Senegal

Sare Dembayel Latrine Project - Senegal

Sare Dembayel Latrine Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Sare Dembayel Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
Sare Dembayel, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Sare Dembayel is a village in the Kolda region, with an estimated population of 900. The main ethnic group is Fulakunda, with a few PulaFuta households. Sare Dembayel is located 13 kilometers from the National Road.

At their closest "Road Town," Mampatim, one can potentially access a wider range of food, education, and medical care. However, due to the long distance and difficult terrain, community members are often limited to the options presented within Sare Dembayel.

The Regional Capital, Kolda, is 67 kilometers from Mampatim. In Kolda, one can access the hospital to address more serious ailments and materials that the Road Town does not hold. To travel there, one must walk or bike 13 kilometers to Mampatim and wait for a small bus that has an irregular schedule. A few community members own scooters or older motorcycles, but paying for a ride is expensive and not an option most people can opt for.

Pertinent structures within the village include a primary school, a mosque, several small boutiques, and a health hut. Beyond these buildings, community members and youth must seek alternate and inconvenient options for education and health. Most times, children are not able to pursue higher education beyond the primary school level, and they typically start working at a young age in their family's fields.

Sare Dembayel Latrine Project - SenegalDepending on the season, the village may be vastly empty, with children and adults alike working in their fields. Upon returning from their work, community members relax by drinking and sharing tea with one another, while sitting on a large mat under a shady tree. Children play with one another with makeshift balls and homemade toys. Young girls must balance taking care of younger children and cooking and cleaning for their family. These chores usually take precedence over education and enjoying time with friends and family.

When community members are sick, they do not have the financial means nor the physical energy to travel to the "health post," which is like a local clinic. As a result, deaths occur annually from common and preventable health risks, mostly affecting the youth.

Because of the lack of jobs or financial incentives available in the village, men often seek seasonal or year-round work in more populated areas of Senegal, or in some cases, work abroad in surrounding countries. However, these jobs are difficult to obtain and sustain.

Throughout the year, community members plant, tend, and harvest their fields of rice, corn, millet, peanuts, and cotton.

Problem Addressed
A variety of factors play a significant role in the village’s poor health and the lack of infrastructure can lead to discouraging health outcomes. Due to the unavailability of sanitation infrastructure, open defecation is a dangerous practice rampant within the community and can exacerbate health and safety issues that are otherwise preventable, such as diarrhea and fecal contamination of water and food.

Sare Dembayel Latrine Project - SenegalOf the 70 compounds surveyed, 18 households reported having “non-functioning latrines”- meaning that efforts towards constructing latrines have been initiated, but due to the lack of materials and knowledge surrounding latrine construction, they are no longer in use. Therefore, 65 compounds of these 70 currently open defecate into the bush, roughly translating into 828 people out of 900 who must open defecate, as there are no other means.

Currently, the mosque does not have a latrine. Several community members frequent the mosque, especially on Fridays, and people from surrounding areas also visit the mosque, as they do not have a mosque in their villages. A nearby household has a latrine that they have opened for mosque Attendees. However, this latrine is becoming too dilapidated for use, as it is poorly constructed.

In survey responses, community members have emphasized the inconveniences and detrimental health effects of open defecation. Reoccurring and common responses include:

- the insufficient separation between feces and human contact
- children playing in the bush and bringing fecal matter back to the household and to family members
- the inconvenience of going to the bush during times of sickness (i.e. diarrhea), night time, and relentless rains
- water during the rainy season washing fecal matter into the compounds, subsequently affecting water and food sources
- inability to provide a place to defecate for guests and visitors

Project Description
This project is to build 25 single ventilated pit latrines, 24 at the household level and one at the mosque.

Beneficiaries will pay an 11,000 CFA (~20 USD) contribution. Each will Dig a pit that is 2 meters by 2 meters by 2 meters (depth x width x length), and gather and bring sand, gravel, and water for mason and brick-makers. They will attend a health talk concerning Water and Sanitation Hygiene behaviors and latrine maintenance.

The mason and brick-makers will:

- Create bricks from 6 bags of cement to surround the pit
- Mason will line bricks with cement
- Iron grid (4 bars) will create a structure for the pit cover, connected with iron wire, covered with gravel and cement
- Two meters of PVC Pipe and the PVC Coude will be used to connect the seat to the pit foot holdings will be constructed with remaining cement.
- Remaining PVC Pipe and a T connecting piece will be connected above the latrine and serve as a ventilation pipe
- With remaining iron, the mason will construct a makeshift “door handle” so that once the pit is full, latrine-owners will have the opportunity to empty the latrine.

An approximate timeline for brick-making is about two days, with a day break prior to the mason’s arrival so that the cement can successfully solidify, while masonry work will require about two days.

The committee members and the Peace Corps Volunteer will create and lead hand-washing demonstrations and periodically update one another on the progress of the project and if there are any concerns. The mason has had several trainings on WASH related topics and has received formal training on latrine construction. In addition, he has committed to attend these health talks for the households to teach members how to care for a latrine and what to do once it is full and ready to be emptied.

Health talks will be conducted at the household level, so that attendance can be assured and understanding of information presented reinforced. Community members will attend talks to build knowledge surrounding proper Water and Sanitation Hygiene (WASH) practices and understand proper care of latrines.

Upon distributing soap and hand-washing materials, household members will be asked to demonstrate proper hand-washing and relay the importance of hand-washing in relation to common illnesses. At the 3-month mark, surveys will be conducted to determine if hand-washing materials provided are still in use, specifically after using the latrine.

Project Impact
The project will benefit 400 people, comprised of people from 24 households and the mosque in the community.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Dorothy Nam

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Peace Corps Volunteer will conduct surveys 3 months afte completion to assess effectiveness of hand-washing materials, and follow-up on latrine maintenance and care.

The mason and brick-makers will present latrine care information at health talks.

The households will regularly maintain and repair their individual latrines upon completion.

Fundraising Target
$4,400

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$200

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,200

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Well and School Garden Project - Senegal

Well and School Garden Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Well and School Garden Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Lxxxxxxx, Tambacounda, Senegal

Community Description
The village of Lxxxxxxx is an ethnically Pulaar farming village with a population of about 600 in the heart of the Boundou Reserve. The economy consists of millet and peanut farmers that rely on rainy season water to grow their crops.

There is a 1-room school that is attended by over 80% girls. Most families send sons to school in nearby Goudiry. Since Goudiry is a larger town, parents perceive the school to be better equipped for teaching, with more opportunities, a higher chance for migration to a city center, increased access to college, and increased chances of emigration for better economic opportunities.

The village is in an ecologically valuable reserve, and some local men work for free, part-time, as ecoguards, teaching the local population about both the value and maintenance of the different ecosystems, flora, and fauna. They are partnered with the school, and take the students on field trips, as well as involve them in land reclamation projects and other conservation efforts.

The one teacher is a Wolof man from the tourist town Mbour, who has for 4 years worked to grow the opportunities, especially for the female students. He himself has a daughter and wife in Mbour who he sees on vacations and in the summer. He is also now fluent in Pulaar.

Well and School Garden Project - SenegalProblem Addressed
The people of the village of Lxxxxxxx are experiencing water supply problems. The population draws water mostly from one well, then from rainy season streams (3 months annually). Two wells are functional for the whole Village. The animals drink from troughs from one, and the other is far from the people, providing water for a crops field. This well also dries up every year, so is not accessible year-round.

In addition, the school in Lxxxxxxx is a difficult walking distance from the village well. The students therefore have no choice but to share the responsibility of carrying water to the school for their needs (erasing the chalkboard, washing their hands, and using the latrine). This labor detracts from schoolwork as it is time consuming, and tiring.

The trees planted by the students and ecoguards are also in need of more than rainy season water, especially the fruit trees. Finally, the students are poor. The idea of a garden and the benefits it would bring (economic and health related) is an impossibility without a water source.

Project Description
This project is to build a well and create a community garden in Lxxxxxxx.

The well will enable the school to have water self-sufficiency, so the students can have water have water for drinking, using the latrine, erasing the chalk board, washing their hands, and for starting a garden.

Well and School Garden Project - SenegalThe school garden will benefit the health and wellbeing of the student body.

The construction time will be 4-6 weeks. At 1.5 meters in diameter, 2 meters will be hand-dug per day, for 30 meters. Lining will be added daily, made of iron, cement brick, and mortar. Cement over steel lining is to be added after the digging is completed each day.

Once the water table is reached, the bottom of the well will be built by sinking 2 pre cast concrete rings. Factored into the cost of well construction is a preventative structure.

At the top of the well, there will be a 3-meter cement ring on top of a gravel barrier. This serves to prohibit standing water, so as to protect the integrity of the well, prevent water from seeping into the well, and allow people to access the water safely.

A series of courses are already being taught by the PCV, and the ecoguards in financial and land management. The fence is complete around the school, so all that remains is a water source.

The community will provide locally-available materials, and housing the workers.

The local teacher and volunteer ecoguards are facilitating the building, maintenance, and operations of the well, garden, and live fencing in order to build the agricultural capacity of 85+ local students.

Additional lessons include safe water supply usage taught by a volunteer representative from the Service Regionale de l'Hydralique, food transformation taught by a volunteer representative from local food agency, Experna, and Financial Planning and Business Planning taught by the PCV. Finally, this project is of an ongoing nature; locals will be trained in project management.

Project Impact
Over 600 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Moriah Lee. Moriah previously completed the Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The financial commitment, in tandem with business planning, by M. Sokhone has demonstrated the town's desire for a well. The community is purchasing all of the tools to be used for the garden and well not covered by Water Charity funds.

Certain activities, including live fencing, will lower maintenance costs and increase the sustainability of the project and the future projects started by the ecoguards and students.

The inclusion of local experts, including women's groups, water specialists, ecoguards, and the teacher-planned teaching events, will create a series of stakeholders who can maintain the momentum of gardening dissemination after the well is completed.

Comments
A water source will allow the maintenance of reforested trees around the school (planted by Boundou Reserve Ecoguards with the students in 2016), which will instill in the students a sense of responsibility for the ecologically significant park in which they live.

Let Girls Learn
This project will accrue to the benefit of girls, who bear the main responsibility for retrieving water, and make up most of the school population. Easier access to water will make it easier for them to attend and remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$2,800

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,800

 

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Household Latrine Project - Senegal

Household Latrine Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Household Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Dxxxxxxxx, Thies Region, Senegal

Community Description
The community is located in the Thies region in Western Senegal. The population is roughly equal parts Pulaar-speaking individuals and Wolof speakers. It has been able to secure vital resources such as running water from a spigot, a paved national road, numerous fields for farming, and 5 shops in which people are able to buy basic necessities. Locally grown vegetables are the village's chief income source. The population cultivates several fields of carrots, cabbage, turnips, peanuts, mangoes, onions, bitter tomatoes, and peppers.

The community also has a primary school to educate their young children--who account for about half of the population. The entire population is led by three chiefs who intervene when issues arise, hold meetings to make the village aware of new projects or problems arising within the village, and represent the village at various events. The village is continually seeking ways to improve the quality of life for its citizens through community-led initiatives such as this latrine project.

Problem Addressed
There are a total of five compounds in the village which do not have access to a proper latrine. Members of these households resort to open defecation, which leads to sanitation-related diseases such as diarrhea, pneumonia, and cholera.

A baseline survey to investigate the health practices in the community revealed that at least 25% of children under 5 had diarrhea in any two-week span. Similarly, 53% of respondents said that children were very likely to have pneumonia. These illnesses can be easily avoided with access to proper latrines and adoption of proper hygiene practices. Seven percent of respondents stated that they believed that open defecation did not have any negative consequences.

Project Description
This project is to build 5 latrines in the remaining 5 compounds in the community that currently do not have access to proper sanitation.

The work will progress as follows:

1. The latrine committee and the PCV will call on participating households to begin digging the pits.

2. The head mason and the PCV will return to the vendors with whom prices were negotiated and buy all the materials and transport them to the village.

3. The sand supplier will bring the necessary sand.

4. The brickmakers will begin making bricks to line the pits.

5. Once the bricks are dry, the mason will continue with the rest of construction and latrine installation.

a. Each latrine requires digging two pits, each with a dimension of 2x2x2 meters, lined with cement bricks, and covered with a slab. This design ensures durability so that the latrines will be able to serve a typical household over a long period of time.

b. These latrines will not require a superstructure or any kind of toilet seat. Instead, each slab will have a small hole on the top that can be covered when not in use.

6. Every day, member of the latrine committee will visit each work site to oversee construction.

7. Once finished, the local nurse will conduct follow-up home visits to ensure people are practicing proper handwashing techniques and that handwashing stations are available in each household. Solar lanterns will be distributed to participants.

Household Latrine Project - SenegalProject Impact
Fifty people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Keifer Winn

Monitoring and Maintenance
A latrine committee has been created to help supervise the project. The committee consists of four community leaders who will check up on laborers’ daily progress. They will also ensure that participating households are held accountable, contributing necessary funds and attending behavior change trainings.

One of these trainings will cover latrine maintenance, ensuring that households will extend a latrine’s lifespan to its fullest potential and improve community health.

Counterparts will also conduct monthly home visits to guarantee that all household members are using and maintaining the latrine and as well as practicing proper hand washing.

Fundraising Target
$700

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$10

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$690

Household Latrine Project - SenegalHousehold Latrine Project - Senegal

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Middle School Latrine Project - Senegal

Middle School Latrine Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Txxxxxxx, Department of Linguere, Region of Louga, Senegal

Community Description
Txxxxxxx is a small, rural village located 35 kilometers southwest of the departmental capital, Linguere, in the region of Louga. Of its 1,500 inhabitants, 90% are Pulaar and 10% are Wolof. Though the village is predominantly Pulaar, the Wolof are the region's majority ethnic group.

Txxxxxxx is the center of the rural commune, boasting a Health Post as well as one of only two middle schools in the commune. Students whose homes are distant from the village center walk and drive horse- or donkey-drawn carts several kilometers to attend school in the village each morning.

Individuals within the community of Txxxxxxx typically generate income through animal husbandry, herding cows, sheep, and goats.

Problem Addressed
The middle school has been borrowing a private space from the mayor's office since its inception. This year, the mayor is evicting the middle school so that the preschool, which has been located in the mayor’s office in the meantime, may utilize the space.

Two new classrooms have been constructed, but at a distance quite far (over 1 kilometer) from the village center, posing a challenge to all students but especially those that live outside of the village proper and commute many kilometers each day.

There is no electricity, running water, or latrine access at this new site. Students therefore have reported that they wait until school gets out to relieve themselves. This relocation to a more remote schoolhouse puts attendance of all students, but especially female students, at risk.

Maintaining proper menstrual health and hygiene is not possible without access to running water, toilets, or privacy. This population of rural, Pulaar girls is already vulnerable to social and cultural forces that keep female students from participating as fully in academic life.

Both school faculty members as well as parents of students have shown concern about the lack of amenities at the distant new school location and the potentially harmful effects on students’ ability to learn.

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalProject Description
This project is to build three toilets at the new school: one for the teachers, one for the girls, and one for the boys.

The mayor's office has financed a water line out to the school in order to make toilet construction possible, demonstrating the community’s commitment to the project, financial and otherwise. The new pipeline is complete and functional.

For this project, materials will first need to be purchased in Dahra Djoloff, the road town 35km northwest, and transported by pick-up truck to Txxxxxxx.

First, the brick maker will blend sand, cement, and gravel to form bricks. The laborer will then dig two 2m x 2m pits (the students’ blocs will share a pit) for the masons to line the pits with the finished bricks along with supporting rebar.

PVC piping will provide an evacuation route from the toilet to the pit as well as ventilation by way of T connector. Stalls will be fashioned with remaining bricks and doors, including the installation of a water spigot (robinet) by the community in each stall, a layer of cement will then be placed above the latrine pit, along with the placement of the Turkish toilets, connecting all relevant piping.

Hand washing stations will also be built by a local metalworker out of rebar and placed strategically so as to encourage proper hand washing behavior.

Additionally, materials necessary for maintenance and longevity of the toilets, such as buckets for flushing waste, plastic kettles for personal hygiene, and cleaning supplies like scrubbing brushes, will be purchased.

Construction of the toilets themselves will begin in December 2017, once the area is solidly out of the rainy season. The initial phase of the construction aspect has already been completed, as the school now has water access.

Messaging on topics such as water, sanitation, hygiene, and toilet maintenance will be delivered.

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalThe PCV will continue her work on the topic of menstrual health and hygiene with female students both attending the elementary school in the village as well as the middle school. More students progress from the village’s elementary school to its middle school each year, so outreach to future generations of middle schoolers is also important.

Project Impact
105 students and staff will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Alika Johnston

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school will monitor the use of the improvements and maintain the facilities.

Attendance is assiduously kept by the teachers at the middle school, so trends in female attendance may be isolated from before and after project implementation.

Furthermore, absences of the entire student body due to illness may also be tracked in relation to the WASH component of the project. With better WASH practice adherence, all students may enjoy fewer days out of school due to illness.

Let Girls Learn
This project accrues to the benefit of girls, in that it allows them to remain in school, by providing access to resources and privacy so that they may hygienically and discreetly manage their periods while attending classes.

Fundraising Target
$1,600

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$100

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,500

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalMiddle School Latrine Project - Senegal

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Gagnick Latrine Project - Senegal

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Gagnick Latrine Project - SenegalThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Gxxxxxx, Wxxx, and Dxxxx, Commune of Gagnick, Department of Guinguineo, Region of Kaolack, Senegal

Community Description
The three target villages of this project are Gxxxxxx, Wxxx, and Dxxxx. All three villages are located within the rural commune of Gagnick in the department of Guinguineo in Kaolack.

People in the communities of Wxxx and Gxxxxxx make a living primarily through farming millet and peanuts. People in Dxxxx typically work by rearing cows and sheep.

Ethnically, the village of Gxxxxxx is one-hundred percent Sereer, the village of Dxxxx is one-hundred percent Pulaar, and the village of Wxxx is eighty percent Wolof and twenty percent Sereer. Despite the mix of ethnicity, all of the members of all three communities can understand and speak Wolof fluently; this is how the separate villages communicate with one another.

All three of these villages identify as one-hundred percent Muslim and therefore value cleanliness highly. Thus, these villages are actively seeking to adopt a more cleanly lifestyle despite limitations.

The combined population of the three villages is about 1,000 people with the bulk of this population being youth under the age of eighteen. Additionally, all three of these villages have access to running water that is pumped from the commune capital, Gagnick Khojil, but none of these villages have access to electricity. Some households within these communities have independently paid to have solar panels attached to their houses, and most households have paid to have running water spigots constructed their compounds.

As far as health care infrastructure, Gxxxxxx has a Health Hut located locally that serves over four villages including Gxxxxxx and Wxxx. The community members of Dxxxx do not have a Health Hut that they can utilize, and must go to a Health Post, a higher performing healthcare infrastructure that is often times more expensive.

Gagnick Latrine Project - SenegalProblem Addressed
One of the biggest challenges within the three communities engaged in this project is financial limitations. Locals' jobs and herders and farmers typically provide individuals with enough money to feed themselves and their families, and enough money to handle minor health issues that may arise. However, individuals in these communities seldom have money to invest in construction projects, treating severe illnesses, and other luxuries. Most people living in the area resort to defecating in their fields, as there is no feasible alternative

A former Peace Corps Volunteer helped these communities receive forty household latrines. However, there are still over seventy remaining houses that have no latrine infrastructure whatsoever. Because of inadequate hand-washing and latrine infrastructure throughout these villages, diarrhea has been named as the top health care issue by local health workers.

Additionally, individuals in these communities do not always have the money needed to treat illnesses such as diarrhea and dehydration resorting from diarrhea.

In addition to financial problems, these three communities are all rural bush communities that do not have resources for building latrines regularly available. Transporting materials from other sites is nearly impossible for these individuals as vehicles only transport materials in bulk, and materials are too bulky and heavy to be transported by horse or donkey.

Project Description
This project is to construct ventilated-pit latrines in 31 households in the three villages.

Efforts began in February, 2017, when meetings were held with each village after the communities expressed interest in having increased access to latrines. At each meeting, project objectives were outlined, a village treasurer was designated, and community contributions were established. The meetings were led by PCV counterpart Ibrahima Diouf. In addition, treasurers from each Village, Mas Ndaiye, Niokhor Diouf, and Adama Sow have agreed to collect money from participating households and track the progress of each household in their respective village.

Gagnick Latrine Project - SenegalSince the initial meeting, 31 households have paid at least one-third of their total community contribution. Participating households will now purchase a hand-washing station, and attend behavior change communication health talks on hand-washing, the importance of latrine use, and latrine maintenance.

After each community member has attended these sessions, paid their entire cash contribution, and dug their pit holes, locally-hired masons will construct latrine pits and cement toilet seats over two days. Community members will then be required to provide either traditional millet-stalk fencing to enclose the infrastructure, or independently pay to add on a cement brick enclosure around the cement toilet chair.

After construction is complete, the PCV and her counterpart will complete home-visits to ensure that individuals are washing hands and using their latrine properly, in addition to reinforcing objectives of health talks.

The in-kind contribution for the project will consist of digging the pit hole, water for cement, lunch for masons, and transport of sand. The community contribution is compromised of the mason fee, hand-washing station, and latrine wire.

Water Charity funds will pay for the latrine materials, material transportation, and brick-making labor costs.

Project Impact
285 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
A. Dunajcik

Monitoring and Maintenance
The latrines will be maintained and repaired by the individual families.

Project Funding
This project has been paid for by a donor who chooses to remain anonymous. Please Donate so that we have funding for our next project in Senegal.

Gagnick Latrine Project - SenegalGagnick Latrine Project - Senegal

Gagnick Latrine Project - SenegalGagnick Latrine Project - Senegal

 

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Fatick Region Latrine Project - Senegal

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Fatick Region Latrine Project - SenegalThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Fxxxx and Nxxxx, Fatick Region, Senegal

Community Description
Fxxxx and Nxxxx are in the Fatick Region of Senegal. These towns are located on the tidal salt waters of the Sine Saloum Delta and all inhabitants of the village are proud members of the Sereer minority ethnic group. The community gathers salt, fish, and shrimp for a living.

Fatick Region Latrine Project - SenegalDuring the rainy season, farmers also grow peanuts and millet. There are also a few beautiful mango and cashew orchards just to the north of the villages. The two towns work together to harvest salt on the shared salt flats, and often fish together. This has fostered strong bonds between the two villages, which is also strengthened through the numerous familial connections and shared farming land. In rainy season, the salt flats separating the two villages flood, excluding a 3-kilometer raised dirt road that remains above the tide line.

The people are incredibly friendly, as part of the Senegalese tradition of Teranga (roughly translated to 'hospitality'). A locally-run set of huts operates as a small hotel for tourists who want to get off the beaten path. The town is 11 kilometers from the nearest paved road and the dirt road varies in its state of upkeep.

Problem Addressed
A community-conducted baseline survey in Nxxxx identified several problems with activities related to proper sanitation and hygiene. The survey initially indicated that the number of households without latrines was just over 50%. However, further investigation indicates that 24 of 31 (77%) households do not have latrines.

Additionally, the neighboring town of Fxxxx has 26 households without latrines. Of these households in need, a total of 19 households—10 in Fxxxx and 9 in Nxxxx —have demonstrated the dedication and interest needed to participate in the project.

Fatick Region Latrine Project - SenegalProject Description
This project is to build 19 latrines in the neighboring towns of Fxxxx and Nxxxx.

In both villages, counterparts will work together to construct latrines for households that lack basic sanitation facilities and engage in health classes to ensure proper usage, maintenance, and hand washing. This will increase the maximum benefit to the health of the community and the households directly affected.

The latrines will be single ventilated improved pit latrines. This was decided by the Fxxxx / Nxxxx Sanitation Committee as it met the standards of the existing latrines in the two villages.

The pits will be dug to 2-meters by 2-meters by 2-meters, and lined with concrete. Each latrine will have a PVC pipe vent and a Turkish-style seat made of concrete.

Families will additionally provide a wall or fencing to provide privacy during use. Adjacent to all latrines a hand washing station will be set up with soap to ensure proper hygiene.

All participating members will also attend three health classes related to proper hand washing, microbial disease transmission, and latrine maintenance. Additionally, part of the community contribution will go towards the purchasing of locally available hand washing stations.

The start of construction will be largely contingent on the water table and harvest. The water table must recede once the rains have stopped to begin digging the latrines. Also, the available labor for both community contribution and the mason will be devoted to the harvest of the peanuts before construction can begin. The mason has the capacity delegate younger masons under his employ to engage in multiple projects simultaneously, so actual construction should move along quickly.

Fatick Region Latrine Project - SenegalThe community role leading up to this will be crucial. Each household will make monetary and labor donations to their respective latrines, ensuring project ownership. Specifically, these families will provide money to pay for the cost of the manufacture of the cement plate and the hand washing station. The households will also dig the pits prior to the mason’s arrival and bring sand and water for cement mixing.

The funds from Water Charity will go toward other materials and labor necessary for the project. These include cement, rebar, gravel, PVC piping, wire, masonry labor, and transport costs.

Project Impact
127 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
H. Knecht

Monitoring and Maintenance
The latrines are designed to last for many years, providing long-lasting health benefits to the individual households receiving assistance and the community at large.

Education provided through the health classes will also introduce proper behavior to reduce diarrheal diseases, engage in proper waste management, and improve hygiene.

The construction of the latrines will be contingent on the presence of the households at these classes. Additionally, the Sanitation Committee will maintain an active presence in the community.

Project Funding
Funds for this project have been provided by an anonymous donor.

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Funds Needed : 
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Xxxxx Xxxxxxx Pipeline Expansion Project - Senegal

Xxxxx Xxxxxxx Pipeline Expansion Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Xxxxx Xxxxxxx Pipeline Expansion Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxx Xxxxxxx, Podor District, St. Louis Region, Senegal

Community Description
Xxxxx Xxxxxxx is a rural farming community located between a tributary to the Senegal River and the N2 highway. The village life is dictated by farming seasons and religious celebrations. The most remarkable characteristic of the community is the genuine kindness and warmth the inhabitants show to one another, and their visitors.

The village consists of approximately 1,000 members, and contains a health structure and various small businesses. Due to access to the newly built highway, the community has seen a tremendous development in population, infrastructure and commerce in the last 5 years.

To date, Water Charity has funded and completed two impactful projects within the village’s limits. The first was a latrine project for the elementary school, whose previous and dilapidated infrastructure could not handle the growth of students in the village.

The second project, completed with the help of the community and the PCV, established a central line of running water, passing through the heart of the village. Due to this collaboration between Water Charity and the community, there are now 3 public faucets, 15 private compounds with faucets, 2 new mosques in construction, and more village gardens established than ever before.

Xxxxx Xxxxxxx Pipeline Expansion Project - SenegalProblem Addressed
The original pipeline project established a baseline for what is possible for many of the families in the village. Unfortunately, there are still a great number of families who lack access to the pipeline and therefore fresh and clean drinking water. This water has also been demonstrated as necessary for the establishment of home and community gardens. The majority of the compounds in the village are eager to build on the success of the original project, and emulate its results by purchasing private faucets and establishing gardens.

Xxxxx Xxxxxxx is very fortunate to have a medium sized women's garden (15,000 m2) in the north eastern quarter of the village, which is protected by a previous Peace Corps fencing project. The garden contains three large concrete basins to hold water. The garden has been plagued in its development by a lack of access to water. The garden contains a relatively deep well that was once serviced by a manual pump. Once the pump fell into disrepair, 3 years prior, garden production sharply declined and has almost come to a standstill today. The women have found the pulling of water to be too laborious and time consuming to make garden production sustainable.

Lack of water access in homes and in community gardens creates barriers to sanitation, access to diverse and nutritious foods, and to income-generating activities (such as vegetable sales and completion of new buildings).

Project Description
This project has two distinct aims: to extend running water to the highest density of homes without current access in the village, and to expand the pipeline to the local women’s garden.

The new pipeline is designed to extend 126 m to the west, extending access to 11 more compound. It will continue eastward 360 m, towards the women’s garden, offering access to 8 more compounds that currently lack access. Finally, the pipeline will expand 150 m to the north, servicing 5 more compounds. In total, the project requires 636 m of pipeline to reach 24 compounds, averaging 8 inhabitants each.

This pipeline will also include three faucets at the terminus in the women’s garden, that will provide more than 100 women with water to garden effectively with.

The plumber and material supplier from the first project will again be used, bringing cost-effectiveness to this project.

The projects start-up costs are relatively low, as the village has its contract established with the water service provider and the majority of necessary infrastructure in place.

Xxxxx Xxxxxxx Pipeline Expansion Project - SenegalProject Impact
1,500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
C. Byrnes (This PCV previously completed the Agnam Tonguel Water System Project - Senegal,) 

Monitoring and Maintenance
The monitoring and maintenance of this project fundamentally begins with a maintenance of the infrastructure. The water service has been actively monitored thus far and the only stoppage of water has been for one routine cleaning.

The faucets must be maintained by individual families, but as they become habituated to using them, we can expect families to have the intrinsic motivation to maintain their own individual sources.

The public faucets are maintained by the groups who pay their monthly bills (i.e. women's garden faucets maintained by Women's Group).

The monitoring of project results is the responsibility of the PCV. This includes, but is not limited to, keeping records of which families have purchased faucets and where, what home gardens have been started and their status, recording any profits rom new enterprises started.

Let Girls Learn
This project contains apparent and subtle benefit to the women of the village. As in the prior pipeline project, school-aged girls will save time for attending school and studying after class, if they are freed from the routine labor of pulling water for their families to drink, cook, and bathe with.

Women are empowered by the access to their garden space, as all families have at least one female representative from their home who can cultivate a plot of land. The space, once functional and flourishing, can be used for girls’ education days, whether it be about female health or proper nutrition, as it will be regarded as a space of female empowerment throughout the village.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

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Xxx Xxxxxx Community Water Project - Senegal

Community Water Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Xxx Xxxxxx Community Water Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxx Xxxxxx, Kedougou, Kedougou Region, Senegal

Community Description
Xxx Xxxxxx is a rural farming village wedged in the lowlands between the Gambia River and one of its tributaries. There are remnants of the once lush landscape, with small groves of wild Shea trees, Maad fruit, teak, palm, and baobab. Rice and corn fields surround the village and make a carpet of neon green in the first weeks after seeding.

It is a Jaxanke community, an ethnic minority, and a group that has been persecuted in the past, and is now neglected by the government. In the Jaxanke language, a common greet is, "mun be diyalin?" which translates as "what is sweet?" The typical Dar Salaam response is "Barro doron," or "work only," in English. Clearly, they are motivated and desire work.

Being a group that is an ethnic minority, Xxx Xxxxxx is often overlooked by the government. This equates to a population that is uneducated and unable to access resources that other communities are entitled to. For instance, the village does not have a government-built, cement structure for a school, which many of the surrounding, majority Pular communities have, even though the bamboo shack, that now functions as a school room, houses more students than most buildings in the neighboring villages.

Xxx Xxxxxx is a community that is seeking a more prosperous life, but has a hard time imagining one in Senegal. They see trees chopped down, and encroaching deforestation that destabilizes land and makes finding fuel more difficult. They know it is hard to find a well-paid job without a basic education, yet, still seek jobs abroad. Every young man must at least attempt a trip to Europe, where they see images of prosperity, regardless of the perils en route and the unskilled labor that awaits them.

Those who remain inexhaustibly toil in rice fields, dependent on increasingly unpredictable rains, scavenger the bush for wild meat and cooking fuel that is increasingly rare, and pray that their efforts will be rewarded in this life or the next.

Xxx Xxxxxx Community Water Project - SenegalProblem Addressed
Xxx Xxxxxx, like many rural communities in Africa, lacks sufficient water. The exploding population relies on one hand pump well as their only source of tested, clean, and potable water. Although other wells exist across the community, they all run dry during the two months of extreme heat and dryness.

This timing is also referred to as "Starve Season" because gardens die, forageable food is depleted and storage supplies are low. In an attempt to increase their access to food, and generate a small income, some women use the one pump to water their garden beds throughout the dry season. It is often a futile effort. Women get fed up with waiting in long lines at the pump each day to fill their watering buckets, and give up on their vegetables before they fruit.

To compound the problem, young women are required to wait hours in line to fill their families' drinking water buckets, which keeps them from valuable daylight hours when they could otherwise do their homework or play with friends.

Project Description
This project is to deepen a well, build three basins, install a solar water pump, and teach improved gardening techniques.

The PCV, Community President Mamadou Minté, and Women's Group President Mariama Ba will ensure a timely implementation of all projects, including:

-Create tree nursery with fruit and live-fence species; implemented by Xxx Xxxxxx Women's Group and involves filling tree sacks and watering them.

Xxx Xxxxxx Community Water Project - Senegal-Build elevated basin foundations and dig trenches for PCV pipe; implemented by the men of Xxx Xxxxxx and involves filling tires with packed earth.

-Transport Materials from Kedougou to Xxx Xxxxxx; implemented by the young men of the community who work with donkey carts.

-Deepen Well; implemented by Babacar Keita a well digger who will deepen the well five meters and secure it with molds.

-Construct Basins; implemented by mason Babacar Djallo and his apprentice.

-Install Solar Pump; implemented by Technician Cherno Djallo and team and includes creating a cement box to protect equipment, and well cover.

-Transplant Trees; implemented by the women of Xxx Xxxxxx and includes both a live fence and small orchard.

-Construct Garden Beds; implemented by members of the Xxx Xxxxxx Women's Group.

-Improved Gardening Technologies Trainings; implemented by the PCV. and PC Master Farmer Mamadou Minté including trainings in composting, double digging, pest management, spacing, seed selection and storage, etc.

Project Impact
267 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
W. Benjamin

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV will oversee, monitor and report on the project. It is likely that he will be replaced by another volunteer once his contract is completed.

To ensure that this is a sustainable project, a section of the community garden will be dedicated to low-maintenance, collective crops that can be sold as a group and stored in the Xxx Xxxxxx Women's Group's cash box. This fund will be used to maintain the improvements, and perform necessary repairs.

Two women, from opposite sides of the village have keys to distinct locks, to ensure that funds are not being misused. Unlike a motor-pump that runs on gasoline, this solar powered well will not require daily expenses to pump water into the watering basins.

Let Girls Learn
This project will free up time that young girls traditionally spend waiting line to pump potable water for their families, making it easier for them to remain in school.

Conclusion

This project became infeasible, and the project was terminated.  There was no expenditure or loss of funds.
Any donations will be utilized for other projects in Senegal.

 

Xxx Xxxxxx Community Water Project - SenegalXxx Xxxxxx Community Water Project - Senegal

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Kaymore School Bathroom and Water Project - Senegal

Kaymore School Bathroom and Water Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kaymore School Bathroom and Water Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Commune of Kaymore, Department of Nioro Du Rip, Region of Kaolack

Community Description
The community is a small rural village that gains most of its income from agriculture. The village does not have electricity but does have a water system with a few spigots throughout the village.

The French school is a primary school with two teachers and 88 students.

Problem Addressed
The French school in the community does not have bathrooms or access to water on school grounds. If the students need to use the restroom or get a drink of water, they must go seek out a compound in the village. This takes away time that the students should be spending in the classroom learning.

Project Description
This project is to build two bathrooms, and install a water line on the school grounds.

One bathroom structure will be built, with two separate bathrooms, one for girls and one for boys. A water line will be run from the main village water supply line to the building.

A local mason will be hired to do all of the construction work, and community members will dig the trench for the water line, and the hole for the bathroom.

Water Charity funds will be used for materials and to pay the mason for his work.

Kaymore School Bathroom and Water Project - SenegalThe community will contribute unskilled labor, local resources, and a small amount of money.

The project includes 20 solar lamps, to be distributed to the students as needed. Since the village does not have electricity the lamps will allow the students to study at night.

A training will be held regarding health, hygiene, sanitation, and the upkeep and maintenance of the bathrooms.

Project Impact
88 students and 2 teachers will benefit from the project each year.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
A. Evans, who previously implemented the Padaf Water System Project - Senegal.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV will visit the site frequently to ensure that the facilities are being properly used and maintained.

The community is home to a few masons who can perform repairs as needed. The school teachers have played a large role in the planning of the project and will work hard to maintain what they have gained.

The WASH training will help the students understand the importance of hand washing and proper bathroom sanitation.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

Kaymore School Bathroom and Water Project - SenegalKaymore School Bathroom and Water Project - Senegal

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School Well Project - Senegal

School Well Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

School Well Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxxx, Kolda Region, Senegal

Community Description
The rural village of Xxxxxxxxx, population approximately 500, lies about 15 kilometers north of the regional capital city of Kolda. There is no electricity and no running water. The village consists mainly of farmers and their families.

The primary school serves students from 4 villages: Soussotou, Saare Samba, Saare Dombel, and Saare Banje. The school currently has 129 students enrolled, 81 males and 48 females.

The community has an organization of parents of students (The Parents d' Eleves de Ecole Primere Xxxxxxxxx (PdE)) who upkeep and try to improve the school.

Problem Addressed
The school currently has no well, and the nearest water source is from a neighboring compound, about 600 meters away. With no close water supply, the school grounds have no trees or garden crops growing (excluding the young mangoes planted by the PCV and the head of the PdE August, 2016.) The PdE and teachers of the school have long wanted the school to be thriving with trees and a student-centered garden, but have not been able to realistically sustain any attempts because of the distance of the water supply.

When water is needed, students are pulled out of class to fetch water – usually girls. Additionally, there is no shade in the school grounds – as trees have no reliable source of water.

Project Description
This project is to build a well on the eastern perimeter of the school.

School Well Project - SenegalThe well will be located between the two teaching buildings. It will be 1 ½ meters in diameter, hand dug by laborers to a depth of 20 meters. The sides will be reinforced by rebar (locally sold as Fehr #10) arranged in a grid, and will be lined in with cement.

The sand and gravel for the cement will be sourced locally and brought by the community.

Upon completion of the well, an above-ground structure will be made. It will be approximately 1 meter tall and surround the well in a circle. On top of the structure will be a suspended metal pole (held up by two other pieces) to which a pulley and rope will be attached.

The project includes the purchase of buckets and watering cans.

Immediately upon completion of the well, a tree nursery will be set up with the students and teachers. Additionally, the well will be used to water 9 mango trees that were planted during the rainy season of 2016.

Long-term, the well will be used to continually sustain trees planted in the school. As the school nursery trees mature, they will be planted in the school yard and watered with water from the well. Moringa, pigeon pea, mango, and ornamental china pride trees are among the species that will be planted.

Additionally, when school resumes in Fall of 2017, the well will be used to support garden beds created and seeded by teachers and students. The students will grow bissap, okra, onions, and other assorted vegetables common to the village.

Another intended use of the school space is as a seed and grafted scion source for the community. The well will support grafted mango trees, as well as moringa and pigeon peas. Community members will be able to harvest seeds to plant in their own households as well as use the mangoes as sources for scions. The school can then also be a location for grafting trainings, moringa nutrition and transformation trainings.

School Well Project - SenegalProject Impact
200 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Holly Henriksen will manage the project. She previously implemented the Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - Senegal.

Monitoring and Maintenance
This project will be monitored by the serving PCV, and volunteers who follow in the village. The Peace Corps indicators that will be measured are tree nursery creation, tree planting, tree survival, and gardens created. Additionally, any trainings associated with trees planted at the school (mango grafting, moringa transformation and nutrition, etc.) will be recorded – number of participants and other relevant information.

Maintenance of the actual structure of the well should be unnecessary in the coming years as it will be built to a high standard. The external structures (pulley, metal overhanging bar, buckets, and watering cans) can be maintained with funds from the school and PdE.

Maintenance and care of the trees and garden beds will be sustained by the students and overseen by the teachers, headed by the principal.

Let Girls Learn
This project supports Let Girls Learn. Currently, the school needs water to wash chalkboards, water the 9 mango trees planted, and wash hands. The water is retrieved exclusively by female students, who are pulled out of class to fetch water. Often, they are pulled out of class while class is in session. The addition of a well to the school will save the time that these female students are out of class getting water and increase their amount of time spent in the classroom learning.

Fundraising Target
$1,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,500

 

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