RPCV

Kampala Lifewater Filter Distribution Project - Uganda

Clean water for the first time at C4C Children's Home

This project is made possible through the collaboration of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps AssociationNPC & WC Logos

Location

Central Kampala and surrounding areas, Uganda, East Africa

Community Description Boiling Water at Teresa Home Children's Home
Kampala District is a district in Uganda that is coterminous with the country's capital city, Kampala. The main language spoken is Luganda, although many other languages are spoken, including English, Swahili, Runyankole/Rukiga, Acholi, and Lusoga.  Kampala largest city of Uganda and is divided into five boroughs that oversee local planning: Kampala Central Division, Kawempe Division, Makindye Division, Nakawa Division, and Lubaga Division.  

This project focuses on children’s homes and individual households in this district burdened with the health and economic costs of boiling water for consumption.

Problem Addressed
Although the Central Kampala has a functioning piped water system, the water is not fit for immediate consumption. It must be first boiled. If it isn’t, the health consequences can be dire.  Through the years, Uganda’s capital city, as well as districts up-country, have been suffering recurrent outbreaks of waterborne diseases like, cholera, typhoid, and dysentery, which have sickened tens of thousands and claimed numerous lives.

While boiling water is seen as a necessity for cooking and drinking, it is costly. Many Ugandan homes use charcoal or wood stoves to boil water. (Gas and electricity are also used, but to a lesser degree). The daily task of boiling water is not only an economic burden (especially for households who earn only a few dollars a day), but it also contributes heavily to deforestation, hugely contributing to demand on imported charcoal and wood from rural areas outside Kampala. Boiling also means prolonged exposure to indoor air pollution and respiratory diseases from the burning fumes and smoke created by dirty cook stoves. 

Boiling Water at C4C Children's Moreover, even if water is boiled, this does not remove suspended particulate matter and other physical impurities in the water. The long-term health impacts of ingesting these particulates are uncertain and a reason for concern. Better-off Ugandans purchase bottled water rather than boiling water, but even they feel the economic squeeze. Moreover, without an effective recycling program in Kampala, the plastic bottles that this produces creates unnecessary demand on imported plastic products and generates mountains of trash.

Project Description
This project seeks to distribute 50 Sawyer Point One filters to 3-5 children’s homes and day care centers in the Greater Kampala area, as well as approximately 30 individual households. Each Sawyer filter has the ability to filter out impurities as small as 0.1 micron, and can effectively remove bacteria that causes typhoid, E. coli, dysentery, cholera, and other serious waterborne diseases, making it unnecessary to boil water. The filters are extremely long-lasting and capable of producing more than 792,500 gallons of clean water each.

All filter recipients will be taught how to install, operate, and clean these filters to ensure proper care and maintenance, as well as long user life. Teaching will borrow on lessons learned from THIS earlier filter distribution project conducted by Water Charity.
To foster community buy in, all households will be required to contribute funds towards purchasing buckets, onto which the filters will be installed. These filters cost approximately $50 each, and will be provided free of charge to children’s homes and day care centers, and to households of more modest means. For those households with more disposable income, they will be requested to contribute a nominal percentage of the filter costs on a sliding scale.

Beneficiaries will also receive details of a local distributor of Sawyer Filters, should they need future after sales service or wish to purchase additional filters at full cost.

Project ImpactFilter Demonstration
It is envisaged that this project will benefit about 400 Ugandan women, children, and men with a reliable source of clean water, eliminating the need to boil water and saving resources for other competing needs and productive investments, like contributing to savings, buying food for one’s family, or paying for school fees and medical expenses.

This is part of Water Charity's ongoing Filters For Life Program - Worldwide.
 
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jeremy Mak, a member of the National Peace Corps Association and the Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Los Angeles.

Comments
Jeremy has done a large number of projects with Water Charity.  Starting as a PCV in The Gambia, then as an RPCV, and including quite a few ambitious programs to repair or provide new handpumps in communities where their old pumps had ceased functioning, as well as distribute household filters to villages relying on open wells. Water Charity has funded these Gambia Lifewater Pump projects readily (benefitting more than 15,000 Gambians), and will continue to work with Jeremy through a new round of pump and filter projects.  

This filter project is Jeremy’s first in Uganda. To see a complete list of projects that Jeremy has worked on with Water Charity, CLICK HERE.

We at Water Charity commend Jeremy for his outstanding work.

Dollar Amount of Project

$2,500

Donations Received

$0

Donations Needed

$2,500

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. Donating the full amount will allow you to dedicate the project, if that is something you would like.

 


This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.
Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

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Mabumba Primary School Water Project - Zambia

Workers fixing the well

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Mabumba Primary School, Mansa District, Luapula Province, ZambiaStudents at the Mabumba Primary School

Community Description
The Mabumba community is rural and there is no electricity or running water.  Community members live in mud huts with grass thatch roofs.  Most community members rely on farming as their source of income.  Mabumba Primary School is about 17 km or about 10.6 miles from the Provincial Capital of Mansa.  

Problem Addressed
Mabumba Primary School has no functioning source of water on their campus.  There are two open wells, each over 150 meters from school.  These wells can be easily contaminated since they have no lid or cover.  The water cannot be trusted as a safe drinking water source and often dries completely in the hot season.
 
Like all the schools that the Water for Zambia project has targeted, there was a merry-go-round play pump that had not worked since 2009. This pump was intended to pump water through the energy created by children playing on the merry-go-round. Unfortunately, the project failed and the pump quit working after just one year.

Project Description
The Water for Zambia project will remove the merry-go-round and all the rusted piping below. The merry-go-round will be installed elsewhere for the children to play on.  The rusted piping will be removed and replaced with PVC pipes. Each section of the PVC piping is 3 meters. The pipes will be securely connected with solvent cement.  

well siteUnder the Water for Zambia project, all targeted schools require borehole rehabilitations.  These rehabilitations require no further drilling. The borehole at Mabumba Primary School is 21.3 meters deep, with a static water level of 8.5 meters.  At the bottom of the well, will be a sand layer.  At the end of the piping, will be a sand screen to prevent any sand and debris from coming up through the pumping. The pedestal will then be attached to the concrete and a hand pump will be installed. The construction process will take a total of 5 days. 

The pumping will allow water to flow at a rate of 10 liters per 21 seconds. The pump will be easy for students to utilize and the water is potable without purification. The above- ground improvements will include the creation of a cement apron around the pump and a drainage way to direct overflow to a soak pit.  The soak pit collects all runoff water.  Students have been provided with fruit trees to plant near the new water source.

Additionally, the surrounding villages and community members will come to the school to access the new source of water. There are certain hours when the borehole will be open to the community. During open hours, the borehole will be a center of activity. Men, women, and children of many ages will come to collect water, chat, and laugh. All community members utilizing the water source will pay a small fee to the school that will be saved in a spare-parts fund for future repairs.

The new borehole allows for students and teachers to improve the cleanliness of all school facilities, including toilets. The convenient source of water allows student hygiene to improve.  Girls are most impacted by this development.  Many young girls would once drop out of school after reaching puberty.  The new water source will allow the girls to remain in school.

This project is being completed in collaboration with Water for Zambia.  All construction carried out by the Water for Zambia project is done in partnership with the local government council. The construction team will come from the Mansa Municipal Council located in the district capital, Mansa, in the Luapula Province.  

There are five men involved in the project.   Swala Mumba is certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is directing the team and handling all administrative tasks on the ground in Mansa.  Swala is trained in record keeping, program planning, and accounting. He has an advanced diploma in project management from the Institute of Commercial Management (located in the UK). He started working at the Mansa Municipal Council in 2008 as a rural water supply and sanitation assistant. 

Bernard Chansa is also certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is also the only plumber at the Mansa Municipal Council, and is, therefore, always needed for countless tasks. He started working at the council in 2006. He leads the construction team in the field.  Patrick Chabu is a skilled bricklayer. He is in charge of the soak pit construction and plastering at all the schools. He started working for the council in 2007.  Michael Mpana and Daniel Impundu are half-brothers. Michael is 20 years old and Daniel is 19. They are both handymen and help with all the heavy labor tasks. They are in training with Mr. Chansa in borehole construction and maintenance. 

Project Impact
This project will impact 1,212 people at the school directly; 1,190 students enrolled at the school and a teaching staff of 22.   In addition, many of the villagers, as well as visitors and future students, will utilize the water .he number of people impacted by this project is likely to be well over 2,000.

Drainage pit

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily McKeone

Monitoring and Maintenance 
The schools and surrounding communities have been involved in every step of this project’s progress. These boreholes have an expected lifetime of 50 years.  It is the hope of many that the communities will sustain their borehole for that lifetime.

During the construction process, the community will provide labor, sand, and stone for the project.  The value of these contributions is about 20% of full project cost. 

The students will be engaged in the process of sensitizing the community. Teachers will prepare a course about water, sanitation, and proper utilization of the borehole.  Class discussions will include information about boiling drinking water, chlorine usage, washing hands after latrine use and proper hygiene.  Following the course, students will create sketches, poems, dances, and songs of various scenarios around water and sanitation. The performances will demonstrate proper and improper borehole use.  The students will present to the community at large for a day of sensitization and celebration.

Lastly, Mabumba Primary School has formed a maintenance committee to monitor and protect the borehole.  Teachers and the Parent Teacher Association are involved in the committee and will ensure proper regulation, operation, and maintenance.  This committee meets regularly to address any issues that arise. The committee will be responsible for determining hours of operation for the borehole, locking the borehole on off hours, and collecting community fees.  All community fees will be safely secured for a spare parts fund.  Spare parts are available in the district capital of Mansa. Additionally, rural area pump minders are trained to repair the Afridev boreholes. Area pump minders (or APM’s) are equipped with toolkits and bicycles to reach rural areas and assist with repairs. 

Comments
The school will now have a reliable source of drinking water.  The struggle to find water and the time spent searching have been eliminated.  Since the task of fetching water mostly falls on young girls, this project will have the most impact them.  The students will have more time to dedicate to their studies and other tasks. The impact of a clean water source on campus is expected to improve health and sanitation at school, resulting in improved school attendance.  The school has been instructed to plant fruit trees near the borehole, to also assist with the issue of food security in the area. Finally, the school is in the process of constructing an additional classroom for students.  It is expected that construction will be completed sooner as a result of the new, convenient source of water. 

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it does fall into Water Charity's LGL+ grouping of projects that have a pronounced element involving helping girls go to, and stay in, school, and part of Water Charity's Let Girls Learn Initiative.

Emily McKeone worked with Water Charity as a PCV, directing the prototype project, which created boreholes for three schools.  With the assistance of Water Charity, she was able to come back to Zambia as an RPCV and continue her work.  This project is #11 of 13 school boreholes with Emily,  bringing the total to 16 schools boreholes in Zambia.

This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.

 
Any additional donations will be utilized to fund additional projects in Zambia.
 
This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.
 
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Rusinga Island Parish, St. Joseph's Girls' Secondary School Water Project - Kenya

large tank behind the crowd

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Kakrigu, Rusinga Island, KenyaPoint where the water reaches the school

Community Description
The area is high on the Likongo Hill in Kakrigu, on Rusinga Island. It consists of the St. Joseph's Girls Secondary School, the Rusinga Parish Catholic Church, housing and offices for the Priests and Sisters.  The school, at capacity, comprises 85 students, faculty and staff of 15, and church staff of 10. This community supports the girls' school and local parish.  These girls are from very poor surroundings, and would not be in school if it were not for this school. To get to the main road, which is dirt, the walk is about a mile. From there, the nearest town is Mbita, and that is several miles away. The walk to Lake Victoria is about a mile and a half.

Problem Addressed
The water for the entire community comes from a deep borehole on the hill above all of the structures in this small community. The pump in the well supplies a central tank that then distributes the water through a series of 2-inch pipes. At present, the borehole is not supplying any water. There has been water in the well even in the driest of weather in the past.  A well expert, from Nairobi, has been on site and indicates that the pump is working but the fault may be in the pipe and connections. 

Project Description
This project is to restore water to the community.  180 feet of old pipe will be removed and replaced with lower-cost and more easily handled PVC pipe, and piping to the school will be repaired.

Rusinga Island Parish, St. Joseph's Girls' Secondary School will provide sourcing and coordination.  Dakal Enterprises from Nairobi has provided the project plan and budget.

The length of the project is a matter of days with the benefit of the whole community having access to clean water. The contractor will come to the site, remove the steel pipe and pump from the well, and connect the pump to new PVC pipe installed in the well.
They are the parish priest, Robert Sewe, Sister Ann, children from the hill, teachers, cooks and   residents and local youths.
Project Impact
This project will benefit 110 adults and secondary girl students.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Dave Rowson

Monitoring and Maintenance
The project will use a not-to exceed-contract and will be run in proper project management form. The well is under the access and control of the Parish Sisters, and they will be responsible for the upkeep and monitoring.

Comments
This is a high-impact, quick-turnaround project that will impact, immediately, over a hundred young girls, faculty and support staff.

This project is directly related to ensuring that the St. Joseph's Girls have the maximum opportunity to learn. St. Joseph's Girls Secondary School provides a rigorous academic schedule from Form 1 to Form 4.      

Presently, when there is no rainwater in the tanks, the girls have to trudge to Lake Victoria and carry 20 liters or more water back to their dorms for drinking and washing. There are several problems with this situation.
    
1) Walking nearly 4 miles with such a load is tiring and will affect study time and effort.
2) Lake Victoria is not clean.  Among pollution and fecal runoff, it has schistosomiasis, typhus and other diseases associated with it. Water guard is used, when available, but that is a cost not easily met by most girls. under the tree is the outlet for the school

Having the access to clean water is not only an academic benefit, but is a very important health benefit. So much more should and could be accomplished during the time allocated to hiking to the lake and hauling heavy loads of water back to the school.  The health of the community is a real concern here.

This is the second project Water Charity has undertaken with David & Rebecca Rowson as RPCVs in the parish of Rusinga Island.  To read about the first, which involved a series of small water projects, CLICK HERE.

As PCVs serving together, Dave & Rebecca completed 3 projects with Water Charity in Kenya in this region:

St. Joseph's Girls School Water Project - Kenya
Waware Mixed Day Secondary School Rainwater Harvesting Project - Kenya
Sargy Education Center Rainwater Catchment Project - Kenya

Bravo!  Congratulations to both David and Rebecca for all the great work they have done in Kenya.

This project is part of the Water Charity and National Peace Corps Association East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.  If you would like to see additional projects of this type, please go to that page and Donate.

This project is being funded through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

This project has been finished.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Priests' house and churchThe pump that supplies the junction box


Parish priest, Robert Sewe, Sister Ann, children from the hill, teachers, etc.

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Kiritiri Water Tank Project - Kenya

Villagers

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association, and falls under our East Africa Water & Sanitation Program..

Location

Kiritiri, Mbeere South, Embu County, Eastern Province, KenyaDry season

Community Description
Kiritiri, Kenya is a market community of several thousand located in Eastern Province. Recently, it was made a regional headquarters and the population has grown drastically. The area is south of Mount Kenya, far enough from the effects of the Mountain to get any benefit from the increased rain there. Kiritiri is located on the paved road leading to Kamburu dam, one of the largest hydroelectric dams in the country. Despite that, one in three planting seasons produce enough for excess to sell for income. Water is by far the community's largest concern. Other issues within the community are lack of income and poor housing.

Problem Addressed
When RPCV Jennifer Mueller lived in the community from 1997-1999, there were four water boreholes as well as some shallow hand-dug pits where water collected. Since then, however, 3 of the 4 boreholes have stopped working due to the water table lowering and since a recent political division, Kiritiri is now a district headquarters causing the population to grow considerably. Fifteen years ago, water could be purchased for 5 shillings a 20-liter jerry can, (a fee used to keep the boreholes maintained); the cost has increased to 20 shillings a liter in the dry season (accounting for supply and demand). The one borehole remaining just doesn’t have the capacity for the population growth.

rainy season

Project Description
The Maragwa Umoja group will start to build Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks, and then build water tanks to help with lack of water, poor housing, and lack of income. With the addition of cement to normal local subsoil, and needing little water and no firing to cure (using wood that is scarce), the bricks are then made into uniform interlocking bricks. The hand-operated press machines creating the interlocking bricks take less mortar, thereby reducing costs. The brick presses come in straight and curved forms, the curved specifically for water tanks and the straight bricks for foundations and water draw points. One bag of cement makes 100 to 150 bricks depending on the soil consistency. About 400 bricks are needed for a 5,000 liter tank.

Rainfall in the area and the average size of homes (tin roofs available for catchment area) would make 5,000-liter tanks the best option to sustain an average family of five through a dry season using the water for drinking and cooking. Any greater capacity would rarely fill fully.  The press machines are made in Nairobi, and are hand operated requiring no electricity and few parts with the potential to break. Should replacement parts be necessary, as they are built in-country, parts would be locally available. The tanks then need only a skin of waterproof cement on the inside to make them waterproof, and a roof to prevent malaria-carrying mosquitos from entering... as well as reducing loss from evaporation. 

Project funds will be used to build 10 tanks to get the project started, using them as training. When the business is off the ground and making profits, the group will then use that money to build tanks for the remaining 90+ members. Bricks will also be produced for sale to others in the community

local homeThe brick method allows tanks to be built for half to 2/3rds of the cost of plastic water tanks bought from out of the area. The straight bricks used for the support platforms can also be sold as housing bricks that do not melt away in the rain, as many conventional mud brick or wattle and daub houses do, expanding the business potential beyond just water tanks. 

With both machines, materials for water tanks and houses can be produced locally without transportation costs, as the machine can be moved to the building location instead of moving thousands of mud brick or stone. Costs of the ISSB bricks are a bit more than mud brick but less than the stone quarried out of the area, a local engineer estimates they should be sold for 15 shillings instead of 26 for stone. Mud bricks are about 10 shillings each, but are poor quality, and do not withstand the rainy seasons well.

Once the technology and access spreads across the districts it could reach 10,000 or more with the communities of Iriamurai, Siakago, and Gachoka all within a short distance and lacking water.

Project Impact
This project will directly impact 500 people and indirectly benefit several thousand in Kiritiri itself.
dry season
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jennifer Mueller

Monitoring and Maintenance
Each family receiving a tank, will be responsible for the care and maintenance of the tank.

The tanks are fairly easy to keep once built.  A little water needs to be kept in them to prevent the concrete from cracking over time and to keep it hydrated. Each year they do need to be cleaned of the roof debris that gets washed in as well as cleaning the roof before the rainy season to prevent debris and contaminants from entering the tanks. Once the tanks are in place, the 105 women of the group will have more time for their families and school as well as increased funds from not having to purchase water. As the profits from the business come in, money to build more tanks, pay school fees, improve their housing, and those directly doing the labor, will be paid wages they would not receive otherwise.

Comments

Water Charity has extensive experience with the ISSB technique and has done many projects that utilize them.  A good example is the Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program - Uganda.

The Maragwa Umoja self-help group is a women’s group registered with the government of Kenya, located about a quarter kilometer from the town, founded in 1999, to help improve their situation. They received a grant from the Department of Agriculture a few years ago to build a water pan by placing an earthen dam across a drainage way to help with the water problem in the area. Without any engineering design or assistance on the construction, the end result is that water evaporates quickly leaving them without in the dry season and even when it is there, it is too dirty to be drinkable from sediment and animal access. As water is such a common problem in the area, the group swelled from 20 members to over 105. With the increased membership this project will directly benefit at least 500 members of the group and indirectly benefit several thousand in Kiritiri itself as the demand for the available water sources are lessened.

Jennifer plans on traveling in the summer of 2016 (July at best guess right now) and staying for three months to establish the business side of the project, and oversee the completion of the first tanks.

Dollar Amount of Project
$5,900

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,900

This project has been completed, but we are still accepting donations.  To see the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

dry seasonkitchen in local home

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Siyabu Village Water Project - Malawi

Mama and youth carrying water

NPC & WC LOGOThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location

Siyabu Village, Zomba District, Malawi
map
Community Description
Siyabu is a typical rural Malawian village without running water or electricity, located along a dirt road, about a two-hour walk from the city of Zomba.

Problem Addressed
There is no accessible clean water source for rural residents of Siyabu Village. This leads to illness and, in some cases, death, particularly among children under the age of 5. Most residents currently fetch water for drinking and cooking from dirty wells or waterways like streams or rivers. Women, in particular, are vulnerable in the absence of clean, nearby water sources. In our partner villages, women fetching water from sometimes distant, unsanitary sources have experienced domestic abuse for taking too long and husbands suspect infidelity or rape when women venture into remote areas, and death from drowning in flooded rivers during the rainy season.

Linesi Masala, a mother of two and resident of Siyabu, was abused by her husband for taking too long to retrieve water from a shallow well, where wait times were very long. He accused her of using that time to sleep with other men. Her husband subsequently died of dysentery. Approximately five couples in Siyabu have divorced over this issue.

Mother and youth at the water holeProject Description
This project entails constructing a borehole in Siyabu Village. A village project committee, acting on behalf of the entire village, chose the borehole location. The site is publicly accessible. 

EZ Borehole Drillers, a company located in Blantyre, with substantial experience in the area, including other boreholes funded by Water Charity, will do the construction. The installation will take about 2 weeks to complete. It is expected that water will be reached at about 45 meters, but the well will be drilled to depths of about 60 meters, if necessary. Before drilling, a hydro-geographical assessment using electrical measurements will be conducted to find the depth of the underlying aquifer. EZ Borehole Drillers will guarantee the borehole for one year.

Above ground, the boreholes will include a standard metal pump mechanism, a cement foundation to protect the pump mechanism, a cement spillway to channel excess water, and a clothes-washing station. Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the skilled labor as well as for the materials that cannot be found locally, such as piping, fixtures and fittings, and concrete. Communities will contribute volunteer labor, materials, including bricks and sand, and about $400 in cash.

Project Impact
There are 104 households, or 512 people, who will directly benefit from the project.  Village X will gather data from nearest health clinic to evaluate the impact of the borehole, comparing rates of waterborne illness before and after installation.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
VillagersThe project will be administered by Michael Buckler, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Malawi from 2006 to 2008. He is the founder and CEO of Village X, a social enterprise located in Washington, D.C. dedicated to improving community development work in sub-Saharan Africa.  He is a member of the National Peace Corps Association, Friends of Malawi, and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington, D.C.

Monitoring and Maintenance
EZ Borehole Drillers will conduct 2 days of community-based borehole management training. Trainees will include the village chief and members of two borehole management committees, a technical committee responsible for upkeep and maintenance, and a sanitation committee charged with keeping the borehole tidy. The technical committees will collect a maintenance fee of 100 MK (about 20 cents) per month per household to ensure that there are sufficient funds to adequately maintain the facility and repair it when needed. 

Comments
This is an important infrastructure project that will improve the health and wellbeing of Siyabu. It is well planned, with strong management and fiscal safeguards in place. It incorporates elements of oversight and buy-in by the residents to make it sustainable into the future.

This project is part of our ongoing Malawi Borehole Program, in concert with Michael Buckler and Village X.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.
If you like this project, and want to help with future projects of this type, please Donate for the East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

This project has been COMPLETED.  To view the results, CLICK HERE.

at the waterholewoman and baby walking through the fields

Villagers thanking Water Charityvillagers

 

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Lukangaba Primary School Water Project - Zambia

Students at Lukangaba Primary School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logo

Location

Lukangaba Primary School, Mansa District, Luapula Province, Zambia

Getting ReadyCommunity Description
The Lukangaba community is rural and there is no electricity or running water. Community members live in mud huts with grass thatch roofs. Most community members rely on farming as their source of income. Lukangaba Primary School is about 20 km or 12.4 miles from the Provincial Capital of Mansa.

Problem Addressed
Lukangaba Primary School has no functioning source of water on their campus. The teachers and students have to walk over a kilometer to reach a river for drinking water. Work on Lukangaba’s new borehole begins in the thick of dry season, and any well source of water near the school has dried. Like all the schools that the Water for Zambia project has targeted, there is a merry-go-round play pump that has not worked since 2009. This pump was intended to pump water through the energy created by children playing on the merry-go-round. Unfortunately, the project failed and the pump quit working after just one year.

Project Description
The Water for Zambia project will remove the merry-go-round and all the rusted piping below. The merry-go-round will be installed elsewhere for children to play.

Next, the piping will be replaced with PVC pipes. Each section of the PVC piping is 3 meters. The pipes are securely connected with solvent cement. Then, a rope is utilized to connect all piping together. Under the Water for Zambia project, all targeted schools require borehole rehabilitations. The borehole at Lukangaba Primary School is 33 meters deep, with a static water level of 9 meters. At the bottom of the well will be a sand layer. At the end of the piping will be a sand screen to prevent any sand and debris from coming up through the pumping. The pedestal will then be attached to the concrete and a hand pump will be installed. The construction process will take a total of 5 days.

The pumping will allow water to flow at a rate of 10 liters per 21 seconds. The pump will be easy for students to utilize, and the water is potable without purification. The new borehole will allow for students and teachers to improve the cleanliness of all school facilities, including toilets.

Additionally, the surrounding villages and community members will come to the school to access the new source of water. There are certain hours when the borehole will be open to the community. During open hours, the borehole will be the center of activity where, men, women, and Lukangaba Primary Schoolchildren of many ages come to collect water, chat, and laugh.  All community members utilizing the water source will pay a small fee to the school that is then saved in a spare parts fund for future repairs.

The above ground improvements will include the creation of a cement apron around the pump and a drainage way to direct overflow to a soak pit. The soak pit will collect all runoff water. Students have been provided with fruit trees to plant near the new water source.

All construction carried out is done in partnership with the local government council. The construction team comes from the Mansa Municipal Council located in the district capital, Mansa, in the Luapula Province. There are five men involved in the project.  Swala Mumba is certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance.  He is a counterpart to Emily who assists with directing the team and administrative tasks.  Emily has trained Swala in record keeping, program planning, and accounting. He has an advanced diploma in project management from the Institute of Commercial Management (located in UK). He started working at the Mansa Municipal Council in 2008 as a rural water supply and sanitation assistant.

Bernard Chansa is also certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is also the only plumber at the Mansa Municipal Council, and is, therefore, always needed for countless tasks. He started working at the council in 2006. He leads the construction team in the field.  Patrick Chabu is a skilled bricklayer. He is in charge of the soak pit construction and plastering at all the schools. He started working for the council in 2007.  Michael Mpana and Daniel Impundu are half brothers. Michael is 20 years old and Daniel is 19. They are both handymen and help with all the labor heavy tasks. They are in training with Mr. Chansa in borehole construction and maintenance.

Project Impact
This project will directly impact at least 1,200 people. There are the 576 people at the school; 564 students enrolled at the school and a teaching staff of 12. And, as well, this project will also impact neighboring villagers, visitors, and future students.

Lukangaba SensitizationReturned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily McKeone

Monitoring and Maintenance
The schools and surrounding communities have been involved in every step of this project’s progress. It is a long held belief, that development without community engagement is not sustainable. These boreholes have an expected lifetime of 50 years. It is the hope of many that the communities will sustain their borehole for that lifetime.

During the construction process, the community will provide labor, sand, and stone for the project. The value of these contributions is about 20% of full project cost.

The students have been engaged in the process of sensitizing the community. Teachers prepared a course about water, sanitation, and proper utilization of the borehole. Class discussions will include information about boiling drinking water, chlorine usage, washing hands after latrine use and proper hygiene. Following the course, students will create sketches, poems, dances, and songs of various scenarios around water and sanitation. The performances will demonstrate proper and improper borehole use.  The students will present to the community at large for a day of sensitization and celebration.

Lastly, Lukangaba Primary School has formed a maintenance committee to monitor and protect the borehole. Teachers and the Parent Teacher Association are involved in the committee and ensure proper regulation, operation, and maintenance. This committee meets regularly to address any issues that arise. The committee is responsible for determining hours of operation for the borehole, locking the borehole on off hours as well as collecting community fees. All community fees will be safely secured for a spare parts fund.  Spare parts are available in the district capital of Mansa.  Additionally, rural area pump minders are trained to repair the Afridev boreholes. Area pump minders (or APM’s) are equipped with toolkits and bicycles to reach rural areas and assist with repairs.

Comments
The convenient source of water will allow student hygiene to improve. Girls will be most impacted by this development. Many young girls would once drop out of school after reaching puberty. The new water source will allow the girls to remain in school. The struggle to find water and the time spent searching will be eliminated. Since the task of fetching water mostly falls on young girls, this project will most impact them. The students will have more time to dedicate to their studies and other tasks. The impact of a clean water source on campus is expected to improve health and sanitation at school, resulting in improved school attendance. As such, this project receives the WC designation LGL+, for projects that promote the values and intentions of the Let Girls Learn program without actually being part of the official program. It is a part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative.

The school has been instructed to plant fruit trees near the borehole to also assist with the issue of food security in the area.Gathering water

During Emily’s time as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia, she recognized the problem of inadequate access to safe drinking water sources. She was shocked to discover that all of the schools in the area lacked an on-site, working water source.  Water Charity helped her do her first 3 school borehole projects as a PCV.  After her COS, she decided to return to Zambia as an RPCV, and start her own effort, Water for Zambia.  We at Water Charity have joined with Emily and Water for Zambia and have funded all of the work she has done for Zambia.  At present, we have committed to do 13 school water projects.  This is number 9 of 13.

$0 - This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.

 
Any additional donations will be utilized to fund additional projects in Zambia.
 
This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.
 
 
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Bikira Catholic Parish Community Water Projects - Uganda

Kitteredde Primary School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Bikira Catholic Parish, Masaka Diocese, Kasali Sub-County, Rakai District -- Uganda
Students carrying water
Community Description
The pump project will serve five communities, including three schools, one novitiate, and the Bannakaroli Brothers Community. The names of the schools are St. Joseph’s Secondary School (coed), Sacred Heart School (boys), and Kiteredde Vocational Institute (coed).  Students in the three schools range in age from 12 to 20 years old.  Girls form the majority of the population in the two coed schools.

More than half of the students are boarders at the schools, and the others walk to school from surrounding areas.  Most of the students come from poor farm families.  In addition to the students who live in the schools, the community is also made up of teaching and support staff, half of whom are women.
 
Problem Addressed
The current surface-type water pump was installed ten years ago.  Since then, the population of the institutions has doubled while the capacity of the pump has remained constant. Presently, the pump can’t produce enough water for the total population in the area. As a result of this situation, the only alternative water source where the Brothers and students draw water is highly congested with poor sanitation.  To make matters worse, during the dry spell these water sources dry up.  There is a major need for installing a submersible pump which will reach down to the water table and provide a clean and adequate water supply for the Brothers’ Community and the schools in the area.
Man using manual pump
Project Description
Water system: There are five institutions, which will share in using the system: a secondary school, a secondary technical school, a vocational school, a novitiate, and the Brothers’ residence.  The system will consist of the following components:

1.  Water Source:  The water will be pumped by submersible pump from underground through a borehole to an existing well, which has a reliable water table, which will meet the needs of the project.

2.  Characteristics of the well:  The present well will not change.  The engineer will only remove the galvanized pipes and the manual pump and replace them with plastic pipes and the submersible pump.  The present borehole was constructed in such a way that it can be used either manually or using a motor pump.  Therefore, there is no need to enlarge the existing bore hole.

3.  Main Tank:  Water from the underground will be pumped through the transmission pipes into the main tank.  From the main tank, water will be distributed to different institutions by gravity flow through the pipe network, which is already in existence.

4.  Submersible Pump: The engineer will install a Grundfos submersible pump with an output of 5,000 liters per hour, which is both reliable and powerful enough to pump water for the whole community.Students collecting water

5.  Network:  This is composed of pipes, which distribute water from the main tanks to various areas of the community.  The network includes one reserve tank for each of five communities.  The tanks now in place are old and need to be replaced.  These will be replaced later when the Brothers obtain enough money to do so—probably through fundraisers organized by the Brothers of St. Charles Lwanga Foundation in Chicago.

 6.  Power Source:  Electricity from the national power line will be used to run the pump.
 
Storehouse:  There is a need for a small storehouse where spare parts can be kept. This house is also necessary to protect part of the pump system including the switch, electric wires, and water meter from bugs, weather, and children.  The funds necessary to construct the house will be paid by the schools.

Elder in a wheelchairProject Impact
This project will benefit 2,200 people.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
James Salvatore

Monitoring and Maintenance
The maintenance and sustainability of the project will be the responsibility of Kiteredde St. Joseph’s Secondary and Technical school management committee and administration. According to the engineer, the average cost of maintaining the pump is around $55 per month. This expense will be included in the overall annual budget of the school, which will be paid for through school fees charged to the parents. Since the Bannakaroli Brothers administer the schools and their own community and novitiate, they will bear practically all of the responsibility for the implementation and the administration of the project.

 Comments
The Bannakaroli Brothers Community with the help of the engineer will oversee the implementation and administration of the project.

James is a Returned Peace Corp Volunteer who was posted in Piura, Peru from 1966-68.
This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.  If you like this project, please donate to our East Africa Water and Sanitation Program, of which this project is a component. 

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

Elders housed in the communityExisting well

Collecting waterStudents carrying waterStudents collecting waterSchool and tanks

SchoolSchool

SchoolSchool

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Doumandzou Primary School Bathroom Project - Gabon

Doumandzou Primary School Bathroom Project - Gabon

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Water Charity is pleased to have this be our very first project in Gabon!

Location
Doumandzou, Woleu-Ntem Province, Gabon, Central Africa

Community Description
Doumandzou is a small village of about 250 people in the Woleu-Ntem province in northwestern Gabon, about 10 miles from the border with Equatorial Guinea.  Themen at the well nearest large town is only about 45 miles away, but conditions of the road turn that distance into a 90-minute drive.  Doumandzou is in the full tropical rain forest with two rainy seasons from September to December and from February to May. The community has a self-sufficient agricultural base, with a few farmers able to sell their products to a larger market.  There is a working well and pump to provide water to the village. 

Several wealthier residents operate generators in the evenings that help power the growing use of cell phones across the entire village.  Within the past five years, a new health clinic has opened with a full-time nurse.  There are no stores to speak of in the village, but there are two small bars that operate out of two residents’ homes. 

In 1965, Peace Corps volunteers constructed a three-classroom primary school and three teachers’ houses, with two latrines, one for the teachers and one for the students.      

A group of five volunteers (including three RPCVs) lived in Doumandzou for six weeks in early 2015 as they set about repairing the primary school.  The villagers lived up to the reputation in the region for hospitality and were extremely generous and welcoming over that period.  Two residents in cement block homes provided lodging.  Villagers shared food from their gardens, and provided volunteer labor for the repair of the school. The school, along with the new-staffed health clinic, will reverse the trend of population loss.

schoolProblem Addressed
Several issues dominate the village, including isolation and economic opportunity, but two stand out for this project.  First is its loss of population.  In the past three decades, population has moved away from the village in search of jobs, but also for closer access to basic health and educational facilities. With the deteriorating condition of the school and the teachers’ houses, it was difficult to recruit and maintain teachers, and the school had been closed for as long as a year on several occasions over the past 20 years.  Parents sent their children to neighboring communities to stay with relatives in order to ensure prolonged schooling.  With the school renovations completed in February, 2015, the village was already at the start of the new school year in September.  There was an increase in the number of students, and a full-time teacher with clean, solid housing.  

The second issue is sanitation, particularly for the school.  During the 2015 school renovation, the volunteers recovered two latrines that Peace Corps Volunteers had built in 1965 that had been taken over by forest growth, one for the students and one for the teachers.  Both were structurally sound, but only the latrine for the teachers appeared to be still in use by residents, since there was a path through the forest to the doors.  The student latrine with two stalls was full and unused.   

There are no facilities at all for students.  With a couple of notable exceptions, most residents have makeshift outdoor latrines with little provision for healthy sanitation practices. 


Project Description
This project comprises the construction of two latrines for the students of Doumandzou’s newly renovated primary school, plus integrated sanitary handwashingold latrine stations. Taking advantage of simple and proven designs, the project will create latrines that are safe, convenient, easily cleaned, and odor-free. These toilets, in conjunction with the handwashing stations, will enhance and promote personal hygiene in the school and surrounding village. The two components of the project are detailed below.

Latrines: The selected technology is the well-known Ventilated Improved Pit (VIP) latrine with construction details borrowed from a CARE design proven during the building of 1,400 latrines in Zambia. In order to assure an appropriate environment for girls and boys, two single-stall latrines will be built.  They will be separated from each other and from the school by approximately 20 meters.  For each latrine, a pit 3 m deep will be dug and lined with 10 cm cement blocks. The reinforced cement slab used to seal the pit will have a drop hole and foot rests designed to minimize fecal contamination.

A second hole in the rear of the slab will house the VIP ventilation pipe that provides fly and odor control. Shelter walls will be built on top of the slab using 10 cm block, and will include a labyrinth-style, no-hands entryway. A simple sloped aluminum roof will cap the shelter, with gutters attached to capture rainwater for the handwashing station. Based on the size of the pit, the materials of construction, and the number of students using the latrines, the facility should last 20 years.

Encore de la Paix, a social action arm for the Friends of Gabon, an affiliategroup of the National Peace Corps Association will work with the villagers to complete the project.

The villagers of Doumandzou have committed to digging the two latrine pits and making the required cement blocks prior to the arrival of the Encore de la Paix volunteers. The latrines will be sited north of the school building near the edge of the cleared school terrain.

Handwashing station: A simple station for hand washing will be constructed for each latrine. The selected technology mimics the Tippy-Tap, a simple design allowing hands-free washing. A several-liter reservoir suspended from wooden poles is tipped by foot lever to slowly dispense washing water. Bar soap is tied to the poles. School teachers will assign the task of filling the reservoir daily, and providing soap monthly, to a rotating list of students. During the rainy season, roof runoff will supply the needed water; at other times of year, assigned students will carry water to the school. While this technology is not particularly durable, the required materials are available locally, so that once the stations are demonstrated, they are likely to be maintained or rebuilt by students or villagers as needed.

Project Impact
This project will  impact 285 people directly, including 35 students yearly (with enrollment growing to 50 at times) and the 250 people of the village, who will have access.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
John Dickson, RPCV Gabon ('76-'79)

Corp  de GardeMonitoring and Maintenance
While the school staff will be responsible for daily monitoring and maintenance of the latrines, Encore de la Paix is working closely with a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who lives in the capitol and has extensive contacts in this region.  He will be procuring the materials ahead of their arrival and contracting with the skilled labor.  He is also the on-the-ground liaison with the village association, and the parents' association from the school.  The President of the village association is a retired regional director for the Ministry of Health; he owns a home in the village and makes regular visits between the capital and Doumandzou.

Encore de la Paix will coordinate with the school principal and the health clinic nurse on follow-up activities to ensure re-supply of the water (during the brief time when school is in session during the dry season) and of materials for annual cleansing.  Regular visits by the President of the village association and annual visits by the American coordinator based in Libreville will support on-going monitoring and maintenance. The latrine will be completed before mid-April, when the American volunteers depart.

Comments
The Association of People Of The Village Doumandzou will provide community involvement. 

Encore de la Paix is a group of Gabon RPCVs, a service arm with Friends of Gabon, an affiliate group of National Peace Corps Association. John Dickson reports:

Peace Corps closed its operations in Gabon in 2005, but are The teamnow conducting an assessment with the plan to return in 2016-7.  When the group of five Encore de la Paix volunteers worked with the village of Doumandzou to repair the school earlier in 2015, we were surprised at how the villagers remembered by name the first group of Peace Corps volunteers who had built the school in 1965.  The group of seven young men had only stayed in the village for seven months to complete the school, but they left a lasting impression.  We met several graduates of this school, including the man who went on to become regional director at the Ministry of Health, another who was a parliamentarian, a policeman, as well as several who stayed in the village and recalled their school days fondly. It was not uncommon that, while we were working on the school, villagers would come by to watch, to lend a hand, or to offer produce from their gardens. 

At times, we would glance into the classrooms and catch school-age children sitting at the new desks, admiring and anticipating the day when the classrooms would be ready for use. All this reminded us of the importance of the school, and now the latrine, but also the importance of reconnecting with the Gabonese, of working and living side-by-side with our hosts, and making new friendships.

Let Girls Learn

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it does fall into Water Charity's LGL+ grouping of projects that have a pronounced element involving helping girls go to, and stay in, school. 

Building latrines in Doumandzou lines up precisely with the Let Girls Learn Project in that it will provide all students, but especially girls, with a clean, comfortable place to meet their sanitary needs while continuing to stay in school.  School ages vary widely in Gabon; as students enter formal education late, interrupt their schooling for a year or two before returning.  This results in a wide range of students enrolled at this primary school. 

There are girls who have already reached puberty sitting alongside others who are about to enter puberty and others who are far from that stage.  The older girls who have lost school years face several obstacles in continuing.  Not only are they embarrassed to be sitting side by side the younger girls, but also the lack of facilities causes them to lose even more school.  However, new sanitary facilities can make it easier on them to continue, and they can even be enlisted to discuss sanitary practices with the younger girls. Finally, we hope to work with the nurse at the village clinic to provide basic instruction in sanitary practices for the school-age girls.

This project is being paid for through the support of an anonymous donor.  If you would like to see more projects like this, please donate to our Western Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion CLICK HERE.

Ambassador Akutteh

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Nachuma Village Water Project - Malawi

Woman getting water

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC LOGOS

Location

Nachuma Village, Zomba District, Malawimap of Nachuma Village, Malawi

Community Description
Nachuma is a typical rural Malawian village without running water or electricity, located along a dirt road, about a two-hour walk from the city of Zomba. Nachuma, an unusually large village (two to three times larger than other Village X partner villages), has one operational borehole, built in 1993, that frequently has maintenance problems. Most of the village doesn't use this borehole due to long walking distances.

Problem Addressed
There is no accessible clean water source for rural residents of Nachuma Village. This leads to illness and, in some cases, death, particularly among children under the age of 5. Most residents currently fetch water for drinking and cooking from dirty wells or waterways like streams or rivers. Women, in particular, are vulnerable in the absence of clean, nearby water sources.

Project Description
This project entails constructing a borehole in Nachuma Village. A village project committee, acting on behalf of the entire village, chose the borehole location. The site is publicly accessible. EZ Borehole Drillers, a company located in Blantyre, with substantial experience in the area, including a number of other boreholes funded by Water Charity, will do the construction.

Polluted water sourceThe installation will take three days to complete. It is expected that water will be reached at about 45 meters, but the wells will be drilled to depths of about 60 meters, if necessary. Before drilling, a hydro-geographical assessment using electrical measurements will be conducted to find the depth of the underlying aquifer. EZ Borehole Drillers will guarantee the borehole for one year.

Above ground, the boreholes will include a standard metal pump mechanism, a cement foundation to protect the pump mechanism, a cement spillway to channel excess water, and a clothes-washing station. Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the skilled labor as well as for the materials that cannot be found locally, such as piping, fixtures and fittings, and concrete. Communities will contribute volunteer labor, materials, including bricks and sand, and about $400 in cash.

Project Impact
There are 1,487 people in 302 households who will directly benefit from the project. Village X will gather data from nearest health clinic to evaluate the impact of the borehole, comparing rates of waterborne illness before and after installation.

Return Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Michael Buckler

Monitoring and Maintenance
EZ Borehole Drillers will conduct 2 days of community-based borehole management training. Trainees will include the village chief and members of two borehole management committees, a technical committee responsible for upkeep and maintenance and a sanitation committee charged with keeping the borehole tidy. woman carrying water

The technical committees will collect a maintenance fee of 100 MK (about 20 cents) per month per household to ensure that there are sufficient funds to adequately maintain the facility and repair it when needed. 

This is an important infrastructure project that will improve the health and wellbeing of Nachuma. It is well planned, with strong management and fiscal safeguards in place. It incorporates elements of oversight and buy-in by the residents to make them sustainable into the future.

Comments
EZ Borehole Drillers can conduct a survey and complete the borehole within two weeks. This project is URGENT, as the rainy season will arrive in mid to late November.

Michael Buckler, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Malawi from 2006 to 2008, will administer the project. He is the founder and CEO of Village X, a social enterprise located in Washington, D.C. dedicated to improving community development work in sub-Saharan Africa.  He is a member of the National Peace Corps Association, Friends of Malawi, and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington, D.C.

Mike expressed, “Once again, thanks so much for the partnership. Please help us finish the last two boreholes before the rains come!”

Due to the devaluation of the currency in Malawi, and great program management by Village X, Water Charity is able to build an extra borehole this year in our Malawi Borehole Program.  This program falls under our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Initiative.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.
 

Villagers thank Water Charityvillagers thank Water Charity

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Malamba Primary School Water Project - Zambia

Boys from the Malanda School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC LOGOS

Location
Malamba Primary School, Mansa District, Luapula Province, Zambia

Community Description
The Malamba community is rural and there is no electricity or running water. Community members live in mud huts with grass thatch roofs. Most community members rely on Malamba Primary Schoolfarming as their source of income. Malamba Primary School is about 40 km or 24.8 miles from the Provincial Capital of Mansa.

Problem Addressed
Malamba Primary School had no functioning source of water on their campus. There was an open well near the school that was utilized for water to clean with. The water from the well is unfit for consumption. The next nearest source of water was over 1 km away. Like all the schools that the Water for Zambia project has targeted, there was a merry-go-round "play pump" that had not worked since 2009. This pump was intended to pump water through the energy created by children playing on the merry-go-round. Unfortunately, the project failed and the pump quit working after just one year.  Water Charity has never used these play pumps, but has done a number of projects to tear them out and install functional hand pumps.

Girls are most impacted by this development. Many young girls drop out of school after reaching puberty. A new water source will allow the girls to remain in school.


Malamba school bathroomsProject Description
This Water for Zambia project will remove the merry-go-round and all the rusted piping below. The merry-go-round will be installed elsewhere for children to play. Next, the piping will be replaced with PVC pipes. Each section of the PVC piping is three meters. The pipes will be securely connected with solvent cement. Then, a rope will be utilized to connect all piping together. Under the Water for Zambia project, all targeted schools require borehole rehabilitations. These rehabilitations require no further drilling. The borehole at Malamba Primary School is 26 meters deep, with a static water level of 8.5 meters. At the bottom of the well there will be a sand layer. At the end of the piping will be a sand screen to prevent any sand and debris from coming up through the pumping. The pedestal will then be attached to the concrete and a hand pump will be installed. The construction process takes a total of five days.  The pumping will allow water to flow at a rate of ten liters per 21 seconds.

Additionally, the surrounding villages and community members will come to the school to gain access the new source of water. There are certain hours when the borehole will be open to the community. During open hours, the borehole will be a center of activity. Men, women, and children of many ages will come to collect water, chat, and laugh.

All community members utilizing the water source will pay a small fee to the school, that is then saved in a spare parts fund for future repairs.

The above-ground improvements will include the creation of a cement apron around the pump, and a drainage way to direct overflow to a soak pit. The soak pit will collect all runoff water. Students will be provided with fruit trees to plant near the new water source.

All construction will be carried out by the Water for Zambia project, and will be done in partnership with the local government council. The construction team comes from the building the wellMansa Municipal Council located in the district capital, Mansa, in the Luapula Province. There are five men involved in the project.

Swala Mumba is certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is a counterpart to Emily that assists with directing the team and administrative tasks.  Emily is training Swala in record keeping, program planning, and accounting. He has an advanced diploma in project management from the Institute of Commercial Management (located in UK). He started working at the Mansa Municipal Council in 2008 as a rural water supply and sanitation assistant.

Bernard Chansa is also certified as a trainer of trainers in borehole construction and maintenance. He is also the only plumber at the Mansa Municipal Council, and is, therefore, always needed for countless tasks. He started working at the council in 2006. He leads the construction team in the field.

Patrick Chabu is a skilled bricklayer. He is in charge of the soak pit construction and plastering at all the schools. He started working for the council in 2007.  Michael Mpana and Daniel Impundu are half brothers. Michael is 20 years old and Daniel is 19. They are both handymen and help with all the labor heavy tasks. They are in training with Mr. Chansa in borehole construction and maintenance.


Project Impact
There are more than 900 people that will be directly impacted by this project, 459 students enrolled at the school, a teaching staff of 10, and another 450 local villagers who will come to get water from the well.  Visitors to the school and future students will also be impacted. 


Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily McKeone
 
villagers
Monitoring and Maintenance
The schools and surrounding communities have been involved in every step of this project’s progress. Development without community engagement is not sustainable.

These boreholes have an expected lifetime of 50 years. It is the hope of many, that the communities will sustain their borehole for that lifetime.

During the construction process, the community provided labor, sand, and stone for the project. The value of these contribution is about 20% of full project cost.

The students will be engaged in the process of sensitizing the community. Teachers will prepare a course about water, sanitation, and proper utilization of the borehole. Class discussions will include information about boiling drinking water, chlorine usage, washing hands after latrine use and proper hygiene. Following the course, students will create sketches, poems, dances, and songs of various scenarios around water and sanitation. The performances will demonstrate proper and improper borehole use.  The students will be presented to the community at large for a day of sensitization and celebration.

Lastly, Malamba Primary School has formed a maintenance committee to monitor and protect the borehole. Teachers and the Parent Teacher Association is involved in the committee and will ensure proper regulation, operation, and maintenance. This committee will meet regularly to address any issues that arise. The committee is responsible for determining hours of operation for the borehole, locking the borehole on off hours, and collecting community fees. All community fees will be safely secured for a spare parts fund.  Spare parts are available in the district capital of Mansa. Additionally, rural area pump minders will be trained to repair the Afridev boreholes. Area pump minders (or APM’s) will be equipped with tool kits and bicycles to reach rural areas and assist with repairs.

Comments
The school will now have a reliable source of drinking water. The struggle to find water and the time spent searching will be eliminated. Since the task of fetching water mostly school signfalls on young girls, this project will most impact them. The students will have more time to dedicate to their studies and other tasks. The impact of a clean water source on campus is expected to improve health and sanitation at school, resulting in improved school attendance.

The school has been instructed to plant fruit trees near the borehole, to assist also with the issue of food security in the area. Malamba Primary School is also in the process of constructing an additional classroom for students. It is expected that construction will be completed sooner as a result of the new, convenient source of water.  The pump will be easy for students to utilize and the water will be potable without purification. The new borehole will allow for students and teachers to improve the cleanliness of all school facilities, including toilets. The convenient source of water will allow student hygiene also to improve.

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it does fall into Water Charity's LGL+ grouping of projects that have a pronounced element involving helping girls go to, and stay in, school. 

Emily McKeone worked with Water Charity as a PCV, directing the prototype project, which created boreholes for three schools.  With the assistance of Water Charity she was able to come back to Zambia as an RPCV and continue her work.  Now we are completing 13 more school boreholes in conjunction with Emily, bringing the total to 16 schools boreholes in Zambia.  This is school #7 of 13.

This project is part of our Water for Zambia Program.   It also falls under our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

This project has been fully paid for by an anonymous donor.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

If you like this project, please donate to the Water for Zambia Program so that we will have money available for similar projects.
 

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