Water Charity’s Filters For Life Initiative – Worldwide Water Filter Distribution Program

Water Charity’s Filters For Life Initiative – Worldwide Water Filter Distribution Program

Water Charity’s Filters For Life Initiative – Worldwide Water Filter Distribution Program

Filters For Life Program - Worldwide

With new developments in filter technology, we can now provide needy communities with long-lasting, effective water filters that can provide up to 2000 gallons of water a day… for a reasonable price.

We are very excited about this program, which will include individual projects all over the world. The need for these filters is great, and there is almost no limit to the number of wonderful new filters we can distribute as the funds become available.

Trying the Filtered Water

Keep in mind:

  • 80% of all disease is water-borne
  • Lack of clean drinking water is the leading preventable cause of death worldwide
  • 443 million school days are lost each year due to water-related illness
  • 6.3 million children under the age of five died in 2013

As an addition to our current roster of successful programs in water and sanitation, which have included well drilling, rainwater catchment, toilet and handwashing station construction, emergency relief, reforestation efforts and more–including a good number of filter projects–as well as our acclaimed Appropriate Projects initiative, this new program will be an umbrella for our worldwide push to get these new filters into the hands of those people who desperately need them. It will include all relevant projects, large and small… thus enabling people to donate to the overall effort.

There is no need for these statistics to be true anymore. We have all the tools we need to completely eliminate this suffering and waste of life. The predominant victims of this terrible situation are young children. These kids deserve a chance.

The projects in this program will be upwardly scalable, and as such, the more money we can raise, the more filters we can give out. Instead of creating and packaging the individual filter delivery projects one by one and funding them separately, it makes sense to raise as much money as possible and keep the filters flowing. In this way, we can also get larger grants from foundations and concerned organizations. We fully expect that this program will grow into the largest thing we have done.

For those interested in the filter technology we are presently proposing, please feel free to go to the Sawyer website and peruse the relevant materials. We will be implementing primarily their Point One filter, but for hospitals, clinics and other sites we will also be making the Point Zero Two purifier available. [note: normally viruses are not a major issue for drinking water.]

This is an exciting program, and we hope you will see the need for it and join in. Water Charity is currently active in over 60 countries around the world. As the money comes in we will take the Filters for Life – Worldwide program into all of them and beyond.

If there are certain regions where you are especially interested in helping, it will be possible to donate specifically for those countries or areas. Just send us a message with your donation. However, we are hoping people will recognize that a general donation to the program itself will be the most effective way to get the maximum number of filters out in the shortest amount of time.

We are water… literally. The human body is about 70% water by mass, and a typical human cell is composed of 98.73% water molecules.

Individual FFL projects in their entirety can be found HERE, and are listed at the bottom of THIS page.  Please consider supporting this monumental effort.

Filters being deployed in Pakistan Flooding
Conclusion of Earthquake Relief & Water Filter Project – Nepal

Conclusion of Earthquake Relief & Water Filter Project – Nepal

Conclusion of Earthquake Relief & Water Filter Project – Nepal

This project has been completed under the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association, in association with our friends Wine To Water.

To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

 In response to the earthquakes that devastated Nepal in April and May 2015, Water Charity and Wine To Water have partnered to support the people affected by these events with clean water.  Sawyer filters and water holding buckets were procured to enable victims of the destruction to have access to clean water.
The need and urgency of this relief cannot be overstated. More than 3 million people in Nepal lack access to clean water and sanitation due to infrastructure and homes being completely destroyed throughout much of the country. So, in addition to dealing with the magnitude of the destruction of the earthquake, and the pending monsoon season in a couple of weeks which will make living conditions much worse for many, the lack of clean water will compound these problems with an increase in water-borne illnesses.
In an effort to make the highest impact possible, water filters were distributed to the following territories within Kathmandu Valley. Upon the original site assessment of each territory, a local community leader was chosen and trained on program management. This step has proven to be very helpful as these community leaders have ensured the proper care and use of the filter over the weeks following the distribution.
Wine To Water’s CEO, David Cuthbert, joined the ground team to do site visits and assessments on these locations and are pleased to report nearly 100% adoption of the use of the filters in the field. It is clear and extremely evident that they are greatly appreciated by the recipients and highly helpful during this difficult time.

Location 1: Kavreshtali, Ward 5 and Phutung District

In this rural area 3.5 KM north of Kathmandu, 110 filters were distributed thus far. Many more filters are needed to cover more of the population but over 2500 people are using the filters within these areas. The community leader, Nirmal Lama, is overseeing the maintenance and use of the filters by the population. In this area, 275 homes were totally or partially destroyed of the 490 that existed there.
Location 2: Sangla Club, Ward 3
In Sangla Club, 60 Sawyer filters were distributed for the benefit of 1,200 people who live here. The earthquake nearly leveled every home in this area as 240 were totally destroyed of the 268 that once covered the area. People are now living in tents or temporary shelters in this area. Community leader Saraswati Joshi is overseeing the local filter operation.
Location 3: Darmashtali
In Darmashtali, 35 filters have been set up in community hubs and are being used by 1,200 people. Springwater has been contaminated due to the earthquake’s destruction but is still accessible in the community. Filters are being used at these stations to clean water for drinking, bathing, and food preparation. Filter maintenance and management are being done by two young leaders, Ajit Shahi and Shyam Dongol.
Darmashtali, a village rich in Nepali heritage, culture, and community, has seen 90% of its homes destroyed and personal items totally lost. In many ways, they are starting over. As we visited the community on June 4th, 2015, it was evident that the entire community was coming together as best as possible to build temporary shelters in advance of the monsoon season in June. The town is made up of many tradespeople and skilled labor workers.
Although some progress has been made and the water situation has improved, food shortages were obviously still a very large issue. In visiting one of the houses this week, David witnessed a woman cleaning mud off of scattered rice that was buried under the rubble of what was once her home.
The partnership between Water Charity and Wine To Water has directly contributed to provide clean water for thousands of folks in desperate need throughout Nepal.

We would like to thank David Cuthbert and Kyle Lomax once again for their work on this much-needed project. 

This project falls under our ongoing Filters For Life Program – Worldwide.

While the work in Nepal has moved from disaster relief to development, there is still a tremendous need for clean water.  We will continue this successful project as long as we receive funds to pay for the installation of filters in areas that were hit by the earthquake.

   

   

   

Earthquake Relief & Water Filter Project – Nepal

Earthquake Relief & Water Filter Project – Nepal

Earthquake Relief & Water Filter Project – Nepal

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

After the devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake that hit Nepal, Water Charity immediately began to try and find ways to help.  Potable water is always a valuable and important commodity after a disaster, so we decided to jump in and send high quality, effective water filters to aid in the relief effort.  Using Sawyer filters, which comprise the backbone of our Filters For Life Program, we joined together with a few of our friends to send 1,000 filters to be installed in refugee camps, hospitals, community centers and schools around the hardest-hit areas.

Working together with our friends, fellow non-profit Wine2Water, installation of these filters began immediately in the days after the first earthquake and will provide clean drinking water for as many as a hundred thousand people.  We hope that with all the problems the Nepalese refugees have to deal with, that safe, clean drinking water will cease to be one of them.

The earthquake that hit on the 25th of April, and a second major tremor on May 12th, killed more than 8,600 people and brought down buildings in Kathmandu and the country’s central districts.  More than 8,000 people died in the disaster and many remain homeless. This disaster is said to affect over 8 million people in the region of Kathmandu.

This project falls under our ongoing Filters For Life Program – Worldwide, in which we are trying to make sure these high-quality Sawyer filters make their way into as many hands as humanly possible.  While not as flashy as drilling wells, water filters are probably the single most effective way to prevent death and unnecessary suffering due to unpotable drinking water (the leading cause of preventable death worldwide).

In disaster situations, having access to clean, potable drinking water is generally the first priority.  Long before the food runs out, thirsty people are forced to scavenge for a source of water, which will generally prove unhealthy and waterborne illnesses are known to run rampant in refugee camps where proper filtration, or at least some little bit of bleach, is not being used to clean the water.


Water Charity, in concert with the NPCA, paid for this project out of pocket and is asking donors to contribute to this effort by helping us recoup the funds we have already spent, enabling us to expand the relief effort.  All money raised in excess of the current cost of the project will go to further relief efforts in Nepal.

Fundraising Goal
$6,500

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

While the work in Nepal has moved from disaster relief to development, there is still a tremendous need for clean water.  We would like to continue this successful project and ramp up filter installations in the affected regions of Nepal.  Please consider donating to this effort to allow us to implement a Phase 2 and help even more people.


Water Charity is proud to be among the first groups to get tangible help on the ground in emergencies like this one, and the typhoon Haiyan earlier where we engaged in a similar series of projects to help survivors.

Ponyentanga Borehole Project – Ghana

Ponyentanga Borehole Project – Ghana

Ponyentanga Borehole Project – Ghana

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY & the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Ponyentanga, Wa West, Upper West Region, Ghana

Community Description
The community is a rural community in the Wa West district in the Upper West region of Ghana. The community is located on the main road from Kumasi heading to Wa, but still has a high poverty rate estimated at 85% by USAID. The major tribes in the community are the Dagaaba, Waale, and Birifor tribes, all speaking a dialect version of the language Dagaare spoken in the Upper West region of Ghana and some portions of Burkina Faso.

In the community, like most places in Ghana, fetching water is primarily an activity done by girls. Even more so, the girls tend to be of school age, who spend most of their time fetching water, preparing food, and cleaning, rather than doing their homework.

The people in the community are mostly subsistence farmers. Their main crops are maize, millet, and yams. All of these are used to prepare local food, but a large portion of millet is used to prepare a drink called a pito. This is a semi-alcoholic drink is prepared by almost every woman in every house in the community. They use this drink to give an offering at church services and to sell in the market.

Problem Addressed
At the moment, many of the students and neighboring community members are forced to fetch water at a nearby dam, as the borehole closest to the school is almost two kilometers away. Students choose to stay at home instead of coming to school due to a lack of water at the school. This results in attendance at school being incredibly low and little engagement outside of school.

Many students chose to go home during class hours in order to drink water and decide not to return to school afterward. The girls selected to fetch water to the school stay at home rather than suffer carrying water from the borehole all the way to school. As the community members are fetching water at the dam for drinking and preparing food, there is a high rate of bacterial infections and diarrhea, as the dam is also used by the cattle for drinking.

Project Description
This project is to build a borehole in the community.

A geophysical survey will be conducted (using a terrameter for the 4-point Wenner test) arranged for by the WATSAN committee. This way, once they are able to select a location, the probability of hitting freshwater will be very high.

Once a location has been chosen, the WATSAN committee will mobilize the school and neighboring community members to collect stones and sand used for the mixing of concrete for construction. The committee will then contact the drilling engineer (that they arranged through the Community Water and Sanitation Agency office in Wa) to come and start drilling the borehole. The drilling engineer will mobilize the drilling rig at the worksite and drill through both overburdened and other types of rock (at an estimated 80 meters).

In addition to paying for labor, Water Charity funds will be used to purchase PVC pipes to lower into the drilled hole. The drilling engineer will then do a discharge test, 90% recovery test, and a physio-chemical and bacteriological analysis of the water to ensure that the water is clean.

When this is finished, the WATSAN committee and the drilling engineer will work together with community members to create the pump pad and install the already purchased Afridev hand pump.

Project Impact
The project will give 500 people access to clean water. This includes students and teachers at the school campus and surrounding family members who live close to the school.

The WATSAN committee will benefit from the project by increasing their capacity to plan and make new boreholes and learn more about maintenance for the existing ones in the community.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Sean Sinclair

Monitoring and Maintenance
The WATSAN committee will receive training from the Community and Water Agency in Wa and monitoring and maintaining borehole. Currently, only one member has expertise in repairing boreholes. In the next coming weeks, the WATSAN committee will have a workshop where that one member will share his knowledge on maintaining boreholes with the other members. Then, when the project is completed the committee will be able to maintain and monitor the borehole.

The community plans on charging ten pesewas per basin of water to collect funds for future maintenance and repairs.

Comments
While this project has not been undertaken as an official Peace Corps Let Girls Learn project, it accomplishes the same objective of creating conditions that will enable girls to go to and remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$2,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$2,900

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 – This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  

Additional donations will be allocated to other projects in Ghana.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

Conclusion of Ponyentanga Borehole Project – Ghana

Conclusion of Ponyentanga Borehole Project – Ghana

Conclusion of Ponyentanga Borehole Project – Ghana

This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Sean Sinclair. The project was designed to build a borehole in the community. The project was somewhat delayed because Sean had to leave the community, but it was finally finished with the help of another PCV.

To read about the start of the project, CLICK HERE.

A summary of Sean’s report is as follows:

Problem Addressed
The community is a rural community in the Wa West district in the Upper West region of Ghana. The community is located on the main road from Kumasi heading to Wa, but still has a high poverty rate estimated at 85% by USAID. The major tribes in the community are the Dagaaba, Waale, and Birifor tribes, all speaking a dialect version of the language Dagaare spoken in the Upper West region of Ghana and some portions of Burkina Faso. In the community, like most places in Ghana, fetching water is primarily an activity done by school-aged girls. This puts a huge pressure on them, as most of their time is spent fetching water, preparing food, and cleaning rather than doing their homework.

Many of the students and neighboring community members were forced to fetch water at a nearby dam, as the borehole closest to the school is almost two kilometers away. Students chose to stay at home instead of coming to school due to a lack of water at the school. This resulted in attendance at school being incredibly low, and little engagement outside of school. The use of the water from the dam for drinking and preparing food was leading to a high rate of bacterial infections and diarrhea, as the dam is also used by the cattle for drinking.

The project was intended to help improve attendance at the school and reduce bacterial infections in community members by constructing a new bore hole at the school for both school and community use.

How the Work Progressed
The project started with the reformation of the WATSAN committee to maintain and monitor the projected borehole and current boreholes in the community. The president of the WATSAN committee was educated on borehole repairs after attending a conference and came back to the committee to pass on the knowledge to the other members.

After the WATSAN committee was prepared, they contacted the regional water and sanitation board to get a contractor to come and perform a geophysical survey (done using a terrameter for the 4-point Wenner test). The WATSAN committee met with the chiefs, school members, and stake holders to identify a location. The WATSAN committee mobilized the school and community members to collect stones and sand used for the mixing of concrete.

After this was finished, the committee contacted the Community Water and Sanitation Agency office for a drilling engineer to come and drill the bore hole. They came to mobilize the drilling rig at the work site and dig through the various types of rock to a depth of 82 meters. PVC pipes were then put in the hole that was constructed.

The drilling engineer then performed a discharge test, 90% recovery test, and a physio-chemical and bacteriological analysis of the water to ensure that the water was clean. Once the water results came back with perfect marks, the WATSAN committee and the drilling engineer worked together with community members to create the pump pad and install the already-purchased Afridev hand pump.

When the borehole was finally finished, the community gathered to celebrate an opening ceremony for the new bore hole. The president of the committee used this opportunity to educate community members about the importance of water and the need to eliminate open defecation.

End Result
The project gave five hundred people access to clean water. This includes students and teachers at the school campus, and surrounding family members who live close to the school.

The WATSAN committee is now empowered to plan and make new bore holes in the community, and by meeting with the drilling contractors they learned more about maintenance for all bore holes in the community.

The community is also prepared to maintain and repair the borehole with a small amount collected from each person who uses the facility.

One community member educated the community on the importance of clean water during the opening ceremony and used that opportunity to educate the community about open defecation, as one common defecation location in the village was close to a bore hole.

Comments from the Community
From the counterpart of the community and form 3 students:

“The people of Ponyentanga are short of words to express their profound gratitude to you and Peace Corps as a whole.”

“This bore hole will save the students from fetching and carrying water all the way from the community to the school along the dangerous street.”

“The sanitation will be improved because the toilets and the urinals will always be scrubbed. Also, washing hands before and after eating will be enhanced. The nearby houses around the school will also benefit from the borehole. Trees planting will now be easy.”

“Meanwhile, the community members assure you that, in case there is a break down, they will contribute to maintain the borehole so that its purpose will fully be realized. On the other hand, the head teacher and his staff pledged to take good care of the borehole to keep it long.”

“I cease this opportunity to thank you very much for the tremendous effort to the realization of this wonderful project which the community and the school have yearned for a very long period of time. The community wishes you well.”

“Now, we can focus on learning.”

We are grateful to Sean for completing this important project.

    

Conclusion of Ponyentanga Borehole Project - GhanaConclusion of Ponyentanga Borehole Project - Ghana

Filters for Life Program – Worldwide

Filters for Life Program – Worldwide

Filters for Life Program – Worldwide

The Filters For Life Program is Water Charity’s flagship, worldwide endeavor to provide much-needed water filters for people around the world. With developments in filter technology over the last five years or so, we can now provide needy communities with long-lasting, effective water filters that can provide as much as 650 gallons of water a day each.  These carbon nanotube filters are guaranteed to last for 1,000,000 gallons (and often last far longer with a modicum of maintenance)… and this technology allows for this at a very reasonable price.

The hollow membrane style (dialysis) filters offer a substantial improvement over the older bio sand, ceramic, and activated charcoal filters we had been using.

They are small, light, and easily transported. Whereas, bio-sand filters are large and heavy.  The making of the various grades of sand and the transportation of this heavy material accounted for a huge portion of the cost of a bio-sand installation.

The Sawyer filters we use are very durable and difficult to break… whereas the ceramic filters we had favored previously are notoriously prone to cracking and thus eliminating their ability to protect people from pathogens.  They also had far slower flow rates, and could, therefore, serve fewer people per installation.

We are very excited about this program, which will include individual projects all over the world. The need for these filters is great, and there is almost no limit to the number of filters we can distribute as the funds become available.


Keep in mind:

  • 80% of all disease is water-borne
  • 50% of all hospital beds worldwide are occupied by someone suffering from a water-related illness
  • Lack of clean drinking water kills more people globally than all forms of violence combined… including war.

There is no need for these statistics to be true anymore. We have all the tools we need to completely eliminate this suffering and waste of life. The predominant victims of this terrible situation are young children. Simple diarrhea is a leading killer of children under 5.  When it is so simple to prevent waterborne illness, there is no excuse for this. These kids deserve a chance.

As an addition to our current roster of successful programs in water and sanitation, which have included well drilling, rainwater catchment, toilet, and hand-washing station construction, emergency relief, reforestation efforts, and more–including a good number of filter projects–as well as our acclaimed Appropriate Projects initiative, this new program will be an umbrella for our worldwide push to get filters into the hands of those people who desperately need them. It includes most of the relevant projects, large and small… thus enabling people to donate to the overall effort.

For various reasons, some filter projects are tied into other initiatives or programs… generally where the filter installations are just a part of a larger effort.  Many rainwater catchment projects, for instance, have a filter component, but is that only a few filters are involved, and the larger part of the project are the gutters, the tanks, and the distribution system… such projects don’t technically fall under this program.

The projects in this program, are larger distributions and are upwardly scalable. As such, the more money we can raise, the more filters we can give out. Instead of creating and packaging the individual filter delivery projects one by one and funding them separately, it makes sense to raise as much money as possible and keep the filters flowing. In this way, we can also get larger grants from foundations and concerned organizations. We have hope that, in time, this program can grow into one of the largest things we have done.

For those interested in the filter technology we are presently using, please feel free to go to the Sawyer International website and peruse the relevant materials. We use primarily their Point One filter, but for hospitals, clinics, and other sites we will also be making the Point Zero Two purifier available.  Both filters are engineered to have no holes large enough for even the smallest microbes to pass through. Point One = .1 micron engineering and Point Zero Two = .02 microns [note: The Point One is more than capable of handling the amoebas, cysts, bacteria, and protozoa that normally render water un-potable.]

This is an exciting program, and we hope you will see the need for it and join in. Water Charity is currently active in over 65 countries around the world. As the money comes in we will take the Filters For Life program into all of them and beyond.

If there are certain regions where you are especially interested in helping, it will be possible to donate specifically to those countries or areas. Just send us a message with your donation. However, we are hoping people will recognize that a general donation to the program itself will be the most effective way to get the maximum number of filters out in the shortest amount of time.

We are water… literally. The human body is about 70% water by mass, and a typical human cell is composed of 98.73% water molecules. Think about it.

CLICK HERE to see all the projects or the links for the various individual projects in this program at the bottom of the page.