can't afford in the dry season.  It's incredible, when you think about it, how valuable one drop of water is.

This project has been made possible through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

Please use the donate button below so that we will have funds on hand for more great upcoming projects in Ghana.

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