Health Center

Kisese-Dissa, Magereza, and Teiriani Water Project - Tanzania

Village women filling their water jugs

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC LOGOS

Location

Kisese-Dissa, Kondoa District, Dodoma Region, Tanzania

Community Description
The project community is comprised of three neighboring villages: Kisese-Dissa, Magereza, and Teiriani.  These three villages are located in central Tanzania in the region of Dodoma, notoriously one of the hottest and most dry areas in Tanzania. The majority of the 2,000 inhabitants in this area are people of the Warangi tribe that maintain their livelihood through tending large farms, where the primary crops are beans, peanuts, corn, and sunflowers, and managing small herds of livestock consisting of goats, cows, and a few sheep.  Because these farms and animals provide the only source Village Woman carrying many water jugsof income for most families here, they are constantly at the mercy of the rains and dependent on having access to sufficient water. "Water is life," states Mama Adamu, a grandmother living in the village of Kisese-Dissa. 

In the rainy season, lasting from December to early April, the area is full of vibrant colors: the luscious greens of corn stalks, bright fields of yellow sunflowers, and the rich brown of constantly wet soil.  However, by the time September rolls around, the last of these colors has faded and the landscape becomes a hazy blend of various shades of light brown and gray.   When the rainy season has passed, the only source of water in the area comes from a natural spring in the ridgeline that forms a backdrop on the western skyline of the village.  During these dry months, people spend their time fetching water, storing their harvested crops, and resting for the next round of planting.  A few households try to maintain small home gardens throughout the dry season but often give up due to the heavy labor of fetching water to nourish their plants. 

Life here revolves around water.  Whether it is talking about how scarce the rains were this past year, when the rains will return, or whether the closest tap actually has water on that particular day, water is a constant topic of conversation in this dry district.

Children attend the primary school in Kisese-Dissa from neighboring villages.  In total, nearly 500 students attend this school and are taught by 11 teachers in unfinished, crowded classrooms.  It is not unusual to walk into a classroom and find 80+ students; some sit on crowded benches while others line the wall or sit in the aisles.  These close quarters offer a haven for germs, especially since the children are currently unable to wash their hands while at school. 

The clinic located in Kisese-Dissa is also the primary health center for the ward, comprised of five villages.  People come here to be tested for HIV or malaria, to give birth, receive vaccinations or other shots, and be treated for various wounds.  One doctor and a rotation of three nurses staff the clinic.  Because both the primary school and clinic are located in this village, there are constantly people from other villages passing through.  However, these unfamiliar faces are often from another village in the ward.  Because Kisese-Dissa is located on a dirt road at least 3.5 hours from the nearest large town, it remains rural and unknown to many individuals outside the district of Kondoa.

Life in rural Tanzania is difficult.  Every day physical labor is required for survival.  Whether it is hauling water, preparing the farm, tilling fields, or harvesting crops, there is always something to be done. Every Saturday, people converge on the distant village of Madisa, a 90-minute walk one-way, to buy fresh produce for the week. However, despite this rigorous lifestyle, the people here remain optimistic and find moments to celebrate.  Relief from the cycle of labor comes in the form of weddings, political campaigns, local soccer games, and religious holidays.  On these occasions, people do not hold back.  Whatever they have, they share with friends and neighbors by preparing sumptuous feasts and recognizing their culture by playing traditional Kirangi music on handmade drums and cow horns as the older women sing songs from their memories.

Problem Addressed  
When surveying the inhabitants of Kisese-Dissa, it does not take long to gather a consensus as to what the biggest issue is: water.  While the increasingly unpredictable rains are not something that can be fixed, the ability of the village to harvest and store water is an issue that can be resolved.  In the 1980’s a 40,000 L cement water tank was constructed to harvest water from a natural spring in the nearby mountain, then distribute it to the residents of Kisese-Dissa through a pipe system. 

However, since the construction of this tank, the population has nearly tripled and additional pipelines have been laid to provide water for the neighboring villages that have no other source of water; therefore, this 40,000 L tank has become insufficient.  The tank is closed off at night, allowing it to be refilled by the spring.  Water from the spring is able to refill the tank within 8 hours, after which time the water continues to flow in but is directed to the overflow pipe, which simply dumps the water onto the ground outside the tank, wasted and unusable.
broken pipe repaired with plastic bags
Therefore, when the pipes are opened each morning, it is only matter of hours before the tank is emptied and unable to refill fast enough to maintain strong enough water pressure to push the water to the furthest destinations.  As a result, water often does not reach its furthest destinations, and even if it does, it is usually cut off by about 1:30 pm.  That gives people a period of four hours to haul all the water they need for the day, 50 to 70 liters per household.  During this time, they are competing with their neighbors for use of the tap; in some places, a single water tap serves up to 200 people!  When the water is cut off, people then walk upwards of two kilometers to obtain water from another tap; people will even fetch water from the nearby riverbed. 

In the dry season they have to dig down at least three feet in the riverbed to access water, and in the rainy season they are using water that is contaminated by livestock, since the river is a popular place to water the animals.  The local primary school is one of the locations that rarely receive water.  Although there is a tap installed at the school, water only reaches the school about once a week, and at a very slow trickle.  For the rest of the week, the students and teachers have no water to drink, no water to clean the bathrooms, and no water to wash their hands after using the bathrooms. 

When asked about how she deals with the water issues, 6th grade student Shialah says, “If it’s really hot I bring water from home, and I just don’t go to the bathroom at school.  Usually I can wait until I get home."  Other students are not so fortunate: those who can’t ‘hold it’ will sometimes go to the bathroom in the bushes to avoid the disgusting toilets.  And some students live far from the school and are unable to return home at lunch break to refill their water and eat lunch; they simply sit at the school and try not to think about how hungry they are.  Students often miss class due to minor illnesses, such as diarrhea and the common cold, which could be minimized if students had the means to wash their hands at school.

Another area that is in desperate need of a reliable water source is the clinic for the ward, located in Kisese-Dissa.  At a health center responsible for delivering babies, treating serious wounds, and treating HIV, where contact with bodily fluids is inevitable, the lack of water is an obvious health hazard.  The doctor and two nurses are forced to haul water from the closest tap and store it in buckets at the clinic.  The lack of running water greatly increases the risk of spreading disease through unsanitary practices.  The absence of water at the clinic is due to a faulty pipeline. 

The pipeline has a handful of leaks that are repaired in by simply wrapping plastic bags or rubber strips around the pipe to prevent water from squirting out.  Adding to the problem is dirt build-up or other debris that clogs the pipes and obstructs water flow.  The filtration screen that was installed at the spring source has slowly deteriorated, letting larger objects pass through and obstruct the flow of water, while also potentially contaminating the water.  Local government officials have attempted a variety of solutions to remedy the water issue, but have been thwarted in finding a permanent solution.  Last year, due to the scarce rains and limited water supply, numerous households not only lost the crops in their farms, but were also unable to maintain their home gardens, instead having to ration the water for day-to-day tasks such as bathing, washing clothes, and cooking.

Overall, the health of this community group is pretty good compared to other places, but there are still a variety of health issues.  One of the biggest health issues among both adults and children, following malaria, is diarrhea.  The doctor believes that people drinking from unsanitary sources such as the river or shallow, hand-dug wells without using any method of purification cause most cases of diarrhea.  Common illnesses such as diarrhea and the common cold are common, especially among school-age children. 

Project Description
To remedy this water issue and assure that water arrives not only to the clinic and school, but also increases the amount and duration of water availability at other sites, the people of Kisese-Dissa will construct a 50,000 L water tank adjacent and connected to the existing water tank.  The existing water tank is located about 300 yards behind the local clinic and is positioned at the base of a ridgeline.  The surrounding area consists of small farms and a gulley that originates in the mountain and continues throughout the village.
Young girl carrying water
Once the first tank is filled, the excess water will be directed into the new tank, instead of being dumped outside and absorbed back into the ground where it is unusable.  This new water tank will also help to increase the water pressure, thus pushing the water as far as the primary school and distant village of Teiriani throughout the entire day.  Via underground pipes, the new tank will be connected to the existing pipe system so that when the water from the first tank is drained, a valve can be opened to allow water from the second tank to enter the system.

To further increase water pressure, a new air valve will be installed at two key points in the pipe system, which will guarantee that the water reaches the furthest destinations.  A thorough cleaning of the existing tank and pipe system will also take place to remove any blockages that have built up and to conduct any necessary repairs.  To prevent future blockages, and to help reduce water contamination, the filter screen at the spring will be replaced and an additional screen will be installed where the pipe dumps the water into the tanks. 

Furthermore, the existing tank will be re-coated with another layer of plaster to prevent cracks from forming and strengthen the tank.  Additionally, once the lid of the tank is completed, the boards that were used to support it during construction will be resold and that money will be used to buy new pipes to replace those that could not be adequately repaired.  All of these efforts – the new water tank, filter screens, air valves, system cleaning, and pipe replacement will ensure that the people of Kisese-Dissa, Magereza, and Teiriani will have a constantly accessible source of water to care for their families, enact healthy hygiene habits, and maintain home gardens. The local primary school will further benefit by using their new water source to construct two hand washing stations, which will provide students and teachers the means to reduce the spread of illness by washing their hands after using the bathroom or returning from the farm. 

In coordination with this project, a one-day seminar will be held at the school to remind students and teachers of proper hand washing techniques and appropriate times to wash their hands.  Another seminar about hand washing, water purification, and water management will be held in the village of Kisese-Dissa to educate residents about healthy practices and ways to reuse gray water. This project will take place as soon as the funds are received, and the tank will be completed within 40 days.  This tank is a priority for the entire village and will be completed through a group effort.  The chairmen from Kisese-Dissa, Teiriani, and Magereza have assembled volunteer groups that will come each day to assist the lead workmen during construction. 

The first task is to dig the hole to make a level base for the tank; this will be completed in three days.  The next phase is to lay the foundation, a combination of cement, rocks, and crushed rock.  The architect has allotted four days for this process and another three to complete the floor of the tank.  After a day of drying, work will begin on the 1.8 m high walls and continue for 12 to 15 days.  Once the walls are finished, the workmen will spend three days building the concrete and rebar slab that is to act as a lid for the tank. For at least two weeks following completion of the lid, water will be poured daily over the cement surface to prevent cracking. 

As work on the tank is being done, the pipe foremen will oversee the digging of the ditch to lay the pipes.  This process, plus repairing the tap at the primary school, will take about a week.  To ensure completion within the specified time, the foremen will pre-order supplies and each evening will check to make sure that the supplies for the next day are already there. The goal is to have this tank completed and functional by the end of January 2016. Using Water Charity funds, supplies will be bought to build the tank, to buy the pipes and parts that will connect the two tanks, and to provide a small, reduced salary for the builders.  The most expensive items include bags of cement, crushed rocks, boards, and rebar, but there are many other smaller materials that will be used for this project, such as wire mesh, chicken wire, nails, steel wire, and the cost of transporting the materials. 

Showing their dedication to the project, the community is providing the equivalent of 26% of the total cost of the project.  Their contributions include labor, buckets, gathering large rocks and sand, support poles, expert consultations, food for the workers, land for the tank, and a night guard to sleep at the site throughout construction.  Beyond these physical contributions, the members of the water committee – the chairmen of the villages, the village executive officer, and the three lead workmen – are expending their own time and effort to prepare this proposal, oversee construction progress, and complete evaluations for at least a month after the completion of the tank.

Project Impact
Number of people affected by the project: 2,000

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Rochelle Latka

Monitoring and Maintenance
Monitoring the progress of the tank and the indirect projects following the tank’s completion will be a constant, ongoing process headed by the village chairmen and the headmaster at the primary school.  At least twice a week during the period of tank construction, the chairman of Kisese-Dissa and the Peace Corps Volunteer will visit the site to monitor progress and address any issues through an on-site survey and discussions with the lead workmen.  The same process will be used to monitor the laying and connection of the pipes. 

A week after the tank’s completion, each village chairman will visit all the taps in his/her village to assess the quantity and availability of water; this will continue for a month, with the results being reported back to Kisese-Dissa’s chairman, to be shared with the foremen, and the volunteer.  Monitoring of the hand washing stations at the primary school will be done by the headmaster and primary school teachers, with assistance from the volunteer.  Final evaluation will take place in March to assess the continuation of the hand washing stations.  Finally, using a before and after survey, the amount of absences from school and children coming to the clinic with common illnesses will be compared to see if the new water tap at the school has made a positive impact on student health.  This survey will be done from November 2015 to March 2016.

Even after the volunteer leaves, the local Water Committee will support this project.  These groups of individuals, including the village chairmen, village executive officer, and three head workmen, have pledged to care for this project and sustain it in the years to come.  The chairman of Kisese-Dissa and two of the workmen already volunteer their time and efforts to maintain the existing tank and pipe system and have vowed to do the same for this tank. Additionally, after completion of the tank, they will request a monetary contribution from each household, which will then be put in the bank to be used for tank or pipe repairs.  The Water Committee is organizing the community contributions and overseeing construction         

girls at the water pumpComments
This project qualifies as a part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative, but is not part of the official Peace Corps Let Girls Learn program.  We therefore class it as LGL+.  

While all students at the primary school will be direct beneficiaries of this project, the female students will benefit in ways other than just having water to wash their hands and refill their water bottles at school.  In this community, women and girls are responsible for matters relating to the home.  This includes fetching water for tasks such as cooking, washing clothes, and bathing.  Each morning, during every lunch break, and after school, girls who are able to carry a bucket of water are expected to help their mothers or older sisters to bring water to the house.  This is problematic for girls who live in the areas where many people are waiting at a single tap to get water or where water does not reach in the afternoons.  These girls are required to either wait or go in search of other water before returning to school. 

While this is a necessary task, it often causes girls to return late to school and miss out on their studies, not to mention receiving a punishment for being late. This also limits female students’ ability to participate in after school activities as they are requested to return home as soon as school ends to help fetch water for the evening and early morning activities.  By increasing the amount and accessibility of water in these areas, the amount of time that these girls will spend fetching water will decrease and allow them to return to school in time for the afternoon session. Having water readily available at the primary school will also help the older female students. 

The age range of female students that attend the school is 5 to 15 years old.  Many girls begin their menstruation around the age of 14 years old and it is a worrisome enough time without the added fear of how you will be able to clean yourself at school.  In fact, some girls choose to simply skip school when they are menstruating, thus missing out on their education.   In the past few months, the local Peace Corps Volunteer has worked with Huru International to assist these older girls by providing them with reusable pads and knowledge regarding matters of menstruation.  However, it is difficult to put these practices into action when no water is available at the school to wash your hands after changing pads.  Therefore, with the success of this project, these girls will gain the means to hygienically care for themselves without missing school.

The construction of this water tank will offer immediate benefits for the residents of Kisese-Dissa, Teiriani, and Magereza, but it also paves the way for potential future projects.  After obtaining water security, people will be more able to maintain home gardens and obtain nutritious foods, leading to better nutrition.  At the school, there are even more possibilities.  For months, the headmaster and village chairman have discussed creating a school lunch program to feed the children that live too far away to return home for lunch, but the lack of water was a major deterrent in this initiative.  However, with the completion of this project, creating a school lunch program is now a valid possibility.  The creation of a school garden is also now an obtainable goal.  The point of mentioning this is to show that not only will this water tank improve the lives of people in the short term, but it also increases the potential for future projects within the community.

Dollar Amount of Project
$5,100

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,100

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

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Sare Gueladio Health Hut Water Project - Senegal

Village women getting water from the well

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location
Sare Gueladio, Medina Yoro Foulah District, Kolda Region, SenegalHealth Hut

Community Description
Sare Gueladio is a rural village of about 400 people.  Almost all residents of Sare Gueladio and the surrounding villages are subsistence farmers.  The village is located about 7 kilometers from the regional capital, Kolda, in the south of Senegal.  Only about 15% of the residents are adults and more than a quarter of the residents are children under 10.  During certain months, prior to the rainy season and immediately after, most people are occupied with planting, maintenance, and harvesting in their fields.

In the village there is a community operated health structure called a Case de Santé (Health Hut).  Some of the most prevalent health problems in the area are malaria, diarrheal diseases, and respiratory infections.  Testing and treatment for these diseases are usually available at the Health Hut.  Pre-natal visits and deliveries are also conducted at the Hut.  Community health workers who operate the Health Hut are also responsible for conducting outreach and prevention activities.  The health workers that operate the Health Hut and other leaders in the community are extremely passionate about improving the health of their families and neighbors.  They are motivated and extremely hard working when it comes to community improvement opportunities.

In the health hutProblem Addressed
The current problem that exists at the Health Hut is a lack of available, potable water.  The cleanest water that is readily available in the village comes from a well that is substantially far away from the Health Hut and needs to be transported by bike or on foot.  This poses a myriad of challenges for sanitation and health at the facility.  Patients and health workers are at risk for dehydration and other illnesses caused by unhygienic conditions.  Also missing, is a sanitary latrine for patients and care providers to use while waiting or receiving treatment at the Health Hut.

Project Description
Currently, there is a water tower, or forage, in Sare Gueladio.  The forage was financed by a foreign NGO with support from the Senegalese Government.  Unfortunately, right now, there are only two faucets connecting the forage to the rest of the village. This project would finance the installation of a third faucet and the building of an improved, ventilated latrine on the grounds of the Health Hut.

Villagers will dig a shallow trench of about 100 meters connecting the faucet location at the health hut to the main pipeline that feeds the previously installed faucets.  We will then hire a plumber from the Senegalese Department of Water who has previously conducted installations in this village, to bring the necessary materials and equipment and install a new faucet. The residents of the village will also dig a pit that will serve as the septic tank for a ventilated latrine. Once the faucet is installed and there is a convenient source of water, we will hire a local mason to line the pit with bricks, cover and ventilate it, and connect it to a toilet seat.

Water Charity funds will pay for the purchase of the majority of materials and labor.  The community will contribute in the form of labor and cash raised from the people in Sare Gueladio and the surrounding villages that use the services of the Health Hut.

Project Impact
Roughly 1,000 people live in the villages that commonly use the Health Hut.Village man carrying water

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Nathan Rehr

Monitoring and Maintenance
The infrastructure being installed will need to be monitored and maintained by the Sare Gueladio Health Committee.  They will also be responsible for coordinating with the village chief and other groups to pay the water bill.

Comments
Community members lack of clean water was recently highlighted by as a major problem that discourages people from using the Health Hut in the village.  This clean water project will not only increase health benefits for people coming to the Health Hut but will also increase the credibility of the health workers there and encourage greater usage of the health facility.

The Sare Gueladio Health Committee is contributing project management and coordination of the project.

This project has been fully funded by an anonymous donor.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

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Mtae Health Clinic & Dispensary Water Tank Project - Tanzania

Mtae Health Clinic & Dispensary

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the National Peace Corps Association

Location of Project
Mtae, Lushoto District, Tanga Region, Tanzania

Mtae Health Clinic & DispensaryDescription of Project Community
Mtae is a gorgeous rural ward village situated in the Usambara mountains about three hours away from Lushoto Town. Within Mtae are three sub-villages: Mtae Center with a population of about 4,500 people, Mpanga containing about 2,550 people and Mtii with a population of around 2,500 people. The ‘zahanati’ or health center is composed of a clinic and dispensary, and serves all three sub-villages: 

Description of Problem
In Tanzania, water availability is a severe issue. Many villages especially in rural areas do not have easy access to water and walk miles in to the nearest river or lake in order to fill only two buckets of water. The lack of water results in unsanitary living situations, which in turn can causes diseases to arise and spread easily between people. The most common diseases resulting from lack of water include diarrheal diseases and common colds. Also because of the lack of sanitation, blood and fecal matter are easily transferred from person to person and animal to person.

The current main water source for the people of Mtae is a stream located about 45 minutes or 1.5 km away from the village and clinic. Typically, villagers have to walk the 45 minutes to carry only 2 or 3, 20 liter buckets of water to their house. There are about 5 communal spigots located throughout the village that are also connected to this stream. However, because the water system was poorly constructed, it is more common for water not to be avilable through these spigots and this causes issues for the people of Mtae and the staff at the clinic to have reliable and constant access to water.

Each day the dispensary sees between 75-300 people, not including those coming for clinic days such as the clinic for pregnant women (Mondays and Wednesdays), family planning (Tuesdays), and the very crowded Children’s Clinic (Fridays). Each day the four nurses and one doctor treat close to 300 people dealing with ailments from minor surgeries, flu-like symptoms, various injections and high blood pressure to the more hands on bandage changing and blood and urine testing for HIV, syphilis and malaria. HIV is a large problem in Mtae and villagers especially pregnant women and their husbands are required to get tested when they visit the clinic.

During the day, there is little to no water. If a patient is bleeding profusely, the staff will wear gloves but because of the limited supplies, they otherwise typically do not wear them. In the dispensary, there are typically three 20-liter buckets of water that are used for hand washing. The clinic has already installed two sinks but there is no water running through them. Currently, the lack of water currently available makes hand washing and proper sanitation of supplies a serious issue at the health center.

Detailed Project Description

The solution to combat the lack of water availability and reduce the spread of contagious disease, germs and blood borne pathogens is to install a 5,000 liter plastic water tank at the health center and connect it to 2 main sinks inside the center and an outside spigot, and connect a gutter system to catch rainfall

Non functioning sinkThe water supply will be used solely for the clinic and dispensary so that the doctor, nurses and patients will be free to wash their hands as often needed, the medical supplies will be properly cleaned using soap and sanitized by boiling, and clean water will be available for patients to drink if they are sick, taking medication or dehydrated, all without fear of water shortage. 

The tank and all of the supplies including pipes, valves and gutters are readily available and will be purchased in Lushoto Town, which is the closest large town to Mtae. The supplies will all be transported to Mtae village by bus, van or pickup truck.

The tank will sit upon a cement stand which will be about 2 feet tall and 7 feet wide. The gutters will be connected to the roof of the clinic and dispensary.

The average rainfall per year in Mtae is about 1,200-1,400 mm and right now July-September, it is rainy season so enough water will be caught.

The cement stand will be built by a carpenter located in the village. The gutters, tank and sinks will be constructed by a plumber who is also a member of the water committee in Mtae.

The community is very motivated will contribute a little more than 25% of the cost. Their contribution consists of travel fees for the supplies, majority of the cost for the plumber, and they have bought the two porcelain sinks and paid for a carpenter to install them within the dispensary.

Also, the water committee of Mtae has agreed to do free hand washing and safe drinking water lessons to the staff and the villagers at the clinic and to follow up to make sure these practices are being enforced. All drinking water at the clinic will be boiled for sterilization.

The water committee has also agreed to take responsibility for maintenance of the tank and gutters after completion of the project. Community members have agreed to volunteer to transport materials for this project to and from the vehicles to the clinic and dispensary.

HandwashingWater Charity funds will be used to purchase the 5,000 plastic liter water tank and all of the supplies necessary to connect the tank to the sinks and gutter system including pipes, gutters, connectors and valves, the bags of cement for the stand, the carpenter to build and secure the stand and the supplies needed for the metal spigot that will service the clinic and dispensary.

Community Organization
The Water Committee of Mtae is helping to organize construction and maintenance of the water tank.

Number of Beneficiaries
9,592 women, men and children of the village, plus people passing through.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing the Project
Mia Young

Monitoring & Maintenance
The water committee of Mtae will be responsible for monitoring and any maintenance of the water tank and sanitation practices.

Comments                                                                                            

The project will provide the clinic with enough water for continuous use year round.

This project is a part of our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

This project has been fully funded by an anonymous donor.  Still, you can donate to this project, and all further funds will go to helping start more projects in the region, and any follow up projects we do here in Mtae.

 


This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

 

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Funds Needed : 
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Kasinje Health Center Water System Project - Malawi

Kasinje Health Center Water System Project - Malawi

NPCA - WC LogosThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.


Location
Kasinje Health CenterKasinje, Ntcheu District, Malawi

Community Description
Kasinje is a trading center in Ntcheu district, located in the Central Region of Malawi. The Health Center in Kasinje serves a catchment area of about 55,000 people living in 57 villages. Most of the population are farmers, growing primarily maize, tobacco and cotton. The area is very poor and uneducated.

The Health Center contains a maternity ward that delivers 120-160 babies each month. It also houses women in their last month of pregnancy so that they can easily access medical assistance as needed and are guaranteed to deliver at the health center.

Problem Addressed
The health center staff is currently inadequate and the Ministry of Health is constantly struggling to find qualified personnel willing to live in Kasinje. This is due, in large part, to the less than desirable living conditions at the health center, including a lack of running water in or near staff housing.

Currently the staff are sharing a borehole with the hospital and the community. This means they are waiting in line for water along with the pregnant women and their guardians living at the hospital as well as with general community members. It often takes hours to draw a single bucket of water.

This time drain impacts the staff in various ways. It takes time away from work and other personal development goals. It also takes away valuable time that could be spent studying or pursuing other extracurricular activities.

The Water Tank

The Health Center has struggled for years to being in enough qualified staff. Currently this health center serving 55,000 people has two Medical Assistants, three nurses and 29 Health Surveillance Assistants. It has been particularly challenging to bring in Medical Assistants and nurses, who do the actual clinical work, because with their qualifications they can easily find work at a health center or hospital offering a higher standard of living.


Project Description
The project designed by the hospital staff involves piping water from an existing tank at the health center, which is filled by a pump, to four different taps located at health center staff housing. There are eight houses located directly on the health center campus, so each pair of houses would share an outside tap.

The first step will be to dig trenches from the tank to the proposed tap sites. This work will be done by community members, organized by the Health Center Committee in conjunction with local chiefs.  The taps will then be installed within brick boxes that will be locked for security. A community member who works for  the local water board has been identified and agreed to oversee the laying of the pipes and the tap installation.

Funding will be used to buy pipes and connecting apparatuses, taps and cement for the tap structure, and to pay labor costs for building the lock boxes. The community will provide labor for digging trenches and laying pipes as well as installing taps. They will also provide sand and bricks for the locked boxes.

Project Impact
Substantial improvement of quality of life for all 24 of the current Health Center workers, and a direct benefit to the 55,000 people who make use of the Health Center.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing ProjectKasinje Health Center, Malawi
Rebecca Burleson

Monitoring and Maintenance
Kasinje Health Center Committee - They designed the project and will oversee its completion once materials are purchased.  Tap users will be responsible for monitoring the condition of the taps and reporting any issues to the Health Center Committee.

Comments
It is the hope of everyone involved that this improvement to the living situation of the Health Center workers will allow the center to attract and maintain a larger staff of nurses, medical assistants and such.  Should the Health Center get even a couple extra people, it will have a significant effect on the treatment and care received by the people in the area.

Dollar Amount of Project
$1,150

Donations Collected to Date
$1,150

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.

 
Any additional donations will be utilized to fund additional projects in Malawi.
 

 This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Mansa District Health Centers Pump Project - Zambia

Mansa District Health Centers Pump Project - Zambia

Location
Ndoba, Mibenge, Mabumba, Mantumbusa, and Kabunda, Mansa District, Luapula Province, Zambia

Community Description
This project will take place at 5 rural health centers throughout Mansa District. The existing wells at the centers are described as follows:

Ndoba Rural Health Center

  • Type of water facility: borehole fitted with India Mark II hand pump
  • Static water level: 5 meters
  • Depth: 26 meters
  • Yield of water: 38 full strokes for a 10 liter bucket (0.22)
  • Diameter of the PVC casing: 4 inch or 100 mm

Mibenge Rural Health Center

  • Type of water facility: borehole fitted with “Afridev” (Africa Development) hand pump
  • Depth: 20 meters
  • Yield of water: 40 strokes to fill a 10 liter bucket (0.22)

Mabumba Rural Health Center

  • Type of water facility: borehole fitted with a hand pump India Mark II
  • Static water level: 10.2 meters
  • Depth: 20 meters
  • Diameter of the PVC casing: 6 inches or 150 mm
  • Yield of water: 32 strokes for a 10 liter bucket (0.28)

Mantumbusa Rural Health Center

  • Type of water facility: borehole fitted with India Mark II hand pump
  • Static water level: 8.3 meters
  • Depth: 42.1 meters
  • Diameter of PVC casing: 6 inches or 150 mm
  • Yield of water: 29 strokes to fill a 10 liter bucket (0.28)

Kabunda Rural Health Center

  • Type of water facility: borehole fitted with India Mark II hand pump
  • Static water level: 7 meters
  • Total depth: 23.4 meters
  • Diameter of PVC casing: 4 inches or 100 mm
  • Yield of water: 34 strokes to fill a 10 liter bucket (0.28)

Mansa District Health Centers Pump Project - ZambiaProblem Addressed
Zambia suffers from one of the world's highest maternal mortality rates at 591 deaths per 100,000 live births. A leading cause of maternal mortality is sepsis.

While the Government of the Republic of Zambia, along with many partnering non-government organizations, has implemented a campaign encouraging pregnant women to deliver at a skilled health facility, Mansa District has not reached 100 % utilization of clinic facilities for deliveries.

Safe Motherhood Action Group (SMAG) members are community volunteers trained to teach pregnant women about safe motherhood topics. As the SMAG members encouraged pregnant women to deliver at the health facility, there was overwhelming concern from the women about the potential for sepsis with a clinic delivery.

Project Description
This project is to install electric water pumps and related piping at the 5 rural health centers, creating running water to improve sanitation and hygiene, especially for obstetric patients delivering at the clinics.

Each pump will lift the water through PVC piping to a 7,500 liter PVC tank mounted on a cement stand (except the Ndoba Rural Health Center, at which the metal stand is being reinforced). The water will then be delivered to the health center through additional piping.

Each of the five installations will be done by the Mansa Municipal Council and community volunteers, and will take 2 to 4 days, for a total of 15 days, for completion.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the electric water pumps, piping, fitting, fixtures, and materials. The funds will also be used to provide fuel for transport of the installation crew to the work site and lunch allowances for the crew members.

Project Impact
53,819 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Rebecca Roberts

Monitoring and Maintenance
The monitoring and maintenance of the pumps will be performed by the Mansa District Medical Office and clinic staff.

The clinic staff will be trained in proper care, upkeep, and minor maintenance of the pumps. The Mansa District Health Office has allotments in their budget for major water pump repairs when needed.

Each of the clinics has a full time guard on duty to protect the clinic and its property.

Comments
This project will bring water to the maternity wings of the rural health centers, greatly reducing the infection rate during delivery. This will encourage women to utilize the services of the center, reducing the potential for deaths due to complications.

Fundraising Target
$7,000

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$7,000

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.

This program is part of the Water Charity and National Peace Corps Association East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.
 
Any additional donations will be utilized to fund additional projects in Zambia.
 
 

Mansa District Health Centers Pump Project - ZambiaMansa District Health Centers Pump Project - Zambia

Mansa District Health Centers Pump Project - ZambiaMansa District Health Centers Pump Project - Zambia

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Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Krava Health Center Pump Project - Cambodia

Krava Health Center Pump Project - Cambodia

Location

Krava Village, Krava Commune, Baray District, Kampong Thom Province, Cambodia

Community Description

Krava Health Center serves 24 villages and 3 communes, around 20,000 people. It is a rural farming area and sits a little over 15 km from the national road.  Most of the population is uneducated about hygiene practices.

Health center staffProblem Addressed

The health center currently does not have a pump for the existing well, located about 100 feet from the center.  Without the pump, the process of obtaining water is labor-intensive, and thus the use of water is discouraged.  This means that sterilizing the facilities and handwashing is kept at a minimum, if practiced at all. 

There is already the infrastructure for 2 toilets and a handwashing station that are currently unused, as there is no access to water.  When patients stay at the health center after giving birth, often for several days, they are forced to endure unsanitary conditions.

Project Description 

This project is to provide a reliable source of water for the health center through the installation of a pump.  Water will be made available for drinking, cooking, sanitation and handwashing.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the pump. The health center director will install the motor.

Supplies for hygiene and cleaning will be provided, and policies and procedures will be adopted.

Krava Health Center Pump Project - CambodiaProject Impact 

5,000 patients who visit the health center each year will directly benefit from this project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project

Jessica Bedard

Monitoring and Maintenance

The well and motor will be maintained and monitored by the health center staff.

Training on hygiene practices and handwashing will be conducted for the health center staff.

Comments 

This is a high-impact project, providing a crucial supply of safe water to a large number of people.  It will decrease the incidence of illness and improve the wellbeing of all of the people who rely on the health center for services.  It properly utilizes existing resources, and has the support and participation of health center administration and staff.

This project is being implemented as part of the Water Charity WHOLE WORLD Water Program – Cambodia. Donations to continue the overall program are being accepted on the program page. This project has been funded by WHOLE WORLD Water.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

Krava Health Center Pump Project - CambodiaKrava Health Center Pump Project - Cambodia

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
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Thnot Chum Health Center Well Project - Cambodia

Thnot Chum Health Center Well Project - Cambodia

Location
Thnot Chum 4, Thnot Chum Commune, Baray District, Kampong Thom Province, Cambodia

Community Description
Thnot Chum Health Center serves a population of over 10,000 people. It sits in a rural farming community and serves as the closest and only affordable health care option for a majority of the population. The local community is largely uneducated and lacks knowledge of basic hygienic practices.

Problem Addressed
There is currently a well located about 70 feet from the health center. However, the well and pump are damaged, and cannot be used. Water for drinking, sanitation, and hygiene must be carried in buckets for use in the sinks and bathrooms.

During deliveries, and for the 2 or 3 days while the mother and child remain for recovery, water is often inaccessible.

Thnot Chum Health Center Well Project - CambodiaProject Description
This project is to repair the well and pump system at Thnot Chum Health Center.

Water will be removed from the well, cracks inside the well will be repaired, and a coating of waterproof cement will be applied.

The outside runoff area will be replaced with new bricks and cement for effective runoff.

A cement cover will be built to protect the water in the well from contamination and to prevent mosquito breeding.

The pump will be replaced and new PVC piping will be installed.

The work will be done by experienced local construction workers with the assistance of health center staff.

Water Charity funds will pay for the pump, piping, cement, and other materials, as well as for the skilled labor.

Project Impact
1,000 people per year who visit the center will directly benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
The project will be directed by Peace Corps Volunteer Josephine Mahlie. She previously implemented the Thnot Chum Commune Well Project - Cambodia

Monitoring and Maintenance
Health center staff will monitor and maintain the well. The water will be periodically tested for potability, and if it becomes contaminated, corrective measures, such as filtration, or chlorination will be applied.

Comments
The project will result in a ready supply of clean water for staff, patients, and families.

This project is being implemented as part of the Water Charity WHOLE WORLD Water Program – Cambodia. Donations to continue the overall program are being accepted on the program page.

This project has been funded by WHOLE WORLD Water.

This project has been finished.  To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Thnot Chum Health Center Well Project - CambodiaThnot Chum Health Center Well Project - Cambodia

Thnot Chum Health Center Well Project - CambodiaThnot Chum Health Center Well Project - Cambodia

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Kandieng Reay Health Center Well Project - Cambodia

Kandieng Reay Health Center Well Project - Cambodia

Location
Prosaut, Svay Teab District, Svay Rieng Province, Cambodia

Community Description
Prosaut is a growing community within Svay Teab District, Svay Rieng Province. As it is located along National Road 1 (the road which connects Phnom Penh and Ho Chi Minh City) and is not far from the provincial town or the Bavet border crossing, there is a constant flow of heavy traffic.

Kandieng Reay Health Center Well Project - Cambodia

Kandieng Reay Health Center officially services 21 villages in the area (with a population of 21, 493 according to a 2012 survey). However, the population has increased steadily since that survey and many people from outside those villages are also beginning to use the health center.

While last year the health center had 9 people on staff and between 1,200 and 1,500 visitors per month, now there are 11 on staff and 1,500 to 2,000 visitors per month. By next year, the staff is expected to double and the patient number to increase dramatically, particularly the number of overnight patients (now only about 10/month).

In the early 1990s, the health center consisted of only a triage center and maternity ward plus a pharmacy. In July of 2013, the health center received funding to renovate 2 buildings that a UN health program had abandoned when the TB rates in the area decreased sufficiently.

Now, there are extra patient wards to care for injuries and longer-term illnesses. The acquisition of an ambulance has further increased patient intake.

Problem Addressed
The health center has only one well to provide for all of its needs for patient care, including drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene. There is a single functioning bathroom, completed previously as a Water Charity project, located behind the maternity ward, far from the two new buildings.

There exist 3 other bathrooms, one shower, and outlets for water for drinking and cleaning, but there is not enough water to supply them.

Project Description
This project is to build a new well with a pump, and install a piping system and 3 water filters throughout the facility.

The project has been entirely planned by community members, and will be carried out under the direction of health center staff (including the co-director and a midwife), with extensive community input.

The well will be drilled by professional drillers using the technology common in the area. It is anticipated that the water table will be reached near 40 meters. The above-ground improvements, including a cement platform, will be built by skilled masons.

Kandieng Reay Health Center Well Project - Cambodia

The new well will be fitted with an electronic pump to circulate the water to various parts of the center.

PVC piping will be installed to bring running water to the bathrooms, shower, operation room, and overnight patient/staff room.

3 water filters will be purchased and installed to ensure that staff and patients have clean, safe water to drink. These will most likely be of the type used by the Red Cross, and recommended by the Peace Corps Medical Officer.

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for equipment, materials, and skilled labor.

The community will contribute additional funds from reserves from the health center’s annual budget.

Project Impact
This project will benefit the 20,000+ residents of 21 villages who use the services of the Kandieng Reay Health Center.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
This project will be implemented under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Christin Spoolstra, who is serving as a third-year volunteer.

Christin previously completed the Kandieng Reay Health Center Bathroom Project - Cambodia and the Hun Sen Prosaut High School Water Project - Cambodia.

Monitoring and Maintenance
Health center staff will monitor the effectiveness of the water supply system, maintain its security and functionality, and perform all necessary repairs.

Comments
This is a necessary and cost-effective method for providing water for all patient needs, leading to improved patient outcomes while contributing to an improved work environment for the staff.

This project is being implemented as part of the Water Charity WHOLE WORLD Water Program – Cambodia. Donations to continue the overall program are being accepted on the program page.

This project has been funded by WHOLE WORLD Water as part of the Water Charity WHOLE WORLD Water Program – Cambodia.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Neareay Health Center Latrine Project – Cambodia

Neareay Health Center Latrine Project – Cambodia
Location
Neareay, Chhouk District, Kampot Province, Cambodia

Community Description
Chhouk District is the second largest district in the southern province of Kampot. Chhouk was one of the strongholds during the Khmer Rouge regime and was one of the last areas to be liberated from Khmer Rouge control when the Cambodian Civil War ended in 1998.

Neareay is located in the Eastern half of Chhouk District, 52 kilometers from Kampot town on recently completed National Highway 3, and 138 km from Phnom Penh. The new road has increased mobility among the population but there are still many families who have never left the district.

The Neareay Health Center is a brand new facility, opening in April, 2013. Upon its grand opening, it will serve 4 immediate villages within the district and approximately 8,000 people. The farthest distance villagers will travel to use the facility will be no more than 5 kilometers. However, Health Center Chief Im Mao anticipates that some of the population from the neighboring district of Chumkiri will use Neareay facility.

Neareay Health Center Latrine Project – CambodiaThe health center is at the center of Neareay, located next to the secondary school and pagoda. The center will have a staff of 8-10 people, including 2 midwives and 4 nurses. The secondary school has 259 students and 17 teachers. The Neareay pagoda has 12 monks living in the monastery.

The new facility was built with only one latrine inside the building designated for the use of health center staff.

Project Description
The project is to build a latrine to be used by the patients at Neareay Health Center.

The latrine will include two compartments, each containing a squat toilet and space for bathing.

The latrine for patients will be located approximately 10 meters behind the building next to the pump well as a stand-alone building. The latrine building will be constructed of bricks covered with stucco, with zinc roof.

The toilets will be of the ventilated concrete vault type that is used throughout rural Cambodia. The inside of the latrine will be laid with ceramic tiles.

A pump and PVC piping will move water from existing water tanks behind the health center to the latrine. A small bucket in the restroom can be filled with water as needed from the cistern within the latrine. The water will be used by patients to bathe, hand flush the toilet, and wash their hands.

Neareay Health Center Latrine Project – CambodiaUnskilled labor, such as digging the pits for the latrines, will be completed by health center staff and members of the community. Construction of the latrine building and plumbing will be completed by local skilled construction workers.

Water Charity funds will be used to pay the skilled workers, and to purchase the building materials, that will include bricks, cement, zinc roofing, doors, ceramic tiles, wooden beams, toilet basin, round concrete sewage tanks, pipes, and drains. All materials will be purchased locally and no more than 8 kilometers from the health center.

Project Impact
8,000 people from 4 immediate villages will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Laura Olson

Comments
This is an essential project for the health center, as it is necessary to accommodate the expected patient load. In providing sanitation facilities to patients, it will immediately improve the health and wellbeing of all who work at and are seen at the center.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$0.00

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT NEEDED BELOW

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

Dollar Amount Needed
$555.00

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Karang Health Post Well Project – Senegal

Karang Health Post Well Project – SenegalLocation
Karang, Fatick Region, Senegal, West Africa

Community Description
The town of Karang is at the very south of the Fatick region, on the border with The Gambia. It is a town of 11,000 people, with one health post working for the entire population.

Karang has 9 independent neighborhoods, each with its own women's group, as well as several independent women's groups that work primarily on vegetable gardens.

The health post is a high functioning institution with weekly causeries (workshops) on nutrition, maternal health, sexual education, malaria prevention and many other topics.

The health post has a large (60 m2) enclosed plot where they are starting a nutritional garden. They need access to potable water in order to maintain and expand this garden. Although there is access to a tap, it is government run and cannot be used for anything other than the regular health center activities.

Project Description
This project is to build a cement-lined, capped well at the health center.

The hand-dug well will be approximately 13 meters deep, with a 3 meter diameter. The location for the well has been verified and approved.

The well will be covered by half a cement lid, and have a meter-tall wall around it. A small runoff area will feed into barrels used for storing water.

The water will be drawn by a simple pulley system and then poured into watering cans which will then be used to water the garden and for drinking by the women while they work and come in for trainings.

Two experienced well diggers will begin work at once. Pauline Sene, the head nurse at the health post, will arrange the transportation of the sand and cement to the gardening site. Once all the materials are there, the well constructors will begin cementing and lining the well. On completion of the well itself, they will build and install the well cap and the small runoff area.

Several weekly gardening and nutrition training sessions with the women's groups in Karang will take place. The main facilitators for these trainings are the head nurse and a health worker.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the materials, including cement, metal beams, and sand, and for transport of the materials.

The health post will pay the labor costs, and any additional funds needed to complete the project.

Project Impact
600 women in the women’s groups and 10 staff persons will benefit from the well and participate in the trainings. In addition, 4 families (about 50 people) will benefit directly from the produce generated by the garden.

Peace CorKarang Health Post Well Project – Senegalps Volunteer Directing Project
William Leborgne

Comments
This project will improve the services that the health center is able to deliver, improve the functioning and effectiveness of the participating women’s groups, improve the health of the community at large, and create an economic opportunity through the sale of the proceeds of the garden.

Dollar Amount of Project
$550.00

Donations Collected to Date
$490.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$60.00 - This project has received major funding through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation, with the expectation of additional donations from the friends, family, and supporters of the Peace Corps Volunteer.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify the Peace Corps Volunteer of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished.  To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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