Senegal

School Well Project - Senegal

School Well Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

School Well Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxxx, Kolda Region, Senegal

Community Description
The rural village of Xxxxxxxxx, population approximately 500, lies about 15 kilometers north of the regional capital city of Kolda. There is no electricity and no running water. The village consists mainly of farmers and their families.

The primary school serves students from 4 villages: Soussotou, Saare Samba, Saare Dombel, and Saare Banje. The school currently has 129 students enrolled, 81 males and 48 females.

The community has an organization of parents of students (The Parents d' Eleves de Ecole Primere Xxxxxxxxx (PdE)) who upkeep and try to improve the school.

Problem Addressed
The school currently has no well, and the nearest water source is from a neighboring compound, about 600 meters away. With no close water supply, the school grounds have no trees or garden crops growing (excluding the young mangoes planted by the PCV and the head of the PdE August, 2016.) The PdE and teachers of the school have long wanted the school to be thriving with trees and a student-centered garden, but have not been able to realistically sustain any attempts because of the distance of the water supply.

When water is needed, students are pulled out of class to fetch water – usually girls. Additionally, there is no shade in the school grounds – as trees have no reliable source of water.

Project Description
This project is to build a well on the eastern perimeter of the school.

School Well Project - SenegalThe well will be located between the two teaching buildings. It will be 1 ½ meters in diameter, hand dug by laborers to a depth of 20 meters. The sides will be reinforced by rebar (locally sold as Fehr #10) arranged in a grid, and will be lined in with cement.

The sand and gravel for the cement will be sourced locally and brought by the community.

Upon completion of the well, an above-ground structure will be made. It will be approximately 1 meter tall and surround the well in a circle. On top of the structure will be a suspended metal pole (held up by two other pieces) to which a pulley and rope will be attached.

The project includes the purchase of buckets and watering cans.

Immediately upon completion of the well, a tree nursery will be set up with the students and teachers. Additionally, the well will be used to water 9 mango trees that were planted during the rainy season of 2016.

Long-term, the well will be used to continually sustain trees planted in the school. As the school nursery trees mature, they will be planted in the school yard and watered with water from the well. Moringa, pigeon pea, mango, and ornamental china pride trees are among the species that will be planted.

Additionally, when school resumes in Fall of 2017, the well will be used to support garden beds created and seeded by teachers and students. The students will grow bissap, okra, onions, and other assorted vegetables common to the village.

Another intended use of the school space is as a seed and grafted scion source for the community. The well will support grafted mango trees, as well as moringa and pigeon peas. Community members will be able to harvest seeds to plant in their own households as well as use the mangoes as sources for scions. The school can then also be a location for grafting trainings, moringa nutrition and transformation trainings.

School Well Project - SenegalProject Impact
200 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Holly Henriksen will manage the project. She previously implemented the Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - Senegal.

Monitoring and Maintenance
This project will be monitored by the serving PCV, and volunteers who follow in the village. The Peace Corps indicators that will be measured are tree nursery creation, tree planting, tree survival, and gardens created. Additionally, any trainings associated with trees planted at the school (mango grafting, moringa transformation and nutrition, etc.) will be recorded – number of participants and other relevant information.

Maintenance of the actual structure of the well should be unnecessary in the coming years as it will be built to a high standard. The external structures (pulley, metal overhanging bar, buckets, and watering cans) can be maintained with funds from the school and PdE.

Maintenance and care of the trees and garden beds will be sustained by the students and overseen by the teachers, headed by the principal.

Let Girls Learn
This project supports Let Girls Learn. Currently, the school needs water to wash chalkboards, water the 9 mango trees planted, and wash hands. The water is retrieved exclusively by female students, who are pulled out of class to fetch water. Often, they are pulled out of class while class is in session. The addition of a well to the school will save the time that these female students are out of class getting water and increase their amount of time spent in the classroom learning.

Fundraising Target
$1,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,500

 

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Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal

Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Well and Solar Pump Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, Tambacounda, Senegal

Community Description
The community is made of 8,200 people, most ethnically Pulaar, who are proud to live in what was pre-colonially the capital of the Boundou region (now Tambacounda). The community is composed mostly of women, children, and elderly, as many young men have migrated to find work.

More than 60% of the Xxxxxx population lives below the federal threshold of poverty, leading to food insecurity. The economic decline among the population is explained by:

1. the low post-colonial productivity of their primary economic activity, agriculture because of:

a. significant loss of soil fertility due to desertification,
b. lack of availability of agricultural training, therefore
c. an inaccessibility of many small operators to credit, and

Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal2. the lack of technical training in other sectors:

a. the only training for young people available is within the family, for that ever-shrinking percentage lucky enough to have been born in a family with prior skills (and this of course is rare for women, who start families early), and
b. stories of success from Dakar and abroad lure the men to pursue career options elsewhere, often after having started a family of his own. Thus, young men leave behind young wives with no employment skills, and young children, who are food insecure.

Problem Addressed
The problems to be addressed are water availability in the fields. There is a single well, which only provides water during the rainy season.

There are 8 gardens in Xxxxxx, which are not sufficient to meet the demand for vegetables of its 8,200 citizens.

Project Description
This project is to build a well, with a solar pump, to serve the water needs of the community.

A small community of volunteers in have given 2 hectares of registered land for the creation of a market garden, intercropped space for staple grains, and a fruit tree farm.

35 committed members have signed an agreement form to work for shared plots, attend ongoing trainings until August this year (with a break until November when cold season gardening begins).

Also, the agriculture club (15-19 students, which has helped the PCV plant and maintain trees) at the local high school will be attending all trainings.

1. From April 2017 - June 2017, a hand dug well will be constructed. At an excavation of about 1.5 meters in diameter, a local well company (head mason Mr. Sumare and 3-4 of his workers in tandem with one local metal worker) will dig two meters per day. The two meters dug will be supported by concrete poured from the top (between the sides of the excavation and temporary framework made of rebar) that becomes the permanent lining to the well, daily. This process will be repeated until the water table is reached at 30-35 feet.

The bricks will be made on site. The metal worker is scheduled to come every few days to make the new rebar rings and hooks for the next 4-6 meters until the water table is reached. Then, concrete rings, built by the head mason on site, will be sunk below the water line. Then, small gravel will be sunk to the bottom of the well as a sort of filter. The top of the well and below the ground for 3 meters will consist of a concrete and large gravel barrier for people to stand on while accessing water. This will channel draining water into a basin and keep rain or contaminated water from going into the well.

A tree nursery will be started in April, with a hands-on training and distributed maintenance calendar for members of the group.

Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal2. In June 2017: After the completion of the well, a local volunteer from The hydraulics office will test the water for contamination, and conduct a safe irrigation training for 35 group members, high school students and any interested community members. This office will construct an “irrigation only” sign, to be installed on the day of training. The health PCV will train on dangers of unsafe drinking water, and importance of hand washing.

3. In June 2017: a solar pump will be transported and installed by a company in Dakar that specializes in solar pumps. Amadou Gakko, a solar pump technician will train 35 people, and additional high school students and interested community members on use, maintenance, and sustainability of the solar pump. Another PCV will give lesson on the dangers of uncontrolled slash and burn practices, so that local farming can scale up, as well as live fencing (with live fencing seed distribution).

4. In July 2017, pre-rainy-season staple crop lessons will be taught, cultivation of land will be carried out, and trees from the nursery will be planted. Post-rainy season (August 2017), 35 community members will harvest local crops and market garden, and distribute among 595 inhabitants.

Project Impact
Over 500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
M. Lee

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV, and group lead Sada Dieng will be present every day to oversee progress. The responsibility for maintenance of the project will go to the 7 volunteers, with whom the PCV is conducting project management training with her counterpart using PDM (Project Design and Management) Peace Corps curriculum in March. However, until August (year one of the project) the PCV will be working closely with the volunteers to launch the project successfully, teach record keeping, and teach financial and business management so that the project may sustainably continue for years to come.

In addition, business planning by Sada Dieng and youth member Dienaba Thiam has demonstrated the group's ability to cover any maintenance costs, be it the purchase of repairs or new tools that may arise after grant funds are exhausted. The community group will manage this fund, having been trained on project management by PCV.

Certain educational activities, like live fencing, will lower maintenance costs and increase the sustainability of this project and the future projects started by members of the group. The inclusion of local experts including technicians, health and water specialists, farmers, and business people in planned teaching events will create a series of stakeholders who can maintain the momentum of technology dissemination after the initial project is completed.

Comments
The arable space will be maximized by an accessible supply of water. The project will result in increased access to fresh local food, which will boost the economy and increase the nutrition of the local population.

Fundraising Target
$4,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$150

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,350

 

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Middle School Latrine Project - Senegal

Middle School Latrine Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, District of Medina Yoro Foulah, Kolda Region, Senegal

Community Description
Xxxxxx, a southern Senegalese village of 500 people, is a vibrant community made up of mostly people of the Pular ethnicity. This small, but historically significant locale is the seat of the communal government and is constantly welcoming visitors and officials for meetings and events.

The local sources of income are animal husbandry and field crops such as peanuts, millet, corn, and rice. The government structures include two schools, a health post, the mayor's office, and the office of the prefecture. There are also a number of small restaurants, a tailor, and shops that sell basic cooking materials and household items.

Additionally, with a new road being built between the village and the regional capital, Kolda, business and commerce between cities is becoming easier and easier. This village has a lot of potential for growth and can become a point of service for many of the surrounding villages.

There are a number of working groups within the community, such as a women's savings group, a youth association, and a health committee. Families value solidarity, hospitality, and unity of thought and action. The people say that they hold tradition in one hand, and modernization in the other. They want a brighter future for their children, but also to hold on to what makes them uniquely Pular.

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalProblem Addressed
The village of Xxxxxx is the site of one of only two middle schools in the commune. This means that since its inauguration in 2005, the middle school has hosted students from any number of the surrounding 99 villages. Some students live as far as 30 kilometers away, and have to temporarily move to a closer village just to go to school. Others live in villages between 6-8 kilometers away, and make the trek by foot, bike, or donkey cart every day, twice a day. For these students, going to school is no easy task.

The school was constructed without toilets. This means that if students need to use a bathroom, they would have to take the time to walk some distance into the village and ask permission to use somebody’s home toilet. However, the students are now in the habit of relieving themselves behind the school buildings. In both situations, students are disrupting the learning environment by requiring more time out of the classroom to find a bathroom or by defecating in the open on school property.

The health risks of open defecation are serious, and the diarrheal disease it engenders is one of the top killers of children under five in the region.

Project Description
This project is to create a sanitary place for students and teachers to use the bathroom by building a total of four toilets on campus, complete with two handwashing stations. and to use this opportunity to talk to the community about the importance of latrine usage.

Specifically, a head mason will lead a team that will be charged with the construction of two sanitary blocks, one for males and one for females.

Each sanitary block will be constructed with cement bricks and iron supports. Each will have a superstructure with dimensions 2 x 2 x 2 meters, and will be roofless (this is what the community asked for, because otherwise the odors will be trapped inside), and fixed with one metal, locking door per toilet.

The latrines will be Turkish style seats, connected to an offset pit via PVC pipes. The pits will also be 2 x 2 x 2 meters in dimension and lined with cement bricks. The pits will be covered, and contain removable windows, for emptying, and an aeration pipe, to allow odors to escape.

The handwashing stations are "tippy-tap" style (pressing a foot pedal will incline a water-filled jug to dispense a small stream of water), but will be made out of metal, which is meant to be durable enough for public use over a long period of time.

Working alongside the mason, members of the local youth association will contribute by bringing sand and gravel to the work site via horse or donkey charet, and will dig both of the pits.

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalThe metal components (doors, pit windows, handwashing stations) will be built in the regional capital and transported to the site along with the cement, iron bars, and other supplies. Water Charity funding will be used to pay for the majority of materials, supplies, equipment, and labor.

The community will contribute 10% of the total cost in cash and 15% in labor.

Project Impact
400 students will directly benefit from the project, with 13,000 people in the commune receiving indirect benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
R. Bannister

Monitoring and Maintenance
The vice principal of the middle school will assist with the formation of a sanitation committee, which is in charge of the cleaning schedule and maintenance of the latrines. Students will pull water for the toilets every morning before school, as there is a well only 130 meters away from the construction sites.

The toilets will be constructed in a way that will allow the school to empty the pits when they are full. They will be offset from the superstructure, lined with cement, and built with two removable “windows” which will allow it to be cleaned.

Money for repairs and cleaning supplies will be managed by the vice principal and come from the school’s funds. The health workers in the area will continue health talks on school campus and reinforce the importance of latrine usage and handwashing.

Fundraising Target
$1,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,500

 

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalMiddle School Latrine Project - Senegal

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Funds Needed : 
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Kedougou Community Well Project - Senegal

Kedougou Community Well Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kedougou Community Well Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxx, Kedougou, Senegal

Community Description
Xxxxxxxx is a community of 220-250 people, depending on the season. It is located on the Fongolimbi road on the way to Dimboli. Farming is the main source of income for everyone in the village.

The village is 3.5 - 4 kilometers from one side to the other, with a hill in the middle. It is made up of two halves, Xxxxxxxx Labor and Xxxxxxxx Mawni.

Problem Addressed
The issue that the village is facing is water security in the dry season. When the rains come, the water table around the village is raised very high so there is no problem with wells or the forage drying up, or not having enough water, but during the dry season the water table lowers to a point where some of the wells dry up and are no longer a reliable source of clean water.

Kedougou Community Well Project - SenegalThe other issue that presents itself in the dry season is that the forage, while deep enough, requires a motor pump to bring the water into the basin. The system is effective, but expensive because it is a gas powered system. During the dry season, when it would be needed, a lot of the villagers do not have the funds to maintain constant use of it. So, they end up walking to the other side of the village to use the wells that are deep enough to have water through the dry season.

There is also the issue that the forage system is great, but it is twenty years old and there are days that it is "tired" and has to take a rest, so even if they have the funds there are days were the forage is just not available.

This presents a problem when the next closest source of clean water is a kilometer or more away in either direction. This also eliminates all possibility of dry season vegetable farming, so, in order to have proper nutrition, they have to go to the closest market which is about 20 kilometers away up the mountain.

Project Description
This project is to build a well in an area where water access is cut off in the dry season.

There will be one main well digger and two assistants chosen by the village chief, one from each side of the village.

The dimensions of the well are roughly:

-20 meters deep
-1.25 meters across

The mouth of the well and cover will be constructed by a mason from the village as well. The dimensions will be:

-1.25 meters tall
-1.25 meters across

The PCV will be responsible for purchase and transport of most of the materials, with the village responsible for providing sand and gravel with transportation of all materials once inside the village. Water will also be provided by the village from a nearby water source.

Kedougou Community Well Project - SenegalThe PCV and the village chief will be responsible for overseeing the construction of the well and mouth of the well by the well digger and mason on a daily basis.

The women's group will be responsible for the construction of the fence surrounding the well. The dimensions will be 7 meters x 7 meters

The education component will be overseen by the PCV and president of the Women's Association. The training will be held every other Sunday afternoon for the duration of the well construction. This training will encompass:

-Water treatment and storage
- Hand Washing
- Proper hygiene around and using water
- Water conservation techniques in dry season gardening.

At the end of the training there will be a demonstration of skills learned and a graduation of the course. There will also be a follow-up demonstration about three months later to judge the retention and implementation rate of what was learned.

Project Impact
150 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Ashley Prettyman

Monitoring and Maintenance
The well will be the responsibility of the women's group to maintain.

Let Girls Learn
Water collecting is primarily a women's and girl's responsibility. Having a closer source of water will enable the girls to be on time to school in the morning and have more time in the afternoon to dedicate to their school work. It might also help motivate men and boys to help with the water because it is not as far and it is not as hard to do, which would give the girls more time.

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it carries with it the same attributes, providing for the sanitation and hygiene needs of girls. Therefore, we designate it a Let Girls Learn + project.

This project is part of our ongoing Western Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

Fundraising Target
$1,850

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,850

 

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Progress: 

Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - Senegal

Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - Senegal

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Kolda, Kolda Region, Senegal

Community Description
The region of Kolda is Senegal's poorest and among the most malnourished. This project will be done in a neighborhood called Xxxxxxx in the capital city of the Kolda Region, Kolda. It will be done at a demonstration space run by a "Master Farmer" named Cherif Diallo. A Master Farmer is an individual identified by the Peace Corps who shows exemplary farming and teaching skills who uses their garden space for trainings and demonstrations.

This demonstration space is a place where innovative and sustainable agricultural practices are displayed and taught. During its 2-year life span, the Kolda Master Farm has had demonstrations and trainings on attaining higher yield on field crops without the use of chemicals, cold season gardening, live fences, and tree grafting. Cherif's demonstration space has a very wide audience, as it is in the capital city of the region and is very close to the city center, only about 1 kilometer outside of the main market.

Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - SenegalEvery person who is trained, tours, or visits the Master Farm will benefit. Annually, the Master Farm has around 250 visitors, who will benefit from the improved capability, innovation, and convenience.

Problem Addressed
The main well at this demonstration space caved in in July, 2016, due to heavy rains. This is the main source of water for the farm during the dry season. Until the well is re-dug, no gardening or advancement can be made at the garden, and no trainings or demonstrations can be held.

Since this farm is primarily a demonstration space, there are many visitors for the various trainings, tours, and demonstrations. In order to ensure sanitary visits while supporting a large number of people, a proper toilet is needed within the farm.

Project Description
This project is to build a well and a latrine at the Master Farm.

A 10-meter-deep well will be constructed about 10 meters North of the prior well location. A specialist will be hired to dig, as the soil is extremely sandy. When water is reached a reinforcement buttress of cement will be installed.

Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - SenegalMaster Farmer Cherif Diallo and a hired mason will construct the reinforcement out of rebar, fencing, and cement. After the well has been sufficiently reinforced, an above-ground structure will be built for ease of access to the well. It will consist of approximately 150 bricks, made by a locally-hired mason.

A latrine will be constructed in the Eastern corner of the farm. The pit will be dug to a depth of 2 meters. A specialist will be hired to dig, as the soil is extremely sandy. When a depth of 2 meters is achieved, the walls of the pit will be reinforced by bricks and rebar. Approximately 30 bricks will be used.

A brick structure, 1 meter by 2 meters in size, will then be built by the mason using about 300 bricks. It will contain a concrete platform and a turkish toilet seat, and will be topped by a zinc sheet roof.

Project Impact
100 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
H. Henriksen

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Master Farm keeps records of how many people visit, tour, or attend a training at the farm. This attendance shows the number of people who will benefit from the installation of these features. Additionally, the master farmer keeps a record of all the produce, trees, and products he grows at the farm.

The Master Farmer has been farming for nearly 40 years, and is a very skilled mason. He will perform all repairs.

Comments
Improved farming techniques taught at the Master Farm will increase crop yields, leading to improved food security, enhanced nutrition and health, and increased economic opportunities.

Fundraising Target
$1,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,900

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Dahra Latrine Project - Senegal

Dahra Latrine Project - Senegal

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Dahra Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

District of Dahra, Region of Louga, Senegal

Community Description
The village is approximately 30 km from the nearest town and has a population of roughly 3,000. It is made up of two ethnic groups, Wolof and Pulaar, and, dependent on the time of the year, you can find a sizable Sereer population.

The community is made up of 6 neighborhoods, and each neighborhood has at least 2 members who are volunteer community health workers. This means that they spend time extending education to the community about things such as malnutrition, malaria, exclusive breastfeeding, and vaccinations.

Problem Addressed
Currently, there is not a restroom or a water source in the middle school. As a result, many students have stopped attending school, or their attendance has dramatically decreased.

The health post serves approximately 7,000 individuals, including people from neighboring smaller communities, health post staff and their families, and even nomadic herders. It has only two fully operational restrooms.

Project Description
This project will provide seven latrines and one water access point (robinet).

The seven latrines will all be VIP latrines, consisting of cement privacy structures, roofs, and locking doors. Five of the seven latrines will have Turkish basins, and the final two will have western toilets seats.

Dahra Latrine Project - SenegalFive of the latrines, and the one robinet will be constructed at the local middle school, while the last two latrines will be added onto the health structure.

Once these structures are completed, students at the middle school will complete WASH trainings during class with the village's community health workers and the volunteer. The students will also be exposed to further WASH behavior change activities through their participation in the Junior Health Committee Club.

In addition, community health workers will hold bi-monthly trainings on proper WASH practices at the health post to educate the citizens that will be benefitting from the new latrines at the health post.

The community will contribute in the form of cash contributions to the project.

Objectives of the project include providing students at the middle school, as well as the patients at the health post, with access to improved water and sanitation as well as providing education on the importance of good sanitation practices.

Project Impact
3,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Sydney Hurst

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school and health post will elect separate committees to handle the care and cleaning of the latrines, contributing to the sustainability of the project by maintaining the latrines in good working order.

Should there be a problem, the latrines and robinet are both being built by masons in the community, so they will be able to fix them in the future.

The community will sustain this project by consulting the Latrine and Robinet Addition Committee, which will see to the cleaning, maintenance, and all other tasks regarding the latrines and robinet.

Dahra Latrine Project - SenegalThe education of proper hygiene and sanitation practices will be enacted and sustained by continuing to discuss the topic and working as closely as possible with the youth. Most recently, the community has planned to begin a youth club that will focus on health issues, being a primary way to increase the sustainability of the material side of the project as well as the educational side of it.

Let Girls Learn
Five of the seven latrines that are being built will be located at the local middle school. This will provide female students with the proper environment needed to fully focus on their studies. The five latrines will be separated based on gender, two for male, two for female, and one for teachers. This separation will allow for maximum privacy and safety for the female students.

This project is part of the Let Girls Learn program started by FLOTUS Michelle Obama in partnership with Peace Corps. The goal of this project is to keep girls attending to school. It is a part of Water Charity’s Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

Fundraising Target
$ 2,750

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$305

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,445

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Velingara Women's Group Garden Project - Senegal

Velingara Women's Group Garden Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Department of Velingara, Kolda Region, Senegal

Velingara Women's Group Garden Project - Senegal Community Description
The project will be implemented in a rural village of 450 people, located in the eastern part of the Kolda region. It is 5 km from the paved road, 30 km from a major city, and there is no running water or electricity.

All families are subsistence farmers, with peanuts, sorghum and corn as the primary crops. Due to the village’s remote location and resource constraints, economic activities are limited to cotton and charcoal production.

Ethnically, the village is Pulaar, with two main sub-groups: Fulakunda and Pula Futa. The Pulaar ethnic groups are traditionally pastoralists, and their living situations continue to reflect these traditional nomadic values. Villagers live in short-lived domed mud brick houses with straw roofs, women cook with fuel wood collected from the forest, and livestock roam the village. There are 20 family compounds, with approximately 20-25 people living in each compound. Men and older women are usually found working in the woods or fields, and younger women take care of the children, cooking and cleaning.

The population is very young; almost 50% of the population is under the age of 18. There is a primary school in the village, and the middle school is located in a roadside village 5 km away. Though the middle school is relatively close, many families do not have the expendable income necessary to pay for school fees and supplies.

Indeed, this village is located in the poorest region of the country, with the majority of the population living below the poverty line of $1.90 per day according to the World Bank. Because of this and the community’s remote location, many villagers suffer from malnutrition. This, in turn, affects the well being of the entire family as each member of the family shares responsibilities of the fields and/or the home. There is a strong workforce of motivated women eager to capitalize on income-generating activities and provide adequate nutrition for their families.

Problem Addressed
The primary barrier to adequate nutrition in this village is access to fresh fruits and vegetables. The diet is severely lacking in proteins and essential nutrients, comprised primarily of carbohydrates from grains such as sorghum, corn, or white rice. Due to very large family sizes and little income, members of the community do not have the expendable income necessary to buy healthy food. In addition, the nearest market is 10 km away, and without electricity, there is no preservation method to store fresh produce. As such, when possible, women construct personal vegetable gardens. This is easy during rainy season while livestock are tied up and water is abundant, and each household maintains its own vegetable garden. However, during the remaining eight months of dry season, water limitation and lack of a collective garden space prevents the production of fresh vegetables. As such, the majority of the year, vegetables are severely lacking from the diet and community nutrition is very poor.

Velingara Women's Group Garden Project - Senegal Project Description
This project is to create a protected one-hectare gardening space with water access. A center well will be built with three feeder basins.

The women are well versed in gardening practices, and ultimately want to create a long-lasting garden that the entire gardening cooperative can utilize year round.

The village men worked with a contractor to install a chain-link fence to enclose the gardening space and protect it from livestock. The women created a tree nursery, and planted thorny tree species around the perimeter to begin establishment of a live fence to ensure sustainable protection. Fruit trees (guava and mango) were also planted within the garden to increase the village’s fruit production.

A well contractor from a nearby city has visited the site and agreed to build the well and accompanying basins. A thirty meter, cement-lined well will be constructed in the center of the garden space, structurally reinforced with rebar for use with pulley systems.

Three 80 cm x 80 cm feeder basins will be built adjacent to the well and water poured into these basins will be gravity fed twenty meters through underground piping to the accompanying 2 m x 2 m storage basins.

The Peace Corps Volunteer will hold primary responsibility for purchasing materials, and the village men will be responsible for transportation of the materials from the city to the village.

The contractor has a team of three well diggers and one mason that will live in the village and work daily until the well and accompanying basins are complete. The village will provide room and board for the workers.

Since there is no water available at the work site, the women will pull and transport water to the work site each morning. Construction is expected to be finished in time for the women to begin dry season gardening.

Upon completion of this project, the women’s group of Sare Meta will have a long-lasting garden space equipped with all the necessary resources to produce vegetables year round. Additionally, due to the large garden size, women have the opportunity to grow vegetables in excess and sell them to surrounding villages, thus supplementing the family income.

Velingara Women's Group Garden Project - Senegal Further, the Peace Corps Volunteer will conduct a series of trainings to promote fruit tree propagation, grafting, and orchard management. The success of this project will result in the establishment of a community orchard, income-generating opportunities for women, and increased community nutrition.

The Women's Group will be responsible for the cash and in-kind contribution for the project, 25% of project cost

Project Impact
84 women will directly benefit, and the remaining 366 older women, men, and children will indirectly benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jenna Dodson

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Peace Corps Volunteer will be responsible for the following:

-Purchasing construction materials, creating inventory list, and monitoring material use
-Supervising/monitoring construction of well and accompanying basins
-Overseeing tree nursery construction, maintenance and planting
-Conducting an orchard management training

The community (men and women’s group) will be responsible for the following:

-Paying the cash contribution
-Transportation of materials to the work site
-Ensuring proper room and board for the on-site construction workers
-Construction, maintenance and planting of 1,000-tree nursery to complete the live fence
-Maintaining the garden after construction, including tree pruning and fence repair

The well contractor and his team will be responsible for the following:

-Purchasing construction materials
-Digging and reinforcing the well with cement
-Masonry for the feeder basins and wellhead
-Implementation of underground pipe system

Let Girls Learn
Although not designated as an official Let Girls Learn project, this project will indirectly benefit young girls in three ways. First, they will have improved nutrition due to increased consumption of essential vitamins and minerals. This will decrease their susceptibility to disease, thus reducing the likelihood of school absences due to illness. Second, there is potential for income generation when women sell excess produce. These funds may be used to offset the cost of their children’s education. Lastly, women involved in business transactions will act as role models for young girls eager to continue their education in order to find better work opportunities.

Fundraising Target
$1,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$100

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$ 1,400

 

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Dayxxx Well Project - Senegal

Dayxxx Well Project - Senegal

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Dayxxx Well Project - SenegalThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

This project page has been redacted at the request of Peace Corps.

Location
Dayxxx, Fatick Region, Senegal

Community Description
Dayxxx is a rural village of 300, located in the southern part of the Fatick region. It primarily a Mandinka village; however, Seerer, Bambera and Pulafuta ethnicities are also found in Dayxxx.

Regardless of ethnic group, everyone in the village makes a living from the land. The work of the farmer is never finished. With the change in season the bush is alternatively an aqua marine sea of onions, or a medley of earthy tones from peanuts and grains. Farming efforts are aided by semi-seasonal rivers in rainy season and a high water table during dry season. Dayxxx is full of hardworking people, yet there is always a challenge to provide adequate nutrition.

Problem Addressed
The primary issue within Dayxxx is the lack of protected, improved water available spaces in which one can farm. Throughout the Senegalese gardening season, there is alternatingly either not enough water to consistently garden, or there is not sufficient protection against roaming livestock.

Dayxxx Well Project - SenegalDuring the busy rainy and cool seasons, women and children wake up before daybreak to walk to the fields to spend the entire day, to ensure animals do not destroy their produce. This a large time commitment to protect their fields, day after day, coupled with the low availability of spaces with a water source often leads to lower productivity, and subpar levels of nutrition within Dayxxx. The Women’s Group of Dayxxx is one of the most motivated groups in the village, yet they lack any space to collectively garden. Empowering this group is a strong step towards ameliorating this situation.

Project Description
This project is to build a well to provide water for the women’s garden. It will work in tandem with a second project with outside funding that will cover the purchase of fencing materials.

The goal is to increase access to nutritious foods through the creation of a women’s garden immediately adjacent to Dayxxx. This project will increase the scale of rainy season gardening, which is often conducted on marginal land at a great labor cost, and the diversity of dry season gardening, which in Dayxxx is often constrained to only onions.

The location of this garden space is a 15 second walk from Dayxxx along the main access road to the fields. The project will decrease the large workload currently dedicated to non-productive agricultural activities. At the moment, significant amounts of time are spent in transit to the old gardening space and dissuading animals from said space. This workload falls almost completely on the women and youth of Dayxxx.

Water Charity funds will pay for the materials, transportation of material and labor costs of hand digging a concrete-lined well.

Dayxxx will contribute to the project by donating land for the garden. The Peace Corps Volunteer, in partnership with his counterpart, will coordinate construction activities. The community is also securing funding for the fencing, as well as for tools and seeds to work the garden.

Upon completion of the physical garden space, the PCV will implement a cross-sectoral teaching schedule of related agriculture, health and business trainings by utilizing the expertise of regional volunteers and pilot farmers. These steps will lead to sustainable use of the garden space, self-sufficiency and enhanced capacity for skill sharing long after the PCV leaves.

Dayxxx Well Project - SenegalProject Impact
300 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
P. Jones

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Women’s Group will monitor the well upon completion, perform necessary maintenance, and control access.

Let Girls Learn
While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it accrues to the benefit of women and girls. The time saved in irrigating the garden, together with the nutritional and economic benefits that accrue, work toward making it easier for girls to remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$700

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$700

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the G3 Foundation, of Costa Mesa, CA, USA.

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Digaly Sanitation Project - Senegal

Digaly Sanitation Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Diagaly, Communauté rurale Barkedji, Département Linguere, Region Louga, Senegal

Digaly Sanitation Project - SenegalCommunity Description
Diagaly is a small village in the Linguere Region of Senegal. It is 6 km from a major paved road, and is home to about 3,000 residents. The community is strongly defined by its nomadic livestock herding history. Receiving between 190-350 mm of rain per year and daily temperatures reaching 110-115 degrees Fahrenheit on the average day during the months of March-June makes Diagaly a challenging place to live.

The village is made up of two ethnic groups, Wolof and Pulaars. The Pulaar ethnic group is traditionally Nomadic, and in many ways that makes them more vulnerable now. Their living situations often reflect the transient lifestyle they are known for. This often translates into less permanent living structures and reveals the unpredictability of the coming year as they see it.

The Wolof population generally lives in the more compact village center that is much more permanent than their Pulaar neighbors. This means they have more reliable access to water and to the market or small shops.

While the village is relatively remote, it serves as the economic hub for about 13 smaller, surrounding villages. Livestock and subsistence farming dominate the lifestyle. Despite the large population, there is only a public French elementary school and a Franco-Arab school that serves the 8-13-year-old range. After this, students will generally travel to nearby cities to continue their studies while living with friends or family during the school year.

Digaly Sanitation Project - SenegalDuring the rainy season, there is a large influx of people who come to farm or bring herds of cattle up from the south to take advantage of the grazing lands. Diagaly is also home to a Master Farm which is a Peace Corps/USAID project to create pilot farms to serve as educational centers and demonstrate new technologies. This serves the community of Diagaly and the surrounding villages as a place to learn, share, and acquire materials like seeds or vegetable transplants that were previously out of reach for more people. In puts on multiple trainings a year and has open doors to anyone interested in learning or discussing challenges.

Problem Addressed
The Pulaar community has little in terms of permanent infrastructure, which can be traced to their traditionally nomadic lifestyle. This part of the community is largely, if not entirely, without access to latrines and continue the practice of walking out to the bush to relieve themselves. Children, in general, do not walk so far, and relieve themselves just outside of the family compound. This has huge implications for health in the community and puts all at risk. With the extreme heat and arid conditions, diarrheal diseases associated with fecal contamination can quickly lead to dangerous dehydration and potentially death.

Currently, the main educational institutions of Diagaly do not have proper sanitation facilities. The Master Farm, the French School, and the Franco-Arab school are all held back because the people they serve must walk long distances to either find a latrine, or to openly defecate nearby, which endangers others at the educational facilities. The lack of latrines also serves as a barrier to those using these educational facilities. It takes time away from learning as students and teachers leave class for extended periods to go to the bathroom.

Digaly Sanitation Project - SenegalProject Description
This Project will build sanitation facilities at the Master Farm and Franco-Arab school as well as return latrines at the French school to working order.

The Master Farm (which serves about 200 people a year) will build one latrine and one washing stall in the same structure that is connected to a basin.

The Franco-Arab School (which serves about 110 people, including teachers) will build two latrines in one structure that is connected to a single basin. They will also bring a water source to the school, which will include 200 m of piping, a water meter, and a water spout.

The French School (which serves about 250 people, including teachers) will replace 9 wood plank doors, 7 Turkish toilets, some cement repair to the stalls, and 15 m of piping to provide a water source to the latrines.

Each institution is responsible for managing its project. The parent associations of both the French School and Franco-Arab school will work closely with the PCV to create an action plan, hire the mason, acquire materials and oversee the work as it is executed. The pilot farmer from the Master Farm will work with the PCV to follow the same steps as the two schools.

Each institution will also install a Tippy Tap, which is a device made for washing hands. This will be built by a blacksmith in Diagaly and be showcased at these 3 visible locations to encourage washing hands and the spread of the technology.

In the month prior to and following building these facilities, Peace Corps Health Volunteers from the region will help put on trainings that sensitize the community to the issue of open defecation and train each institution on proper maintenance for the latrines.

Project Impact
560 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Adam Keally

Monitoring and Maintenance
This project will include consistent Follow-up, as the PCV works closely with each institution. They will each elect a member of its organization to be responsible and accountable for the maintenance of the latrine. That person will receive training from the Peace Corps Health Volunteers and the mason on how to maintain a clean, functioning latrine.

Let Girls Learn
Girls are more widely affected by the lack of sanitation facilities, making it a bigger barrier to their education and equality in the long run. Having clean, functioning latrines with running water will help remove barriers that keep girls out of school. Girls are significantly more likely to drop out of school than boys in Diagaly, making it important to address the obstacles they face.

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it does fall into Water Charity's LGL+ grouping of projects that have a pronounced element involving helping girls go to, and stay in, school.

Fundraising Target
$1,200

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$1,200

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the G3 Foundation, of Costa Mesa, CA, USA.

Additional donations will be used for future projects in Jamaica.

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Touba Mouride Latrine Project - Senegal

Touba Mouride Latrine Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Touba Mouride Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
Touba Mouride, Fatick Region, Senegal

Community Description
Touba Mouride has around 2,100 people, living in 217 households. A primarily ethnically Wolof town, it is largely devoted to agriculture practices, including raising peanuts, millet, and corn. In addition, it has a large women’s garden. A small subset of the village is Pulaar, living in a small community outside Touba Mouride, but still included in the village census.

Touba Mouride is filled with hard-working families who are committed to improving their health status. There is a highly functional health hut and committee, and the health hut serves 15 surrounding villages.

Problem Addressed
A baseline survey showed that of the 56 household sampled, 50% have a latrine that is only a simple unlined dug hole for a pit, 25% have a latrine with a pit lining, and 25% have no latrines.

Project Description
This project is to build 30 new family latrines in the community. The latrines will be simple slab pit-style, with each family providing the simple reed structure or room structure.

The latrines will be built away from major water sources, such as wells, as well as cooking areas, to avoid contamination. The work will be done by two experienced masons and their team of skilled workers.

Touba Mouride Latrine Project - SenegalEach latrine pit will be 2.5 meters deep, and 2 meters on each side. The pit walls will be lined with bricks made from cement and sand, along with mortar between the bricks. On all four corners there will be columns which will provide structural integrity.

The plate over the hole will be built with cement and lined with rebar so prevent collapsing. The bottom plate of the pit will be built in the same manner as the top due to the weight that must be supported.

The sand will be provided by the participating members of the community.

A series of health talks will be conducted with all beneficiaries. Topics will include hand washing at the five critical times, childhood illnesses related to WASH, disadvantages of open defecation, and latrine maintenance. The topics will be illustrated by a mural.

Project Impact
300 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Lauren Hall

Monitoring and Maintenance
Home visits will be conducted to be sure the families receiving latrines have adopted the behavior changes and are using the latrines properly.

Fundraising Target
$3,100

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$175

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,925

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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