WASH Tour

NTC Well Rehab - South Sudan

NTC Youth

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps NPC & WC LogosAssociation, working with Water is Basic.

This is Project 7 of Phase 2 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program. Phase 1 of the program began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These Phase 2 projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.The Village

Location
NTC, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan    

Community Description
NTC is largely comprised of military personal, and civilians who depend on farming, hunting, and animal rearing. Five miles away from the main city, Yei Town, NTC stands strong and united despite its diversity. The 300 household region had originally formed a committee to manage and maintain the borehole. However, the committee struggled and couldn’t endure.

Problem Addressed
Mary Gamba is a mother of seven with her youngest only 6 weeks old. Having a new born, on top of her already demanding family, has made gathering water an extremely complicated task since the borehole broke (over six months ago).  SMarry Gambaince the well broke, Mary has had to wake up at four in the morning to fetch water from the next available well, a 3 mile round trip, to avoid the overuse of the shallow well in the mornings. However, if she arrives too late, she has to gather water that has been stirred up with the excess particles at the bottom. 


Sebit Malish, a member of the disseminated committee, had tried to collect the monthly household fees for the borehole when the committee was still in session. The village has one of the lowest fees in the region for borehole use, only 2ssp.  Many of the military personal are responsible for the loss in payment, refusing to pay Sebit some days. Other days, the soldiers forced his family to use the shallow well multiple miles away to keep the clean borehole water to themselves. Focused on what’s best for the community, Sebit knows they may need to gather more money from the families every month to keep the borehole open and consistently maintained. 


Betty MeniallaBetty Menialla is another female resident, in NTC.  She is responsible for many of the domestic care activities in her family. At 17, it is becoming too difficult for Betty to find the time to finish her schoolwork every day as she becomes increasingly needed by her family, as her parents age.  She talks about her time in primary school when she was able to keep up with her studies and the education that the boys in her community were earning.  As Betty grew up and graduated to secondary school, the boys continued their education while Betty was required to spend more and more time helping with her family.  Among many other tasks, gathering water has become her sole responsibility.  With the borehole broken, fetching water has taken over the majority of Betty’s time while her studies have fallen behind.

Project Description
This project is to rehabilitate the well. It is being implemented in collaboration with Water is Basic, a locally owned and operated water drilling company. Over the last 8 years Water is Basic has been a reliable company in South Sudan, drilling and rehabilitating boreholes.

BoreholeFirst, the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. We believe that the problem is a pipe that is rusted through, but sometimes it is hard to be sure before taking the pump apart. The project will restore the GI pipes and the head of the borehole to reliable and working order. 

Problem Impact
This project will impact 300 people.

Volunteer Directing Project
Steve Roese.  Steve has been involved in South Sudan since 2004.  

Monitoring & MaintenanceThe Borehole
Water Is Basic educates and empowers the community by helping them learn the importance of diverse and equal organization. The water committee becomes a reconciliation tool as mixed genders, tribes and religions work together to manage the community well. By aiding the village in developing a committee, and managing and maintaining their well, the village is able to collect and save money to dedicate to future repairs.

Comments
Funds to repair the borehole and educate the local community provides empowerment for many who have felt defeated by local military personnel. Supplying the community with a repaired borehole and the education to implement solutions if problems arise, ensures that there is enough savings and knowledge to repair the borehole during potential future breakdowns.

While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it is in keeping with the goals and objectives of that program, and, as such, falls under Water Charity's own Let Girls Learn + heading.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  If you wish to see more great projects like this one, please contribute to our South Sudan Well Rehab Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

 

Children of the VillageMalishShallow wellFields

 

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Bor Dinka Congregation Well Renewal - South Sudan

Working on the Well

NPCA & WC LOGOThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association, in coordination with Water is Basic.

This project is Project 4 of Phase 2 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program. The program's Phase 1 began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These new projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. The CommunityWe continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.

Location
Yei Town, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan 

Community Description
The Dinka congregation is inside Yei Town, with a robust and passionate congregation of 2,500 members. After South Sudan declared itself the newest nation in the world, the refugees who had fled into Uganda and the Congo returned, many stopping and staying in Yei rather than travelling farther back to their war-destroyed territories. Because of this, over half of the community is a diverse group of citizens with few original residents scattered amongst them. Many of the men are soldiers for the SPLA (Sudan People's Liberation Army), the army of the Republic of South Sudan, which was founded as a guerrilla movement in 1983 and was a key participant of the Second Sudanese Civil War.

The rest of the community makes their livelihood from small businesses, selling anything they can scavenge, make, or grow. Since the population’s dramatic population increase, the density has forced many to live exceptionally close, making it difficult for sanitation to stay a top priority. Church YouthThis, atop of the lack of clean water, has had significant effects on the mortality rate of local children.

Problem Addressed
The borehole was originally drilled next to the Dinka Congregation site to help hydrate the construction workers during the Church’s construction.  However, with such a large population using the clean water as well, the borehole ended up breaking 18 months ago, leaving the community in dire need again, and forcing the construction crews to halt work on the new church. 

The Church is being paid for solely with tithes that the congregation has slowly been saving, over the past years. Along with lack of clean water, the current devaluation of the South Sudanese pound has also become a factor in the building process.

Being in the center of town has its advantages, but it also has its disadvantages, such as long distances to the edge of town and beyond to the next available water source, although not even a clean one. Church youthEven with boreholes half a mile away, the waits are extraordinary, some days over three hours long. The women of this community spend many hours a day just waiting in line, plus they have to pay an extra 5SSP a month (compared to those living closer to the boreholes), making it more difficult to afford the water while attempting to raise funds to fix their local borehole. 

Single mothers struggle most in this situation, forced to bring all their children with them just to fetch water, keeping these children from school or keeping themselves from the further necessary house work or farming to provide for their family’s food and education. With added prices onto the water that already takes more of their time to gather, many mothers find themselves forced to make a choice between their child’s health or education, and hydration or solid sustenance. 

Project Description
This project will be in collaboration with Water is Basic, a locally owned and operated water drilling company tied to a U.S. based ministry.

Church youthFirst the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. The problem may be rusted pipes, but sometimes it’s hard to be sure before taking the pump apart. Once the problem is zeroed in on, the crew will go to work replacing the parts needed.

Once the pipes are replaced and back in place, the pump head will be attached and checked. If everything is working properly the last step is to check the water flow rate to make sure the borehole has been drilled deep enough and the pressure is high enough. 

Project Impact
This project will benefit 2,500 people in the community.

Project Manager
Steve Roese is President of Water is Basic U.S., an entrepreneur and pastor, Steve has been involved in South Sudan since 2004 where he has fought alongside his brothers and sisters for peace and opportunity. Rehabbing the wellHis motto is “whatever it takes” and he means it when it comes to building the new nation of the Republic of South Sudan.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The church leaders and surrounding communities will be involved in every step of this project. It is a long-held belief that development without community engagement is not sustainable. It is the hope of many that the community will sustain their borehole for the well’s longevity with this dedicated and passionate support.

Comments
Water Is Basic operates an internship program where local, promising secondary school graduates manage the projects for one year. Two recent graduates from Nehemiah Gateway University, in Albania, oversaw interns and the projects the interns were directing. In exchange for their work, the interns are given access to distance learning courses and are then assisted in applying for, and attending, their university of choice.

While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it is in keeping with the goals and objectives of that program, and, as such, falls under Water Charity's own Let Girls Learn + heading.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  If you wish to see more great projects like this one, please contribute to our South Sudan Well Rehab Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

 

 

Finished Well with fencing

Laying pipesChurch congregatesFixing the Well

Workers rehabbing the well

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Illimoko Well Rehab - South Sudan

Celani Opanni at the shallow, dirty well

NPCA & WC LOGOThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity, Water is Basic & the National Peace Corps Association.

This project is part of Phase 2 in our ongoing South Sudan Well Rehab Program. The program's Phase 1 began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These new projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.

Location
Illimoko Village, Yei River Region, South Sudan
The Community
Community Description

Illimoko is a small village, a conglomeration of 48 households and approximately 250 residents and counting. With an uneasy economy struggling from increased irregularity created by South Sudan’s current civil war, the amount of residents in Illimoko fluctuate daily as many families are forced to move around in search of work. The main source of Illimoko’s income is made from small-scale farming, supported by the temporary workers that wander in and out of the community.  

The village is right off the main road, on the way from Yei Town headed towards Koboko. Since the borehole was drilled in 2013, the neighboring church has been responsible for monitoring the water usage. 

The recent outbreak between government forces has increased the distress on local communities, such as Illimoko. Being a part of Yei River County is an extensive concern for locals. A central and exponentially diverse community of South Sudan, this major hub is a central location for trade from Uganda and Congo. The basic availability of clean water provides a much-needed relief to the stress and struggle this village has been through. 

The VillageProblem Addressed
While Illimoko is home to one of Water is Basic’s drilling specialists, the additional management of water usage and maintenance has not kept one of the borehole’s pipes from rusting out and requiring repair.

Having a drilling specialist live locally has benefited the community well, as he has provided attentive care and vital education on maintenance, to others within the community. This has helped empower the community, making them feel that they are able to provide sustainable solutions to their problems. 

Since its drilling, the residents have been diligent in collecting monthly funds for a healthy savings.  Most families provide a monthly 5SSP (approximately 25 cents) to the borehole’s committee, to ensure a healthy savings. A month before the pipe rusted out, the pastor of the church ran away with the community’s savings. Beyond losing their ability to provide clean water for their families, the community is struggling with the betrayal of someone whom they thought was a well-trusted individual. Celina Oppana

Celina Opanni is one of the many individuals whom is suffering from this physical and emotional loss. The 38-year-old is, practically, a single mother to six children as her husband is forced to work hours away in the Argo forest, the only steady and guaranteed work, for the government, around. This has left Celina lonely and distraught as she not only cares for her children on her own, but maintains the family’s farm. Time is of the essence, as anyone with one or two children knows. But with six kids and an entire farm to operate, it is nearly impossible for Celina to add an extra three hours to her daily routine to commute back and forth to the closest shallow well. Even then, water is not guaranteed during the dry season as many families from surrounding areas rely on this shallow well, typically drying out what little is available. Celina says she often buys water from the GIZ Company so her kids can have clean water to drink. But with the water costing 2 SSP per jerry can (half of what the monthly fee for full-time use of the borehole, before it broke), there is too much of a financial strain on her family for water from the GIZ Company to act as a long-term, sustainable solution.

Youth at the shallow wellProject Description
This project is to restore the well to full service.  In collaboration with Water is Basic, a locally owned and operated water drilling company, the project should only take 1-2 days to complete.

First, the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. The crew will go on to replace the parts needed. and the pump head will be re-attached and checked. If everything is working properly, the last step is to check the water flow rate to ensure the borehole is deep enough and the pressure is appropriate for the community’s needs. 

The next, major part of this project will be to help the community and committee make the necessary organizational and operational changes are made to prevent another mishap, like the one with the pastor.  These changes will include involving many people from the community into the committee to spread the feeling of empowerment. The treasury position will be separated between two committee members to ensure a check and balance system is set in place.

Project ImpactThe Well
This project will benefit more than 250 residents.

Project Manager
Steve Roese,President of Water is Basic U.S.will oversee the project

Monitoring and Maintenance
Once Water is Basic is finished repairing the borehole, the non-profit will oversee the expansion and increased education of the committee, currently run by the church. There will be two treasurers, one member of the community and one member of the church, who will be responsible for keeping track of the fees earned to ensure the savings stay safe. The other members will be responsible for teaching proper WASH techniques and making sure that people are using these techniques around the well.  

The well repair will give the community of Illimoko clean and healthy water, again. For a child, water is everything.  The repaired borehole will give new life to the community, helping them keep the funds normally used for medical bills that accumulate from treating water-borne illnessesYoung girl carrying water. The repair will also give time back to families for work, education, and spending time with each other. The shallow well that the Illimoko residents are currently gathering water from will be navigated to local crops, lessening the amount of physical labor the residents use to water their crops. 

More importantly, this clean water will help people like Celina Opanni use her hard earned money for food or sending her children back to school. The kids of Illimoko will see immediate health benefits from having a constant source of clean water, giving the community greater control of their future by having a better understanding of how to raise and use the money accumulated from borehole-usage fees. The community will take part in the committee and have a large part in decision-making, ensuring better management, and lessening the control of any one individual, to prevent the problem as previously experienced with the ex-pastor.  With great hope, the residents of Illimoko are looking ahead to begin investing in other community developments, such as building schools, diversifying income opportunities, and developing health facilities. 

Comments
Water is Basic’s strength come from the experienced local personnel. These individuals lead the non-profit’s mission with determination and skill, guiding the country to develop self-sustaining water systems, managed and operated by local villages. It is the mission of Water Is Basic, and these projects being done with Water Charity under our joint South Sudan Well Rehab Program, to build communities and empower the Sudanese to implement solutions for their water crisis on their own.

Part of the program involves an internship program where local, promising secondary school graduates manage our projects for one year. Two recent graduates from Nehemiah Gateway University, in Albania, oversaw interns and the projects the interns were directing. In exchange for their work, the interns are given access to distance learning courses and are then assisted in applying for, and attending, their university of choice.
 

Phase II, which includes this project, is being supported by an anonymous donor, who will match your donations. Please click the Donate button below to keep this great program going.

 

fieldsWellGathering waterVillage

Water used for cropsCommunity around the dirty well

The Village

 

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Jon Village School #41 Hygiene Project - Kyrgyzstan

Underclass Students at School #41

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC Logo and WC Logo

LocationPlaying volleyball in the gym

Jon Village, Bazar-Korgon raion, Jalalabad Oblast, Kyrgyz Republic

Community Description
Jon Village is located near the raion center, in Bazar-Korgon raion, Jalal-Abad Oblast.

There is only one school in the village, called School 41, which has 302 students (157 girls and 145 boys), 26 teachers (24 women and 2 men), and 7 other staff members (1 maintenance man, 3 cleaning women, 1 security man, 1 grounds keeper, and 1 cook). Sixth - eleventh form students attend school 6 days a week in the morning while first-fifth form students attend 5 days a week in the afternoon. The school is publically funded and also hosts community events, such as sports and meetings, being the only public building in the village other than the tiny, intermittently open clinic.

The village of Jon is a community of ethnically Kyrgyz people while the raion of Bazar-Korgon is predominantly ethnically Uzbek. Jon is an agricultural and bedroom community for the neighboring town of Bazar-Korgon (that is, almost all workers who work in the fields or outside the community), is relatively poor compared to neighboring communities, and has reported unemployment of 70-80%.

Problem Addressed
Jon school suffers from repeated Hepatitis A infections (2 cases in 2013, 1 in 2014, 2 in 2015).

Current hand washing facilityCurrently, the school has one hand washing station exterior to the school, filled by bucket from the nearby canal that the students and staff can use to clean their hands. Unfortunately, it is under-used, likely in part due to poor maintenance and the fact that it cannot be used in excessively cold temperatures as the tap freezes (November-February).

A survey of the school revealed that almost all students and staff (95%) interviewed use the outhouse at school. This survey additionally revealed high rates of absenteeism due to diseases (overall 2.6 reported days/month, ranging from 1.1 monthly days reported by 11th form to 4.2 monthly days reported by 10th form) and menstruation (1.7 to 2.5 reported monthly days reported by women and girls of apparent maturity). Appealing hand washing facilities would reduce disease spread and allow female staff and students to attend more days of school/work per month. Further, few people surveyed were able to list the correct times to wash hands (an overall average of 0.4 correct answers per survey taker from 5 pre-defined correct answers to an open-ended question).

A local nurse, who works at the raion HPU, identified the issue of poor hygiene at the village school. She consulted with the school director and identified priorities for facility improvement to improve school hygiene. These are sinks for hand and dishwashing in the existing kitchen and eating building, an-add-on facility to the existing school gym for showering, and the construction of a small new structure to house a hand washing station in proximity to the existing outhouse.

Currently, the only facility is an exterior hand washing station filled by bucket.  62% of survey takers reported using the hand washing station even though spot-checks showed it to be empty every time checked, 20% reported washing their hands in an irrigation ditch, 20% reported washing their hands in the kitchen and eating room presumably using a dipper and bucket, 5% reported using rain water, and 2% reported using snow. To support the proposed facilities, a small pump for the existing water cistern, a drain pit for wastewater, a hot water heater, and piping is needed. Additionally, a training program to educate on proper hand-washing timing and procedure and instill good habit is necessary. The training combined with remodel will together reduce absenteeism from school thus improving education. Existing Cistern

Project Description
This project is to implement the UNICEF “TopTaza” training program, build a shower at the existing gym, build a hot-water hand washing station near the existing outhouse, add sinks for hand and dish washing in the existing kitchen and dining building, and build associated infrastructure (piping, waste water, pump, and water heater).

Funding will be 50% from Water Charity, 25% financial support from the Beshik-Jon Ayil Ukmut, and 25% community in-kind matching labor and transportation costs.Funding priorities were made by the director of the school, the idea originated with a local nurse who works for the raion HPU, and plan made by both of them in combination with a local contractor.

There will be numerous positive outcomes from this project.  Here are the expected goals: reduction in the spread of communicable diseases (especially Hepatitis A, colds and flu’s, and diarrheal diseases) through the village school in the community at large, improvement of hygiene knowledge and habit which will percolate through the community, short-term employment opportunities for this cash-starved village, reduced absenteeism from school, and reduction of gender inequality in education. Specifically, the aim is for every student in the school to be able to name at least 2 times when hand washing is critical and be able to demonstrate effective hand washing with soap.  The school hopes an observational study of hand-washing will show 90% effective hand washing with soap (improved from 0%); and that absenteeism reported due to both illness and menstruation will reduce by 1 day monthly.

This project consists of two parts: the actual infrastructure remodeling and the training. For the infrastructure, first, all the necessary supplies (concrete, piping, pump etc.) will be purchased and brought to the school. Then workers will build and install the components. The training will be accomplished through implementing UNICEF’s TopTaza program. This program relies on training students in each class to act as a health aid monitoring and encouraging hand washing. The classes compete to achieve the best hand washing compliance and the bulk of the work is performed by students with assistance from staff and training personnel.

School kitchen where future sinks will beCommunity Organization
Jon Village School

Project Impact
This project will impact 1,843 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Marguerite Leeds

Monitoring and Maintenance  
The new infrastructure should last many years.

Currently, nation-wide, Kyrgyzstan is experiencing a paradigm shift. People in villages frequently state that they feel the responsibility of their government is to provide flowing water systems to every village. This appears to be a reach for modernity and correctness. Government offices appear to feel this too as multiple officials have voiced village water systems as a priority (already the norm in urban areas).

As the country builds modern water infrastructure, value will occur only when people adopt matching modern practices. Jon village, via this school infrastructure and education/training project, will be ready to jump when public water infrastructure reaches their homes because they will understand the value of the change and have hygiene priorities in line with those of public health. In this way, this small project will have long-reaching influences.Upperclass

The school has committed to the increased water, soap, and electrical costs that will be incurred as a function of the proposed facility improvements. The facility improvements are simple and any maintenance needs should be well within the ability of the staff already at the school.

Let Girls Learn
According to the Global Public-Private Partnership for hand washing, adequate hand washing facilities increase school attendance by girls by up to 6 days per year. This project will reduce absenteeism of students and staff (which is predominately female) due to menstruation. Absenteeism due to menstruation by females of apparent maturity is reported at 1.7 to 2.5 days per month.

Dollar Amount of Project
$2,000

Donations Collected to Date
$2,000

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been fully funded by friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Marguerite Leeds.  Additional donations will go to other projects in Kyrgyzstan.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

School Outhouse with Director showing future hot water hand washing stationUnderclass

School Cafeteria and GymOuthouse

 

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Sil Latrine Project - Senegal

Sil Village

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Sil, Department Koupentoum, Region of Tambacounda, SenegalMen and boys in the village

Community Description
Sil Village has a population of approximately 2,000 people, although this fluctuates quite a bit when the farming season ends. The main form of income generation is selling peanuts as cash crops.

Sil acts as a logistic, religious, and social hub for the surrounding communities which are populated by about 10,000 people. The people are 100% Muslim, mostly split between two different "brotherhoods". One of these brotherhoods, the Maurids, is headed by a Marabout whose family started the village three generations ago. This family holds hereditary title of both the positions of Village Chief and Marabout.

PCV Derek Rush reports that, "Living in Sil has been an extraordinarily trying experience for me. Not only have I experienced a great difficulty with language, but the culture has given me more than a few moments of frustration. For example, when I first arrived in village I tried desperately to find meaningful work and to get people organized. Meetings would start two hours late some days and others would not happen at all because I would plan them on days such as Sunday, which also happens to be the day of the weekly market. Slowly, as my language and understanding of the people improved, both my work and integration into the community have become easier, though daily challenges still exist."

TrainingsProblem Addressed
Traditionally, most latrines in the village have been constructed by digging a pit and then covering the top with either a cement platform or logs that are then topped with soil. Due to the sandy condition of the soil though, these latrines frequently experience collapses when the rains come and families commonly resort to open defecation in the bush until a new one is constructed. What is needed is brick walled pits to support the latrine to prevent this.

Some of the difficulties facing this community are its geographic location and the difficultly accumulating capital for such projects. The village is located 30 kilometers from the main highway and mostly reliant upon the sale of peanuts for income. Because of this, financing construction projects is a difficult prospect.

Project Description
After doing a brief survey of latrines at the site, and having several discussions with village leaders, a plan was formed to build simple lined pit latrines for families that were willing to come to the planning meetings and related trainings. Of the more than 50 families who initially showed interest in the project only fourteen have consistently come to all the trainings and meetings.

The trainings consisted of two 45 minute to one hour long talks covering the importance of latrines, how diseases spread from open defecation, hand washing, and how to build a Tippy Tap.

The objective for this project is to provide fifteen latrines; fourteen to families and one installed in the Health Post that is meant for the mostly Pulaar women who refuse to use the Turkish toilets and have frequently dig cat holes in the facility to defecate into.

Villagers

The intent is that these latrines will lead to a more sanitary environment that has fewer cases of diarrhea and other illnesses caused by open defecation. In addition I hope that families will also adopt improved hand washing techniques for the same end.

Community Organization
Sil Latrine Group and Sil Health Post

Project Impact
This project will impact 75 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Derek Rush

Monitoring and Maintenance  
Derek will be personally supervising this entire project from the purchase of the materials, construction of individual latrines, and follow-up home visits. These visits will be conducted to see how families are using the skills and knowledge which were taught at the community meetings.
 

Comments
This project has been nearly six months in the making. Derek admits that he learned a lot through this project and considered cancelling it several times due to lack of community participation and lack of experience.  After he engaged in several long conversations with his community work counterpart, participating families, and health post staff in the village, they successfully collected all of the community contribution.  People are beginning to collect the necessary sand and gravel to make the cinderblocks that will be used.

Dollar Amount of Project
$660

Donations Collected to Date

$0

Dollar Amount Needed
$660

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

Riding horsesold latrine

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Call to Nature Permaculture Project - Ghana

Boy gardening on the farm

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

LocationMichael with the youth in the garden

 Kunkunuru, Greater Accra Region, Ghana

Community Description
Call to Nature Permaculture has a general site for its school garden that is a two-acre piece of land offered by the elders of Kunkunuru community.  The site has a small dam which was created through sand winning activities (illegal sand mining) many years back. Due to a high water table and good amount of clay, the existing dam is suitable to store water for gardening.

Problem Addressed
It takes students many hours to scoop enough water from the dam to water the whole field. This does not give them enough time to engage in other activities, which include preparing beds, planting, weeding, staking, and numerous other tasks. A better water storage and distriribution system is needed to improve effectiveness.

Boys working in the gardenProject Description
This project is to greatly increase the water storage capacity, and build and extensive water distribution system.

Currently the size of the dam measures 20 × 30 feet with a depth of 1 meter. An excavator will be hired to open it up to 50 × 70 feet a depth of 2 meters.

After excavating, vetiver grass will be planted on the banks of the dam to keep it firm and compact since its root travels many meters into the soil. After this, water plants will be introduced into the dam to prevent evaporation and also to improve aquatic life in the dam.

An irrigation system will be set up to allow many hours of watering will to be done in just 5-10 minutes, thereby giving the community enough time to engage in other activities. The main system will consist of PVC pipes running through the middle of the farm. Attached to these are the spray tubes, which run between the planting beds. A water pump will pull water from the dam and distribute it through the spray tubes to water the plants.

 
Young girl working on the farm

Through this project, students are able to learn how to grow their own food using permaculture, a method that cares for the earth, people and fair trade. At the beginning of every week the produce is harvested and shared among the schools for their meals, surplus is sold at a well-organized farmers market, and money is saved to support poor students to further their education. In addition, surplus food is donated to the orphanage and the disabled institutions.

The project accomplishes many objectives, including the development and proliferation of the permaculture technology, teaching useful skills to students, improving food security in the community, assisting in small business development, and providing humanitarian aid.

Community Organization
Call to Nature Permaculture, led by Solomon Amuzu, its Founder and Director 

Project Impact
This project will benefit more than 3,000 people.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Michael McGaskey

Monitoring and Maintenance
Michael and Solomon will supervise the construction.  The improvements will be maintained by Call to Nature Permaculture

This project is made possible through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

To donate for similar projects in West Africa, use the Donate button below.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

Girls gardening

Shallow well

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Sinthiang Cherif Latrines Project - Senegal

Sinthiang Cherif Village

NPC & WC LogosThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location

Sinthiang Cherif, Velingara District, Kolda Region, SenegalLatrine Enclosure

Community Description
The small village of Sinthiang Cherif is located in the region of Kolda in southern Senegal. This particular region is known as the Fouladou in which the population speaks various dialects of Pulaar; Sinthiang Cherif's inhabitants speak both Fulakunda as well as Pulafuta. While the village may be young at 26 years old, Sinthiang Cherif has been able to secure for itself vital resources such as robinets (running water from a spigot), a paved national road, numerous fields for farming, and 3 boutiques in which people are able to buy basic necessities.  While these victories may seem small, they are in fact large hurdles overcome by a village of 240.  

Geographically speaking Sinthiang Cherif is located at the top of a hill, safe from flooding during the rainy seasons (May-Sept). However, the village faces another challenge: rocky soil, despite this the population has managed to acquire several corn, millet, peanut, and cotton fields. In addition to this, the village also generates its income by way of charcoal, lumber, and livestock such as goats, chickens and cattle.

Regardless of the size of the village, the population has placed importance on education.  Therefore, a primary school exists in Sinthiang Cherif to educate the young children, who account for about half of the population. Since the celebration of birthdays is non-existent within the culture, it is difficult for the population to know their exact age. However, it is easy to note that there exists one child for every adult, and the population is continually growing with a new birth approximately every month. 

The senior population is less evident. However, the village does have a sort of "retirement" compound in which a few senior citizens live together and divide responsibilities among themselves. The entire population of Sinthiang Cherif is overseen by the chief who intervenes when issues arise between individuals; holds meetings to maintain the village aware of new projects or problems arising within the village; represents the village at various events, and other responsibilities that may arise. Village elderSince the village is entirely Muslim, the chief also participates in leading religious holidays such as Korite and Tabaski. The village of Sinthiang Cherif is continually seeking ways to better the quality of life for its citizens, including the addition of electricity in the future as well as latrines.

Problem Addressed
Since it was founded 26 years ago, Sinthiang Cherif has lacked the proper facilities necessary to dispose of human waste. All 29 compounds are in need of latrine improvements, completion, or have no latrines at all. Approximately 13 compounds had initiated the construction of a latrine for their household. However, these latrines are unsafe for use, especially for children. Since many of these unfinished toilets are simply deep holes in the ground, a falling risk could create devastating consequences. Sixteen compounds lack any sort of facility to use. Therefore, they resort to open defecation in wooded areas. The lack of an appropriate latrine leads to behaviors such as open defection, a lack of dignity and privacy, and the transmission of sanitation related diseases such as diarrhea.

Project Description
A meeting was held in October, 2015, with the head of every household to discuss the budget of the project as well as the logistics. It was collectively decided that every compound in Sinthiang Cherif was in need of latrine improvements, completion, or needed a latrine built since there was none available to them. Women of the Village

The village was divided by compounds that have a latrine, but needed vast improvements; compounds that started to dig, but had not finished; and lastly, compounds that did not contain a latrine, as such the prices would vary between the three groups. A discussion of the different costs was held and their respective contributions were calculated and everyone was informed of these expectations. Approximately 29 Turkish toilets will need to be completed before May, 2016, as that is when the rainy season begins. 

Water Charity funding will cover the cost of materials and mason wages.  The village's contribution is to complete the construction of an enclosure around their new latrines for privacy, in addition to 25% of the cost of the latrine (amount varies per household). 

Two masons will be hired for the timely completion of the project, and the masons will be paid the same amount for each latrine that he/she completes. These masons are well known by the village chief who has assured us that these individuals will do a fine job of constructing the latrines. Furthermore, the masons will be in charge of providing their own working materials. However, the village and the masons will work together to bring in the materials needed for the completion of the latrines (i.e. sand, rock, cement). 

Elementary SchoolThe rocky soil is an issue that the village would like to resolve by using a power auger from an outside source. This cost has been included in the project, but if a compound wished to save money, the individuals will dig the hole itself. Other technologies for the construction of the latrines include a donkey charette for the transportation of sand and rocks, shovels, trowels, string line and line pins, and water and buckets. 

Lastly, the village is expected to participate in the WASH, soap making and latrine maintenance trainings that will be held and facilitated by a counterpart and World Vision. After the successful completion of these trainings as well as the privacy enclosure, each compound will receive a certificate of completion which will serve as a reminder to each compound of their commitment to maintain their latrines and ensure sustainability.

Project Impact
This project will impact 240 villagers as well as all visitors.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Raquel Bautista

Monitoring and Maintenance 
While it is important that each compound receives a latrine, the need for good WASH practices is also important. To start, a WASH mural was created depicting hand washing with the use of soap and running water.  Next, Raquel held a soap formation in which she cross-collaborated with a Community Economic Development volunteer who taught the women of the village how to make simple soap for hand washing, then educated the women about the proper hand washing times. This training will be repeated upon the completion of the latrines to reinforce this information. Women in the kitchen

Furthermore, there will be training on latrine maintenance so that the population feels confident in maintaining their latrines and for the longevity of the latrines themselves. A latrine committee within the village and a partnership with World Vision will assist in the sustainability of the latrines and provide support for the population concerning their latrines as needed.

Dollar Amount of Project
$3,950

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,950

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Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

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Badoudou Latrine Project - Senegal

Young female students carrying water

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Badoudou, Department of Foundiougne, Fatick Region, Senegal

Community Description
Badoudou is a small rural village of approximately 800 people, in the Fatick Region of Senegal.  Livelihood primarily consists of subsistence millet and peanut farming, but due to the village’s close proximity to the mangroves, fishing and gardening also generate income.  However, the community is still extremely poor.

The majority of households, which hold an average of 14 people, most of which are children, do not have access to essential facilities, such as latrines or water.

Badoudou has a French primary school, which also serves three surrounding villages.  Badoudou also has a daara, an Arab school, which serves and lodges more than 70 children from nearby islands, year round.  Both schools have committees dedicated to bettering the lives of their students.  

Additionally, the village has a health hut, a two roomed facility, staffed by one health worker to provide basic health care, such as first aid and malaria treatment, as well as a midwife to deliver babies.  The health hut also has a functioning health committee, which is committed to providing the Road in Badoudou community with the information and materials necessary to keep themselves healthy and prevent disease.

Badoudou is made up of almost 100% Sereers, a lively ethnic group with a beautiful culture.  For generations the village has been home to the same families, and thus the atmosphere of the community is very supportive, and all decisions are made collectively.  The people of Badoudou have determined their greatest need is for a latrine and WASH project after discussing the health status within the community, and are very committed to its success and grateful for the opportunity.

Problem Addressed
In Badoudou, community members are constantly sick with coughs, colds, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, and fever.  Young children experience this burden in excess, both in severity and frequency. It is most noticeable during the rainy season, when bacterial infections leave many out of work and school for days, and require mothers to walk their sick children the seven kilometers to the nearest hospital, too frequently. This can primarily be attributed to poor hygiene and sanitation, due to open-defecation and lack of hand washing.  Without the knowledge on hygiene and health, and the facilities to keep the community clean, the people of Badoudou are suffering too often and living in fear of disease.

After a health baseline survey was performed in Badoudou, results showed the community to have a high incidence of hygiene-related illness, especially amongst children under five.  In Senegal, diarrheal disease and pneumonia represent the top causes of death for children under five, behind malaria. Survey results also showed that 55 out of 67 households within the community did not have a latrine, and thus a majority of the population practices open defecation in their own yards, or in nearby fields.

Additionally, neither the French nor Arab school in the village has a latrine or hand washing station, leaving over 200 students without access to proper sanitation.  Finally, survey results showed that members of Badoudou do not have the knowledge of how hygiene impacts their health, and do not take important measures, such as hand washing, to prevent disease.  When asked about hand washing practices, the households generally only mentioned before meals as a critical time, and typically use a communal bowl of water with no soap.  No household presented a designated hand washing station.

After a community-wide meeting to discuss the survey results, all in attendance determined a latrine and hygiene project to be most beneficial for the community as a whole.  It has the ability to improve community-wide sanitation due to access to latrines, as well as to encourage healthier hygiene practices through health talks and school programs.  A large-scale WASH project is essential to improving the overall health status in this community.

Project Description
The Badoudou WASH Education and Latrine project is composed of three phases:

First, a curriculum has been developed to teach the students at both the French elementary school and the Arab school about the importance of hygiene for health, as well as how to adopt better practices. Activities include a course on germ theory, a WASH mural painting, soap making, hand wash station building, as well as a day of filming students’ skits and songs on related topics. The school directors, teachers, as well as some students will be leading these activities.

The second phase of this project is a series of similar health trainings for the rest of the community members.  A member from each household will be required to attend each training in order to be eligible to receive a latrine.  The topics include hygiene and related illnesses, hand washing and hygienic behaviors, soap making and hand wash station building, and finally latrine usage and maintenance.  These trainings will be led by volunteers in the community, members of the health committee, local NGO representatives, and the local hospital’s hygiene agent.
 
The final, and most important phase of this project, to which the vast majority of funding for this project will be dedicated, is building of improved latrines for community-wide access. Fifty-five households will receive a simple pit latrine.  These will be 2 x 2-meter square pits, lined with bricks, cemented over, and capped with iron bars and concrete.  This model is the most basic, yet hygienic and sustainable option.  The cement lining prevents the latrines’ contents from contaminating the surrounding ground, and thus keeps the community cleaner.  It will be durable throughout rainfall, is large enough to last years, and can be pumped out and reused in the future.  

Pit LatrineAdditionally, the two schools in the village will each receive one 2 x 2-meter pit latrine, but attached via PCV piping to a Turkish toilet, in a 1 x 1-meter stall for privacy. Each pit is to be dug by household and community members, while village masons will be constructing bricks and the rest of the latrines.  Funds for this project will go primarily towards the cement, concrete, and metal for latrine construction, as well as some labor fees.  In addition to digging the pits, the community will be transporting all materials, as well as contributing sand, water, and cash.

Project Impact
This project will impact 975 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Lindsay Reesing

Monitoring and Maintenance 
When the project is completed, improved health status, as well as improved health behaviors are expected across the community.  Aside from improved latrines, expected outcomes of this project include increased number of hand washing stations, as well as members using these stations at the necessary times.  Additional outcomes include women being educated on childhood illness prevention, a decreased number of children who had coughs, colds, and diarrhea, and an increased number of their parents seeking care.

As these outcomes are recognized within the community, and members believe in the success of the project, it is expected that they will take responsibility for their health and embrace behavior change to improve overall health status.

Each household will be monitored over the next year to assess this change through a series of home visits by community health workers.  Incidence of illness, as well as methods and urgency of treatment will be measured. WASH behaviors will be observed, and barriers to these behaviors determined.  Depending on the progress that has been made, additional trainings can be developed to re-ensure that community members have all the knowledge necessary, and are taking the proper steps, to keep their families healthy.

Comments
The community organization that is involved with this project is the Badoudou Health Committee.  As Badoudou's health committee also serves two other nearby villages, this project is an example to possibly be implemented again over the next few years.

Dollar Amount of Project

$5,500

Donations Collected to Date

$50

Dollar Amount Needed
$5.450

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

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Progress: 

Marakonye Primary School Well Rehab - South Sudan

Marakonye Primary School Students

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association, working with Water is Basic.NPC & WC Logos

This project continues Phase 2 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program.  The program's first phase began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These new Phase 2 projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.Map of Yei River Region

Location
Marakonye Primary School, Yei River County, Central Equatoria State, South Sudan

Community Description
Marakonye is a village found in the northern part of Yei River County, four miles away from the main Yei Town.  The community of Marakonye has been around since the 1920’s, mostly comprised of the Kakaw tribe of the Tike Forest.   For economic prosperity, the 20-household village works in lumbering and farming.  With both a primary school and a regularly and highly attended church, many individuals benefit from the borehole, located just outside the primary school.  The school’s attendance has dramatically decreased due to lack of water and the school’s transition to government funding.  Since 2011, the school has had to repair the borehole two times.

Alex Kiliona Peter- School HeadmasterProblem Addressed
Alex Kiliona Peter is the head teacher of the primary school. He, along with his wife and six children, live four miles away from the school. The borehole was originally drilled for the school, but with a despondent surrounding community, it has been difficult to rally support and funds to fix the borehole. Alex is nervous, as school starts up again in February, and his 668 pupils have no way to obtain drinking water while in their classes. Alex remembers how the borehole broke during last semester’s exams and the treacherous conditions the students put themselves through as they sat through exams, dehydrated. 

Nineteen-year-old Peter Lat is one of these pupils.  He lives a mile away from the school, and is completely dependent on the borehole for water during school and to bring home to his family after classes. Peter Liot Like Alex, Peter remembers the tough time preparing for his exams just as the borehole broke. Alex, like many students, was forced to travel a mile to get water. This caused Alex to be late to multiple exams and thus fail to move forward into the next grade. 

Marry Asa is the cook for the teachers at the school.  With the extra need for water for cooking, drinking, and washing, Marry is struggling to collect ten jerrycans of water at a time. The lack of water has caused many of the teachers to become ill, keeping the students behind, and causing distress for Marry.

Project Description
Isaac’s Wells partnered with Water is Basic on this project to rehab the well at the Marakonye Primary School. This project should only take 1-2 days to complete.
Marry Asa
First, the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. We believe that the problem is a pipe that is rusted through, but sometimes it is hard to be sure before taking the pump apart. The project will restore the GI pipes and the head of the borehole to reliable and working order.

Problem Impact
This project will impact 646 people directly; 640 students and at least 6 staff.  This well rehab will also impact visitors, future students and the surrounding community.

Project Director
Steve Roese
Teachers at the School
Monitoring & Maintenance
Water Is Basic educates and empowers the community by helping them learn the importance of diverse and equal organization. The water committee becomes a reconciliation tool as mixed genders, tribes and religions work together to manage the community well. By aiding the village to develop a committee and manage and maintain their well, the village is able to collect and save money to dedicate to future repairs.

Comments
Providing clean and close hydration for pupils, teachers, and school staff, provides a greater attentiveness, regular pupil advancement, and relieves the extraneous stress from those whom depend on the borehole for use during school and for their families throughout the day. Providing a better environment for education helps keep medical costs low and empowers pupils to graduate and obtain jobs that allow them to put money back into the community and funds for borehole management.

School YardWater is Basic is a borehole drilling organization in the Republic of South Sudan birthed and led by Sudanese religious leaders in response to the Country’s water crises. It is a Sudanese solution to a Sudanese problem with funding from Water Charity. The organization also utilizes thousands of volunteers who work to manage and oversee operations of wells once they are installed or restored.
 

While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it is in keeping with the goals and objectives of that program, and, as such, falls under Water Charity's own Let Girls Learn + heading.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  If you wish to see more great projects like this one, please contribute to our South Sudan Well Rehab Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

 

Students in the School yardStudent raising the flag

 

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Fimpulu Primary School Water Project - Zambia

A teacher and pupils at Fimpulu Primary School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Fimpulu Primary School, Mansa District, Luapula Province, Zambia
old well
Community Description
The Fimpulu community is rural and there is no electricity or running water. Community members live in mud huts with grass thatch roofs. Most community members rely on farming as their source of income. Fimpulu Primary School is about 26 km or about 16 miles from the Provincial Capital of Mansa.

Problem Addressed
Fimpulu Primary School had no functioning source of water on their campus. Work on Fimpulu’s new borehole began in the thick of dry season, and their open well near the school had dried completely. Identical to other schools that the Water for Zambia project has targeted, there was a merry-go-round play pump that had not worked since 2009. This pump was intended to pump water through the energy created by children playing on the merry-go-round. Unfortunately, the project failed and the pump quit working after just one year.

The Water for Zambia project will remove the merry-go-round and all the rusted piping below. The merry-go-round will be installed elsewhere for children to play. Next, the piping will be replaced with PVC pipes. Each section of the PVC piping is 3 meters. The pipes will be securely connected with solvent cement. Then, a rope will be utilized to connect all piping together.

Under the Water for Zambia project, all targeted schools require borehole rehabilitations. These rehabilitations require no further drilling. The borehole at Fimpulu Primary School is 30.6 meters deep, with a static water level of 9 meters. At the bottom of the well there will be a sand layer. At the end of the piping will be a sand screen to prevent any sand and debris from coming up through the pumping. The pedestal will then be attached to the concrete and a hand pump is installed. The construction process will take a total of 5 days.

The pumping will allow water to flow at a rate of 10 liters per 21 seconds. The pump will be easy for students to utilize and the water will be potable without purification. The new borehole will allow for students and teachers to improve the cleanliness of all school facilities, including toilets. The convenient source of water will allow student hygiene to also improve. Girls will be the most impacted by this development. Many young girls would once drop out of school after reaching puberty. The new water source will allow the girls to remain in school.

teacher execited after receiving safe drinking waterAdditionally, the surrounding villages and community members will come to the school to access the new source of water. There are certain hours when the borehole is open to the community. During open hours, the borehole will be a center of activity. Men, women, and children of many ages will come to collect water, chat, and laugh. All community members utilizing the water source will pay a small fee to the school that will then be saved in a spare-parts fund for future repairs.

The above ground improvements will include the creation of a cement apron around the pump and a drainage way to direct overflow to a soak pit. The soak pit will collect all runoff water. Students will be provided with fruit trees to plant near the new water source.

Project Description
All construction carried out by the Water for Zambia project will be done in partnership with the local government council. The construction team will come from the Mansa Municipal Council located in the district capital, Mansa, in the Luapula Province. There are five men who will be involved in the project. Swala Mumba will oversee the work on the ground in Zambia for Fimpulu Primary School.

Swala Mumba is certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is a counterpart to Emily who assists with directing the team and administrative tasks.  Emily has trained Swala in record keeping, program planning, and accounting. He has an advanced diploma in project management from the Institute of Commercial Management (located in UK). He started working at the Mansa Municipal Council in 2008 as a rural water supply and sanitation assistant.


Bernard Chansa is also certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is also the only plumber at the Mansa Municipal Council, and is, therefore, always needed for countless tasks. He started working at the council in 2006. He leads the construction team in the field. Patrick Chabu is a skilled bricklayer. He is in charge of the soak pit construction and plastering at all the schools. He started working for the council in 2007.

Michael Mpana and Daniel Impundu are half-brothers. Michael is 20 years old and Daniel is 19. They are both handymen and help with all the labor- heavy tasks. They are in training with Mr. Chansa in borehole construction and maintenance.

Project ImpactParents attending a meeting at Fimpulu
This project will directly impact 807 people; 797 students enrolled at the school and a teaching staff of 10.  It also will impact surrounding villages (who will have access to the borehole), visitors and future students.  Conservative estimate of the total impact is closer to 3,000 people.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily McKeone

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school and surrounding communities have been involved in every step of this project’s progress. It is a long held belief, that development without community engagement is not sustainable. These boreholes have an expected lifetime of 50 years. It is the hope of many that the communities will sustain their borehole for that lifetime.

During the construction process, the community will provide labor, sand, and stone for the project. The value of these contributions is about 20% of full project cost.

The students will be engaged in the process of sensitizing the community. Teachers will prepare a course about water, sanitation, and proper utilization of the borehole. Class discussions will include information about boiling drinking water, chlorine usage, washing hands after latrine use and proper hygiene. Following the course, students will create sketches, poems, dances, and songs of various scenarios around water and sanitation. The performances will demonstrate proper and improper borehole use.  The students will present to the community at large for a day of sensitization and celebration.

Lastly, Fimpulu Primary School has formed a maintenance committee to monitor and protect the borehole. Teachers and the Parent Teacher Association are involved in the committee and will ensure proper regulation, operation, and maintenance. This committee will meet regularly to address any issues that arise. The committee will be responsible for determining hours of operation for the borehole (and locking the borehole on off hours), as well as collecting community fees. All community fees will be safely secured for a spare parts fund.  Spare parts are available in the district capital of Mansa. Additionally, rural area pump minders are trained to repair the Afridev boreholes. Area pump minders (or APM’s) are equipped with toolkits and bicycles to reach rural areas and assist with repairs.

runoff areaComments
The school will now have a reliable source of drinking water. The struggle to find water and the time spent searching will be eliminated. Since the task of fetching water mostly falls on young girls, this project will most impact them. The students will have more time to dedicate to their studies and other tasks. The impact of a clean water source on campus is expected to improve health and sanitation at school, resulting in improved school attendance. The school has been instructed to plant fruit trees near the borehole, to also assist with the issue of food security in the area.

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it does fall into Water Charity's LGL+ grouping of projects that have a pronounced element involving helping girls go to, and stay in, school, and part of Water Charity's Let Girls Learn Initiative.

Emily McKeone worked with Water Charity as a PCV, directing the prototype project, which created boreholes for three schools.  With the assistance of Water Charity, she was able to come back to Zambia as an RPCV and continue her work.  Now we are completing 13 more school boreholes with Emily, of which this is #10, bringing the total to 16 schools boreholes in Zambia.

This project is part of our Water for Zambia Program.   It also falls under our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

This project has been fully paid for by an anonymous donor.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

If you like this project, please donate to the Water for Zambia Program so that we will have money available for similar projects.
 

Pupils dancing during sensitization meeting

 

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