Mongolia

Kharkhorin Main Hospital Water Purification Project - Mongolia

Kharkhorin Main Hospital Water Purification Project - Mongolia

Location
Ovorhangai aimag, Kharkhorin soum, Mongolia

Community Description
The town of Kharkhorin is a large soum with a population of about 15,000 residents. The town itself consists of three neighborhoods (bags) and there are another five neighborhoods that are in the surrounding countryside.

Kharkhorin Main Hospital Water Purification Project - Mongolia

Kharkhorin is one of Mongolia’s ancient capital cities. It is home to a working monastery (irden zo), as well as giant stone turtles that mark the ancient boundaries of the once magnificent city.

The town of Kharkhorin is located along the Orkhon River. Roughly 100 km up river from the town is a mine that has produced contamination that has eliminated the fish population and heavily mineralized the water of the river.

The Kharkhorin Main Hospital currently accommodates 74 patients, and is staffed by 16 doctors, 36 nurses and 49 other workers.

Depending on the time of year the hospital draws its water from the river and from wells. The river is frozen in the winter.

Safe water is not available in the hospital, and the families of most patients bring fluids from their homes or stores. Giardia and other parasites are present in the well water of the town.

Illustrative of the mineral contamination, it is noted that all of the tea kettles and water boilers at the hospital are caked with sediment and metals.

At the hospital, drinking water for the patients and staff currently comes from a large open pot in the kitchen, which is boiled every morning or as demand requires.

Project Description
This project is to purchase and install a four-filter water purification system to provide safe water for the hospital. The high-capacity filter will produce hot and cold filtered water, and will be installed in a high traffic area. It will produce water to be used for all of the drinking and cooking needs of the hospital.

The system uses one sediment filter, one pre-carbon filter, one post carbon and a UF membrane filter.

Kharkhorin Main Hospital Water Purification Project - Mongolia The four filters work together to remove organic and inorganic materials. The filters will clean the water of 99.99% of particles, sediment and heavy medals, cysts, parasites, and pathogenic bacteria, including e coli, cryptosporidium, giardia, and salmonella.

The plumbing and installation will be done by hospital employees. The hospital will pay for the replacement as necessary of the filter stages, and will follow a standardized maintenance schedule.

Trainings on the importance of clean water as well as the maintenance of the system will be conducted.

Project Impact
This project will benefit 175 people at any point in time.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Nicholas Swope

Comments
The health and wellbeing of all patients and staff will be greatly improved through access to clean water.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Nicholas Swope of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Nicholas and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

 

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Jargalant 12-year Secondary School Water Project - Mongolia

Jargalant 12-year Secondary School Water Project - Mongolia

Location
Jargalant town, Orkhon region, Mongolia

Community DescriptionJargalant 12-year Secondary School Water Project - MongoliaJargalant -- popularly known as "Ulaan Tolgoi" or "Red Head" -- is situated in Orkhon province, in the central, northern region of the country. It was founded in 197

8, and there were many Russians among its early planners and residents. It is situated about 30 km outside of Erdenet, one of the country's major urban hubs.

Traditionally, Mongolians lived as semi-nomadic herders, moving once per season with their herds. This is still the standard lifestyle of many modern Mongolians. But living in the remote countryside comes with many challenges.

For one thing, there is the question of their children's education. Jargalant 12-Year Secondary School is the only school in this county. It is a public institution and there are currently just over 500 students enrolled. To accommodate the children of local herding families, there is a student dormitory in a separate but nearby building.

The dormitory can house up to 50 students and currently has about 40 students, aged 6-17, living there during the week. Many of these children return to their families in the countryside on the weekends. There is one adult "house mother" who permanently lives in the same building. There is also a "dormitory teacher" who works there during the day.

Like all of Jargalant town, the dormitory does not have running hot water. There is a shower house in town that offers hot showers for the price of 1300 tugrugs for children (about $1) -- approximately the entire weekly allowance of most of the dormitory students. Needless to say, very few of them take advantage of this service. The local hospital considers this lack of access to running hot water to be a health hazard.

The dormitory washroom currently has two water-heating shower fixtures, but these are designed for individual households. Both have broken, and repairs have not been successful.

Project Description
This project is to provide running hot water for the school dormitory.

Jargalant 12-year Secondary School Water Project - MongoliaProject funds will be used to purchase a new, industrial grade water boiler, with all attachments and fixtures, for installation in the dormitory washroom.

The Haier 40-liter water heater has a sufficiently-large capacity to supply water to two shower heads at one time, and can provide showers for many children in close succession before needing to refill and reheat. The attachments to be purchased include two shower heads, flexible water piping, and pipe joints.

The dormitory "house mother" will help purchase everything in Erdenet. Jargalant School’s plumber and electrician will help with installation and upkeep of the boiler.

Project Impact
This project will directly affect approximately 40-45 school children per academic year.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Laura Alexander

Comments
This simple project will greatly improve the health and wellbeing of the students who reside in the dormitory.

Laura previously completed the Jargalant Public Hospital Water Purifier Project – Mongolia.

Dollar Amount of Project
$420.00

Donations Collected to Date
$420.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Laura Alexander.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Laura of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Laura and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Jargalant Public Hospital Water Purifier Project – Mongolia

Jargalant Public Hospital Water Purifier Project – Mongolia

Location
Jargalant, Orkhon Province, Mongolia

Community Description
Jargalant -- popularly known as "Ulaan Tolgoi" or "Red Head" -- is situated in Orkhon province, in the central, northern region of the country. It was founded in 1978, and there were many Russians among its early planners and residents. It is situated about 30 km outside of Erdenet, one of the country's major industrial and mining hubs.

Jargalant was intended to function as a farming town to supply foodstuffs for Erdenet. After the transition from a planned economy in the early 1990's, Ulaan Tolgoi's many large, state-owned industries were privatized and unfortunately few of them remain in operation today. Now, the majority of the town's some 3,300 inhabitants are private vegetable farmers or herders. The community has one secondary school, two banks, a public hospital, and a number of other small, private businesses (including a few shops, two veterinaries, a hair salon, and a flour mill).

Jargalant Public Hospital Water Purifier Project – MongoliaThe Jargalant Public Hospital treats some 40-45 bed patients every month and provides services to approximately 30-35 outpatients every day and employs 22 workers. The tap water has a high mineral content and is not considered suitable drinking water unless it has been boiled. Currently, the hospital uses a small water boiler to provide water to its patients. However, these have a low capacity and break frequently, as they are subject to heavy use every day.

Project Description
This project is to purchase and install an electric water purifier to provide safe, clean water for hospital patients and workers.

The purifier will be attached directly to a water pipe and thus will not need to be refilled. It will provide both hot and cold water -- an important feature in Mongolia where many people shy away from drinking cold water (and where average winter temperatures hover around -20 Celsius).

The purifier will be installed in the primary service room, which is located just next to the entrance lobby and waiting room. This location maximizes accessibility for both in- and out-patients, as well as for staff.

Jargalant Public Hospital Water Purifier Project – MongoliaThe purifier will be purchased from a local distributor in Erdenet. The distributor has already been contacted and will deliver and install all equipment free of charge. The distributor will also provide a brief training on maintenance and upkeep to hospital workers.

New filters will be re-purchased by the hospital for a nominal cost every 3-6 months.

Project Impact
The project will affect the some 850 people who pass through the hospital every month, including hospital staff.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Laura Alexander

Comments
This is a simple but effective solution to the problem of providing safe water to visitors and staff at the hospital.

Dollar Amount of Project
$525.00

Donations Collected to Date
$525.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative, with the help of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Laura Alexander.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Laura of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Laura and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Sukhbaatar Aimag General Hospital Water Distiller Project - Mongolia

Sukhbaatar Aimag General Hospital Water Distiller Project - MongoliaLocation
4th district, Baruun-Urt Town, Sukhbaatar Province, Mongolia

Community Description
Baruun-Urt is the capital of Sukhbaatar Aimag (province), which is located in eastern Mongolia, bordering China. The city is 550 km away from the largest city and capital of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar. Sukhbaatar Aimag itself is a small province of about 55,000 people, of which about 15,000 live in Baruun-Urt.

The surrounding areas of Baruun-Urt are mineral-rich, with a large zinc mine seven kilometers away from the city. The available drinking water has high levels of sulfur which residents rarely, if ever, filter.

Sukhbaatar Aimag General Hospital Water Distiller Project - MongoliaIn recent years, the number of people in Sukhbaatar who have stomach diseases, liver and gallbladder disorders has increased significantly due to the bad quality of the drinking water. Baruun-Urt water is supplied by deep wells and with pipes to those with running water.

Sukhbaatar General Hospital is the main provider of health care in the province, and they serve thousands of people a year in their inpatient units and outpatient clinics. As of now, the patients who are hospitalized have no source of drinking water. Family members provide patients with tea and water from home or buy bottled water from the nearby stores.

Project Description
This project is to provide a reliable source of clean water for the patients at the Sukhbaatar General Hospital by purchasing and installing a large water distiller. The distiller removes impurities through boiling the water and condensing the steam.

Sukhbaatar Aimag General Hospital Water Distiller Project - MongoliaThe water distiller will be placed in the kitchen in the main hospital where it can be accessed for drinking water and cooking. Water will be passed out to the patients with their meals.

The kitchen staff will be responsible for the maintenance and use and will be trained accordingly. The hospital will pay the costs for any future needs of the distiller.

Project funds will be used to purchase the distiller and transport it from the capital.

Project Impact
This project will benefit the 160 patients who occupy the inpatient units each day plus the 275 workers.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Kate Borkowski

Comments
The distiller will remove most of the mineral contaminants from the water and provide the patients and staff with an adequate supply of safe water. The technology is widely used in the region, and has been proven to be effective.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00 + additional funds

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project now has been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative, with additional funds from the Elmo Foundation for future projects in the country.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Kate Borkowski of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Kate and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Ulaanbaatar Child Care and Development Center Water Purification Project - Mongolia

Ulaanbaatar Child Care and Development Center Water Purification Project - MongoliaLocation
Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

Community Description
Ulaanbaatar, the Mongolian capital, is the center of culture and development in Mongolia. With a population of 1,172,400 people, it is home to about 38% of the total population.

As Ulaanbaatar develops rapidly, the water quality is gradually worsening. Although the water quality in Ulaanbaatar is considered to be better than other parts of the nation, the water is under-treated and is contaminated with chemicals and facieses, and water born-illnesses, such as giardia, are common.

Ulaanbaatar Child Care and Development Center Water Purification Project - MongoliaThe project will be implemented at the Child Care and Development Center on the edge of Ulaanbaatar. The center is one of three state-run orphanages in Mongolia. The orphanage houses 120 youth ranging from 8 to 18 years old.

Project Description
This project is to purchase and install a water purification system to provide clean drinking water for the youth and staff who reside and work at the center.

The system will consist of one main high-efficiency purifier to serve the orphanage. The purifier carries a few gallons of water that is boiled and filtered. The filters are fairly priced, and the agency is able to resupply.

The purifier will be placed in the lobby next to the kitchen to ensure 24-hour accesses to clean water. Furthermore, the purifier serves cold and hot water, which is a plus, as Mongolians prefer hot water, believing it to deter illness and be better for the body.

Project Impact
This project will benefit 120 youth and 10 staff.

Ulaanbaatar Child Care and Development Center Water Purification Project - MongoliaPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Esayas Wureta, Peace Corps Response Volunteer

Comments
Esayas previously completed the Arvikheer School Filter Project – Mongolia during his prior service as a Peace Corps Volunteer.

The center evaluated alternative technologies, and determined this to be the most appropriate for their needs. They have undertaken to provide service and maintenance, thus ensuring sustainability.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Response Volunteer Esayas Wureta of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Esayas and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Executive Judgment 443rd Prison Filter Project - Mongolia

Executive Judgment 443rd Prison Filter Project - MongoliaLocation
Burentogtoh Village, Nuurstei District, Khuvsgul Province, Mongolia

Community Description
The Executive Judgment 443rd Prison is located in Burentogtoh Village, Nuurstei District, approximately 20 km from Murun in Khuvsgul Province in northern Mongolia. The total population of Khuvsgul province is 130,000 and the population of Murun City is 40,000.

On average, the prison houses 90 prisoners at one time. The maximum capacity at any given time is 130. Prisoners, all male adults, come from the Khuvsgul province area. Additionally, 70 workers (male and female) staff the prison as guards, social workers, medical personnel, and administration.

Executive Judgment 443rd Prison Filter Project - MongoliaDue to the remote location of the prison, a shallow well is the sole source of water for the prisoners and prison workers. The water from this well is sometimes yellow and salty in color. It is believed that intake of this water has caused gastrointestinal health problems in multiple residents.

Project Description
This project is to build 3 large slow sand filters at Executive Judgment 443rd Prison. These filters will help clean and filter the water before it is used for drinking and food preparation.

The filters will be made using water barrels purchased from the local market. Plastic piping will be constructed on the top and bottom of the filters in order to slow the process and not disturb the essential layer of bacteria. Layers of sand and gravel will fill a majority of the 200 L barrels and will act as additional filtration.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the barrels and piping for all 3 filters.

Executive Judgment 443rd Prison Filter Project - MongoliaThe sand and gravel will be collected in the community.

One local community member has volunteered to be lead engineer/teacher on the project. He will work with the prisoners to construct these filters. All work will be supervised by prison officials and Peace Corps Volunteers in coordination with the Khuvsgul Province Health Department.

Project Impact
97 men residing in the prison and 70 workers employed by the prison system will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Cody Villanueva

Comments
Providing clean water for the prisoners and staff will have an immediate health benefit. In addition, the project will teach a useful skill for the prisoners, with potential economic benefit.

Dollar Amount of Project
$225.50

Donations Collected to Date
$225.50

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Cody Villanueva of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Cody and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Arkhangai Hospital Water Filter Project - Mongolia

Arkhangai Hospital Water Filter Project - Mongolia

Location
Tsetserleg, Arkhangai, Mongolia

Community Description
Arkhangai Aimag is a 55,300 square-kilometer province located in the center of Mongolia, with a population numbering 89,311. The province (aimag), divided into 19 soums and 99 baghs, is well-recognized for its mixture of mountainous regions, fertile pastures, wooded hills, abundant natural waterways, and a relatively cool Mongolian climate in comparison to other provinces.

Unfortunately, despite the natural beauty of the province, 78% of the total population that live in soums and baghs, whose annual income

primarily coming from raising and selling the meat and woolen textiles from livestock, still lack healthy resources. For this portion of the population, healthy food and sanitary water systems are virtually nonexistent.

Arkhangai Hospital Water Filter Project - Mongolia

The Central Hospital of the Arkhangai Aimag is located in Tsetserleg. Over 100 outpatients pass through the hospital each day. The hospital has an inpatient capacity of 85 and on average houses roughly 35 inpatients daily.

Project Description
This project is to purchase 2 quality water filters, and install them in critical and highly-frequented locations at the hospital.

The project will be implemented under the direction of the Arkhangai Health Department.

The first filter will be located in the recovery ward of the hospital. This will allow patients who are recovering from severe illnesses, surgery, or other issues, the best quality of water available.

The second filter will be located in the first floor waiting room, where a large number of patients pass through and spend time.

The ceramic filters contain elements that remove up to 99.99% of particles, cysts, parasites and pathogenic bacteria including e coli, cryptosporidium, giardia, and salmonella typhii. The silver-impregnated system also reduces chlorine, rust, sediment and organic chemicals.

Each filter will be able to process up to 24 gallons of water per day.

Each filter will purify a minimum of 6,000 gallons, depending on the source water. The carbon matrix interior provides additional support in removing chemicals like chlorine and other bad taste and odor elements.

The candles inside the filters need to be cleaned every 2 months and replaced every 2 years, at nominal cost.

Two trainings will take place to educate the hospital staff. The first will be to educate maintenance workers and nurses on the proper upkeep of the filters and the process for ordering new candles.

Arkhangai Hospital Water Filter Project - Mongolia

The second training will educate the doctors and nurses about the importance of clean/safe water.

Project Impact
36,500 people who pass through the hospital each year will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Tim Jenkins

Comments
Giving the inpatients and outpatients clean water to drink will drastically improve their health and quality of care. The trainings will give the project a sustainable outcome.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

 

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Tim Jenkins of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Tim and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Saintsagaan Water Filter Project - Mongolia

Saintsagaan Water Filter Project - Mongolia

Location
Saintsagaan, Dundgovi, Mongolia

Community Description
Saintsagaan village is the capital of Dundgovi province in Mongolia. It is located about 270 km south of the country’s capital of Ulaanbaatar in the Gobi dessert. Ulaanbaatar is also the nearest large urban center.

The population of Saintsagaan is about 14,000. Many of the people are employed by the government, working at either the provincial or the district government level. The province’s main industry is animal husbandry and livestock products, such as wool.

There are no above-ground water sources anywhere near Saintsagaan. The ground water is deep enough, however, to withstand the well-below-freezing conditions (-22°F, -30°C) experienced in winter, and the pipes of places with running water are winterized.

All the water sources in Saintsagaan are wells, and water is pumped up using modern technology. Some buildings and homes have running water and some do not.

The water pumped from the wells is not pure and has many parasites and minerals. The people regularly boil the water in order to make it safe to drink, but they are unaware of, or unable to do anything about, the minerals which are causing them to have health problems such, as kidney stones.

Saintsagaan Water Filter Project - MongoliaProject Description
This project is to purchase 2 high-quality water filters and place them in public service locations where they will benefit the employees and the visiting public.

The Health Department and the Children's Center are government-run organizations. The work places were chosen for the placement of the filters because they have stable populations, and staff can be trusted to use the filters consistently and appropriately.

The filters do not require electricity, and their use does not require that the water first be boiled. They use a 7-inch ceramic filter within a high-quality stainless steel container. They each produce 24 gallons of filtered water per day.

The ceramic filter elements remove up to 99.99% of particles, cysts, parasites and pathogenic bacteria including e coli, cryptosporidium, giardia, and salmonella typhii. The silver-impregnated system also reduces chlorine, rust, sediment and organic chemicals.

Total filter capacity is a minimum of 6,000 gallons depending on the source water. The carbon matrix interior provides additional support in removing chemicals like chlorine and other bad taste and odor elements.

The candles inside them need to be cleaned every 2 months and replaced every 2 years, at nominal cost.

Trainings of key staff members will cover such subjects as filter upkeep, the importance of drinking water, and how to order new filters through the Health Department at the end of two years.

Project Impact
The project will benefit 40 Health Department staff plus about 100 people each day who visit the health center and the adjoining hospital.

The project will also benefit 15 Children's Center staff plus about 35 visiting children per day.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Matthew Renninger and Megan Bush

Comments
This project utilizes the appropriate technology to resolve the local water quality problem that faces the community. With proper maintenance, the filters will continue to provide safe water for a large number of people far into the future.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00 + additional amounts for future projects.

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been jointly funded through the generosity of Daniel Renninger, of Oak Harbor, WA, USA, and Janet Bush, of Springfield, VA, USA, who each donated $500. The additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Matthew, Megan and/or other PCVs in Mongolia

Those who wish may continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Matthew and Megan of your donation. Additional funds will be similarly used to fund future projects.

 

 

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Division 5 Deep Well Remediation Project - Mongolia

Division 5 Deep Well Remediation Project - Mongolia

Location
Division 5, Choibalsan, Dornod, Mongolia

Community DescriptionDivision 5 Deep Well Remediation Project - MongoliaChoibalsan is the aimag center (provincial capital) of Dornod, the easternmost province of Mongolia. Choibalsan is 664 kilometers east of the Mongolian national

 capital, Ulaanbaatar.

Division 5 is situated in an abandoned Soviet military base nine kilometers outside of Choibalsan. It was a Russian military base until the collapse of the Soviet Union. When the Russian forces withdrew, they left behind several brick and concrete buildings that have since mostly collapsed due to neglect, looting, and the ravages of Mongolian weathe.r

This past year there was a Dzud, an abnormal weather phenomenon characterized by a dry summer followed by a particularly cold winter, and known for obliterating Mongolian herders' livestock. The Mongolian government and U.N. declared a state of emergency and the government estimates that as many as 4 million heads of livestock were killed.

About 250 herders, many of whom had lost all of their livestock, were driven to occupy the abandoned buildings of Division 5. Many of the buildings lack windows or roofs, and admirable community efforts have been made to purchase "gers" (yurts) before the winter sets in. For example, an extended family of nine will now be contentedly living in one ger.

The resolve and work ethic of this group is astounding. This summer they set up a community gardening collective, and are actively developing chicken and pig-farming schemes for income this winter. The pit for their winter-proofed, partially-subterranean chicken greenhouse/coop has already been dug and is advancing rapidly.

As the students of the community must walk the nine kilometers into Choibalsan to stay in dormitories through the week, Division 5's children did not until last month have the opportunity to attend kindergarten. The community members, with the help of an Australian VSO volunteer, acquired two gers in August and built a fully-functioning, credentialed, and staffed kindergarten out of them.

Division 5 Deep Well Remediation Project - MongoliaDivision 5 currently has two sources of water. One is a privately-owned, hand-drawn well that will not be deep enough to avoid freezing solid this winter in temperatures that frequently plunge below -30C. The other is a river, roughly one kilometer away, from which ice will need to be hacked with a pick and then melted by cooking stove fires.

Before they left, the Russians drilled an extremely deep well that is lined with still-intact piping. It is right in the middle of Division 5, mere meters from the kindergarten, the community garden, and the new chicken pit.

The abandoned well has been examined by local water authorities, who have determined that it only needs to be re-bored of the sludge that has accumulated over the past two decades, and will not freeze during the winter.

Project Description
This project is to refurbish the existing deep well to provide water to the families of Division 5 and for the kindergarten.

Project funds will be used to rent the boring equipment and pay for the labor of the technicians.

A fully functional electric pump has already been donated by an Australian farmer. The resourceful people of Division 5, who have already built most of the furniture for the new kindergarten, will volunteer their labor to build a small pumping house to protect the pump mechanism from the winter cold.

This well will greatly ease the burden of the teacher and cook who administrate the kindergarten, and will also enhance the irrigation abilities of the gardening collective.

Project Impact
250 people will immediately benefit from the project. However, it is expected that another harsh winter will drive even more herding families into Division 5, thus increasing the number served.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Bob Figlock

Comments
The remediation of an existing deep well is the most cost-effective method of bringing water to this population in need. The project arose from and is being forwarded by a strong community organization.

The well will have the capacity to provide for the needs of the community during its period of expected growth.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the extreme generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Figlock, Sr., Monterey, CA, USA.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify PCV Bob Figlock of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Bob and/or those of other PCVs in Mongolia.

 

 

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Uyanga Soum Secondary School Latrine Project - Mongolia

Uyanga Soum Secondary School Latrine Project - MongoliaLocation
Uyanga Soum, Ovorkhangai Aimag, Mongolia

Community Description
Uyanga Soum is large Mongolian community of over 10,000 people and a student population of 1,300 pupils. The entire community lives in either a wooden or Mongolian ger (yurt). There is 24-hour electricity (with the occasional power loss) and cell phone service available throughout the residential area, but no running water is available anywhere, with the exception of a single shower house.

Most people in Uyanga work as either a herder or miner in an unofficial mine 30 minutes away from the residential center. The area is rich in gold and copper deposits. Others run small stores, provide transportation services, work in banks, or are civil servants.

Uyanga Soum Secondary School Latrine Project - MongoliaThe one latrine at Uyanga Secondary School is built over a pit about one-meter deep. There is a constant strong odor which results from the pit being dug too shallow.

Mongolia is subject to harsh winters where the ground is frozen for over six months of the year. Fecal matter freezes and collects rather than deteriorates. Every year a large pile of frozen feces collects and peeks out of the squatting hole.

A sanitary and safe restroom is essential to prevent the spread of communicable diseases and raise the standard of life in the community.

Project Description
This project is to build a ventilated pit latrine at the school.

Uyanga Soum Secondary School Latrine Project - MongoliaThe plan is an adaptation of the Blair Latrine, popular in Africa, to the Mongolian environment. The design has a vent, like a chimney, which connects the pit with the outside air.

The latrine will be four meters deep with a wooden skeleton to maintain the pit's integrity. A cement floor will be placed on top of the pit with a wooden structure on top. A brick chimney leading from the pit to above the wooden latrine structure will ventilate, removing foul odors.

The cement floor is necessary to hold the block vent and prevent odors and flies from escaping the pit. A screen will be placed at the top of the chimney to prevent flies from breeding and entering the community. An aluminum waste bin with a cover will be installed for easy paper disposal.

The latrine will be built by the Uyanga School Staff led by Peace Corps Volunteer Terrence Edwards. The latrine will be maintained with regular use of ash and sawdust.

This project is a pilot for future latrine building projects headed by the World Health Organization (WHO). The report at the completion of this project will have direct influence on latrine construction by the WHO around the country.

Project funds will be used for materials, such as wood, brick, cement, iron wire, plastic tarp, nails, screws, and paint. In addition, funds will be used to purchase tools and transport tools and materials as necessary.

Project Impact
1300 people will benefit from the project, consisting of students, faculty, and staff.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Terrence Edwards

Comments
Unique solutions to sanitation problems are required for this harsh environment. This is a well-planned project, using appropriate technology. It has wide community support and utilizes the labor of the community. As a model project, its success will be replicated.

Dollar Amount of Project
$375.06

Donations Collected to Date
$375.06 + additional funds for future projects

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Steven Aurigema II, of West Babylon, NY, USA, with the help of friends and family of PCV Terrence Edwards.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will advise Terrence of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Terrence and/or those of other PCVs in Mongolia.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Mongolia

Follow Us

Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google+ icon
YouTube icon
RSS icon


Donate $25 or more for Water Charity projects.

SiteLock

GlobalGiving vetted Organization 2016

***  Copyright 2017 ©  -  Water Charity is a 501(c)(3) non-profit (DLN 17053217312048) based in California & operating Worldwide  ***

 
 
Support Us