FONI BINTANG KARANAI DISTRICT REHAB TOUR, WEST COAST REGION, THE GAMBIA 

FONI BINTANG KARANAI DISTRICT REHAB TOUR, WEST COAST REGION, THE GAMBIA 

FONI BINTANG KARANAI DISTRICT REHAB TOUR, WEST COAST REGION, THE GAMBIA 

Foni Bintang-Karenai is one of the nine districts of the Gambia’s West Coast Region, which is located on the south of the Gambia River in the southwest of the country. Foni Bintang-Karenai is in the central south of the Region, between Foni Kansala and Foni Brefet. This district is dominated by the Jola tribe and some Fula as well as Mandinka tribes. The vast majority of people in the district are subsistence farmers, growing groundnut, maize and millet with some communities notably women engaged in collecting and selling wild herbs for traditional medicinal purposes. Herbs locally called “Mborr Mborr, Kinkiliba and sangfito” are commonly associated with this district. It still keeps traditional tribal culture and it also served as a source of typical Jola and Mandinka tribe history and traditional way of life. The district is also the home of an old Mandinka love poem called “Masannehsisay Bintang Bolong daala”. This love poem was played by the local griots of the district called “Jali” depicting the love life of a powerful man believed to possess mystic powers and a woman from a lower inferior caste possessed by evil.

However, the district is prone to illegal deforestation, especially in rosewood among others. The area is also prone to wildfires and as a result, this has led to the scarcity of fresh drinking water. According to Global Forest Watch reports, in 2010, the district had 243ha of tree cover, extending over 1.7% of its land area. In 2021, it lost 225mha of tree cover, equivalent to 76.5t of CO2 emissions. In Foni Bintang Karanai District, the peak fire season typically begins in mid-February and lasts around 12 weeks. All these factors have made life harder for the indigenous tribes that live within the district especially when it comes to clean drinking water. The district also borders with the Senegalese region of Cassamance which has been the center of separatist rebel conflict for four decades. As a result, it hosts hundreds of refugees which added more stress to the already alarming clean water crisis the district faces. The border between Casamance and The Gambia is long and porous. There are no official border crossings and people move from one side to the other with little restriction. Border communities are historically interlinked, most notably through inter-marriage, and have been partaking in the same social norms and customs since pre-colonial times. The influx of refugees earlier this year has made the water crisis worst in the district. Although a huge chunk of the refugees has gone back since the tensions have eased, but clean drinking water scarcity still remains to hunt communities. 

This rehabilitation tour will provide access to clean drinking water for thousands of people directly. It will have a great impact on their health and social habitation in general. It will tremendously benefit women and girls as they bear the brunt of water collection within the household. It will make girls enrich their potential at school and also help women enrich their potential socially and economically especially at the household level, as at the moment they spend a huge amount of time in water collection daily. It will also forge harmony and understanding among members of communities, as at times quarrels and scuffles occur during water collection. 

1. BATABUT KANTORA VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°12.375 W016°09.524 

Population: 550 

2 Conversion heads, 2 new cylinders (twin pump), 8 centralizers, 2 stainless steel pipes, hand washing station, the contractor will construct a new water trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically. 

Batabut Kantora village is located along the Trans-Gambia South Bank Road. It is a Mandinka tribe community of roughly 550 people. It is a subsistence farming community growing groundnut and millet. According to sources, the community consists of the “Bujiran Kailandang” clan who hailed from the “Koringolu” of the ancient Kaabu Kingdom in the 18th century. 

The community is facing a severe water crisis as it’s population cannot cope with the only water source available. 

2. GIBANACK VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°12.876 W016°08.376  

Population: 180 

1 conversion, 1 cylinder, 1 stainless steel pipe, hand washing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically  

Gibanack village is located about 2 km north of Arangallen Village along the Trans-Gambia South Bank Road. The community is primarily made up of the Manjago tribe who originally migrated from Guinea Bissau during the PIGC war for independence from Portugal. The community is a subsistence farming community, growing millet, corn and groundnut with a handful of them engaged in fishing tilapia along the banks of The River Gambia. The only water source in the community has been broken for a long time and they currently depend on neighboring villages like Arangallen for water, which has resulted in a severe water crisis for the community. 

3. JAKO VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°13.698 W016°10.431 

Population: 350 

2 New cylinders, 2 conversion heads (twin pumps), 2 stainless steel pipes, dewatering and sanitizing the well, plus a hand washing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically 

This village is about 4 km north of Sibanor along the Trans-Gambia south bank road. It is a Jola and Mandinka tribe community. The community depends on subsistence farming mainly growing groundnut, millet, and corn. The community is also known for the collection of traditional medicinal healing herbs in the bush which women notably sell for livelihood. The community’s only water source is broken and as a result it is facing water crisis for a long time. People travel about miles daily to neighboring villages in search of clean drinking water for their families. 

4. MANYINA VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°12.495 W016°12.312 

Population: 400  

1 Conversion head, new cylinder, 2 stainless steel pipes, re-digging the well extra 2 meters, de-watering and sanitizing well, hand washing station, new concrete slab. The contractor will construct a new water trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically. 

Manyina Village is located along the Trans-Gambia South Bank Road. It is quite close to Sibanor. It is Mandinka tribe settlement and a subsistence farming community growing millet, rice and groundnut with a handful of women engaged in collecting medicinal herbs in the bush for economic gains. The community is faced with a water crisis. It has only one handpump serving the entire village and as a result of the high pressure it keeps breaking down due to poor standard parts and repair. This makes the villagers to depend on their neighboring village of Sibanor which is often not accepted by the Sibanor community.  

5. KABOKORR VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°22.274 W016°14.998 

Population: 750 

New cylinder, conversion head, dewatering and sanitizing well, 2 meters re-digging, rod couplings. 6 stainless steel pipes, 6 centralizers, and hand washing station, the contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically  

Kabokorr village is situated east of Tampoto, and west of Killy Village along the Trans-Gambia South Bank Road. The community consists of Jola and Mandinka tribes living harmoniously together. The community is a subsistence farming community, growing groundnut, millet, and rice. Rice remains the most commonly grown food in the community, especially among women who sell the proceeds for the sustenance of their families and certain social functions. The Village has been suffering from a lack of clean drinking water due to a large number of people within the community, especially during the rainy season when their open wells got damaged by rain runoff. The current water source is not enough to serve the entire village. 

6. KANUMA VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°13.822 W016°16.441 

Population: 400 

1 Conversion head, 1 new cylinder, check-nuts, rod couplings, 5 centralizers, hand washing station, the contractor will construct a new water trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically. 

Kanuma Village is located about 5 km north of Tampoto along the Trans-Gambia South Bank Road. It is a Mandinka tribe community of roughly 400 people. They are the descendants of the Biyayi clan who migrated from the ancient Kaabu Kingdom. The village is a historical place for several Manneh, Sanneh and Sanyang families. The community is a subsistence farming community growing groundnut, millet and corn. It is well known for producing traditional farming implements like “doumo and kobirango”. The community’s water source has broken down for a long while now, as a result, the community is currently depending on neighboring villages of Nyangit for water, which is about 2 kilometers away and they are often given a frown face there anytime they come collecting water. This has often resulted in scuffles and quarrels between the two neighboring communities. 

7. BUNIADOU VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°12.051 W016°11.822 

Population: 250 

1 conversion, 3 meters extra re-digging, 3 culverts, dewatering and sanitizing the well, ground concrete fortification, concrete slab, 1 stainless steel pipe, hand washing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically  

Buniadou village is located on the outskirts of Sibanor along the Trans-Gambia South Bank Road. It is a Fula tribe community that migrated from the East of the country in search of pasture and better life. The community is a subsistence farming community growing groundnut, millet, and rearing of animals notably cows for sustenance. The community has only one water source which has been broken for a long time and they currently depend on Sibanor and other open wells for drinking. This water crisis has led to illness among the community members as some of them consume contaminated open well waters. 

8. KILLY VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°12.422 W016°13.942 

Population: 950 

New cylinder, 1 conversion head, rod couplings (stainless steel), dewatering and sanitizing the well, plus hand washing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically 

Killy village is located along the Trans-Gambia south bank road. The community consists of the Jola and Mandinka tribes. The community depends on subsistence farming mainly growing groundnut, millet, and corn. Women also collect traditional medicinal herbs from the bush and usually sell them at weekly markets called “Loumo”. This helps in household sustenance and other social activities. The community is facing a severe water crisis as the current water source is not enough for the community leading to so many households depending on contaminated open wells which have serious health effects on their health. The refugee crisis earlier in the year when war broke out in the Cassamance, also put a heavy burden on the community’s water issue. 

9. BAJAGAR VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°12.054 W016°07.259 

Population: 700  

2 Conversion heads, 2 new cylinders, concrete slab, de-watering and sanitizing well, hand washing station, new concrete slab. The contractor will construct a new water trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically. 

Bajagar is the last village within the Foni Bintang Karanai district bordering Foni Kansala District. It is located along the Trans-Gambia South Bank Road. The community has tremendous history and culture, especially among the Jola tribesmen. The traditional Jola initiation festival called “Futampaf’’ is also popular in this village dating back centuries ago. The community is faced with a water crisis as the current water source is not enough. This has led to many people using contaminated open wells which has detrimental health effects. The recent rainy season has caused the collapse of wells due to heavy downpours and erosion.

10. BATENDENG VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°15.358 W016°18.927 

Population: 350 

1 New cylinder, 1 conversion head, dewatering and sanitizing well, rod couplings. 1 stainless steel pipe, 6 centralizers, hand washing station, the contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically  

This Village is located about 8km north of Somita Village along the Trans-Gambia South Bank Road. The community is a Mandinka tribe settlement. It is a remote community and a subsistence farming one as well, growing groundnut, millet, and corn. The Village has been suffering from a lack of water since its water source has been broken for a long time. As a result, the community sorted to using open wells which makes some people sick, especially among women and children. This has affected their daily life too.

FONI BREFET DISTRICT REHAB TOUR (PHASE 1) – The Gambia

FONI BREFET DISTRICT REHAB TOUR (PHASE 1) – The Gambia

FONI BREFET DISTRICT REHAB TOUR (PHASE 1) – The Gambia

WEST COAST REGION, THE GAMBIA 

Foni Brefet  is one of the nine districts  of  the Gambia, which is located to the south of the Gambia River in the southwest of the country. Foni Brefet is in the center of the region, between Kombo East and Foni Bintang-Karenai. This district is dominated by the Jola tribe and some Fula as well as Mandinka tribes. The vast majority of people in the district are subsistence farmers, growing groundnut, maize, and millet. It still keeps traditional tribal culture and it also serves as a source of typical Jola tribe history and traditional way of life. However, the district is prone to illegal deforestation, especially in rosewood among others. The area is also prone to wildfires and as a result, this has led to a scarcity of fresh drinking water. According to Global Forest Watch reports, in 2010, the district had 243ha of tree cover, extending over 1.7% of its land area. In 2021, it lost 225mha of tree cover, equivalent to 76.5t of CO2 emissions. In Foni Brefet District, the peak fire season typically begins in mid-February and lasts around 12 weeks. All these factors have made life harder for the indigenous tribes that live within the district especially when it comes to clean drinking water. The district also borders the Senegalese region of Cassamance which has been the center of separatist rebel conflict for four decades. As a result, it hosts hundreds of refugees which added more stress to the already alarming clean water crisis the district faces. 

This rehabilitation tour will give access to clean drinking water for 9,559 people directly. This will have a great impact on their health and social habitation in general. It will tremendously benefit women and girls as they bear the brunt of water collection within the household.  The work will also help all the people who visit or pass through the region, and the hundreds of Senegalese refugees that are currently located there.

This project is part of our ongoing Water For Everyone Intiative. WFE Gambia has been going for a number of years now and is on track to service every village and every well in the country on schedule.

  1. JALOKOTO VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°12.393 W016°17.395 

Population: 1500 

4 stainless steel pipes with rods, new conversion head, pedestal, check-nuts, dewatering and sanitizing the well, and a hand washing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically.

 

  1. SOMITA VILLAGE VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°12.299 W016°18.139 

Population: 1900  

2 Conversion heads, a new cylinder, a hand washing station, and new concrete round fencing. The contractor will construct a new water trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically. 

  1. NDEMBAN JOLA VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°10.931 W016°20.614 

Population: 450 

2 New cylinders, 2 conversion heads, 4 stainless steel pipes, concrete slab, and a hand washing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically.  

 

  1. BULLOCK VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°10.840 W016°24.752 

Population: 1800 

New cylinder, conversion head, concrete slab, 2 culverts, hand washing station, rod couplings. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically  

 

  1. BAJANA VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°11.260 W016°23.709 

Population: 850 

2 New cylinders, rod couplings (stainless steel),2 conversion heads, plus a hand washing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically 

 

  1. SUTUSINJANG VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°11.239 W016°23.157 

Population: 500 

New cylinder, conversion head hand washing station, rod couplings. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically  

  1. JAGIL VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°11.523 W016°22.109 

Population: 400 

New cylinder, conversion head, 5 stainless steel pipes, concrete slab, Re-digging and dewatering well, hand washing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically.

 

  1. BREFET VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°14.845 W016°22.851 

Population: 750  

Conversion head, new cylinder, 1 culvert, hand washing station, new concrete slab. The contractor will construct a new water trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically. 

 

  1. NDEMBAN JAPIHUIM VILLAGE 

GPS: N13°12.210 W016°20.310 

Population: 450 

2 New cylinders, 2 conversion head, 1 stainless steel pipes, re-digging and dewatering of well, hand washing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically  

 

These projects range from around 50 cents per person served up to around 3 or 4 dollars. It depends on what exactly is wrong and what needs to be done. Contact us for detailed project costs.

It is possible to adopt a village well, even long-term. We do have an anonymous donor, though, who is likely to pay for all of these wells unless someone else steps up beforehand. Tours like this are ongoing. So, any funds collected in excess of the actual cost will roll over to the next village handpump tour in The Gambia. 

The timeline will be 2 or 3 weeks depending on the weather and local conditions, parts availability, etc.

The results will be as they always are with these projects.  The handpumps will be brought to full repair and provide their villages with clean water once again.  This, of course, will have numerous beneficial effects for the village.  Waterborne Illness will go down drastically with incidence of diarrhea falling to negligible levels.  The hours the women and girls of the village currently spend walking to distant water points will be used for other purposes, including allowing more girls to stay in school and get educations.  It will also result in a lot less deforestation… as people will no longer need to boil water from the rivers and streams.

The sustainability of these projects is insured as we are in contact with each of the village elders and if they should require our help in the future, they can alert us forthwith.  Furthermore, we try to instill ownership and responsibility for the water point in every village.  We gather the Water Use Committee and give them tips on preservation and maintenance of their handpump.  We also encourage them to collect and save a small amount of money for simple repairs.  Often if a pump fails the initial cost is an inexpensive grommet or bushing.  Left unchecked, the entire well fails and inevitably rust-out or otherwise require a much more expensive intervention. Having the WFE B2B program ensures that we will always be available and hands-on in every village until such time as there are no villages doing without any longer.

Foni Jarrol District Handpump Repair Tour Phase Three—The Gambia

Foni Jarrol District Handpump Repair Tour Phase Three—The Gambia

Foni Jarrol District Handpump Repair Tour Phase Three—The Gambia

Foni Jarrol is one of the nine districts of The West Coast Region, which is located to the south of the Gambia River in the southwest of the country. Foni Jarrol is in the far east of the region, between Foni Bondali and the border with Senegal. The district is widely dominated by the Jola tribe and is well known for its traditional cultural festival called “Futampaf.” This is a Jola traditional initiation ceremony which dates back centuries.

The district has played host to thousands of refugees fleeing the Southern Senegalese region of Casamance’s crisis, which saw fighting between Senegalese forces and Casamance separatist rebels. This has posed serious difficulties—both economic and social—affecting the district, including the scarcity of clean drinking water. Environmental issues are still persistent due to illegal logging, causing mass deforestation within the district.

KOLLEY KUNDA (GPS: N13°10.281 W015°48.943) Population: 250

2 Conversion heads, 2 new cylinders (twin pump) check-nuts, rod couplings, 12 centralizers, 4 stainless steel pipes, handwashing station, the contractor will construct a new water trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically.

BRUMEN (GPS: N13°14.842 W015°49.945) Population: 300

1 conversion, dewatering and sanitizing the well, ground concrete fortification, and handwashing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically.

AHDULAI (GPS: N13°12.684 W015°52.317) Population: 350 

New cylinder, 1 conversion head, rod couplings (stainless steel), dewatering and sanitizing the well, plus handwashing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically.

JARROL (GPS: N13°14.544 W015°50.731) Population: 400 

1 Conversion head, new cylinder, 2 stainless steel pipes, re-digging the well extra 2 meters, de-watering and sanitizing well, handwashing station, new concrete slab. The contractor will construct a new water trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically.

KALAGI VILLAGE (GPS: N13°14.817 W015°50.203) Population: 950

New cylinder, conversion head, dewatering and sanitizing well, rod couplings. 6 stainless steel pipes, 6 centralizers, concrete slab, and handwashing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically.

Foni Jarrol District Handpump Repair Tour Phase Two—The Gambia 

Foni Jarrol District Handpump Repair Tour Phase Two—The Gambia 

Foni Jarrol District Handpump Repair Tour Phase Two—The Gambia 

Foni Jarrol is one of the nine districts of The West Coast Region, which is located to the south of the Gambia River in the southwest of the country. Foni Jarrol is in the far east of the region, between Foni Bondali and the border with Senegal. The district is widely dominated by the Jola tribe and it is well known for its traditional cultural festival called ‘’Futampaf’’. This is a Jola traditional initiation ceremony that dates back centuries ago. 

The district has played host to thousands of refugees fleeing the Southern Senegalese region of Cassamnce’s crisis which saw fighting between Senegalese forces and Cassamance separatist rebels. This has had serious difficulties both economic and social affecting the district, among which is the scarcity of clean drinking water. Environmental issues are still persistent due to illegal logging causing mass deforestation within the district.

WASSADU (GPS: N13°12.867 W015°51.714) Population:1500 

5 stainless steel pipes with rods, 1 conversion, check-nuts, dewatering and sanitizing the well, hand washing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically.

NIORRO JARROL (GPS: N13°13.921 W015°50.906) Population:350

Conversion head, new cylinder, 3 stainless steel pipes, re-digging the well extra 3 meters, de-watering and sanitizing well, hand washing station, new concrete slab. The contractor will construct a new water trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically. 

JOREM DRAMEH KUNDA (GPS: N13°14.225 W015°53.893) Population:300

1 Conversion head, 2 new cylinders (twin pump), de-watering and sanitizing well, check-nuts, hand washing station, new concrete slab, The contractor will construct a new water trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically. 

KANGMAMUDU (GPS: N13°10.714 W015°48.476) Population:500 

2 New cylinders (twin handpump), conversion head, dewatering and sanitizing well, hand washing station, rod couplings. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically. 

CHEWELL VILLAGE (GPS: N13°10.736 W015°48.834) Population: 300 

New cylinder, conversion head, rod couplings (stainless steel), dewatering and sanitizing the well, plus hand washing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically. 

NB: WATER QUALITY TESTING FOR 5 VILLAGES (FONI JARROL DISTRICT REHAB TOUR PHASE 1)

Foni Jarrol District Handpump Repair Tour Phase One—The Gambia

Foni Jarrol District Handpump Repair Tour Phase One—The Gambia

Foni Jarrol District Handpump Repair Tour Phase One—The Gambia

Foni Jarrol is one of the nine districts of The West Coast Region, which is located to the south of the Gambia River in the southwest of the country. Foni Jarrol is in the far east of the region, between Foni Bondali and the border with Senegal. The district is dominated by the Jola tribe, and it is well known for its traditional cultural festival called the “Futampaf.” This is a Jola traditional initiation ceremony which dates back centuries ago. (See picture below.)

The district has attracted thousands of refugees fleeing the Southern Senegalese region of Casamance’s crisis, which saw fighting between Senegalese forces and Casamance separatist rebels. This has had posed serious economic and social challenges to the district, among which is the scarcity of clean drinking water. Environmental issues are still persistent due to illegal logging, causing mass deforestation within the district.

Sintet (GPS: N13°14.293 W015°48.835) Estimated population: 900

After de-watering and sanitizing the well, we will replace the twin handpump rods, two conversion heads, and check-nuts; we will install a handwashing station and 4 stainless steel pipes. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically.

Kansambou (GPS: N13°10.275 W015°48.261) Estimated Population: 250 

After re-digging the well an extra two meters, as well as de-watering and sanitizing the well, we will replace the conversion head, the cylinder, and a new concrete slab. We will install new pipes, and the contractor will construct a new water trough for the village livestock to drink from.

Jorem Bunda Kunda (GPS: N13°15.186 W015°53.048) Estimated Population: 300

After de-watering and sanitizing the well, we will replace the conversion head, install a new cylinder, replace the check-nuts, and pour a new concrete slab. The contractor will construct a handwashing station and a new water trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically.

Kampassa Village (GPS: N13°10.074 W015°48.810) Estimated Population: 800 

After de-watering and sanitizing the well, we will install a new cylinder, conversion head, check-nuts; we will pour a new concrete slab and install four stainless steel pipes, and a handwashing station to halt the transmission of COVID. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants.

Arenkoli Kunda (GPS: N13°14.122 W015°51.823) Estimated Population: 300

After de-watering and sanitizing the well, we will install a new cylinder, new stainless steel rod couplings, a new conversion head, plus a handwashing station. In addition, the contractor will construct a new concrete trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which should better the community’s economic situation.

Lower Saloum District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 2—The Gambia

Lower Saloum District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 2—The Gambia

Lower Saloum District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 2—The Gambia

The Central River Division’s Lower Saloum is one of the poorest regions in The Gambia. Most people in the villages of Lower Saloum are engaged in subsistence agriculture – there is a recognized ‘hungry season’ when little food is available, but agricultural labor is most intense. There are serious environmental and ecological vulnerabilities, especially with increasing desertification. Lower Saloum is home to Kaur, one of Lower Saloum’s market towns, once had a groundnut processing plant, with associated export trade via the River Gambia, but this ceased over a decade ago. Lower Saloum is home to mangroves, which are located at the interface of land and sea in tropical regions, and offer a considerable array of ecosystem goods and services. Mangrove ecosystems are highly effective carbon sinks, sequestering vast amounts of carbon within the soil, leaves, branches, roots, etc. This is the second phase of our Lower Saloum District Handpump Repair Tour.

Ballanghar Kerr Jibel Village (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ39.453  W015ᴼ24.801) Estimated population: 550

After dewatering and sanitizing the well, we will replace the twin handpump’s two cylinders, two conversion heads, and rod couplings; we will construct a concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

Tabaworo Nyukulum (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ39.768 W015ᴼ22.921) Estimated population: 200

We will replace the well’s conversion head, cylinder, and rod couplings; we will install two stainless steel pipes, add extra ground concrete, as well as construct a concrete water trough and handwashing station.

Kerr Lien (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ40.257  W015ᴼ23.841) Estimated Population: 250

We will replace the conversion head, the cylinder, and the rod couplings; we will install one stainless steel pipe, a concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

Balangharr Jalato Ndery (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ39.614 W015ᴼ24.590) Estimated population: 400

We will replace the cylinder and conversion head; we will add extra ground concrete to the base, concrete water trough, hand washing station.

Balangharr Kerr Majara (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ40.395 W015ᴼ23.663) Estimated population: 300

We will replace the cylinder, the conversion head, and the check nuts, add extra ground concrete, and install a handwashing station.

Gungurr Tukulor (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ42.669 W015ᴼ22.786) Estimated Population: 300

After dewatering and sanitizing the well, we will replace the cylinder, conversion head, centralizer, check nuts, and pedestal. We will add extra ground concrete to the base, and construct a concrete watering trough for the village ruminants and install a handwashing station.

Ballanghar Kerr Nderry (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ39.878  W015ᴼ23.746) Estimated Population: 1,800 

We will re-dig, de-water and sanitize the well. We will then re-pour the concrete slab and replace the cylinder, install seven stainless steel pipes, add extra ground concrete to the base, construct a concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

Simbara Khai (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ44.228 W015ᴼ20.614) Estimated population: 800

After de-watering and sanitizing the twin handpump-equipped well, we will replace the two cylinders, two conversion heads, 2 stainless steel pipes, and check nuts; we will construct a concrete watering trough for the village livestock, as well as install a handwashing station.

Buduck Village (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ42.339  W015ᴼ22.018) Estimated Population: 200

After de-watering and sanitizing the well, we will replace the cylinder, the concrete slab, and five stainless steel pipes; we will add extra ground concrete to the base, construct a concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

Jimbala Felngo (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ44.175  W015ᴼ22.804) Estimated population: 850

We will replace the cylinder, the conversion head, and the concrete slab; we will construct a concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

All these projects include costs for hand washing stations in each community as part of Water Charity’s efforts in fighting COVID-19 and promoting community hygiene.

See our Lower Saloum District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 1—The Gambia

Tento Malick Bah Solar Powered Water Project—The Gambia 

Tento Malick Bah Solar Powered Water Project—The Gambia 

Tento Malick Bah Solar Powered Water Project—The Gambia 

PROJECT INFORMATION

Location of Project: Tento Malick Bah Village, Upper Saloum District, Central River Region, The Gambia, West Africa; GPS Coordinates: N13°46.948 W015°05.687

DESCRIPTION PROJECT COMMUNITY

The small village of Tento Malick Bah, located 5 kilometers off the northern Trans-Gambia Highway via Panchang in the Central River Region, consists of Fula and Wollof tribal members. The village is composed of 18 family compounds and 29 households. Tento Malick Bah is populated by approximately 300 people whose livelihoods are primarily based on subsistence farming, growing groundnut, maize and millet. Both the Wollof and Fula tribal members live harmoniously together in the village.

DESCRIPTION OF PROBLEM

The village’s reliance on subsistence farming for income and staple foods is fraught with challenges and risks. Due to climate change, the rainy season starts later and ends earlier; soil fertility is generally poor; they have limited if any defenses against agricultural pests such as locusts, etc. The deck is definitely stacked against ensuring stable and sustainable livelihoods and food security in the village.

But the greatest threat to the community is the lack of clean drinking water. There is only one un-covered well in the village with a depth of about 28 meters down to the water table. Water is drawn from the well using a rope and pulley and a great deal of effort. This open well is the only source of drinking water for the entire community. During the dry season, the inflow of water into the well doesn’t always keep up with the amount being collected. Women and children sometimes rise before dawn to wait in lines at the well to fetch the water that has accumulated overnight. But, before long, the water level lowers and the water becomes clouded with sand and silt. This water must be allowed to settle and then sifted through a cloth to remove as much sediment as possible. Recently, a dog fell in the well and died—going unnoticed by the villagers who drank from the well. An outbreak of diarrhea hit the village, resulting in various water-borne sicknesses. The remains of the dog were later removed from the well. In spite of their best efforts, diarrhea and other ailments attributed to drinking the water are all too common. Rarely a week goes by when a family doesn’t have to take at least one family member to the medical clinic a few kilometers away for treatment. This is a drain on time and money, which contributes yet further to income and food insecurity in the village.

DETAILED PROJECT DESCRIPTION 

The project will include the following:  

Stage 1: Drilling of a 4.5-inch borehole at the depth of 55 meters, by a reputable drilling outfit. This deep drilling will provide an ample flow of clean fresh water all year-round. A high-quality GRUNDFOS solar submersible pump will be installed along with high-quality mono-crystalline solar panels. A fully braced 6-meter galvanized tower will be built and a 2,000-liter triple-coated water storage tank will be mounted on the tower. All works will be fully monitored for quality assurance and effective execution of work with a warranty provided.

Stage 2: This stage involves the laying of pipes from the water tower to three selected water points (taps) in the village. This will be completed by the contractor supported by the villagers. Three water points will be erected which will make water accessible and easier to reach by all villagers. The pressure pipes and plumbing materials will be of high-quality material considering the harsh environmental conditions around that area.

COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION

The community will provide some of the manual labor, including the digging of trenches and pipe laying, etc. They will also provide gravel and sand as their contribution towards the project. Any other necessary manual labor will also be provided by the community. The village will also host and feed the workers.

MONITORING AND MAINTENANCE

The community has already set up a solid and trustworthy Water Management Committee that will oversee the sustainability of the project. The team is gender-balanced, consisting of three males and three females.

Further training will be conducted for the Water Management Committee on the Community Water Management Model, after the completion of the project, and also to sensitize the community on the importance of taking good care of the taps and the entire water system to maintain durability. The selected water committee members will be visiting taps regularly to check if every tap is working properly. It was strongly agreed at the same meeting that every month, each compound head will pay a token and a bank account will be opened by the village water committee, with three mandatory signatories, where the collected amount will be saved for future maintenance and repair. The committee will be transparent and audited in the financial transactions, reporting monthly to the villagers at the Bantaba (village square) to be coordinated by the Alkalo (village head). Through this mechanism, the community will maintain a sense of ownership and responsibility.

Three people have been identified to be in charge, of monitoring and controlling the solar-powered water borehole system after the completion of the project. The borehole drilling outfit has offered to train these three identified persons on the usage of the water system and how to report to them if there is any fault.

Water Charity Program Director (Ebrima Marong) will visit the community regularly to check whether the system is working accordingly and also check if the water management committee is working effectively.

Sabach Sanjal District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 2 – The Gambia

Sabach Sanjal District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 2 – The Gambia

Sabach Sanjal District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 2 – The Gambia

 Sabach Sanjal is in Upper Baddibu, one of the six districts of the North Bank Region of The Gambia. Its main town is Farafenni. The North Bank Division is now the Kerewan Local Government Area, and the former Upper Baddibu District is now divided into an Illiasa District and a Sabach Sanjal District. The district is home to Pakala Forest Park, a protected area in The Gambia covering 1,161 ha (2,870 acres). By and large, residents of Sabach Sanjal practice subsistence farming.  Their main occupations are farming, including crop cultivation, cattle rearing, and fishing. In a recent assessment report conducted by the environment unit of the Ministry of Health in 2019, The Gambia found that most communities in Sabach Sanjal district lack access to potable drinking water and are still practicing open defecation.

Kataba Mbapu (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ32.727  W015ᴼ31.171) Estimated Population: 650  
 
After re-digging, de-watering, and sanitizing the well, we will replace the cylinder, the concrete slab, and five stainless steel pipes; we will add extra ground concrete to the base, constructing a concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

Nyang Kunda (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ32.338  W015ᴼ.29.145) Estimated Population: 400  
 
We will replace the conversion head and check-nuts; a new concrete water trough will be constructed, and a handwashing station will be installed.

Mbapa Ba (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ35.199 W015ᴼ28.953) Estimated population: 800 
 
We will replace the cylinder, the rod couplings, the bearings and the axle, the concrete water trough, plus the hand washing station.

Kumbija (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ32.670 W015ᴼ25.953) Estimated population: 200 
 
We will replace the cylinder and the conversion head; we will add extra ground concrete to the base, construct a concrete water trough for the village ruminants, plus install a handwashing station.

Taiba (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ32.810 W015ᴼ31.621) Estimated population: 350 

After re-digging, de-watering, and sanitizing the well, we will replace the twin handpumps’ two cylinders, two conversion heads, and the check nuts. We will install four stainless steel pipes, construct a concrete water trough and a handwashing station.

Tandiato (GPS Coordinates:  N13ᴼ31.366  W015ᴼ25.229) Estimated population: 200 

We will replace the handpump’s cylinder, its concrete slab, and bearings; we will construct a water trough for the village ruminants and install a handwashing station. 

Pallen Fula (GPS Coordinates:  N13ᴼ34.047  W015ᴼ26.307) Estimated Population: 900 

After de-watering and sanitizing the well, we will replace the cylinder and the conversion head. We will install two stainless steel pipes, add extra gravel plus cement to the base and the walls, construct a concrete water trough, and install a handwashing station. 

Sabach Sukoto Fula    (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ33.912  W015ᴼ32.313) Estimated population: 300 

We will replace the cylinder, add extra ground concrete to the base, construct a concrete water trough for livestock, plus install a handwashing station. 

Sabach Sukoto    (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ33.671  W015ᴼ32.467) Estimated Population: 600 

After de-watering and sanitizing the well, we will replace the cylinder, the bearings and the axle, add extra ground concrete, construct a concrete trough, and install a handwashing station. 

Njaine (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ35.784  W015ᴼ26.551) Estimated population: 1,200 
 
After re-digging the well, replacing the cylinder and the stainless steel rod couplings, we will construct a concrete water trough, plus install a handwashing station.

NB: All these projects include a handwashing station for each community as part of Water Charity’s efforts to fight COVID-19 and promote good hygiene.

Foni Bondali District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 1—The Gambia

Foni Bondali District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 1—The Gambia

Foni Bondali District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 1—The Gambia

The Gambia’s “Fonis,” the West Coast Region bordering Senegal’s Casamance region, has experienced intermittent turmoil overflowing from West Africa’s longest-running civil conflict, four decades of sporadic violence rooted in a separatist rebellion by neighboring Senegal’s “Mouvement des forces démocratiques de la Casamance” (MFDC). The longstanding currents of informal trade across Casamance’s northern border with The Gambia are pathologically bound up with violence and environmental degradation. Casamance refugee communities on the Gambian territory of the “Fonis,” variable in size but generally in the thousands, are long-standing and very largely “self-settled” with kin or other social connections.

In late January 2022, sporadic gunfire was heard from the Ballen Village, Foni Kansala District, West Coast Region in The Gambia, not far from the Gambia/Casamance border. The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) military mission in the Gambia (ECOMIG) chased a truck carrying illegal timber. The truck driver maneuvered within villages in the Fonis and headed towards Casamance for sanctuary. Gunfire was exchanged between the two forces: ECOMIG vs MFDC. Two soldiers were killed and seven were held in captivity by MFDC. The ICRC negotiation led to the release of the 2 dead bodies. As of February 2022, a total number of 2,464 people were affected, comprising 2,204 internal displaced populations (IDPs). Presently, the region remains in a state of economic precariousness.

Atop the district’s existing lack of clean drinking water, the refugee influx into the Gambian border district of Foni Bondali has exacerbated the water scarcity crisis for a number of vulnerable villages. This humanitarian situation is alarming as the fighting intensifies. Thousands of refugees have fled from Cassamance and within its surrounding villages toward safer villages in the Foni Bondali District. This project seeks to rehabilitate water sources within 10 villages in the district to make clean drinking water accessible for the host villages, as well as the refugees.

Kayabor (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ15.311 W015ᴼ57.078) Estimated population: 300

We will replace the bearings, chain, axle and rod couplings; we will install a new tank, add gravel and sand, install 5 stainless steel pipes, and construct a concrete water trough and handwashing station.

Bantangjang (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ16.784 W015ᴼ57.512) Estimated Population: 350

We will replace the conversion head, the cylinder, the check-nuts, and rod couplings; we will construct a concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

Foni Bondali District Handpump Repair Tour

Bondali Tenda (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ15.164 W015ᴼ54.268) Estimated population: 350

We will replace the cylinder and chain. We will construct a new concrete water trough, a new concrete slab top, and a handwashing station. We will add gravel and sand to the surrounding ground for proper drainage. 

Foni Bondali District Handpump Repair Tour

Kallang Village (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ13.846 W015ᴼ57.744) Estimated population: 250

We will replace the well cylinder and its stainless steel rod couplings. We will construct a concrete water trough for the ruminants. We will install 2 stainless steel pipes and construct a new pedestal, plus a handwashing station.

Giffon Village (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ15.866 W015ᴼ56.420) Estimated Population: 200

We will replace the well’s cylinder, the axle, and the bearings; we will construct a concrete water trough for domestic animals to drink from, plus a handwashing station.

Foni Bondali District Handpump Repair Tour

Kalimu Village (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ14.580 W015ᴼ55.278) Estimated Population: 400

We will dewater and sanitize the well first. We will replace the twin handpump’s 2 cylinders, its 2 conversion heads, bearings and axle. We will install 2 stainless steel pipes, as well as construct a new concrete water trough and a handwashing station.

Foni Bondali District Handpump Repair Tour

Bullenghat Village (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ12.040 W015ᴼ55.215) Estimated population: 650

We will replace the twin handpump’s stainless steel rod couplings, its 2 cylinders, and its 2 conversion heads; we will construct a concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

Foni Bondali District Handpump Repair Tour

Jending Village (GPS Coordinates:N13ᴼ12.442 W015ᴼ55.843) Estimated population: 300

We will replace the conversion head. We will construct a new concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station. We will add gravel and sand for proper drainage.

Bissari Village (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ12.125 W015ᴼ54.231) Estimated Population: 350

We will first dewater and sanitize the well. We will replace the apron, cylinder, conversion head, bearings and axle. We will install 4 stainless steel pipes. We will construct a new concrete water trough and handwashing station.

Foni Bondali District Handpump Repair Tour

Fass Chabai Village (GPS Coordinates: N13ᴼ13.540 W015ᴼ59.349) Estimated Population: 700

We will begin by dewatering and sanitizing the well. We will then replace the twin handpump’s 2 cylinders and 2 conversion heads. We will install 2 stainless steel pipes, as well as construct a new concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

Foni Bondali District Handpump Repair Tour

All of these projects include the cost of constructing a handwashing station in each community as part of Water Charity’s ongoing efforts to combat the spread of COVID-19.

Foni Kansala District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 1—The Gambia

Foni Kansala District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 1—The Gambia

Foni Kansala District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 1—The Gambia

Foni Kansala is one of the nine districts of the Gambia’s West Coast Region, which is located to the south of the Gambia River in the southwest of the country. Foni Kansala is in the southeast of the division, between Foni Bintang-Karenai and Foni Bondali. This area of the country is prone to illegal deforestation, especially in Rosewood. The area is also prone to wildfires and as a result this has led to scarcity of fresh drinking water. According to Global Forest Watch reports, in 2010, Foni Kansala District has 29.9ha of tree cover, extending over 0.21% of its land area. In 2009, it lost 75.0mha of tree cover, equivalent to 23.0t of CO2 of emissions. In Foni Kansala District, the peak fire season typically begins in mid-February and lasts around 12 weeks. All these factors have made life harder for the indigenous tribes that live within the district, especially when it comes to clean drinking water. Notably the district is dominated by the Jola tribe and a handful of Mandinka tribe.

GIBAGARI VILLAGE (Coordinates: -16.015 13.255) Population: 300

Gibagari is located about 4 KM off the Trans-Gambia south Bank Road via Sangajor. It is a community of about 300 people. The community is primarily made up of the Jola tribe.The village is also home to a small group of Fula herdsmen. The community’s only water source handpump has been broken for along while and as a result they walk miles to nearby villages of Burock and Jomo Kunda to get water, which comes with bullying at times.

We will first dewater and sanitize the well. We will install 8 new stainless-steel pipes with rods, a new conversion head, new pedestal, and check-nuts. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically. We will also install a handwashing station.

JONYER VILLAGE (Coordinates: -15.986 13.284) Population: 250

This remote village has only one handpump serving the entire village and as a result of the high pressure it keeps breaking down due to poor standard parts and repair. This makes the villagers to use open wells which causes sickness for them. The community is made up of the Jola tribe who survive primarily by way of subsistence farming in groundnuts and palm oil farming.

We will replace the conversion head, install a new cylinder, 7 stainless steel pipes, a handwashing station, and a new concrete slab. The contractor will construct a new water trough for the village ruminants to drink from, which will help the community economically.

KAPPA VILLAGE (Coordinates: -16.100 13.184) Population: 450

Kappa is located about 4km south of the Trans-Gambia south bank road via Kampant. It is a Jola community of roughly 450 people. It is a subsistence farming community growing groundnut, millet and rice. This community is remote and most often forgotten. It has only one handpump which used to serve the entire community and it broke down overtime. For a long while now, the community is using open wells for drinking and other household activities. It also plays host for several refugees fleeing from Southern Senegalese region of Cassamance. The water crisis in this village is a huge one.

We will install a new cylinder, conversion head, 5 stainless steel pipes, pedestal, tank, concrete slab, and handwashing station. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from.

BUJIGA VILLAGE (Coordinates: -16.088, 13.206) Population: 600

Bujiga is located about 6 KM off the Trans-Gambia south Bank Road via Kampant. It is a Jola tribe community of roughly 600 people. It is a subsistence farming community, growing groundnut, millet and rice. The Village has been suffering from lack of water due to the large number of people within the community especially during the rainy season. The current water source is not enough to serve the entire village and as a result some people took to open wells for usage which has resulted in sickness especially among women and children. Due to the in flock of refugees fleeing from Southern Senegalese region of Cassamance which has been fighting for separation from Senegal for the past 35 years, the village is facing severe water shortage.

We will install a new cylinder, new conversion head, bearings and axle, and rod couplings. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants. We will also construct a handwashing station.

BAJONKOTO VILLAGE (GPS: -16.095, 13.230) Population: 350

This isolated and remote community is a subsistence farming community, growing groundnut and palm wine tapping. It is a Jola and Manjago tribe community. The community has only one water source which has not been functional for a long while and as a result severe water scarcity hits the village resulting to villagers travelling to long distant villages of Saringa and Kurudulai searching for water. Women and girls are currently facing the brunt of taking the long distance. Some accidents have been reported along the road, because they had to cross the busy Trans-Gambia South Bank highway with their buckets to get drinking water.

After dewatering and sanitizing the well, we will install a new cylinder, a new concrete slab, and new stainless-steel rod couplings, and a new conversion head. The contractor will construct a new trough for the village ruminants to drink from, as well as a handwashing station.

Foni Bintang Karanai District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 1—The Gambia

Foni Bintang Karanai District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 1—The Gambia

Foni Bintang Karanai District Handpump Repair Tour Phase 1—The Gambia

The Fonis are south of the river Gambia and part of The Gambia’s West Coast Region north of and bordering the Casamance region of Senegal. Many refugees live in the Fonis, following historical cross-border patterns of human mobility. The refugee community, variable in size but generally in the thousands, is long-standing and very largely “self-settled” with kin or other social connections.

For communities along the border and beyond, informal trade is normalized and quite visible. It is a livelihood and money-saving activity for many people. llegal timber exploitation in the Fonis has recently brought Casamance and The Gambia to international attention amid concerns over poorly-regulated global trade networks and the deteriorating planetary environment. If water were readily available to the people of the Fonis, they would be able to make a living by way of trade, husbandry, or subsistence farming. Residents of the Fonis would not be forced to turn to illegal or informal trade, nor deforestation of the Casamance region of Senegal.

Batendeng Kajara (Coordinates: -16.317, 13.257) Estimated Population: 350

We will replace the bearings and the cylinder, install 7 stainless pipes, a new chain, rod couplings, and construct a new concrete water trough and handwashing station.

Batabut Danelu (Coordinates: -16.153, 13.194) Estimated population: 300

We will replace the cylinder and install 2 stainless steel pipes. We will re-dig, de-water, and sanitize the well. We will then build a new concrete water trough and a COVID-19 prevention-related handwashing station.

Sitta (Coordinates: -16.161, 13.234) Estimated Population: 300 

We will re-dig, de-water, and sanitize the well; we will install 2 stainless steel pipes and construct a new concrete slab, a new concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

Jakoi Sibrick (Coordinates: -16.291, 13.268) Estimated population: 550

For the twin handpumps on the village’s well, we will replace the 2 cylinders and the 2 conversion heads, the rod couplings, the bearings and the axel. We will construct a new concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

Gilansary Village (Coordinates: -16.137, 13.167) Estimated population: 400 

We will replace the well’s cylinder and the conversion head. We will add extra ground concrete. We will rebuild the covering concrete slab, construct a new concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

Bulan’jorr (Coordinates: -16.250 13.278) Estimated population: 400 

We will replace the cylinder and the conversion head. We will add extra ground concrete around the well. We will construct a concrete water trough, plus a handwashing station.

Sitanouggo (Coordinates: -16.131, 13.184) Estimated Population: 600 

We will replace the well cylinder and install 4 stainless steel pipes. We will construct a new concrete water trough for watering ruminants, plus a handwashing station.

Buram (Coordinates: -16.224, 13.258) Estimated Population: 200

We will begin by dewatering and sanitizing the well. We will replace the 2 cylinders, as well as the bearings and axle, on the twin handpump. We will add extra ground concrete to the base, as well as construct a new trough for animals and a handwashing station.

NB: All these projects include cost for hand washing station in each community as part of Water Charity’s efforts in fighting Covid-19.