RPCV

Kyarn Khin Migrant Community Bio-Sand Filter Project - Thailand

Kyarn Khin Migrant Community Bio-Sand Filter Project - Thailand

Introduction
This is a project designed to open up access to clean filtered water for consumption and daily use by a community of over 60 Burmese migrants living and working in the border town of Mae Sot, Thailand. By using a simple technology with easy-to-find materials, this project is a great investment towards reducing disease and improving quality of life for the families involved.

Kyarn Khin Migrant Community Bio-Sand Filter Project - Thailand

Community Background
Kyarn Khin community is located a short distance from Wat Sakin village next to the Moei River in Mae Sot district, Thailand. The community was established more than ten years ago. There are 14 households and 64 peo¬ple in the community. The majority of the population is Burmese with a small Karen minority. The community is a mix of Buddhists and Christians. The primary language is Burmese, with a minority of Karen speakers.

They are day laborers working on their landowner’s farm, for which they earn 120 Thai Baht ($3.96USD) per day. The community has no toilets, running water, or electricity. Very few people in the community have legal documents or work permits, so the landowner takes responsibility for their security. If they want to go to the market they go by boat to Myawaddy, the town across the river in Burma. Kyarn Khin has no school of its own, but several children over ten years old attend a nearby Burmese migrant learning center.

Problem Statement
The people living in Kyarn Khin community do not have access to sufficient drinking or cooking water, especially during rainy season. All of their cooking water comes directly from the river. Sometimes the landowner brings several bottles of drinking water, but it is not enough for the entire community so they continue to drink and cook with water from the river. In rainy season, the river floods and they use water from a well, which takes 15 minutes to reach on foot. Even so, the well water is not clean.

Due to the lack of clean water, the community reports high rates of skin disease, diarrhea and dizziness. During a needs assessment visit, one community member was in the hospital with a kidney problem that he developed from consuming the river and well water. Furthermore, the few students who are able to attend school often miss class due to diarrheal illnesses. There is no clinic in the community so when the people are sick or injured they have to travel to Mae Tao Clinic in Mae Sot, which takes time and money.

Project Plan
To solve these problems, the community leaders, land owners, community members and a group consisting of RPCV Mark Cox and students from Wide Horizons School, will construct small bio-sand water filters for each house. Wide Horizons students will provide a training on how to build, use, and maintain the filters and then the people of Kyarn Khin will build the filters with the support of the group. Mark will supervise and manage this project activity.

Kyarn Khin Migrant Community Bio-Sand Filter Project - ThailandThis project will increase access to clean, drinkable water for the entire community. This will lower the occurrence of diarrhea and skin disease, allowing people to save their money on visits to the clinic, and increasing students’ learning prospects.

Materials
Water Charity funds will be used to purchase materials, including pipe, fittings, fixtures, and plastic barrels.

Community participants will provide additional materials obtained from the river, including, large stones, medium stones, small stones, course sand, and fine sand.

Counterpart Background
Wide Horizons School (WH) is located in Mae Sot Township, Tak province, Thailand. The program is under World Education, Inc., supported by USAID and DCA (Danish Church Aid) since 2006. The program provides advanced English and project management training for 24 students from different states and ethnic groups in Burma.

Mark Cox, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer from Thailand Group 120, finished his PC service in 2010 and has been working as Project Manager for Khom Loy Development Foundation ever since. He previously successfully completed the Pa Taan Daai Bathroom Project - Thailand during his service as a Peace Corps Volunteer. As a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, he proceeded to complete the Ban Huay Lue Luang Bathroom Project - Thailand and the Future Garden School Water Project – Thailand.

Please donate for this project by clicking on the Donate button below. Any contributions in excess of the amount of the project will be allocated to other projects directed by Mark and/or projects of other PCVs in Thailand.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Brikama Lefaya Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Improvement Project – The Gambia

Brikama Lefaya Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Improvement Project – The Gambia

This is a project to be included under the Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program - The Gambia. Under the direction of Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak, in addition to the repair of non-working pumps and the installation of new pumps, a series of small WASH projects will be undertaken to improve general water distribution, storage, drainage, sanitation, and hygiene in the region.

Location
Brikama Lefaya, Dankunku District, Central River Region-South Bank, The Gambia

Community Description
Brikama Lefaya is a small ethnic Fula community home to 39 villagers from 3 households. Villagers depend on traditional coos and groundnut (peanut) farming and cattle-rearing for their subsistence livelihoods. However, the area is extremely poor, with malnutrition highly prevalent and sickness common. Because of the tiny size of the village, it has often been overlooked by government and outside agencies for development projects. As such, the village is largely marginalized and under-served, even by Gambian standards.

Brikama Lefaya Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Improvement Project – The Gambia

Of the village children, more than half of them exhibit symptoms of kwashiorkor from protein deficiency, and skin infections from poor personal hygiene practices are common. Overall food security is highly unstable, as crop harvests depend on unpredictable rain. In addition, while village women traditionally tended to riverside rice fields during the rainy season, they have abandoned their plots a few years ago due to saltwater intrusion.

In response to these growing malnutrition challenges, the village is slowly but surely starting to diversify its food sources. Jaye Jallow, one of the villagers, has worked with Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak since early 2011 to establish a wood lot, plant a supply of nutritious moringa and pigeon pea trees, start a fruit tree nursery, and inter-crop numerous cashew trees for future income generation and enhanced food security.

In April 2012, the village also started a small women's garden to supplement their diets. The replacement of an old Mark II handpump with a new Dutch Bluepump from a Water Charity project earlier this year help increased Lefaya's water security and the community's ability to support its gardens and tree nursery. However, Lefaya still has a long way to go in strengthening their livelihoods and securing options for a better future.

Project Description
This project seeks improve irrigation, water storage, and drainage in Brikama Lefaya village.

Firstly, with no access to running water, collecting water is an everyday, persistent burden for villagers who depend solely on a manual handpump for their domestic and gardening water needs. Specifically, this burden rests mostly on the shoulders of women and girls, those traditionally responsible for fetching water.

Brikama Lefaya Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Improvement Project – The GambiaDistributing water to vegetable plots and tree saplings is another difficulty. The construction of a cement and plastic pipe water distribution system will cut down the time that villagers toil watering the community's two gardens. Both are used to grow vegetables like tomato, onion, cabbage, pepper, pumpkin, roselle, eggplant, moringa, and pigeon pea, among other crops for village consumption. One of the gardens also includes an extensive tree nursery of gmelina, mahogany, mango, tamarind, orange, and papaya.

This project will construct a network of concrete reservoirs: one will receive water from the handpump and distribute it through pipes to two outlying reservoirs, one in each garden. This will significantly reduce the wait time and hardship of pumping and carrying water to each garden, giving women and girls more time to spend on other tasks. Moreover, creating a better watering system will increase the chances of higher and quicker yields, producing more food for consumption and better household nutrition.

Secondly, this project seeks to improve water storage for animal husbandry. Currently, one trough collects water from an aqueduct fed by the handpump. The trough is filled by some of the village boys every afternoon to water the cows the community tends as they return from their grazing areas by the river. At this point in the river, the water is saline, so the cows cannot drink from it.

The cows are watered only once a day from this handpump and trough. However, the trough can only hold a certain amount of water. When the thirsty cows come, they quickly empty the filled trough. The boys usually fill the trough once before women beginning watering their beds--Cow watering time is the same time that women and girls water the gardens.

Brikama Lefaya Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Improvement Project – The GambiaWhen the trough is emptied, the boys need to pump to refill it a second time for the cows. As cattle are the property of men, watering the cows is seen as a priority over the women's need to water the gardens, which they own. So, the women must wait when the boys need to pump again, and then wait for each individual woman to fill her pails and pans for water—a hugely inefficient use of time.

This project will double the holding capacity of the trough by building a concrete extension so the women won't have to compete with cows for water.

Thirdly, this project aims to build 3-5 concrete showering platforms. The adults bathe themselves in reed-screened areas behind mud houses. But these areas have no flooring, so the used water pools, creating an unsafe environment for algae and bacteria. Creating concrete floors with re-bar supports and soak-away drains will give villagers more comfortable and hygienic places to shower.

Should any funds be left over, we will also construct a privacy wall for children to shower closer to the well. Children usually bathe themselves next to the well, but since there is no privacy wall, they feel exposed to passerby on the road. As a result, they shower quickly and improperly, contributing to common skin diseases. Giving children a proper bathing area will give them more dignity and allow them to better clean themselves.

Project Impact
39 people in Brikama Lefaya Village will directly benefit from the project. The site will serve as a model for more than five villages from which they can get inspiration and ideas for possible water and sanitation improvement projects.

Comments
This is a critical project for the villages, utilizing the most basic repairs to improve water distribution, sanitation, and hygiene.  This project was conflated with another of Jeremy's projects for WC, and many of it's objectives were completed as part of Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program – Phase 2 - The Gambia

All of Jeremy's great work in The Gambia for Water Charity can be found here: The Gambia Lifewater Pump Repair Projects.

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

To make a contribution for this project, please click the Donate button above.

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Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program - The Gambia

Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program - The Gambia

This is a large-scale program to undertake a series of projects to:

(1) repair and install handpumps and (2) to improve water, sanitation, and hygiene conditions in the region.

The initial projects under the program have been, and are continuing to be, carried out under the direction of Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak. To date, 18 Mark II pumps have been repaired and 3 new Bluepumps have been installed. This has increased water access for more than 5,000 women, children, and men in 11 villages. (update: now up to 10,000 people in 20 villages!)


The projects previously undertaken are listed below, and the list will be updated as new projects are added:

To see a PowerPoint presentation that Jeremy has prepared to highlight the previous work, CLICK HERE.  To date, 23 pumps have been installed or repaired.

Community Description
Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program - The GambiaThis program will focus on the Central River Region, The Gambia, West Africa. The area is very rural. The vast majority of the population is without running water or electricity. Services are either very basic or nonexistent. Transportation is difficult, as the communities are located off the main highway, and none of the roads are paved.

Most Gambians in the region make their livelihoods through farming coos, peanuts, and rice in the dry season, by tending cattle, and to a smaller extent, fishing. Poverty is manifested in many ways, most prominently not having enough to eat.

Compounded with poor water access and difficulty of growing food in the dry season, malnutrition and sickness are common, as are skin diseases and other infections. Many of the more remote villages in the area are greatly under-served in every respect. Low government and aid penetration has left numerous villagers living a hand-to-mouth existence.

Numerous Mark II handpumps were installed in the area by the Government of The Gambia and outside aid groups in the 1990's. However, no formal maintenance or repair program exists to ensure proper service functioning of these high-maintenance pumps. As a result, many pumps have fallen into disrepair.

Since the majority of villagers do not possess the specialized tools, the technical knowledge, or the funds to maintain or fix pumps, broken pumps are sometimes abandoned. When a pump breaks, women and girls—those traditionally responsible for fetching water—must walk further and further in search of other villages with working pumps.

More often than not, villagers desperate for water will open the handpump well cover to pull up water with buckets and rope. Removing a covered well compromises the quality and cleanliness of a village's water supply, as contamination through dirt, runoff, and other pollutants can quickly create a breeding ground for a variety of debilitating and potentially fatal waterborne diseases. These illnesses not only harm the health and wellbeing of villagers, but also impact on the ability of locals to work and earn a living.

More pumps will continue to wear out beyond repair unless immediate replacement parts or improved pumps are installed. No organization is currently working in the area to upgrade handpump infrastructure.

Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program - The Gambia

Program Description
The overarching program concept focuses on improving rural clean water access in the Central River Region of The Gambia.

This program seeks to immediately repair broken Mark II pumps, identify villages in need of new Bluepumps, and undertake a series of related water, sanitation, and hygiene projects.

The Dutch Bluepumps are stronger than the Mark II, require little to no maintenance, and have a much higher output of water than the Mark II—all resulting in more reliable water supply and less time collecting water for villagers who solely depend on wells for their water needs.

Although the capacity exists to fix Mark II pumps, the main focus will be to promote and distribute Bluepumps, as it is often more cost-effective and more sustainable to replace old pumps with Bluepumps rather than repeatedly fixing malfunction-prone Mark II's.

This Bluepump technology is donated through the generosity of the Fairwater Foundation, and installed by Swe-Gam, the local Gambian implementing partner equipped and trained to maintain these pumps. Swe-Gam has made an initial offering of 15 Bluepumps, with possible additional pumps available.

Villages will be identified that have defunct pumps and/or that cannot afford to maintain their Mark II's, with a special focus on schools and health centers. The team will work with villages to coordinate the delivery and installation of the Bluepumps.

Special emphasis will be focused on under-served rural villages, particularly traditionally marginalized Fula communities in Niamina East District. The preliminary site list includes the Mount Carmel School in Sofyanama, Fula Kunda, Dankunku Health Center, the Mosque in Kaani Kunda Suba, and Nana.

In addition, assistance will be offered to interested Peace Corps Volunteers who wish to install Bluepumps in water-stressed villages nearby (i.e. Jimbala in Central River Region—North Bank; St. Therese School in Fula Bantang; and Jarra Sukuta, Lower River Region—South Bank).

While the main thrust of the program will be for pump repair and installation of new pumps, small WASH projects will be undertaken to improve general water distribution, storage, drainage, sanitation, and hygiene.

Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program - The Gambia

Under consideration will be creation of a series of robust water distribution networks, including storage reservoirs, which will serve to build and test the operational capacity and proficiency of the team to implement future projects.

The first of these WASH projects to be implemented is the Brikama Lefaya Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Improvement Project – The Gambia.

Most of the Water Charity funds will be used to pay for costs for Swe-Gam to transport pumps from Banjul, the capital, to remote villages and install them. In addition, the money will pay for masons and other skilled labor, as well as incidental materials costs.

A fraction of the monies will support communication costs and local transportation to survey communities and visit Mark II suppliers in the city, in addition to a food stipend for a two person team, and a small per diem for a translator. Additionally, a GPS device will be purchased to mark the sites for increased transparency and accountability to donors and the humanitarian water aid sector.

Villagers will contribute cement, sand, and the gravel needed to form a protective concrete base for the pumps.

This is an extremely cost-effective and ambitious program that will have a widespread impact on the health and wellbeing of a large number of people. It builds upon previous successes, and strengthens the framework to expand the effort. It involves great collaboration with other agencies to amplify the benefits that will accrue.

The major funding for this program is coming through the generosity of Child Relief International.

Additional funds are required. To make a contribution for this program, please click the Donate button below. We will be grateful for donations in any amount. Donations of $250 or more will be acknowledged here:

Beverly Rouse, of Glendora, CA, USA, contributed $250

Brian Lee, of Los Angeles, CA , USA, contributed $250


This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.  

A 2nd phase of this program has also been enacted and completed as well.  To read about Phase 2, CLICK HERE.

Now, a 3rd phase has been enacted and completed as well.  To read about Phase 3, CLICK HERE.

All Phases of this wonderful program still need donations to recoup the funds Water Charity used to pre-fund them, so please consider helping us do more projects like this.

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Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia

This is a tremendous new project that is being implemented under the direction of Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak. The project is to secure access to clean and protected water for Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Villages by installing 3 Blue Pumps.

Jeremy previously completed the Dankunku, Fula Kunda, and Brikama Lefaya Pump Project – The Gambia during his service as a Peace Corps Volunteer, and also finished the Niamina Dankunku Area Pump Project - The Gambia and the Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda Pump Project – The Gambia as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.

Project Location
Si Kunda and Kalikajara Villages, Niamina Dankunku District, and Choya Village, Niamina West District; Central River Region South, The Gambia, West Africa

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaDescription of Project Community
Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara are all ethnic Fula Villages. Most of them make their livelihoods through farming coos, peanuts, and rice in the dry season, and by tending cattle. Poverty is manifest in many ways, most prominently not having enough to eat. Compounded with poor water access (and use of open wells in Si Kunda and Kalikajara), sickness is common, as are skin diseases and other infections.

Water shortage is clearly an everyday problem, with people having to queue to draw water (or pump it at Choya's old Mark II, which was only recently rehabilitated with a previous Water Charity project). Yerro An, Si Kunda's alkalo, or village head, says, "We know our water is not clean or safe to drink, but what else can we do? We don't have any other sources of water."

Description of Project
This project seeks to secure access to clean and protected water for Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Villages by installing 3 Blue Pumps. Blue Pumps, made by Fairwater, are much more robust and long last than the typical outdated Mark II pumps seen in many villages, and the water output is much higher, averaging 12-20 liters a minute. It is much easier to use, especially for children, since there is less handle pressure resistance, and maintenance is minimal because of very few moving parts (as compared to the Mark II)

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaChoya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara each have or had Mark II pumps, but for a variety of reasons, are not having their water needs met. Si Kunda and Kalikajara are each now depending exclusively on open wells to meet their water needs, presenting serious health and sanitation concerns.

Choya in Niamina West has 380 residents / 23 compounds. One of their Mark II hand pumps work (only because it was rehabilitated through the last Water Charity project), the other does not--A pipe broke and the cylinder fell into the water. Villagers have tried two times to pull it out, but no luck. Sometimes water stresses are so heavy, that village women have to trek to fetch water in nearby Sara Bakary, Medina Wollom, or Sara Sambel.

Si Kunda in Niamina Dankunku has 300 residents / 17 compounds. They had two Mark II pumps installed 7 years ago. However, the pumps experienced problems 4 years ago. A local well mechanic pulled everything out, promising to bring new pipes and parts, but hasn't. The community, relying only on an open well for their needs and their cattle's water needs, opened the well last year to ease the dependence on that solitary well.

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaKalikajara in Niamina Dankunku has 115 residents / 11 compounds. Their Mark II pumps are 16 years old. They were pulled out 2 years ago. The pipes were stolen from the alkalo's compound, and so, the community opened the well and relies on the pulley and bucket system.

The Fairwater Foundation has agreed to donate 3 Blue Pumps, 1 each to Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara, with possibly 1 more each for the latter 2 villages. These pumps cost more than $3,000 each installed. The only thing that Swe-Gam, the implementing partner, is asking for is roughly $500 for installation fees and fuel costs from Banjul.

Each community has already agreed to supply the cement, sand, and gravel needed to make the pedestal base for each Blue Pump.

To make a contribution for this project, please click the Donate button below.

$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the SLOW LIFE Foundation as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Jeremy of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Jeremy and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Affe Tidiane Latrine Project – Senegal

Affe Tidiane Latrine Project – SenegalLocation
Affe Tidiane, in the Kaffrine region of Senegal

Community Description
Affe Tidiane is a village of 300 people, located 7 km north of Kaffrine, 60 km from Kaolack, and about 300 km from the capital, Dakar. Most residents are from the Wolof ethnic group, but a few are Pulaar.

There are 22 family compounds, each with about 15-20 residents. Only 3 families own their own latrines. Everyone else goes out to the bush when they need to use the bathroom.

Project Description
This project is to build 16 latrines in the community.

Affe Tidiane Latrine Project – SenegalThe project is being carried out under the direction of the Affe Tidiane Men's Group. Recipients have been chosen by lottery, and understand the requirements of participation.

Each latrine will be 1 meter to 2 meters deep, depending on the size of the family. It should last about 3 years, after which a new hole can be dug and the cement plate re-used.

The soil in the village is sufficiently compact that it can support the cement plate, and cement lining will not be needed.

Two masons, Kaeba Ndao and Abdoulaye Willan, have been contracted to do the work. The masons will dig the holes, build the iron frame, mix the cement with the sand, build the cement frame with the iron frame inside of it, and place it on top of the hole.

Affe Tidiane Latrine Project – SenegalWater Charity funds will pay for the labor of the masons.

Each family is responsible for buying and transporting the materials, consisting of a bag of cement, the bars, the wire, and bringing the sand to the compound. After completion of each latrine, the family will build a fence of millet stalks to surround the latrine area.

Project Impact
320 people will benefit from this project, comprised of 16 families, each of containing about 20 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Laura Perez

Comments
This is a necessary infrastructure project that will contribute greatly to the health and wellbeing of the entire village. All of the residents are enthusiastic about the project, which will ensure its completion, and lead to proper maintenance, replacement, and replication in the future.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Karen Shaines/ Nate Spiller (Senegal RPCV '70 -' 72) and his colleagues in the Plan Benefits Security Division, Office of the Solicitor, U.S. Department of Labor.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Laura of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Laura and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda Pump Project – The Gambia

Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda Pump Project – The Gambia

Location
Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda (hamlet), Badibu, CRR-North, Gambia Touba Murit and Naani Kunda, Dankunku, CRR-South, Gambia Choya, Niamina West, CRR-South, Gambia

Community Description
These five communities are composed of poor subsistence coos and peanut farmers. As a transit point from North to South Bank of the Gambia River, Kaani Kunda also has a number of fishermen.

Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda Pump Project – The Gambia

Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda are predominantly ethnic Mandinka. Touba is mostly Wolof. Naani Kunda and Choya are Fula villages. All of these smaller villages have received little in terms of NGO or government aid with the exception of Mark II handpumps, which were installed in the late 1990's. Sinchu Jaabo's was funded by Saudi Arabia through German NGO GTZ. Two of Kaani Kunda's pumps were installed as part of the Gambian-German Well Project. It is believed that Water Resources put in the rest at Touba, Naani Kunda, and Choya. All have seen little to no servicing. The pump at Choya has been neglected, and serious internal damage to the pump housing has occurred.

Project Description
This project seeks to rehabilitate 7 Mark II Handpumps in 3 districts in Central River Region, The Gambia. They are old and many have corroded and worn out parts.

The parts needing replacement:
Sinchu Jaabo: Handle bearings and axle (1 pump) Kaani Kunda: Handle bearings and axle, chains, new cylinder seals (2 pumps) Touba Murit: Handle bearings and axle, chains, new cylinder seals (1 pump) Naani Kunda: Handle bearings (2 pumps) Choya: Handle bearings and axle, chains, new cylinder seals, new handle and handle casing welds or replacement parts

A previous Water Charity grant has already supported the initial inspection of these pumps. Some additional parts needed to fix/maintain these pumps have already been purchased, including 2 cylinder repair kits, 1 handle axle, 7 handle bearing kits (bearings are the first thing to break in these Mark II pumps). Hamad Cham, a skilled welder and blacksmith from Sambang, Dankunku, has been dispatched to Choya to assess if the handles and handle casings of Choya's pumps can be fixed.

Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda Pump Project – The GambiaProject Impact
The beneficiaries of this project are estimated to number 3,130, broken down by community as follows:

Sinchu Jaabo 200
Kaani Kunda 1,000
Touba Murit 700
Naani Kunda 850
Choya 380

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jeremy Mak, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.

Comments
Water access is a huge problem, especially with outdated pumps for villages with only a single source of clean drinking water. This project accomplishes a tremendous amount in restoring pumps to effective use with limited resources.

Jeremy previously completed the Dankunku, Fula Kunda, and Brikama Lefaya Pump Project – The Gambia during his service as a Peace Corps Volunteer, and also finished the Niamina Dankunku Area Pump Project - The Gambia as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Jeremy and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.


This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Niamina Dankunku Area Pump Project - The Gambia

Jeremy at work

Location
Dankunku District, Central River Region-South, The Gambia

Community Description
Dankunku, a predominantly ethnic Mandinka village, is the center of Niamina Dankunku District, and located 10 km off the Trans-Gambia South Bank Highway in the Central River Region, The Gambia. The population is comprised of roughly 2,000 residents coming from 140 or so compounds. Mostly subsistence farmers, in the rainy season residents grow coos, groundnuts, and rice.

However, because of poor dike management and torrential rains, much of 2010's year's rice harvest was lost. 2011's harvests were very poor because of extremely limited rain.

Niamina Dankunku Area Pump Project - The GambiaWith most of the populace making less than $1 USD per day per capita, only a few compounds can afford to run generators for electricity, and only a handful have solar powered lights. A lower basic cycle school offers education up to grade 9 for children in the area that come from up to 10 kilometers away, and the village's health center serves 60 communities in the surround area with basic medical services. Five “bitiks” sell small consumer goods, like soap, cigarettes, and oil, and a few women make brisk business selling dried fish and seasonal vegetables. A much wider array of goods is available at weekly markets in nearby Jarreng and Bureng.

A solar borehole with 14 distribution taps was installed in 2007 as part of a rural water supply grant aid program from the Government of Japan. Each household contributes 30 dalasis (a little over $1) a month to pay for the upkeep of the system. However, many taps routinely leak or break altogether, and the pipes are corroding from the inside out.

Dependence on this solar borehole and distribution system over the years has allowed residents to overlook maintaining their handpumps and open wells. Out of village's 9 handpumps, only 4 work, (7 need repairs, and 2 have had various parts stolen). In the whole district, more than half of the handpumps need repair. Out of its open wells, only one still functions, primarily to water cattle from nearby Fula Kunda.

Should the solar borehole ever fail, there will be an acute water shortage. In addition, as a condition of receiving the borehole, residents are not officially permitted to use it for gardening or livestock purposes, although one group of women have informally started a dry season women's garden and many others have personal home gardens. If more water were available on a yearly basis, garden production would likely skyrocket, giving a much needed source of income to local women.

Dankunku's Health Center is also experiencing difficulties with water. Although it provides basic medical care and reproductive and child health services for the 2,000+ residents of its namesake, as well as more than 60 other villages in Niamina Dankunku and Niamina West Districts, it is not hooked up to the community's water system.

The health center's facilities are in dire need of repair. Its solar water system broke over a year ago, one handpump has been stolen, and another one, although working, is in need of repair. "Water is our biggest problem," says community health nurse and midwife Ablie Jallow. “We need water in our clinic, especially our maternity ward. Without enough water, it's difficult to wash our hands to curb infection, much less disinfect our instruments."

Despite official assurances that the center's solar pump will be repaired, it has not yet been fixed. Currently, the health center uses water dispensed from the one remaining handpump. Servicing will allow the pump to deliver more water reliably.

Sara Sambel is a traditional coos and groundnut (peanut) growing and cattle-rearing Fula community that lies about 7 kilometers south of Dankunku, with about 10 compounds. Because of its small size, Sara Sambel has largely been left out of development projects. Unlike Dankunku, Sara Sambel does not have a solar borehole, but rather depends on a single Mark II handpump for its water needs. No maintenance has ever been done on the pump. Its well mechanism is rickety and only a limited amount of water comes out.

Project Description
Niamina Dankunku Area Pump Project - The GambiaThis project is to rehabilitate two Mark II handpumps in the Niamina Dankunku Area, one at the Dankunku Health Center and the other at Sara Sambel.

The project will be undertaken under the direction of the Dankunku Health Center and the Sara Sambel Development Council.

Appropriate Projects funds will be used to purchase the well parts-repair kits for cylinder seals, handle bearings and axles, and new chains. Funds will be used to purchase Mark II handpump parts such as cylinder repair kits (1,650 dalasis each), pump chains (1,350 d/ea), handle axles(750 d/ea), handle bearings (350 d/ea), spacers, and housing bolt nuts. Modest transportation costs to cover travel to and from the spare part dealer in Banjul, the Gambian capital, as well as to Sara Sambel, are also covered.

All pumps will be serviced by Saja Jadama, a Dankunku native, who was trained for 7 months as an area well mechanic by the German NGO GITEC in 1992. He will supervise and implement repairs. He has all the necessary tools to disassemble and assemble well components.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak will oversee the purchase and transport of spare parts from Banjul, Gambia's capital, to site, as well as document receipts and all spending.

Recipient communities will pay Mr. Jadama's honorarium (15 dalasis per hour of work) and assist with transporting Mr. Jadama's tools to site.

Should any leftover funds allow for it, another handpump, either at the Dankunku school or at Sara Wallom, an 8 compound community will be fixed.

Project Impact
2,050 people will directly benefit, and 5,000 people will indirectly benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jeremy Mak, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer

Comments
This project exemplifies the dedication of Peace Corps Volunteers to their communities and their needs, even after their service has been concluded. It is the most basic and effective way to ensure the delivery of needed water to these underserved communities.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify the Peace Corps Volunteer of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Socal District Association for the Disabled Bathroom Project - Ukraine

Socal District Association for the Disabled Bathroom Project - Ukraine

Location
Sokal District, Lvivska Oblast, Ukraine

Community Description
Sokal is a town of approximately 22,000, located on the banks of the Bug River in the Lviv Oblast of western Ukraine.

The Sokal District Association for the Disabled is a local nonprofit organization which has office space which includes a physical rehabilitation center and space for trainings and workshops. The mission of the organization is to unite the district’s special needs population, helping them in different aspects of their lives, and maximizing their integration into the community.

The main activities of the Association are to promote the rights of the local special needs population, to lobby for better social programs, and to include the special needs population as part of society. The Association regularly organizes activities for community members such as concerts, festivals, and sport competitions.

Socal District Association for the Disabled Bathroom Project - Ukraine

Since the most recent restroom remodel in 2006, piping in the ceiling above the organization's restroom has begun to deteriorate at an alarming rate. As a result, the restroom ceiling has suffered extensive water damage and the restroom regularly floods.

An additional problem is that the pipes extend over a storage area where donations, such as wheelchairs and crutches, are stored.

Project Description
This project is to repair the piping system that supplies water to the restroom and storage area of the organization.

Project funds will cover the costs of new materials needed to replace the disintegrating system and for payment to locally skilled technicians.

Materials for cosmetic repairs to the water-damaged areas will be covered with any additional funds, with the labor for such work donated by members of the community.

Project Impact
This project will benefit the 25-30 community members who regularly use this space. In addition, approximately 325 community members who attend special events serving the larger community each year will benefit from the project.

Socal District Association for the Disabled Bathroom Project - Ukraine

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily Watson

Comments
This project will create safe and sanitary conditions at the facility. It will enable the organization to continue to deliver high quality services to the community. Emily previously successfully completed the Zabuzhya Library & Youth Center Bathroom Project – Ukraine and the Creative House for Children Bathroom Project - Ukraine .

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Emily Watson of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Emily and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Ewarton Community Centre Rainwater Catchment and Filtration System Project - Jamaica

Ewarton Community Centre Rainwater Catchment and Filtration System Project - JamaicaLocation
Ewarton, St. Catherine, Jamaica

Community Description
Ewarton is a semi-rural community located at the foot of Mt. Rosser in Northwest St. Catherine, Jamaica. The town is approximately 23 miles south of Ocho Rios.

The community has an approximate population of 14,000 people who live in thirteen unique districts. Persons are predominantly involved in agriculture or employed at WINDALCO/Rusal, the local bauxite company. In the center of town is one of the oldest and largest community centres in Jamaica.

For years, the community centre has had piped water from the National Water Commission (NWC). However, due to the world’s harsh economic situation, neither the Ewarton Community Development Action Committee (ECODAC), the local community based organization for Ewarton, nor the centre management committee is able to regularly pay the NWC bill. Currently, service is cut.

Ewarton Community Centre Rainwater Catchment and Filtration System Project - JamaicaA pump station located in the district of Charlton Meadows supplies Ewarton as a whole with NWC water. However, the NWC admitted formally that they do not have enough water to supply Ewarton as a whole.

Water will be used primarily for drinking water with tentative future expansion of the system to collect unfiltered rain water for hand-washing and flushing of toilets.

Project Description
This project is to set up a rainwater catchment and biosand filtration system for drinking water at the Ewarton Community Centre. The hope is to reduce or eliminate the dependence upon and financial burden of the NWC for water.

The project will be carried out by ECODAC and the Ewarton Watershed & Farmers Co-operative Society.

Metal stands for storage tanks and a bio-sand filter will be constructed to create a gravity driven system.

The missing manifold and outlet PVC plumbing will be re-installed on the bio-sand filter created during PCJ's Group 81, Health Initiative, Hub-Based Peace Corps Training in April 2010.

Ewarton Community Centre Rainwater Catchment and Filtration System Project - Jamaica15 feet of 6” PVC gutter will be installed on the SW corner of the main building at the community centre. Then the entire system will be connected together using ½ inch PVC piping.

Funds will be used to purchase 16-gauge metal sheeting, flat iron for cross-bracing, welding rods, and primer for the stands, 15 feet of 6" PVC guttering, joints, and accessories. Glue, PVC joints, PVC caps, PVC valves, and 3 lengths of PVC pipe will be purchased for the manifold re-installation and connecting plumbing.

Anticipated funding from Friends of Jamaica, a U.S. non-profit organization set up by Returned Peace Corps Jamaica Volunteers to support current PCV's, will cover the 2" galvanized piping and initial water quality testing of the filtered water.

In kind contributions of two 650-gallon water tanks, one from ECODAC and one from the Ewarton Watershed & Farmers Co-operative Society, and a bio-sand filter from Peace Corps Jamaica, will be utilized for the project.

The work will be overseen by Brain Perry, Ewarton Watershed & Farmers Co-operative Society Chairman, working with the PCV. Organization members will help with the installation of guttering and provide general assistance.

Construction and welding of the metal stands will be performed by Auto Thomas, Assistant-Treasurer of the Farmers Co-operative and welding expert.

Plumbing assistance will be provided by master plumber, Ken Caldwell, PCV in Falmouth, Trelawny, Jamaica.

After the system has been successfully created, water quality testing of the filtered water will be done by the Scientific Research Council to ensure that the water meets the standards of the Ministry of Health for safe drinking water.

ECODAC will ensure that the water is tested regularly to guarantee that the filter is working properly and effectively.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Mark Bryson

Comments
This project marshals diverse resources to satisfy a crucial need to bring water to the center.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Kathryn Smith of Cheshire, CT, USA.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Mark Bryson of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Mark and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

 

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Ban Huay Lue Luang Bathroom Project - Thailand

Ban Huay Lue Luang Bathroom Project - ThailandLocation
Ban Huay Lue Luang, Muang District, Chiang Rai Province, Thailand

Community Description
Ban Huay Lue Luang is located in the Mae Yao District of Chiang Rai Province, Thailand. This village of 96 members is of Lahu ethnicity, a "hilltribe" spread throughout the northernmost part of Thailand, mostly in mountainous or hilly areas.

Ban Huay Lue is remote-- although only being within 45 kilometers of the provincial capitol, high slopes and rough terrain have prevented an asphalt road from being built to the village. The existing dirt road is drivable during most of the year, but the monsoon season leaves it off limits to most vehicles.

Ban Huay Lue Luang Bathroom Project - ThailandThere is a main field in the middle of the village that has a soccer field, a small market and a small general store that serves as the social center of the community. There is one toilet in this field, but is getting old and falling into disrepair. Most families around the town center do not have private toilets so they share this one instead.

This village has difficulty obtaining funding from government sources for projects because of its remote location.

Pictures of the village, the town center, and the old community restroom can be found at the following Picasa web album:

http://picasaweb.google.com/115454689678252677742/BanHuayLueIntroWaterCharity?feat=directlink

Project Description
This project is to build three new toilets in the village.

Two of the toilets will be part of one structure, located where the current town center restroom is. The third toilet will be close to the convenience store, just up the hill from the town center.

Ban Huay Lue Luang Bathroom Project - Thailand

The restrooms will be built with cement walls one meter high. The rest of the wall portions and roof will be made from bamboo, a nearly endless and free resource from around the village.

The labor will be provided by community members and provided free of cost. A local community leader has experience in building similar facilities. He has a truck and will purchase the supplies in the provincial capital, transport them back to the village, and supervise construction.

The community will maintain the restrooms. Construction and maintenance will be monitored by RPCV Mark Cox, who visits the visit regularly as a part of his regular work.

Project Impact
96 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Mark Cox, RPCV

Comments
Mark Cox is an Returned Peace Corps Volunteer (RPCV), having finished his two years of Peace Corps Thailand service in April 2010. He previously worked in Pa Tan subdistrict, Khun Tan district, Chiang Rai province, and carried out the Pa Taan Daai Bathroom Project - Thailand.

Mark is currently project manager for a poverty alleviation project being undertaken by Khom Loy Development Foundation in Chiang Rai province.

Dollar Amount of Project
$400.00

Donations Collected to Date
$400.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative, with the help of friends and family of RPCV Mark Cox.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Mark of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or other projects in the country of service.


This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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