Swaziland

Nyetane Neighborhood Care Point Latrine Project - Swaziland

Nyetane Neighborhood Care Point Latrine Project - Swaziland

Location
Nyetane community, Mpolonjeni chiefdom, Lubombo region, Swaziland

Community Description
Nyetane is a small community located in the rural reaches of Mpolonjeni chiefdom. There are approximately 750 residents in the area spread over 120 homesteads.

There are two small shops, a high school, a primary school, a preschool, and a Neighborhood Care Point (NCP). Some parts of Nyetane have water taps supplied by Swaziland Water Corporation, while some residents walk to nearby dams or lakes to retrieve their water.

The majority of homes in Nyetane rely on subsistence farming, including maize, cotton, and small vegetable patches. It is estimated that two-thirds of the adults in Nyetane are unemployed, and 185 children in the area are known to be orphaned or vulnerable children.

Nyetane Neighborhood Care Point Latrine Project - SwazilandThe Kingdom of Swaziland currently has the highest HIV prevalence rate worldwide at 31% (for men and women aged 18-49). Engaging the next generation is seen as an important factor for decreasing that rate, and operating a Neighborhood Care Point (NCP) is one method of early intervention.

Research indicates that high HIV rates are often correlated with populations faced with poverty and low education. NCPs enable young children who are orphaned or vulnerable to receive one protein-rich meal each day and also benefit from some early educational instruction (such as story time with preschool-level books, singing ABCs, or practicing colors and shapes).

Preparing children to succeed at school, both by bolstering their nutrition and preparing them for Grade 1, is important. NCPs can help prepare students to fare better in school, creating improved opportunities for the student and their family to escape poverty through employment.

Problem Addressed
Nyetane Neighborhood Care Point (NCP) serves approximately 35 orphaned or vulnerable children every weekday, providing a safe space to play and learn and a protein-rich meal.

Nyetane Neighborhood Care Point Latrine Project - SwazilandThe NCP has been in existence for six years, and five adults are regularly involved in cooking, cleaning, and providing services for the children who come. Nyetane NCP also provides a community meeting space when poor weather prevents outdoor meetings and even serves as a camping ground for a local football club called Boyz to Men.

Unfortunately, this busy community center was not provided with a toilet when it was built, and no community funds have been made available to build one. This means that at least 40 community individuals each week relieve themselves in the grass surrounding the NCP, contributing to an unhygienic environment.

Project Description
This project is to construct pit latrines at the site to fix sanitation problems for children and adults using the center. In addition, a ‘tippy tap’ handwashing station will be provided.

One structure with 2 stalls, each containing one toilet, will be built. The pit has already been dug using community tools and has a foundation of bricks built into the ground, creating a foundation about 15 cm above ground level. There will be a platform made of cement, including two holes for the toilets that will rest on the foundation and cover the hole.

The pit latrine building will be 2.5 meters long, 1.25 meters deep, and 2.5 meters high. The door frames will be 2 meters and 37 centimeters, so there will be sufficient wall to support the door.

The walls will be built of cement bricks made by the community members. The community members have already started making the bricks and are producing bricks of exceptional quality and sturdiness (although they will need the project funds to purchase enough supplies to finish this effort). The brick foundation will allow the cement slab to be raised approximately 15 centimeters above the ground.

Two plastic toilet seats will be provided by the community and installed by the builder. This will allow the toilet to be closed when not in use, helping to limit the number of flies.

The roof will be made of sheet metal over wooden rafters. The builder will ensure the wood is cut to specification, and the sheet metal will be purchased cut to the right length. The toilet will be ventilated with a ventilation pipe purchased through the project funds. The pipe will enter the pit from a hole set behind the pit latrine and will extend into the air (approximately 2.25 meters).

The community will be responsible for maintenance and care of the toilet once the project is completed. Mrs. Ndzinisa and Mrs. Gwebu, as leaders of the Neighborhood Care Point, have headed the project committee and will continue to provide leadership as maintenance is needed. They will be responsible for maintaining the toilet on a daily basis and for mobilizing community members to volunteer for occasional maintenance.

It is estimated that the toilet will serve the community for approximately 10 or more years before a new pit will need to be dug. To make the pit last even longer, the community may purchase a product that increases the rate of decomposition of waste matter. The community understands that care of the toilet will remain their responsibility once the project is completed.

The adult leaders of the NCP will oversee all construction and ensure the project is completed within one month of receiving funds. Maggie Gwebu and Victoria Ndzinisa will be the project managers, while Mfanasibili Tsabedze will be in charge of actual construction. David Tfwala will transport the materials.

The community will donate the land for the toilets, partial labor, partial transportation of materials, and eventually will build new fencing to incorporate the toilet into the yard of the NCP.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the materials needed for the pit latrines, transport to go to and from Siteki (a nearby town), and miscellaneous coordination expenses.

Project Impact
This project will benefit 80 people, comprised of 35 children who eat at NCP each day, plus 4 women and 1 man who regularly cook for them, plus 40 community members using the site on occasion.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Shari Orr

Comments
This is an important infrastructure project for the facility that will improve the health and wellbeing of the children, staff, and community at large.

Dollar Amount of Project
$540.00

Donations Collected to Date
$0.00

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

Dollar Amount Needed
$540.00

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Maseysini Borehole Project - Swaziland

Maseysini  Borehole Project - SwazilandLocation
Ndima Homestead, Maseysini Community, Shiselweni Region, Swaziland

Community Description
Maseysini is located on the main road between Mahamba and Nhlangano. The area of the community this project will affect is a close-knit section on top of a hill.

The nearest water source for this area of the community is in the garden, fifteen to twenty minutes away. The water source is small hole made dirty by cows, and people frequently get sick from the water. The homesteads in the area collect water daily, but rarely garden or keep animals because of the labor required to obtain water for these projects.

Project Description
This project is to drill a borehole in Maseysini.

The project will be implemented under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Lauren Cuddy Egbert.

The work will be done by the most reliable drilling company in Swaziland, Manzi Drilling.

Maseysini  Borehole Project - SwazilandThe borehole will be placed on the homestead of the Ndima family, headed by Make Angelina Ndima who is a primary school teacher and a resource for many families in the community. (It is not possible to put the borehole on communal land because the costs of electricity and maintenance cannot be undertaken by the community at large.)

The Ndima family will run the borehole on their electricity and charge each homestead 15 emalangeni a month (about 1.50 USD) to access the tap. This small fee will cover the electricity costs of running the borehole. Because this water source will be privately run, the family will be able to set aside money for electricity and maintenance.

Project Impact
The borehole will be used by at least ten homesteads, and will benefit upwards of seventy people.

Comments
This is an important project for the community. It utilizes the appropriate technology under the circumstances, and provides a solution for sustainability within the means of the participating families.

The major portion of the funding for this project came from a $500 contribution from CannedWater4Kids, Sussex, WI, USA.

However, the project became infeasible and was terminated with no expenditure of funds. All donations have been re-allocated.

 

Maseysini  Borehole Project - Swaziland    Maseysini  Borehole Project - Swaziland

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Nhlulweni KaGogo Center Latrine Project - Swaziland

Nhlulweni KaGogo Center Latrine Project - Swaziland

Location
Nhlulweni, Manzini Region, Swaziland

Nhlulweni KaGogo Center Latrine Project - Swaziland

Community Description
Nhlulweni is a rural community with about 350 homesteads and approximately 3,000 people. Due to the very high unemployment in the area, the population relies on subsistence farming. Swaziland currently has the highest prevalence rate of HIV/AIDS in the world, and this community has not escaped the devastating impact of the disease.

Nhlulweni KaGogo Center serves as the community health center, and also is used as the main meeting space for the community for community events.

This facility currently has no latrine and the surrounding grounds are instead used. The center hosts a number of community meetings for different groups every week. These meetings include the town council, savings groups, NGO-hosted events, and the occasional mobile clinic. This means that hundreds of community members are using this facility weekly.

The regional mobile clinic has specified the need for a latrine at the location prior to committing to further involvement in the community.

Project Description
This project is to build a public latrine for the community center.

The community has met to discuss the need for this latrine and has decided on the space and appointed a group of members to carry out the construction of the latrine, which will have designated male and female sides.

Throughout construction, locally available materials will be used as much as possible, such as sand and rock for the concrete, and timber for the rafters.

Nhlulweni KaGogo Center Latrine Project - SwazilandOther materials will be purchased locally, such as bags of cement, tin for the roof, and toilet seats. A ventilation pipe will be donated through a nation-wide program promoting sanitation. The items will be delivered by a community member, to be stored in a secure room at the KaGogo Center until needed for the project.

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the materials.

Community members will provide the labor for every step, including digging the hole, building the slab, making the bricks, and the final construction. A local carpenter will be contracted to make the doors and door frames.

As the primary community center, the construction of this latrine will also be used as a demonstration to the community of proper planning, construction, and use of a latrine.

Project Impact
Approximately 200 people visit the center weekly.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Lewis Kiker

Comments
This latrine will provide a safe and sanitary alternative for the community to use at the KaGogo Center.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Andando Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Lewis Kiker of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Lewis and/or those of other PCVs in the country.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Ndvwabangeni Dam Project – Swaziland

Ndvwabangeni Dam Project – Swaziland

About 80% of the population in Swaziland relies on subsistence farming for their survival. As a result, water availability is a huge issue for the country. It is a problem that is especially pronounced in the rural areas where there is an increased dependence on farming. A shortage of water means that a family cannot grow food for income or for sustenance. Thus, water deficiencies directly affect a family's livelihood and food security.

Ndvwabangeni is, by Swazi standards, a very large community located in the northern Hhohho region of Swaziland. It is situated in an area between the Matsamo border post and a small town called Buhleni.

Lady on Path - Swaziland

This project is to construct a scoop dam as a means to alleviate the water shortage. The dam will be located in a central area in the community where it is possible for families to start their own gardens next to the dam. The project is being carried out under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Melissa Lin.

At present, during the dry season, local water sources are not sufficient to support the community. The stream that will supply the dam runs year round, thereby providing the community with a constant source of water. This water will be used for gardening, farming, and other everyday needs.

The community members who initiated and are involved in the project are the members of the Ndvwabangeni Inner Council. They form the community’s local traditional government. As the local representatives they hold a great amount of power to mobilize people to carry out and complete projects.

The community will provide all the labor, tools, and transportation of materials for the building of the dam. A government organization has donated the use of its bulldozer for the project.

Landscape - SwazilandProject funds will be used to purchase the materials to construct the dam and put in the piping, a tap, a concrete wall, and fencing to protect the water supply.

Funds will be collected from the community to be used for future repairs, thus ensuring sustainability.

965 people will directly benefit from this project. It provides not only a water source, but also impacts directly on the issues of malnutrition and food security.

This project has now been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Melissa Lin of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Melissa and/or those of her counterpart PCVs in Swaziland.


This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Funds Needed : 
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Natural Well Development Project - Swaziland

Swaziland MapSwaziland is a landlocked country in Southern Africa, bordered on the north, south, and west by South Africa, and on the east by Mozambique. It is a small country, no more than 120 miles from north to south and 80 miles from east to west. The western half is mountainous, and the eastern border with Mozambique and South Africa is dominated by the escarpment of the Lebombo Mountains.

The climate is temperate in the west, but reaches 104 degrees in summer in the lowveld. The rainy season is during the summer, when rainfall may reach 78 inches in the west.

This project is to be done in a community located in the rural, dry lowveld. An extremely high unemployment rate, the highest global rate of HIV/AIDS occurrence, and a recent drought have hindered all development efforts while making progress all the more necessary.

One of the most pressing issues facing community members is lack of clean and reliable sources of water for drinking and sustaining small gardens (often the only reliable source of food for rural Swazi families). Current water supplies are prohibitively expensive to develop and maintain and people are continually dependent upon rain fall.

This project is to convert a local naturally-occurring well into a functioning tap. It is being carried out under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Serena Parcell in collaboration with the community. The project was developed with the help of a local rural water expert, after a series of community-wide meetings.

Swaziland Landscape

The community is contributing all of the labor and some of the funds for materials. Total community participation is 33% of the project cost.

This project will provide approximately 1,000 community members, located within a one-mile range of the well, with access to clean water. Thus it will have a tremendously high impact for the money spent.

This project has been funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

Any additional donations using the Donate button below will be used to fund other projects by this PCV and/or other PCVs in this country.

 

 

This project has been completed. To read about the concusion, CLICK HERE.

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Funds Needed : 
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