National Peace Corps Association

Refugee Aid Initiative - Worldwide

UNHCR Camp for Syrian Refugees

WATER CHARITY STARTING NEW INITIATIVE TO HELP REFUGEES WORLDWIDE

Massive Refugee Camp

We all know that life in a refugee camp is no vacation. People who have already suffered trauma, atrocities, abuse and victimization find themselves, at the end of a long and difficult exodus... in a place that is often deplorable and depressing.  Furthermore, many refugees are doomed to stay in these places for interminable amounts of time, with little hope of ever getting out and restarting their interrupted lives.

What to do about this is beyond the scope of what Water Charity can deal with at this time... but we CAN commit to trying to make the conditions in these camps better.  

As such, we are pleased to announce this new initiative designed to create water, sanitation, public health, and solar lamp programs for refugee camps around the world.  The first beneficiaries of this new thrust will be the Eritrean refugee camps in the Tigray region of Ethiopia.

As many of you may know, the situation in Eritrea is such that an amazing diaspora of Eritreans have fled the small nation in northeastern Africa... many of them unaccompanied children of 10-12 years of age. In fact, 51% of refugees worldwide are children.

Ethiopia

The roots of this tragic situation, and its wider ramifications, are beyond the scope of this post, but suffice it to say, that the many camps in Ethiopia are overflowing... and new camps being opened at an alarming rate. Furthermore, Ethiopia is unable to extend much help to their displaced neighbors, as their own citizenry are dealing with droughts, famine, uprisings, and severe water crises.  While not completely forgotten, these refugees are forced to depend on whatever the UNHCR (UN Refugee Agency), and a small group of NGO's can muster to give them. They have severe shortages of many things we take for granted... including space to lay their heads, proper sanitation facilities, and lighting in their dwellings.

While many refugees are able to receive some education in these camps, they are unable to read or study at night if they can't afford a kerosene lamp or some other smoky, air-polluting device that brings with it long-term health issues.  While seemingly not directly tied to our water & sanitation mission on the surface, it will lead to their personal health and security. Having a solar lamp available to them will make it easier to find and use restroom facilities in the dark. In addition, they will be able to read after dark... which ties in with our global "Let Girls Learn" campaign.

Eritrean Refugee KidsWe are hoping this initiative will spawn many programs, and allow us to bring aid to camps across the globe. Sadly, there is no lack of people needing help... and the number of displaced peoples is reaching new records. According to the UNHCR, there were at least 65 million refugees last year... the first time we have crossed the 60 million mark on record. And if anything, this year has only been worse.

Measured against Earth’s 7.349 billion population, these numbers mean that 1 in every 113 people globally is now either an asylum-seeker, internally displaced, or a refugee – a level of risk for which UNHCR knows no precedent. In all, there are more forcibly displaced people today than the populations of the United Kingdom, France or Italy.

Please support this initiative to help us start as many programs and campaigns in as many refugee camps as possible.  As they are implemented, you will be able to donate directly to each of our individual efforts.  You can expect the same level of transparency and reporting that we are famous for.  Every project we do is posted on our site in a timely manner with photos, video (where possible), and updates (when needed). We will be bringing to this endeavor our stellar track record of succesful and sustainable, low-cost WASH development work.  Our field-leading efficiency, due to our unique model, will ensure that we get the most bang for our buck... and that the largest amount of people possible will be served.

It is hard enough being a refugee, without a home, stateless and overlooked... the least we can do is make sure they have clean water to drink, a safe place to defecate, and the ability to wash themselves. And if, due to our relations with the manufacturer of the wonderful d.light, we can provide a little bit of extra light along the way, so much the better.

For more insight into this issue, consider watching our friend and filmmaker Chris Cotter's "The Eritrean Exodus: Refugee" after watching the trailer below. It is a great film, and is available on iTunes and other such services.
 

www.theeritreanexodus.com

 

This initiative is being carried out in conjunction with our partners, the National Peace Corps Association. NPCA & WC Logos

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Wondo Genet Well Rehab Program - Ethiopia

Fetching water in Wondo Genet

Phase 2 of our Ethiopia Well Rehab ProgramPromoting Transformation and Hope among the Most Marginalized in EthiopiaNPCA & WC LOGOS

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

Non functioning wellLocation
Five villages in the Wondo Genet region of Ethiopia, spread across three Kebeles (counties).  Kube, Wuchale 1, Lomicha, Wuchale 2, and Abosa.

Community Description
Wondo Genet is in the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region (SNNPR) of Ethiopia, about a four-hour drive south of Addis Ababa. It also is part of the Sidama Zone located in the Great Rift Valley.  Wondo Genet is bordered on the south by Malga, on the west by Awasa Zuria, and on the north and east by the Oromia Region. Based on the 2007 Census, this woreda has a total population of 155,715, of whom 79,664 are men and 76,051 women; 23,125 or 14.85% of its population are urban dwellers.

This region has been suffering from an interminable drought, as well as intractable poverty.  As such, they desperately need assistance to meet their basic living requirements.  The people of these 5 villages have wells which have fallen into disrepair, and are currently unusable... thus making their hard lives even harder.

Problem Addressed
A WaSH survey conducted by the district water office shows that there are 60 existing wells that are not functioning and need repair to provide water to the respective communities. To meet demand, 81 new wells need to be constructed.  Studies have shown that operation and maintenance of water supplies fail after a short period of time because of poor operation and lack of effective maintenance. The district water office has no budget for maintenance and cannot effectively provide technical support. Delay or negligence in operation and maintenance of water facilities negatively impacts the wellbeing of the population, forcing them to travel long distances and wait in lengthy queues for potable water.  Many people resort to dangerous undeveloped water sources, most of which amount to nothing more than a muddy pit.  Naturally, this causes severe, and often deadly, health concerns with a high incidence of waterborne illness.

Project Description
This project is to rebuild 5 wells, one in each of 5 villages. 

Gathering water with donkeyWater Charity has initiated the repairs by partnering with local NGOs to drill the wells deeper, replace handpumps, and otherwise enact repairs that will bring water back to the people of these villages.

Our friends at Water is Life International have people on the ground and a substantial infrastructure for doing WaSH work in the region, including a number of well-drilling rigs donated by our partners at Wine to Water.  By partnering with these groups, WC is able to do these projects at a fraction of their normal cost, without having to have our own personnel waste valuable funds in transit.

Before the repair work begins, an intentional process to engage the community and the government is followed in order to avoid a handout-mentality that can create dependency.  After receiving government permission, a Water Use Committee (WUC) has been elected in each community to take responsibility for the use and maintenance of the repaired well.  The WUC is comprised of four women and three men, which ensures that women will have a strong voice and position to manage the well.  The management of the well by the WUC usually includes charging a nominal fee to the users, in order to maintain a fund for repairs.  This fund is then used for maintenance and repairs to keep the pump operational. In this way our repaired wells are unlikely to meet the fate of many such wells in the region, and should be functional far into the foreseeable future.

Gathering water from a streamA productive and functioning well brings joy to the community as it promotes a healthier life, eases the physical burden of the community, and returns time to women (as the duty of fetching and carrying water traditionally falls to them).  It is vital to the sustainability of the well that the community is involved in the project throughout the entire process for design, planning, and implementation of the project.  WaSH training is provided to the WUC so they can become permanent trainers in the community. The idea is improved sanitation and hygiene behaviors within the community, such as Open Defecation Free areas and consistent handwashing, through the hygiene and sanitation training.

Hydrogeological conditions on site indicate that groundwater is in accessible depth (20 to 30 meter below the ground), has adequate hydraulic conductivity and storage volume and good quality.

Project Impact
Approximately 1,500 people will directly benefit from these repairs... as well as anyone who visits these villages.

Project Management
Josh Elliott, of Wine to Water, is providing administrative oversight for these projects.  And Water is Life technicians are managing the implementation and training aspects.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The WUC set up in each village will be responsible for the monitoring and maintenance of their well.  This will be overseen by WiLI personel who will continue to work with the villagers and train their SLT's.

Undeveloped Water SourceComments
As we have more funding for this program, and its parent programs, Water Charity is committed to continuing this work, and hopes to be able to fix all of the broken wells of Wondo Genet eventually.  As such, we ask you to donate generously.  Every dollar raised in excess of the cost of these rehabs will be spent on further rehabs in the region. 

In this program, as with all WC projects, we have used existing funds to start this project immediately. We only ask for donations once projects are already underway. In this way we can be extremely responsive and speedy in delivering aid where it is needed. Even a short delay in implementation can be costly when dealing with waterborne illness. Other charities reverse this, but we feel time is of the essence. In this way, donating to this program is actually reimbursing us for funds we have already allocated.  The more money we have on hand, the more projects like this we can start.

Dollar Amount of Project
$11,000

This project has been fully funded by an anonymous U.S. donor.  To help us provide more programs like this one, please Donate to our Ethiopia Well Rehab Program.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.


Waiting for water

 
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South Sudan Well Rehab Program

Villagers waiting for water

Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association are pleased to announce a new program designed to help the people of South Sudan by rebuilding and restoring wells across the country.  The program began with the ten wells you will find listed below, which are already completed, as PHASE 1 in the Tore region. We plan on completing as many more well rehabs as we can get funding for. To this end, we have already begun with PHASE 2 in the neighboring region of Yei (more info below).

This is a country that we have wanted to work in for some time, but until now we had found it too difficult... especially in light of the fact that our normal partners, the Peace Corps, have no presence there.

South Sudan is not only the "newest" nation in the world (having broken off from Sudan after a long and bloody civil war that ended in 2005 and saw them achieve independence in 2011), but it is also among the very poorest.  Water issues in the entire region are critical, and the people of rural South Sudan often have to wait in line for water with their Jerry Cans for days when water shortages are most extreme. This is a situation which has led to the breakup of many marriages, due to husbands not understanding why their wives have to be gone so long just to get water, and assume them to be unfaithful.

South Sudan has suffered a lot of internal conflict since its independence; it now has the highest score on the Fragile States Index (formerly the Failed States index).

The Honorable Bidali Cosmas Wori-Koji, Commissioner of Yei River County has given Water Charity permission for drilling and rehabilitation of boreholes in Yei River County, South Sudan.

Well Rehabilitation details:

Well #

Community Name

Boma

Payam

Household Served

Static/ Well Depth

1

Do’bo Area

Baka

Tore

30

55m

2

Mukpara P/School

Baka

Tore

70

60m

3

Munze Community

Baka

Tore

40

65m

4

Hai Mundari

Baka

Tore

32

68m

5

Kuronyangi Area

Avokaya

Tore

50

45m

6

Purini Area

Avokaya

Tore

50

65m

7

Tore Centre

Avokaya

Tore

50

60m

8

Ramba Area

Avokaya

Tore

60

65m

9

Prokele Community

Mundu

Tore

55

65m

10

Bandame Community

Mundu

Tore

60

70m

           

Each of the villages delineated above will be a separate project under this program.  Furthermore, after these ten communities in the Tore area are served, Water Charity intends to continueboy getting water from the well the program in other needy locations. Water is, and remains, one of the most crucial issues of concern for South Sudan.  People resort to drawing water from muddy pits, and are subject to a large variety of waterborne illnesses.

Eighty percent of people in South Sudan’s hospitals are sick from drinking dirty water. According to the United Nations, waterborne diseases kill four children worldwide per minute.  Women and children are the most vulnerable. According to USAID, one in every four children born in South Sudan dies before the age of five! Half of those deaths are from water-related illnesses that are easily preventable.  Every day, Sudanese women and children spend hours bringing water to their families. Some are attacked by wild animals on their journeys, while others are robbed or raped. Time spent hauling water robs children of formal schooling while increased rates of malnutrition, anemia, and scoliosis rob them of their health.

South Sudan is a broken country. The infant mortality rate is 136.3 per 1,000, and maternal mortality is the highest in the world (South Sudan Medical Journal). It has the highest malaria burden in sub-Saharan Africa (Malaria Journal). South Sudanese live on less than $1 a day.

Gathering Water In YeiThere has only been ten years of peace in the region since 1956, which has resulted in a lack of infrastructure. More than 2 million people have died, and more than 4 million have become displaced or refugees. In 2014, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights reported that more than 9,000 child soldiers have fought in South Sudan’s current civil war... to say nothing of the hundreds of thousands that have been forced to fight before Independence.  Prior to the 2005 peace, the world watched as Sudan's Muslim north waged a genocide in the region of Darfur, a predominantly Christian region north of the current border.  Many of the refugees from this crisis fled south into what has now become the sovereign, predominantly Christian nation of South Sudan. Darfur remains part of Sudan, but the world's attention has faded from the region, and most people have little idea of what is happening in Sudan or South Sudan anymore.

The current political crises in South Sudan (since 2014) has cost 10,000 lives and displaced 1.5 million people who are now dependent on streams, rivers and puddles for their daily water supply. More than 2.5 million people are in need of urgent help with their water situation.

Water Charity Gets Involved:
With this program, ten existing wells that are currently nonfunctioning will be rehabilitated.  Each of the wells will have their own project and conclusion pages, which you will find below as they are ready. 

The objective of well rehabilitation is to improve well performance, increase well capacity, clear silt deposits built up in the well, remove mineral build up encrusted on the pump screen, and repair or replace existing pumps.  This is a way of utilizing work already done in order to provide clean water at a lower cost.  By repairing or replacing hand pumps, we can serve as many people as a new well would at a fraction of the cost.

dirty waterFor this project, Water Charity is partnering with Water is Basic, a U.S. based 501(c)(3) organization that is also a South Sudan based nonprofit run by South Sudanese.  The South Sudanese Water is Basic is a borehole drilling organization in the Republic of South Sudan birthed and led by Sudanese religious leaders in response to the Country’s water crises. It is a Sudanese solution to a Sudanese problem.  It is everyone's vision that every person in South Sudan has access to clean, safe water. 

There is a need for, and capacity to do, as many as 100 well restorations per year... or more.  South Sudan is Water Charity's 66th country of operation, and is a very important milestone for us.  Being able to do meaningful work here, in what is clearly one of the most needy places on Earth, means a lot to us.

Water changes everything. As the Sudanese people are able to access clean water, they have witnessed a transformation of health. Death rates fall.  Education rates rise. Access to food is increased, and local economies grow.  Ancient conflicts over water rights and access become obsolete. Peace sweeps through areas where water shortages once caused civil war and conflict.Young boy carrying water jugs

Phase 1 - TORE Region Highlights:
• Will reach 497 households, nearly 5,000 people that will have access to clean water
• Restoring 10 wells and replacing the broken hand pumps
• Holding a 5-day workshop training 48 water committee members on borehole operation and maintenance

Bonus:
• 3 additional well hand pumps will be repaired with local South Sudanese project funds helping an additional 150+ households access clean water.

Program History:
In August of 2015, Water is Basic funded a well hand pump repair workshop in Tore Payam of Yei River County of Central Equatorial State, South Sudan. This project aimed to train/retrain hand pump mechanics, educate water user committee members, and repair10 broken hand pump/wells. There were 7 total participants. The first 2 days were devoted to hand pump repair classroom held at Tore Catholic church Tore Payam.  Lessons included hand pump parts/functions, proper tool/procedures, troubleshooting, and well maintenance. The teachings were fun and interactive; there are mixtures of new and returning participants. The next one day was perhaps the most important addressing the “software” They focused on borehole management, covering topics such as community ownership, source protection, and managing finances. This included each borehole’s own water user committee, usually consisting of seven or nine members each. All water users’ committee members made their own by –laws and set household water user fees, usually about $0.10 (35 SSP) per month.

wellThe remaining 3 days were all spent in the field, repairing the hand pumps and promoting proper hygiene. The participants were very eager to get real experiences to develop skills that complement their new knowledge. On the areas of hygiene promotion the participants are trained on the mode of diseases transmission, washing hands with soap or ashes, and clean water storage. All activity created quite a buzz, with decent sized crowds watching the technicians work, listening to the hygiene promotion, and performing tasks needed for the well (like cleaning the surrounding grass, picking up trash, and fencing the building sites).

The most common mechanical problems were worn out cylinders, pipes and rods.  Other problems included broken handles, chains, pump heads and concrete pad repair.  The participants had a chance to practice a wide variety of repair techniques during the workshop.  The whole workshop ended with successfully repairing all 10 hand pumps and equipping their water user committee with the knowledge to operate and maintain them. As a result, an estimated 760 households in Morobo County now have access to clean water. Also 9 hand pump repair technicians have built both hardware and software skills to make a difference in the Payam (county).

Summary of Program Objectives:
Water Charity intends to expand on the capacity to do good work that our friends Steven Roese and WIB have managed to achieve with this training and well rehabilitation model.  It appeals to our innate sense of economy of scale, efficiency, and high "bang for buck."  We sincerely hope that via this partnership, we can change the lives of many people struggling in this newest nation on Earth.  At the very least, we can remove extreme water and sanitation issues from among their problems.

villagers around the wellBeing a new nation, born of war and strife, the resilient and proud people of South Sudan have a lot of work ahead of them to catch up to their neighboring nations like Ethiopia and Uganda. Many of the people in South Sudan even share cultural and linguistic ties to their neighbors... countries where Water Charity has already done a significant amount of work.  We even have a similar program going in Ethiopia at this time, the Ethiopia Well Rehab Program, which we are confident that this program can replicate.  In time we would like to replicate the successful borehole drilling operations we are doing in the Ethiopia Borehole Program in South Sudan as well.  All this takes is funding.  Please consider helping us with this very important work by clicking the donate button below.

UPDATE:

Water Charity is pleased to announce that PHASE 1 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program, has been successfully completed... and all 10 wells rehabilitated, plus the bonus 3 for a total of 13 wells repaired!  This program began with the region of TORE, in the Central Equatorial State where renewed violence has made it difficult for us to chek up on the communities.  When the security situation is better, we will get back to these sites, and post updates.  Meanwhile, we are continuing with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last 2 years of violence in Unity and Jonglei States. The next 10 well rehabs under the program will be in Yei, where the situation is currently safer, and closer to the base of WIB operations. 

Read about PHASE 1 by CLICKING HERE.

PHASE 2 - Yei Region

Phase 2 has begun and is underway in the Yei Region of South Sudan, along the Yei River.  Water Charity and Water Is Basic have decided to focus on this region of relative stability while the Tore region of Phase 1 remains inaccessible due to civil war outbreaks.

Phase 2 is already doubling the size of the program, and we hope to do many more projects as they are feasible.  The rehabs there are being done as they come, and can be followed by clicking the individual well rehab links below.  All projects following the PHASE 1 link, are all part of PHASE 2.  At present we have initiated projects to repair wells in Abei, Lomulule, Bor Dinka, Loggo II, Illimoko, NTC, San-ji-Sari, Zezira II, and 2 wells in Marakonye​.

​We are happy to report that all 10 of these wells have been repaired now.  We will be posting conclusion reports for them as we are able to gather the data, and sort through the pictures etc.  Check back soon.

We would like to expand on the success of Phase 1 & Phase 2 by expanding this program three or four times larger if possible.  Please help us do as many well rehabs as we humanly can by contributing to this program. 

NPCA & WC LOGOS

This program is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

 

Village woman near the waterholewater committee

Villagers village children near the well

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Ethiopia Well Rehab Program

Ethiopia Well Rehab Program

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis program is designed to help the people of Ethiopia by rehabilitating wells and repairing pumps across the country. It is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

ETHIOPIA

Population: 90 million people

54% do not have access to safe water

89% do not have access to adequate sanitation

39% live below the poverty line

Life Expectancy:  55 years

GNI Per Capita:  $280 USD

443 Million:  The number of school days lost worldwide each year to

water-related diseases

1.8 Million:  Additional number of people estimated to lack access to clean water

in 2016 in Ethiopia due to El Nino related drought

 


The program will begin with the West Arsi region of Ethiopia.  Arsi Negele Woreda is located in the Great Rift Valley, an area of southern Ethoipia susceptible to drought and famine.  Water is, and remains, one of the most crucial issues of concern for these remote regions of Ethiopia.  People resort to drawing water from muddy pits, and are subject to a large variety of waterborne illnesses.West Arsi Map

Due to El Nino related weather effects in the fall of 2015, Arsi Negele has been hit hard by drought.  This drought is widely affecting the southern region of Ethiopia, and in particular Arsi Negele.  Traditionally, people living in Arsi Negele have collected water from traditional water sources, such as ponds and rivers, or some villages have been fortunate enough to have shallow wells drilled with hand pumps.  Traditional sources are not protected and the unclean water causes numerous health problems for the local communities.  Due to the drought, even these sources began to fail in the fall of 2015.  The combined effects of the failure of traditional water sources, as well as exacerbated problems related to the drought, has caused a serious and perilous water shortage in Arsi Negele..

This program will encompass the following 6 villages to start. Each of the villages delineated below will have their own projects under this program.  Furthermore, after these first 6 villages are served, Water Charity intends to continue the program in other needy locations, finding as many wells that need rehabilitation as we can.
Chart

With this program, six existing wells that are currently nonfunctioning will be rehabilitated.  The objective of well rehabilitation is to improve well performance, increase well capacity, clear silt deposits built up in the well, remove mineral build up encrusted on the pump screen, and repair or replace existing pumps.  This is a way of utilizing work already done in order to provide clean water at a lower cost.  By repairing or replacing hand pumps, we can serve as many people as a new well would at a fraction of the cost.

The well rehabilitation program will be followed by a further effort to drill 20 new shallow wells to serve the needs of the population, as well as finding more wells to rehabilitate

For this project, Water Charity is partnering with the local NGO WiLI (Water Is Life International), an organization active in the creation and support of Sustainable Living Groups (SLGs), as well as the improvement of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) practices. SLGs are Water Use Committeecommunity-based savings and credit institutions that are autonomous and completely managed by the poor themselves.

As they mature, eight to twelve SLGs may be organized into Cluster Level Associations (CLAs) to form a second institution of support.  They also create a stimulating context for new learning of healthy behaviors and practices such as drinking from improved water sources, using latrines, washing hands and managing microenterprises. These new behaviors drastically reduce the incidence of waterborne disease and put people on the path toward better economic and social development.  

WiLi has been working in Ethiopia since 2006 and has constructed over 300 wells, provided WaSH trainings for each community receiving a well and established over 400 SLGs that have transformed the lives of tens of thousands of Ethiopians.  These engagements are managed and implemented through a network of partnerships that builds the capacity of Ethiopians to address these challenging issues.

The powerful establishment of a thriving SLG program has brought dignity, hope, and economic empowerment to thousands in the region. To build on established relationships and achievements to continue these positive trends this project will strengthen the SLG program and the formation of CLAs, increase the number of safe water wells, and bring the nexus of these activities together through WaSH trainings and educational programs. 

 

The great need in West Arsi continues to be a call for action and response, and WiLi and Water Charity want to continue the vision of long-term development investment and involvement in West Arsi.  A cost-effective approach to provide clean and sustainable water to a community is to rehabilitate already existing wells and hand pumps.  current source

Summary of Program Objectives 
Rehabilitate 6 wells in the region near Lake Langano, in order to ensure a safe, accessible and sustainable source of potable water to approximately 500 people per well. 

Well rehabilitations are a cost effective way to renew a clean water source within a community. 

  • Subsequently Drill 20 new shallow wells.
  • Support the continued training activities of the SLG program into CLAs in order to benefit over 5,500 SLG members and their families.
  • Observe improved sanitation and hygiene behaviors within SLGs, such as Open Defecation Free communities and consistent handwashing, through hygiene and sanitation training.
  • Introduce the use of bio-sand filters.
  • Build the capacity of the SLG institutions to better serve themselves and become leaders in their own transformation.  

Ideally, this program will scale up to include more villages and regions afield from Wes Arsi, but this program, as big as it ever gets, will be focused on this efficient model, and the tangible goal of making life better for the people of this, and other difficult regions in Ethiopia.

Program Impacts
The approach of combining the WaSH sector with SLGs allows us to tackle a number of varying issues that pose the greatest challenges to the poorest of the poor in West Arsi.  This transformational approach targets the following:

  • Extreme Poverty Extreme poverty can imprison and paralyze people to a life of hopelessness and despair. The SLG movement restores personal dignity and creates opportunity and hopefulness out of the resource base that already exists in the community.  This is called asset based community development. The process is to create formal small groups to envision the future together and establish responsible planning and accountability to increase income. 
  • West Arsi Well RehabFood Security It is estimated that 5.2 million people in Ethiopia are experiencing scarcity of food and undernourishment.  West Arsi is included in this area.  SLG members will gain access to improved water sources and will be able to learn better nutrition and afford a healthier diet through alternative sources of income.  
  • Climate Change Adaptation  Over the past 40 years the cycles of rainfall shortage and drought in Ethiopia have worsened due to climate change.  In drought prone areas in the southern part of Ethiopia, drought has become an annual risk.  Water shortage is a direct result of climate change.  We are helping Ethiopians to adapt to the impacts of climate change by providing alternative water sources that are sustainable during drought periods.
  • Community Resilience and Disaster Response Social support is the foundation of strengthening a community’s resilience and ability to respond and adapt to disasters.  SLGs have proven to be key social structures that improve the ability of families and communities to respond to disasters in a successful way.  By strengthening and expanding our SLG programs, we promote community resilience and partner with communities for positive responses to disasters.
  • Health  Waterborne disease is the number one cause of infant mortality in Ethiopia, causing an estimated 300,000 deaths per year.  The best way to decrease infant mortality and improve the health of children and families in Ethiopia is through clean and safe water.  Our wells provide clean water sources so that death won’t be caused by dirty water, and our sanitation and hygiene education programs help decrease the transmission of water-borne diseases.

UPDATE:

All of the initial well rehabs in this program have been completed.  Conclusion pages are being posted under the individual project pages for each village well. We are in the process of assessing new wells that need rehabilitation in villages nearby and farther away.  Check back soon, as a SECOND PHASE of well rehabs will be underway shortly!

WELL REHABILITATION SITE SUMMARY

Village

GPS Coordinates

Elevation (m)

Depth (m)

Static Water Level (m)

Pump Type

Well Yield (L/s)

UTM East

UTM North

Kushe #1

475140

827438

1676

66

47

Extra Deep Hand Pump

2

Kushe #2

475851

828234

1649

69

38

Indian Mark-II

3

Gubeta Bomba

477271

830388

1618

72

18

Indian Mark-II

1

Buku Wolkite

473603

827858

1656

84

38

Indian Mark-II

2.5

Wondo Lemeche

476893

831783

1600

31

20

Afridev

1

Lalesa

470255

828879

1608

40

22

Afridev

1.5

Kids In Arsi

To contribute to this ambitious program, use the PayPal button below. We welcome corporate sponsorship.

 

NPCA & WC LOGOSAnd to those who have already contributed, thank you for changing the lives of so many of the poorest of the poor in Arsi Negele, Ethiopia, and for partnering with us to promote sustainable access to clean water!

This entire program falls under our larger East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.
These projects are made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

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Funds Needed : 
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Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

Let Girls LearnNPCA & WC LOGOS


First Lady Michelle Obama, in concert with the State Department, USAID, and the Peace Corps, has formed a powerful collaboration, Let Girls Learn (LGL), to expand access to education for adolescent girls around the world. The program aims to improve opportunities for the 62 million girls around the world who are not able to remain in school each year. The goal is to implement community-based projects, funded with donations from non-Federal entities, and was announced with fanfare by Michelle, President Barack Obama, and Peace Corps Director Carrie Hessler-Radelet.Let Girls Learn with Michelle

Water Charity is proud to be intimately involved in this program, not only doing the very first LGL project, but committing to do hundreds more.  We are raising money specifically for these projects, thus enabling the government agencies to direct the funds they are able to raise towards other projects, and have the entire program go further, and reach more people.  We already have dozens of these projects underway, and many more coming through every day!  This promises to be a hugely impactful program.

Water Charity's take on the LGL theme involves building bathrooms and bringing running water to schools that often have neither, as well as other water system projects that save girls from having to fetch water, and eliminate school days lost to waterborne illness.  With all the other pressures that might serve to keep girls from going to, or staying in school, we feel the last thing should be lack of access to sanitation and proper hygiene.  In many parts of the world, young girls drop out of school when they get their menses. Aside from pressure to start families at this age, the lack of clean bathrooms, proper toilets with doors, and running water are major factors in the high drop out rate.  Some girls simply miss school for their entire period every month... many never return.

The program was announced to target Albania, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Georgia, Ghana, Moldova, Mongolia, Mozambique, Togo and Uganda, with Thailand, The Gambia, and Ethiopia under consideration. 62 Million Girls Each YearAll of these countries are now involved in LGL projects, and later this year, the program will expand to include all of the countries where Peace Corps operates.  We here at Water Charity will be funding PCV led projects in as many of these places as we can, and have already hit the ground running.

Through our partnership with the National Peace Corps Association (NPCA), Water Charity has committed to the implementation of projects to build and improve 100 bathrooms, and install water systems, at schools in Albania, as well as another 100 such projects worldwide in the designated LGL countries. We are already on pace to supersede those figures.

In addition, we will continue to enable similar PCV projects in other countries, and implement RPCV projects that are in the spirit of and in support of the LGL mission.  These projects that are in the spirit of LGL, but not officially part of the program, we designate LGL+.  By clicking that link you can see those projects, while the full Let Girls Learn tag is applied to projects within the program, and can be perused seperately.  Both types will fall under this Water Charity Let Girls Learn Initiative, and can be followed from this page.  Projects with an arrow next to them have been completed and have conclusion pages up already.  Those with circles next to them are still underway.Carrie Hessler-Radelet

Access to a clean and safe bathroom is crucial for all children, but is especially important for young girls as they reach adolescence. NPCA and Water Charity helped develop, and provided the funding for, the first LGL project, the Svey Leu High School Latrine Project - Cambodia. That project, which has been completed, exemplifies the need for dedicated bathroom facilities and water systems that provide hygienic and sanitary conditions as well as privacy, safety, and dignity.

Male or female, no student should have to defecate in the open, or attend a school without proper bathrooms and running water. While our focus here is on the needs of the girls, all of our projects also include comparable facilities for the boys, teachers and parents as well.

We hope you will support us in this effort.  Donations can be made on the individual project and program pages. (Links to them are below) Our programs are collections of projects in their own right, as typified by our 100 Water Projects Program - Albania which, alone, will have 100 projects under it.

Donation to our projects go towards recouping the funds we have spent already on that project, as WC pre-funds all of our projects out of pocket and allows people to adopt them, in whole or in part, after they are already begun. The efficiency and agility of this methodology should be obvious, and, in this way, we never ask people to donate to projects that aren't already a reality--as is common in most philanthropy--but to support ongoing, proven, and even successfully completed projects with the knowledge that time is of the essence where water is concerned.

HERE the FLOTUS acknowledges our commitment to LGL. We thank her and her staff for the full paragraph about us on the .gov website (the 5th new announcement)!  And HERE, the Washington Post reports on it (end of 3rd paragraph).

This program is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

USAID LGL Ad

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100 Water Projects Program - Albania

100 Water Projects Program - Albania

This is an effort under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama & Peace Corps, to expand access to education for girls around the world!NPCA & WC LOGOS

100 Water Projects For Albanian Girls!


Water Charity is proud to announce that we have crafted a program to do 100 water projects in Albania over the next year. Due in large part to the vision of Teresa and Graham Anderson, the PCVs spearheading this effort, we have scaled up what would have been 10 school bathroom projects, into a major program to deal with the poor sanitation conditions in schools all around Albania. This ambitious goal is already underway in a dozen schools, and will likely surpass even our lofty goal of 100 projects.

Santa_Maria_Apollonia

This entire program falls under our Let Girls Learn Initiative. This is an effort on our part to step up, and pick up the gauntlet thrown by the First Lady in her call to further girls education around the world. Water Charity did the very first LGL project in Cambodia earlier this year, and aims to do a couple hundred more water projects that expressly aim to empower young women, and allow girls the myriad opportunities that an education can bestow.

NPCA and Water Charity have already helped develop, and provide funding for, a number of great water system projects that exemplify the need for programs like this. It is hard to overestimate the value of clean, functional, dedicated bathroom facilities.  They not only provide hygienic and sanitary conditions, but privacy, safety, and dignity as well.

Lack of proper sanitation facilities at a school contributes greatly to the drop out rate among adolescent women. Upon reaching their menses, many girls simply leave school, and others struggle on while missing a whole week out of every month. Most of them endure a lot of pressure to drop out of school to get married and start families.

Dancing girlsAlbania, as one of only two majority Muslim countries in Europe, has cultural attitudes towards women and their education that influence many Albanian women to give up on the idea of education completely.

Our goal with this program is to work with the schools to create an environment conducive to young women remaining in school.

The majority of these schools lack running water, and many have no functional bathroom facilities whatsoever at the moment.  Even where they do have toilets, they are often in horrible disrepair, or are not useable because there is no running water to flush them... and they are not connected to sewer pipes.

Thus, a large portion of these projects will be to refurbish or build new toilet facilities, complete with running water. We will not stop there, however. Water Charity intends to go on and support a large variety of projects that have LGL impact. As most people know, lack of clean water and adequate sanitation can make people susceptible to frequent waterborne illnesses, and being sick with such sicknesses, keep children out of school... not to mention threatening their very lives.

We hope you will support us in this effort to make a meaningful difference in this beautiful Mediterranean nation. Check out the various projects in the program below, and don't hesitate to donate to any projects that seem worthy to you. We are looking for a large donor to adopt this entire program as well, so contact us if you are interested.
This program is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.
Turkish toiletMoschee Vloraschool

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Ethiopia Borehole Program

Ethiopia Borehole Program - Ethiopia

 

Water Charity is proud to announce our Ethiopia Borehole Program.  This is a major initiative to drill new boreholes in the Sidama region of Ethiopia. The program is underway.  Click the links near the bottom of this page to read about the projects that are started.NPCA & WC LOGOS

This program is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

The drilling will be done by Selam Awassa Water Drilling works & Sanitation PLC, a local company that was donated drilling equipment by our friends Wine 2 Water, who have been gracious enough to make this connection for us.  In order to achieve maximum effect, and a high return on the dollar, this program is being done in partnership with these groups with an existing presence in the region, and a strong record of success in the field of well creation, management and repair. These will be our first projects in Ethiopia in quite some time, and we are thrilled to be working with people who have been actively engaged in doing water and sanitation projects in the area.

The woredas (counties) to be served by this program are Wondo Genet and Dalle to begin with, and as we can compound upon initial successes, we will expand the program to include other needy areas.  Click on the map to the right to expand it.  Each well will have its own project (and conclusion) page, which will be linked below.  This page will be updated as new projects are started and news from the field comes in.

Map of the regionThe regions in question are mountainous with an average elevation of 6,000ft.  60% of the people in the area do not currently have access to clean water.  According to the 2011 UNDP Human Development Report, Ethiopia is ranked as one of the least developed countries at 174 out of 187 in the United Nations Human Development Index.  It is estimated that one in four Ethiopians live on less than one dollar per day. Access to safe drinking water is particularly lacking in Ethiopia’s rural areas.  During the dry season more traditional sources of water are placed under pressure as hand dug wells and other perennial sources dry up.  Although Ethiopia is said to have one of the greatest water reserves in Africa, most of this lies untapped below the surface of the earth with water tables ranging from 50 to over 500 feet down.

Given this variety in depth, the difficulty and cost of doing wells in various areas varies tremendously.  A 180m deep well is going to cost more per person than a 90m... or 30m well.  The areas we have chosen to start this program are neither the hardest nor the easiest regions where this is concerned, but rather represent an area where the need is great, and the infrastructure to get projects done is present and running well.

Ethiopia’s main health problems are said to be communicable diseases caused by poor sanitation and malnutrition.  Water and sanitation-related diseases, particularly diarrhea, are among the top causes of death in the country, especially for children under 5.  In the woredas where our new wells will be drilled, there are frequent cases of dysentery, giardia, typhoid and other dangerous waterborne illnesses.

The majority of the population consists of subsistence farmers, growing crops such as sugar cane, false banana, coffee, and avocado.  The women and children in the communities are responsible for collecting water for their households from unprotected hand dug wells and contaminated ponds. Wells of the kind we will be installing (deep boreholes) provide year-round safe access to water, and will free up many hours of labor. 

The focus is to empower women who carry the burden of hauling water and making a living in a paternalistic society and who offer so much promise to transform communities. Communities and trusted partners are invited to participate in each stage of the work in order to create a sense of ownership, responsibility and stewardship. In this way, a framework and support system is established that can provide long-term benefits for individuals and communities.

A Water Use Committee (WUC) has been established for each water point so money can be collected for repairs.  This will ensure village participation, sense of ownership, and long term sustainability.

Cement pouredAs the wells are drilled, a health and hygiene training program will be organized. Hand washing, diseases transmission, pump care, and other key lessons will be taught. One of the community members is chosen by the WUC to be caretaker of the pump and will be responsible for small maintenance issues and security.  The new boreholes will dovetail with local community based organizations to build upon a community outreach program (Sustainable Living Groups) for the longevity and sustainability of the project. This, combined with WC's traditionally minimal overhead costs, creates a very comprehensive package that doesn't stop at simply drilling a well and installing a pump, but continues to engage with the community, and make sure these water points will continue to provide for the people for many, many years to come.

While this ambitious effort to create wells in a very needy region of a very needy country has a major donor already, we encourage everyone interested in helping out to do so.  The more money we collect for this program, the more people we can help.  This is an opportunity for people to contribute meaningfully to these communities without the massive overhead often associated with such projects.

You can view the individual borehole projects via links at the bottom of this page.

This program falls under our larger, comprehensive East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

 Village Mother

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Western Africa Water & Sanitation Program

Clean water or Dirty water

NPCA & WC LOGOSWater Charity and the National Peace Corps Association (NPCA) have begun a new program to replicate the ongoing success of our East Africa Water & Sanitation Program in Western Africa.  It involves the implementation of dozens of water, sanitation, public health, and environmental projects in a number of West African nations.

The initial countries included in the program were:
Senegal, The Gambia, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Togo, Benin, Morocco, Cameroon, Sierra Leone and Liberia.  Guinea was later added.

Si Kunda, The GambiaIt is likely that we will add other countries in the region to the program as it expands, and as security can be ensured..

This program is open ended, and will consist of individual projects both large and small.  These will include our "normal" projects in the region, as well as even larger, more comprehensive efforts.

Project planning is well underway, and work on the ground has begun on several projects. Individual projects will be phased in for implementation as planning for each is completed. 

The Partnership
Water Charity is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, established in 2008 and headquartered in California, that does water, sanitation, public health, and environmental projects around the world. It has implemented around 2,000 projects in 65 countries to date, about 95% of them under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs).

The National Peace Corps Association (NPCA) was founded in 1979 and is headquartered in Washington, D.C. with a mission to championing lifelong commitment to Peace Corps values. The goals of NPCA are to help the Peace Corps be the best that it can be and help Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs) and RPCV groups thrive.

Averill Strasser, RPCV, Co-Founder and COO of Water Charity, and Glen Blumhorst, President of National Peace Corps Association, are working together in the implementation of this program.

open wellMethodology
The program, along with much of the work done by Water Charity, follows a unique methodology of utilizing the services of PCVs and RPCVs for project management. This imparts a level of cost-effectiveness that is many times that achieved by other organizations doing similar work. In this way, travel and administrative expense are eliminated, as there are capable, local-language-speaking, highly-motivated PCVs already living in the villages where the projects are taking place.

Most often, these projects arise out of the relationship between the PCVs and their host communities, and an effort to bring these villages together on their water & sanitation issues.  This generally involves the formation of a local water committee, the use of entirely local labor, local materials sourcing, and a real commitment on the part of the people who benefit from the projects to monitor & maintain them. 

This is a sustainable and successful model in which the community is invested in the outcome and members are motivated to preserve the improvements.  With the community contributing materials, labor, and money, villagers have a sense of pride and ownership, leading to long-term success.

Within the 10-country program area, individual projects will be planned and implemented one-by-one, rather than following an imposed and fully-developed plan. The model is based on the premise that there is great need in the entire program area, and the most cost-effective way to save lives and prevent and cure illness is to quickly address those needs in the order in which they arise organically from the communities.

 Making soap    Incorporation of Peace Corps Volunteers
The major portion of the on-the-ground administration of projects will be carried out under the direction of serving PCVs. These are all college graduates who have been trained in country, and possess language, technical, social, and community development skills.

There are about 7,000 PCVs at any given time worldwide, with about 1,200 in the designated program area. These PCVs live and work with members of the community, and, in the implementation of our WATSAN projects, they are involved in all stages of community organization, project conceptualization, planning, implementation, completion, and evaluation.

Where there are opportunities to aggregate projects that are being done in close geographic and temporal proximity, we aim to get PCVs working together and offering assistance to each other in planning and execution. This has benefits of economy of scale, camaraderie, continuity, sustainability, and ease of evaluation.

All in all, Water Charity projects serve to strengthen the Peace Corps, and allow PCVs to contribute meaningfully to the health and wellbeing of their host villages.  Projects are often secondary to the primary program assignment of a PCV.  However, such projects always add to the value of the Peace Corps service by bringing needed resources to the village, and creating tangible community development results. 

     The Role of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers
Approximately 215,000 people have served as PCVs since the Peace Corps was started about 54 years ago. They represent an important and valuable resource to assist in the role of community development in the world.

Senegal woman in project groupNPCA is a partner of Peace Corps, and is the designated organization to represent all RPCVs, as well as to amplify the power of the Peace Corps.

In the past 7 years, many RPCVs have worked with Water Charity to directly implement projects. RPCVs return to their country of service because of a lifelong commitment, and bring with them their prior skills, education, and training.

RPCVs will continue to directly implement projects, but will also be utilized to provide training and support to serving PCVs to assist them in all phases of their projects.

Types of Projects
All projects fall under the categories of water, sanitation, public health,and environment, and many of these serve double duty, in that they also cover multiple areas like education, disaster relief, drought & famine aid, as well as the new Let Girls Learn designation. Running water to a school that never had access to water, and building a number of bathrooms, water fountains, and handwashing stations, for instance, is a water, sanitation, education and women's empowerment project all in one!

Typical projects will be community water systems, wells, pumps, tanks, small reservoirs, rainwater catchment systems, irrigation systems, water purification installations, latrines, and handwashing stations.

All projects will require the community participation of labor, materials, and/or money, to the extent that the community is able to contribute, often as much as 25% of the project cost.

The local water committee, in some cases, may decide to impose small fees on the villagers for use of newly-created water facilities, such that there will be funds available for maintenance, repair, and replacement when the need arises. These fees will always be affordable for all residents,

Water Charity is prepared to return to a community and aid the residents in repairs or expansion when local resources do not permit such work without assistance.

All projects have community training and education components to teach villagers the technologies employed, the use, maintenance, and repairs of the improvements, as well as any hygiene and public health concepts that might aid them.

Mass transit in Senegal Where the skilled labor needed to complete a job doesn't exist, Water Charity is pleased to engage in job training, whereby technical skills are imparted to locals looking for work, and thus enabling them to form small businesses which allows them to utilize the acquired knowledge, and apply it in other communities. This creates a rather profound "ripple effect" to our projects, whereby the new (or even pre-existing) businesses of the skilled laborers can proliferate the technology in nearby areas while creating employment and economic incentives.

Where feasible, tools are left behind after completion of our projects to serve in this effort.  In this way, many Water Charity projects have spawned dozens of other similar projects in a given area, without us having to be directly involved... and while boosting the local economy to boot.

Sustainability is ensured by serving PCVs and their replacements, who visit the project sites at intervals after completion and facilitate needed repairs and improvements.  Local water committees and skilled laborer businesses also contribute to the overall sustainability. Water Charity projects have an outstanding success rate because of these elements, and considerably greater longevity than comparable projects, while being an order of magnitude cheaper to implement in most cases.

Implementation
At the bottom of the page is a listing of projects that have recently been started under the program. The list will be updated as new projects come on line. A little triangle next to the project name indicates that it is already completed and a conclusion page has been posted and nested underneath the original project page.

Summary
The program offers unmatched cost effectiveness to implement vital projects using appropriate technology. It benefits from our unique model and past knowledge of and experience in the chosen countries. It eliminates the expenses of travel, in-country headquarters, and administrative costs, and allows for most project dollars to be directed to materials and skilled labor.

Donation to this program is a sure-fire way to aid and assist a large number of people with great water and sanitation needs, speedily and efficiently.

This program is targeted for funding of $2,200,000 over 3 years, rolled out as follows:

  • $440,000 for Year 1
  • $660,000 for Year 2
  • $1,100,000 for Year 3
 


Women carrying water, Senegal

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Svey Leu High School Latrine Project - Cambodia

LET GIRLS LEARN - Svey Leu High School Latrine Project - Cambodia

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the National Peace Corps Association.

This is a project under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama and the Peace Corps to expand access to education for adolescent girls around the world!

 

Location

Svey LeuSvey Leu district, Siem Reap province, Cambodia
 

Community Description
Svey Leu is a district of Siem Reap Province, in north western Cambodia. According to the 1998 census of Cambodia, it had a population of 12,869. The High School there serves a very large district, and some of the neighboring districts do not have high schools.

Svey Leu High School has 425 students (246 female, 179 male) who must moto, bike, or walk far distances if they wish to attend classes. It is also part of Cambodian culture to return home during the mid-day break to have lunch with one’s family. Students consequently travel to and from school 4 times within one school day.

Problem Addressed
The Svey Leu High School lacks hygienic latrines.  Currently, there is only one set of co-ed latrines available for student use.  The school also lacks a working water system preventing proper upkeep of latrines. Female students in particular face difficulties due to these shortcomings as many decide not to attend school when menstruating. These students, therefore, miss about a week of classes every month. The lack of appropriate latrines creates a barrier for female students to keep up throughout the school year, which greatly jeopardizes their potential to graduate and pursue a career.
 
Due to the school’s deficient latrine facilities and water system, female students are discouraged from attending school once a month when menstruating. Given the pre-existing lack of emphasis and support for female education in Cambodian society, projects like this are necessary to remove barriers and advance gender equality.
 

Svey Leu High School

Project Description
This project aims to build 2 new latrines, specifically for female students, and construct a water system to ensure adequate water year-round to keep the latrines functional.

Some of the school’s teachers and students will assist in construction of the water system. Having those who will benefit from the latrines involved in the building process invests them in the success and sustainability of the end product. Additionally, we hope the female students will realize the importance of their education by seeing the support provided to them by their school staff and fellow students.
 
Success of this project will be measured by distributing anonymous surveys to all female students, both before construction and 6 months following completion. These surveys will ask how the state of our school’s latrines affects female attendance. It is expected that the new latrines and water system will better allow female students to pursue their studies.
 
Project Impact
246 female students and the female teachers benefit directly, as will future students who have yet to attend the school. In addition, a large number of current and future family members will benefit indirectly.
 
Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Ann Choi
 
Monitoring and Maintenance
The school will be responsible for seeing to the upkeep of the latrines.
 
Comments
This project is also known as "LGL-15-303-001 Increasing Female High School Attendance" and is the very first project to be implemented under the Let Girls Learn Program.

Ann & one of her students

The high school’s Director, Sokkhun Khat, and Vice Director, Bonyong Soun, approached Ann with this particular project as they had seen a long-standing need to improve the school’s latrine facilities. Both Mr. Khat and Mr. Soun are highly respected in the community, and they can efficiently and effectively motivate the construction workers, teachers, and students in building the latrines and water system. 
 
Mr. Soun will also be involved in drafting the surveys to track progress of the project, in order to ensure that the wording of these surveys are culturally appropriate. Mr. Khat and Mr. Soun together will ensure the proper use and upkeep of the new facilities in order to sustain support for female students by keeping down barriers to their education.
 
Dollar Amount of Project
$2,700
 
Donations Collected to Date
$2,700
 
Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the Robert Victor Sager and Beatrice Mintz Sager Foundation.
 
This project has been COMPLETED.  To see the conclusion of the project CLICK HERE.
Additional donations will be used for other projects in Cambodia.
 
 

Svey Leu High SchoolCamp Hope at Angkor Wat

Reclining Buddha in Svey LeuSvey Leu under rainclouds

 

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Water For Zambia Program - Zambia

Water For Zambia Program - Zambia

NPCA - WC Logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location: 
Mansa District School, ZambiMansa District, Luapula Province, Zambia
 
Community Description: 
The primary schools where this project will take place are located in and around Mansa District in the Luapula Provnice of Zambia. These communities and schools are often without electricity and running water. The villages surrounding the schools consist of mud huts with grass thatch roofs. The main source of income in these communities is subsistence farming. 
 
Problem Addressed: 
The lack of safe drinking water at the middle schools of the district is the main problem to be addressed.  
 
Another community need is for food security, as schools are not currently able to create gardens and orchards due to the long distance to reach a water source.  A new water source will allow easy watering of plants and provide improved knowledge of gardening for students, as well as a convenient food supply.
 

Project Description:

This project is to restore water to 13 schools through the installation of a new water pump and associated improvements at each school. 

During Emily’s time as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia, she recognized the problem of inadequate access to safe drinking water sources throughout her 20-km catchment area. She was shocked to discover that all of the three schools in the area lacked an on-site, working water source.

Borehole and Pump - ZambiaThere was an existing play pump structure at all three schools, but the pumps had not worked since 2009. With the help of Water Charity, she was able to work with a local government group (similar to a Public Works Department) to renovate the water systems at all three primary schools. Each borehole now functional, and is expected to provide access to clean, safe drinking water for 300 people daily for a lifetime of 50 years.

Emily was informed of 13 other schools in Mansa District, with the identical play pump structures, currently facing water crises. She determined that the problem could easily and affordably be solved with the demolition of the existing structures and installation of new Afridev borehole pumps.

 
When she returned home after her Peace Corps service, she vowed to find a way to return to Zambia and renew her efforts to bring safe water to schools in the country.  She reached out to Water Charity to assist her in this endeavor, and a plan was developed for her to go back to Zambia and do this series of projects as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.  Water Charity decided to send her back with enough funding to accomplish this ambitious goal. 
 
This is one of the rare cases where WC paid to send someone to a location, and foot their living expenses while there.  The fact that she is doing 13 schools, and will also be sharing her experience with currently serving PCVs to develop their own WASH development work, makes this cost effective.
 
The work will be supervised by Emily and done by skilled technicians.  At each school, on the first day, there will be some demolition and installation of the pedestals. Then, after one week, allowing the pedestals to cure, the pumps and PVC piping will be installed
 

Each installation will include a runoff area, drain, soak pit, and other improvements as necessary.Mansa School Borehole Project - Zambia

 
Each community will provide the sand and perform the unskilled labor.
 
Each community will create an action plan regarding borehole maintenance, budgeting for spare parts, security, and sensitization of students, teachers, and surrounding communities.
 
Each school will host an orchard and garden.  The project will allow schools to complete other projects which may have been delayed due to a lack of water.
 
During Emily's stay in Zambia, as mentioned above, she will work with serving Peace Corps Volunteers to assist them in developing additional water and sanitation projects.  She will help them with all phases, including conceptualizing with the community, planning and budgeting, implementation, and maintenance and evaluation.  Her efforts in training and support on behalf of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association will result in a continuing flow of needed development projects. 

Project Impact: 
3.900 people will benefit from the project.  
 
Mbaso SchoolEach borehole will provide access to clean, safe drinking water for 300 people daily, for an expected lifetime of 50 years. As a result of this clean drinking water source, communities will experience improved health and sanitation. School absences for teachers and pupils (especially girls) will decrease, improving education for all.  There will be an increased knowledge of gardening and agriculture, food security, and community development.
 
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project: 
Emily McKeone, RPCV
 
Monitoring and Maintenance:
Local Community Maintenance Committees, School Administration, and Mansa District Municipal Council will play roles in the monitoring and maintenance
 
Comments:
In 2014, during Emily McKeone’s Peace Corps service, new boreholes were installed at an initial three primary schools within Mansa District in conjunction with Water Charity, as mentioned above. To read about that project CLICK HERE.  Not only did the communities report improved health and sanitation, but schools were also able to complete construction projects and further develop their infrastructure. This project and its 3 schools/ boreholes served can be considered the pilot project, or 1st project of this program.  Thus, when finished, a total of 16 schools and their defunct boreholes will have been served.
 
Dollar Amount of Project: 
13 additional schools at a cost of $28,000
 

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.

 
Any additional donations will be utilized to fund additional projects in Zambia.
 
Emily at her first borehole project for WC
Water For Zambia

 

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