Positive H2O

Kunahandhoo Island Rainwater Harvesting Project – Maldives

Kunahandhoo Island Rainwater Harvesting Project – Maldives

This is the first project to be implemented under the Rainwater Harvesting Program – Maldives.

Within the community of Kunahandhoo, 4 currently unconnected rainwater tanks, received as a part of a governmental aid program, are sitting unused because the community lacks the resources to develop them into a working system to help meet the freshwater needs of the island.

The four tanks consist of one of 10,000-liter capacity, one of 5,000-liter capacity and two of 2,500-liter capacity. Under the project, the four tanks will be connected to comprise a workable system using the appropriate piping and fixtures.

An optimal site, located between the community harbor and the island’s residential area, has been allocated. A concrete platform will be built and the tanks will be secured. A catchment area will be built over the tanks to house and shade them. Finally, gutters and piping will be installed to capture the rainwater and direct it by gravity into the tanks for storage.

The planning has been completed, and work is underway to purchase the materials and contract the labor for installation. We will keep you updated as the project progresses.

This project has been fully funded by the SLOW LIFE Foundation and Positive H2O. If you wish to contribute to the expansion of the Rainwater Harvesting Program – Maldives to other islands, please click on the Donate button below.

Kunahandhoo Island Rainwater Harvesting Project – MaldivesKunahandhoo Island Rainwater Harvesting Project – Maldives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rainwater Harvesting Program - Maldives

Rainwater Harvesting Program - Maldives

This program is to address the issue of freshwater scarcity in The Republic of Maldives (Maldives). This will be achieved through the targeted provision of new, and the restoration of pre-existing, rainwater capture and storage systems in selected public locations within communities of Maldives.

Rainwater Harvesting Program - Maldives

The program will start with projects in four inhabited island communities, namely Kunahandhoo, Hithadhoo, Maamendhoo and Gaadhoo, in the remote Laamu Atoll, aka Hahdhunmathi Atoll.

The program is being implemented under the direction of Abram Le Cerf, Social and Environment Manager at Six Senses, Laamu. It is made possible through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust, an environmentally and socially conscious resort ownership and management company, and Positive H2O (+H2O), a company of dedicated professional windsurfers who have a passionate interest in the oceans and the environment.

Maldives, being an atoll nation consisting of one percent land and 99 percent ocean, is a country with very little in terms of freshwater resources. Consequently, accessing sanitary and sustainable fresh drinking water is a major challenge faced by the inhabitants of the rural communities of Maldives.

The islands of Kunahandhoo, Hithadhoo, Maamendhoo and Gaadhoo are inhabited by total populations of 783, 1040, 1186 and 417 individuals, respectively. Consequently, the total number of direct beneficiaries of the first phase of this project is 3,426 persons.

Traditionally, for all of their freshwater requirements, including for drinking water, these four communities have been dependent upon shallow fresh groundwater aquifers, aka freshwater lenses, which exist beneath all islands in Maldives, accessed via wells. These freshwater lenses accumulate through rainfall infiltration into the sandy soils of the islands and this freshwater, being less dense than saltwater, subsequently floats on top of the saline groundwater which infiltrates the islands’ soils from the surrounding sea.

Rainwater Harvesting Program - Maldives

 

However, in the face of growing populations the capacity of the freshwater lenses to meet the needs of the populations of Kunahandhoo, Hithadhoo, Maamendhoo and Gaadhoo has become limited through things such as saltwater intrusion due to soil erosion, over-exploitation of the freshwater lenses and monsoonal rainfall changes.

Similarly, degradation of wells and pollution of the freshwater lenses due to inadequate sewage management, industrial effluent infiltration, and inappropriate agricultural practices, all place pressure on local freshwater resources.

To confound matters, as a country which is situated entirely within the tropics, Maldives’ climate is characterized by two distinct annual monsoons, with vastly different rainfall patterns, the southwest monsoon and the northeast monsoon. Accordingly, although during the southwest monsoon, spanning from May to October, rainfall is at its highest, during the northeast monsoon, extending from November to April, dry and hot conditions prevail. Consequently, during the northeast monsoon the communities of Kunahandhoo, Hithadhoo, Maamendhoo and Gaadhoo experience significant water shortages.

Due to the scarcity of available groundwater and surface water within these communities, and the high economic and environmental cost of desalinating seawater, rainwater capture and storage is a key strategy for securing freshwater to support their populations. Indeed, throughout Maldives, in line with relative public policy, multiple public and voluntary sector programs have previously been carried out to distribute and establish rainwater capture and storage tanks in all of the nation’s 200 inhabited islands. However, freshwater shortages still remain.

Rainwater Harvesting Program - Maldives

In recent years, during the northeast monsoon within all four communities it is reported that public and residential rainwater tanks frequently run dry, forcing the expensive importation of desalinated water by barge from Male’.

Although rainwater storage tanks have been distributed in many instances by governmental agencies, in many cases, these tanks have remained unconnected due to a lack of essential components, such as catchments and connective materials, including gutters, pipes, overflows, filters, valves and taps. Consequently, large numbers of rainwater tanks sit idle.

Within Hithadhoo, Maamendhoo and Gaadhoo public rainwater tank systems which have been previously established have become degraded and damaged and are either completely dysfunctional or are functioning at only partial capacity, further confounding water shortage problems during the northeast monsoon.

The first phase of this program is being initiated with the Kunahandhoo Island Rainwater Harvesting Project – Maldives, and will proceed to the other three islands. Upon proven success, it will be expanded to additional islands, in an effort to have widespread impact on the water supply problems facing Maldives.

The projects on the first four islands of the program have been fully funded by the SLOW LIFE Foundation and Positive H2O. If you wish to contribute to the expansion of the Rainwater Harvesting Program – Maldives to other islands, please click on the Donate button below.

 

 

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Javavandh Rainwater Harvesting Project and Mansangh Vandh Well Project – India

Javavandh Rainwater Harvesting Project and Mansangh Vandh Well Project – India

This project is to build two rainwater harvesting systems in Javavandh and a well in Mansangh vandh (hamlet) of Rapar Taluka, Gujarat, India.

The project consists of two parts. The first is the construction a rainwater harvesting system to serve a village, including an underground tank, and another for a school. The second is the construction of a percolated dug well in the stream of a river that will generate water throughout the year.

The combined projects will directly benefit 105 families, or 500 people.

The project will be carried out in partnership with Samerth Charitable Trust, an Indian non-profit development organization that works towards accelerating a humane, sustainable, and equitable society. Samerth has focused on improving the conditions of marginalized communities since 1992. Samerth has been working in Kutch for the past 11 years, with interventions in drinking water, community health, migrant children’s education, and promoting livelihood.

Javavandh Rainwater Harvesting Project and Mansangh Vandh Well Project – India

Kutch, which comprises 23 % area of the state, receives only 13% of the annual rainfall. Therefore, the area has been designated a “Water Scarce Region.”

The project fits in with an overall plan to ensure that there is sufficient water availability, safe sanitation, and effective hygiene practices. It is aimed specifically to impact on the high rate of child mortality existing in the region.

Javavandh Rainwater Harvesting Systems
Community System
Javavandh is a hamlet on the edge of the Small Runn (desert) of Kutch, situated five kilometers inside of the main village called Palasava, in Rapar block. It is one of the last habitats near the desert and fifteen families (total 90 members including men, women and children) are living there.

Samerth has supported this vandh by providing two earthen check dams in the past, but due to bad monsoon seasons on many occasions in the last few years, the people are facing acute water shortages for drinking purposes. There is no supply of water through the pipeline in this area, and therefore the people have to rely on the water available at the dams. When this is not available, the women must go 4 to 5 kilometers to get water for drinking and cooking.

Samerth has identified this vandh for the construction of rainwater harvesting systems. The capacity of the underground tank will be approximately 10,000 liters. This facility will provide safe drinking water to the people of Javavandh, when it is most needed, for a period of 40 to 60 days, depending on the amount of rainfall each year.

Most of the times the people will take water from the earthen check dams for their daily use and they will utilize the underground water in an emergency only. This is like a safe deposit for them and they will utilize this water when the water in the dams has become less, and during the night, when its use will serve to benefit women and young girls.

School System
The village school in Javavandh has 45 children from surrounding areas are enrolled. There is no drinking water available to the children, and they have to take water to school with them each day.

One roof water harvesting system will be built on the school campus to provide the children with drinking water while they are at school.

The system will consist of gutters around the roof of the school, a storage tank, and piping.

Mansangh Percolated Dug Well

A hand-dug well will be built in Mansangh vandh, a remote area where water facilities are not available.

Javavandh Rainwater Harvesting Project and Mansangh Vandh Well Project – India

Samerth has experience in this construction technology, having built 80 dug wells in the Rapar block to date.

The well will be built on the farm of Mr. Gelabhai Ganeshbhai Koli in Mansang vandh, 3 kilometers inside of the main village. The family of nine has been living in this field for the last four years without a direct water source.

The dug well support will solve the problem of drinking water for the entire village of 105 families, or 500 people. At the same time it will provide a reserve of water for irrigation purposes in case of emergency.

Conclusion

The project has been designed to provide for the water needs of a vulnerable population. Through the development of water management committees, the judicious use of water will be ensured and the structures will be maintained. As part of a larger community development program, it will serve the people of the area for many years to come.

This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the SLOW LIFE Foundation as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative in collaboration with Positive H2O (+H2O).

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Antanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba Well Project - Madagascar

Antanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba Well Project - Madagascar

This project is to build three wells in different communities in northern Madgascar. The project will be carried out under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Rowan Braybrook.

The project will benefit three towns in the commune of Anjangoveratra, district of Sambava: Antanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba, with a total population of 3,419, and no wells.

Residents have to get their water from rivers, streams, and even rice paddies, which are polluted by cow and human waste. Several deaths in the towns in the past year have been attributed to water contamination.

The towns are located next to a new 7,200 hectare forest reserve (Makirovana, or “Save the Lemurs”) that contains endangered flora and fauna, giving additional importance to reducing water pollution, forest incursions, and riverbank erosion.

Almost all residents are subsistence farmers and have little disposable income to financially support a well project on their own. However, well use in nearby towns is high, and ARES, an experienced local organization that has organized teams to build over 50 wells in the last 2 years, has agreed to oversee well construction.

The community will transport materials the long distance from the main road, house and feed construction workers, provide basic building materials that can be found locally, and contribute a number of work hours to the project.

The Mayor's Office has signed a guarantee stating that the communities will be responsible for providing at least 25% of the material and labor needed. The contract includes a pledge that the wells will be accessible to all, and will be maintained by the townspeople after they are built.

Villagers see the new wells as recognition for their part in forming the forest reserve. Visits by health workers before and after construction will ensure well use and educate residents about the importance of clean water.

Rowan previously successfully completed the Ambodisambalahy and Anjangoveratra Well Improvement Project – Madagascar.

 

To indicate your desire for your contribution to be allocated toward this project, please click the Donate button above.

$0.00 - The Water Charity participation in this project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative in collaboration with Positive H2O (+H2O).

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Rowan Braybrook of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund projects of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Antanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba Well Project - MadagascarAntanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba Well Project - Madagascar
Antanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba Well Project - MadagascarAntanandava, Anamboafo, and Marolamba Well Project - Madagascar

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Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar

Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar

Under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Felicia Tobias, this project is to build 4 wells in the Amboromana district of Vohemar, Madagascar.

There are currently 360 families living in the area, with population of 1,836 people.

Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar

There is only one public tap serving all the families and it often runs dry. People have to fetch water from a very distant dirty river, or do without.

The residents are very poor and have little to no disposable income to support a well project on their own.

Oversight of the well construction will be undertaken by ARES, a local NGO. Sister Rosalie, a Malagasy local, will be spearheading the construction of the project ensuring that fair and honest prices and wages are paid.

Project funds will be used for materials, including cement, rebar, and well covers, and also for transport of materials and labor.

The community will provide some of the basic materials that can be gathered locally, including gravel, sand, and rocks, and also some of the unskilled labor. This will amount to about 25% of the total cost.

Amboromana Well Project - Madagascar

After construction, the well will be maintained by the community.

Visits by health workers will educate the population about clean drinking water and ensure proper use of the wells.

The project will result in safe clean drinking water within a reasonable distance for the 1,836 inhabitants of the community.

The Water Charity participation in this project has been funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative and Positive H2O (+H2O).

Any additional donations using the Donate button below will be used to fund other projects by this PCV and/or those of other PCVs in the host country.


This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Maui North Shore Beach Cleanup - USA

Positive H2O We are extremely pleased to announce a new partnership between Water Charity and Positive H2O (+H2O). To kick off the collaborative relationship, on October 24, 2010, Positive H2O will host a Coastal Cleanup on Maui’s North Shore as a part of Community Work Day’s island-wide “Get the Drift and Bag It” campaign.

In addition, clean up participants, as well as the community, will attend an evening Fundraiser, with proceeds going towards the +H2O Water Charities Fund, contributing to future +H20 clean water projects.

Pascal Bronnimann - Positive H2O Positive H2O is a team of four professional windsurfers, international athletes and watermen, bound together by a passion for their profession, love of the water and desire to make a difference in the world.

Positive H2O has committed to putting on events, sponsoring and implementing projects, and raising funds to assist Water Charity in our worldwide effort to provide water and sanitation to those in need.

To date, Water Charity has initiated over 300 projects in over 60 countries. This collaboration will allow us to continue to impact upon death and illness resulting from waterborne diseases and to provide access to safe water for everyone in the world.

Positive H2O has already begun to raise money for Water Charity through a campaign to encourage donors to Donate on the Water Charity website.

The work of Positive H2O and their relationship with Water Charity is further described in a new article that appears in Windsurfer International magazine.

 

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion of this project, CLICK HERE.

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