LGL

School Dignity Room Project - Ethiopia

School Dignity Room Project - Ethiopia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

School Dignity Room Project - EthiopiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Shola Gebeya, Hagare Mariam Kesem Woreda, North Shewa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia

Community Description
Shola Gebeya is a small-medium-sized town approximately 110 kilometers north Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa. The surrounding area mainly consists of rolling hills and farmland. Depending on who you ask, the town has about 3,500-8,000 people.

Town is the main town for the woreda, so all the government/municipalities and education offices are located there. This means that the town usually has a fairly busy feel to it.

Problem Addressed
Bxxxx General Secondary and Preparatory School currently has approximately 900 female students. The female students only have access to one latrine on campus. This facility is a great distance from the classrooms and there is no running water.

Menstrual hygiene management is a major issue, and many female students simply do not come to school while they are on their period because of many factors including: embarrassment, lack of sanitary facilities, lack of knowledge about menstrual hygiene, and the taboos that still surround it in their culture.

School Dignity Room Project - EthiopiaIf a female student is absent every month during their period they could possibly miss upwards of 36-40 total days of school. This is approximately 25-30% of the total school days. When missing this many days, the students are falling far behind in their studies, with little chance to make up the days or subject matter.

There is also significant need for education on these issues. Many of the problems with menstrual hygiene management are due to the lack of education. Some females simply do not know what is happening to them. They need proper training on menstrual hygiene management to understand that there is nothing wrong with having these issues, and they can still live normal lives and go to attend school at the same time.

Project Description
This project is to build a Dignity Room on campus for female students.

The building itself will be 6x4 meters, divided into two rooms. One will serve to take care of issues involving menstrual hygiene (changing/washing pads or changing clothes). The other is a room designated for gender club meetings, trainings and simply a room for female students to study/do homework.

The wash room will have sinks with running water. The meeting room will initially host menstrual hygiene management training such as making RUMPS (reusable menstrual pads), but then goal is to widen the spectrum to include all types of sanitation/wash trainings.

The construction will take approximately 2 months from start to finish. Once it is finished, the facility will be used immediately for menstrual hygiene practice, and over time the trainings will be scheduled and begin to be held on a regular basis.

Water Charity funds will be used for to purchase materials, and also to pay for the skilled labor.

The school will contribute 25% of the funds for the project.

Project Impact
The project will benefit 900 female students and teachers at the school.

School Dignity Room Project - EthiopiaPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
William Dickinson

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school will add the Dignity Room to their budget to provide maintenance and upkeep of the facility and ensure that menstrual pads are kept stocked. A program for disposing of the pads will also be put in place.

The members of the gender club have also agreed to clean the facility and contribute dues each month to help with some of the supply cost. This project was the idea of the staff gender club representative at the school, and she is already planning trainings to implement, and will oversee, all facets of the Dignity Room.

Let Girls Learn
This is a Let Girls Learn Initiative project.

Menstrual hygiene is a major problem that keeps girls from attending school in rural Ethiopia. By constructing a room for girls to practice MHM (menstrual hygiene management), they are given more of an opportunity to stay in school, and not simply miss approximately 25-30% of school because they have their period. The room will also function as a meeting place for the gender club, so the females will now have a designated place to discuss and educate themselves on gender issues involving education and empowerment.

Fundraising Target
$2,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,500

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Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - Togo

Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - Togo

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxxxx, Tchaoudjo Prefecture, Central Region, Togo

Community Description
The village of Xxxxxxxxxx is located in the Northeast corner of the Central Region of Togo. It is 27 km from the regional capital of Sokode and is nestled in the mountains between Sokode and the Benin border. Nearly all inhabitants are ethnically Kotikoli Muslim, and speak the language Tem. A minority of people (mostly educated males) speaks French.

The clinic and middle school serve Xxxxxxxxxx and six other surrounding villages. The total clinic catchment area is close to 4,000 people. The village of Xxxxxxxxxx itself has roughly 1,000 inhabitants. Most everyone in Xxxxxxxxxx is a farmer, owning at most 2 hectares of land, and participates in small animal husbandry, including raising goats, sheep, and chickens. Additionally, the village is known for its traditional fabrics made by local weavers.

The biggest health issues are malaria and diarrheal diseases. There is one pump in Xxxxxxxxxx. Most people get their water from open wells or the nearby stream, all of which usually dry up during the dry season.

In terms of fetching water, showering, finding vegetables, and other daily activities, living in Xxxxxxxxxx is difficult. However, although the villagers are isolated and live in poverty, they are open, friendly, welcoming, and eager to learn.

Problem Addressed
There is no clean water available at the Xxxxxxxxxx clinic and no water source at the Xxxxxxxxxx middle school. The lack of clean, running water at the clinic lowers the overall level of hygiene at the clinic, especially during births. The clinic staff makes village women, oftentimes the family members of women giving birth, bring water (oftentimes from the non-potable, open well nearby) to the delivery room to clean the room, supplies, bloody rags, etc. and to provide drinking water for the pregnant mother.

A lack of running water also makes it difficult for health practitioners to wash their hands regularly. There is no available drinking water for clinic staff and patients. Pregnant women are often forced to return to their homes during their pre-natal consultations to bring drinking water in order to take their anti-malarial medications. If the women come from outlying villages, they are forced to buy water to take their medications, which can be a barrier to some women.

Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoThe lack of a water source at the Xxxxxxxxxx middle school also presents a plethora of problems. Teachers and students alike do not wash their hands after defecating or before eating during recess. Food vendors do not have access to water to wash their hands before serving food to the children or to appropriately wash dishes between student use. The nurse has often seen waves of diarrheal diseases among students that stem from these food vendors' unsanitary practices.

Children also have no water to drink during the school day. Some students are forced to go without water all day, especially those who cannot return home during lunch because they live too far away. If a child is thirsty, they must walk to the stream 1 km away to drink dirty river water or ask households beside the school to give water.

Handwashing efforts at the school have failed because of this water access issue. Teachers even make female students fetch water from the stream during class, making them even more behind in their studies.

The Xxxxxxxxxx clinic was constructed in 2000. The original clinic construction included a tower and pipes to provide running water. Villagers or clinic staff would manually pump water every morning, which would be propelled into the sinks at the clinic.

When the clinic and water system was built, the workers stopped digging once they hit rock. Consequently, the running water was only available during the rainy season and dried up completely during the dry season. The running water system stopped working entirely in 2013. An Islamic NGO recently built a shallow well with a manual pump head mechanism close to the clinic. However, this pump head mechanism continuously breaks, and the well is not deep enough to sustain itself during the dry season.

Project Description
This project is to rebuild the water system at the clinic and provide a new water source at the middle school by constructing a well.

The project funds will be used to dig this well deeper (with help from the Islamic NGO) and connect new piping to the original tower. The water will then be pumped into the clinic sinks using electricity (the village got electricity last year).

The second part of the project will build a new 15-meter well at the Xxxxxxxxxx middle school. The well will be covered with a manual pump head mechanism. A well-experienced plumber from Sokode is in charge of all technical construction. Villagers will provide unskilled labor (e.g., digging the well deeper, withdrawing water, sand collection at the riverbed, etc.).

The president of the Village Development Committee is the project leader and will coordinate the clinic and school water committees. The clinic nurse and middle school teachers will co-implement trainings with the PCV.

Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoThe already-established Committee for the Organization and Overview of Community Health will serve as the water committee for the repaired clinic water system. Several members of the parent teacher association, student leaders, and teachers, as well as the school director, will serve on the school water committee.

Both water communities will collect money periodically to make sure that there is always a current sum in their account to fix the systems at any given moment. The electricity bill for the improved clinic water system will be paid out of pharmacy and consultation revenues.

This project includes the following trainings: intensive WASH training (including treatment of water) with both water committees, handwashing and handwashing station construction training with the entire student body, and a gender equitable practices training with the middle school teachers. Fifteen water committee members (of the nineteen total for the two committees) will be able to identify at least three critical times to wash hands, as evidenced by pre- and post-tests.

Project Impact
4,000 inhabitants in the canton, including 260 students at the middle school, will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Y. Ryder

Monitoring and Maintenance
By participating in the water committee, five parents will strengthen the community-school relationship. Four students will also serve on the school water committee. These students will demonstrate leadership by motivating other students and food vendors to maintain school hygiene.

Observation logs will be used to monitor handwashing and water treatment at the school, improved hygiene by the school vendors, handwashing and water treatment at the clinic, and implementation of gender equitable practices by teachers in the classroom. By the end of the project, at least three teachers will have demonstrated gender equitable practices in the classroom.

The two water committees, one at the middle school and the other at the clinic, will ensure maintenance and sustainability of the project. The clinic water committee will be molded into the already well-established COGES committee. Future repairs to the water system will be paid for by the COGES's reserve account, which comes from pharmacy funds and village collections.

Because the new running water system will be powered through electricity, the clinic's monthly electricity bill will increase slightly. The clinic will still be responsible for paying all electricity bills.

The water committee at the middle school will be made up mostly of members from the Parent Teachers' Association, an active group in village. Repairs will come from the Middle School account, which gets money from school fees. The school water committee will collect money from students and their parents at the beginning of the project to add to the school account, and will continue this collection annually.

Both teachers and students in the water committee will ensure that water is treated before drinking and arrange work schedules to fill all classroom water buckets and handwashing stations.

Let Girls Learn
Women and girls are disproportionately affected by the lack of water at the clinic and middle school. More specifically, the lack of water at the school has spiraling negative effects on girls' education in Xxxxxxxxxx.

Girls are often pulled out of class to fetch water. This trip can take up to thirty minutes, especially if they are going to the nearby stream. Lack of water also makes girls late for school because they have to fetch water for the classrooms or school food vendors in the morning before class.

Girls are less likely to come to school during their menstrual cycles because they know they will not have access to clean water. Because they do not come to school full-time, they become very far behind and must drop out or retake a grade level.

This project will not only provide a water source at the school but will also teach the teachers how to implement gender-equitable practices in the classroom. One teacher and the director of the middle school have already attended a Student Friendly Schools training and will help me facilitate the gender training and classroom observations.

The Water Charity participation in this project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.

Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoClinic and Middle School Water System Project - Togo

Conclusion of Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - Togo

Conclusion of Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Yoonhee Ryder. To read about the start of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was designed to rebuild the water system at the clinic and provide a new water source at the middle school by constructing a well.

Yoonhee reports:

Specific Work Done
This project was made up of three main components. First, two 13-meter wells were built in the isolated village of Djouwada in the Kpassouade county of the Central Region of Togo. Before construction of these wells, the Djouwada community members would mostly use the nearby river as their sole source of water and, during the dry season, were forced to dig boreholes in the dried-up riverbed to find water. The people of Djouwada were extremely motivated to implement this project and now continuously use these new wells.

Conclusion of Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoSecond, the Community Health Worker (CHW) in Djouwada and I conducted baseline surveys on water treatment and access and subsequently followed up / conducted health talks with homes that did not treat their water. The Djouwada water committee (established in March 2016) is responsible for encouraging and monitoring water treatment at the household level as well as keeping up with well maintenance.

Third, in collaboration with the local middle school, the community of Kpassouade set up four treated drinking water stations. Students now have increased access to clean drinking water during school. I implemented a comprehensive WASH training with each of the classes at the Kpassouade middle school as well as conducted a school-wide demonstration on how to treat water using chlorination tablets.

Because the lack of water disproportionately impacted young girls, this LGL project had a strong gender focus. I conducted a gender equity training with the teachers at the Kpassouade middle school. Four of the five participating teachers demonstrated gender equitable practices in the classroom at the 4-month follow-up.

Scope of the Project
Due to unforeseeable circumstances and changes imposed by the Togolese government, we had to change the original location of this project***. I worked closely with the director of the Hydraulic office who was able to find the funding to build pumps at both the Kpassouade CEG and clinic. This is why the community decided to decrease the scope of the project and instead build two wells in Djouwada.

Although the scope of the project changed, many people were still impacted by the new wells, water treatment campaign, and gender trainings at the school. In fact, the updated project addressed a more dire need in the community.

Conclusion of Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoCapacity and Skills Built
Many members of the community have increased their capacity and/or skills because of this project. First, the hired plumber, as well as the many community members who helped with labor, increased their capacity to build deep wells. The water committee in Djouwada developed project management and monitoring skills. All the community members in Djouwada were either directly or indirectly trained on water treatment thus increasing their capacity to maintain healthy families and reduce diarrheal diseases. Many community members, including the female students, also increased their capacity to save time in their day for healthy behaviors or studying by using the new, easily accessible wells.

The community health worker in Djouwada, Mr. PIRE Saman, worked closely with me throughout the project and increased his survey implementation and technical health skills. This project increased the capacity of teachers to implement gender equitable practices inside and outside the classroom through our training. The students also increased their own capacity and that of their families to stay healthy by learning about water treatment, handwashing, traditional latrines, and handwashing stations. The county development/project management committee improved their project implementation skills and learned more about project sustainability.

Conclusion of Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoSustainability
The Djouwada water committee will ensure sustainability of this project. Future repairs to the water system will be paid for by the committee's already established reserve account (FUSEC Togo Sokode).

The total in the account is currently 30,000 CFA. This 30,000 CFA comes directly from community member collections. This FUSEC bank account also serves as the official bank account used to secure potential future pump projects with the Hydraulic department.

The water committee in Djouwada will continue to have monthly meetings do regularly discuss and monitor household water treatment and well maintenance. Mr. OURO SAMA Abdoulaye, the math and physical education teacher, will help monitor sustained gender equitable practices in the school. New drinking water stations at the school are able to hold large quantities of water (unlike "tippy-taps") and will be used by students starting in the academic year 2017-2018.

Conclusion of Clinic and Middle School Water System Project - TogoTimeline: How the work progressed
March 2016- started Djouwada water committee
April-May 2017- construction of two wells in Djouwada
June 2017- gender equitable practices training with teachers at the Kpassouade middle school. WASH trainings with all classes at Kpassouade middle school.
June-October 2017- water treatment surveys and trainings in Djouwada
October 2017- follow-up gender equitable practices application in the classroom
October 2017- water treatment training/demo with students at the Kpassouade middle school; set up treated drinking water stations in each classroom.

End Results By the end of the project

1. 2 deep wells installed
2. Increased the capacity of the water committee, staff of the local middle school, and the project development committee
3. Increased application of gender equitable practices at the local middle school
4. 4 drinking water stations installed at the local middle school
5. Reduced the average water collection time in Djouwada by over 10 minutes
6. Reduced the number of people using river water by 66.6%
7. Reached approx. 250 community members through water treatment home visits
8. Implemented a school-wide WASH training with students
9. Implemented a school-wide water treatment demonstration with students
10. Implemented a Student Friendly Schools training with teachers
11. Implemented water treatment trainings with Djouwada community members

Comments from the Community / Testimonials

Mr. BUTCHO, Chief of Djouwada
Mr. Butcho wants to sincerely thank Water Charity for providing water to the community of Djouwada. The village of Djouwada was suffering, especially in the dry season, because they did not have water. These wells have made the villagers healthier in the long run and save time and effort in collecting water. Water Charity has raised the quality of life in Djouwada and provided something so essential, because no one can do anything without water.

Mr. OURO SAMA Abdoulaye, teacher at the Kpassouade Middle School
Mr. Abdoulaye really took the gender training to heart. He decided to create and train a girls' handball team from the village to compete in the national handball tournament in July 2017. Even though he was not paid, and it was during the summer vacation, Mr. Abdoulaye spent hours coaching the team and organizing logistics for the tournament. The Kpassouade team was the only team from a small village participating in the tournament and beat the team from Lome, the capital of Togo. The Kpassouade team won 2nd place. All the girls on the team demonstrated increased self-confidence and leadership. Mr. Abdoulaye then organized a large party inviting the entire village to celebrate the victory and provide an opportunity for younger girls to see female role models in the village.

We extend our thanks to Yoonhee for completing this important project.

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Solar-Powered Borehole and Water System Project - The Gambia

Solar-Powered Borehole and Water System Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Kxxxxxxxx, Jarra West, The Gambia

Solar-Powered Borehole and Water System Project - The GambiaCommunity Description
Jarra Kxxxxxxxx is an ethnically Mandinka village in the Lower River Region of The Gambia. The population of the village is ~1,200 people. There are 52 compounds total in the village, and that number is on the rise.

The village also houses a Lower Basic School, where many young school children attend daily to learn. Around 300 students from ages 4 to 12 attend this school.

Problem Addressed
Kxxxxxxxx's water source is powered by a Government powered grid system, which is extremely inconsistent. In theory, this tap-system is supposed to provide water to the village in the mornings and evenings. Unfortunately, this is nowhere near the case with the village’s tap- system.

The village has gone without water for over two weeks on multiple occasions. This event leads to a course of unfortunate events, including students leaving school early due to lack of water, and people drinking from uncovered wells, which leads to increased cases of diarrhea throughout the community.

With the implementation of this project, the hope is that the village community won’t worry about where to go when there is no water available in the village. In addition, kids will no longer be sent home early and miss class because they have no access to such a vital component of life, such as water.

Solar-Powered Borehole and Water System Project - The GambiaProject Description
The project will be to erect and install a solar-powered 4½" x 25-40m borehole system within the village of Kxxxxxxxx. Upon completion, the water system will include a borehole well, 3 taps at major junctions throughout the community, 4 solar panels, and one 4,000L water tank. This will provide clean water to all the compounds in the village, as well as to Kxxxxxxxx’s Lower Basic School students.

By installing a solar powered tap system, it ensures that even when electricity doesn’t come villagers can still gain access to a clean source of water and students in Kxxxxxxxx don’t have to leave school due to the lack of clean water. Every human being should have consistent access to clean water, as it is so essential to daily life all over the world.

A contractor from the capital city named, Water Point will be responsible for this contract. They will be called upon to drill the well, install the borehole and erect the solar panels and tank system.

Water Charity funds will be used for labor, materials, supplies, and transportation.

The villagers in Jarra Kxxxxxxxx plan on investing heavily in the success of this project. First of all, they will raise a portion of the money for the project on their own. In addition, many of the villagers will assist in the labor. Many have experience working with concrete, plumbing and electrical work.

In addition, the villagers will form a water committee, which will work to raise a water fund to ensure money in case the pump needs repairs in the future.

Project Impact
1,200 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Rehan Khan

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community is heavily invested into making sure this project stays around for a very long time. To ensure sustainability, first the community and the PCV will get together to create a water committee. The tasks of this water committee will be straightforward. Firstly, the committee will collect monthly fees from the village for potential maintenance costs. In case something does happen they will have funds to replace faulty parts.

In addition, they have plumbers that will be part of the water committee and fix things that may possibly need fixing. This water committee will also be involved in trainings about water hygiene, proper pump usage and fiscal responsibility of the funds collected each month. They will enhance the management practices as well as ensure sustainability of the project beyond the project lifecycle.

The capacities built during the project implementation of the counterparts and community members will also contribute to sustainability of the project.

Comments
This project will lead to the following benefits: (I) Increasing clean water availability to the villagers of Jarra Kxxxxxxxx (II) Higher rates of school attendants for girls and boys due to access of clean water, which should decrease rates of diarrhea. (III) Increase the income of the families because of fewer workdays missed due to sickness and money spent on medication. (IV) Decrease chance of children crossing the main highway to fetch water and potentially be hit by vehicles.

Let Girls Learn
This project is a Let Girls Learn project, and it will directly have an effect on girls staying in school. As previously mentioned, when water is not available at the school, all the children are sent home early from school. 48% of the students at the school are indeed female. The previous term, students missed over two weeks of coursework solely because water was not available in the school. These numbers are very disheartening as the availability of water should never be a variable that keeps students out of school. With the installation of this water system we have full confidence that next term the students of Kxxxxxxxx Lower Basic School will miss no school days due to lack of water.

Fundraising Target
$8,300

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$2,156

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$6,144

Solar-Powered Borehole and Water System Project - The GambiaSolar-Powered Borehole and Water System Project - The Gambia

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Solar Tap Extension Project - The Gambia

Solar Tap Extension Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Solar Tap Extension Project - The GambiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Jxxxxx and Bxxxxxxx, Central River Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Jxxxxx is an ethnically Jahonka village in the Central River Region in the North Bank of The Gambia. Jxxxxx has a population of ~630 people according to the village census that the Village Health Worker completed with the Peace Corps Volunteer in July. There are 19 compounds and the entirety of the village population is reliant on the continued functioning of the solar tap system.

The existing solar power tap system has 3 tap locations in prime locations in the village. Bxxxxxxx is also an ethnically Jahonka village with a population of ~2,100 people, according to the village census that the Village Development Committee President completed, and ever increasing because of the presence of a prominent Imam residing there.

Solar Tap Extension Project - The Gambia

Problem Addressed
Currently, there is a solar tap system that serves as the sole source of clean water for Jxxxxx, Bxxxxxxx, Jxxxxx Lower Basic School and the Health Center located in between the two villages.

Because of increases in population, the current water supply system does not have enough capacity to supply sufficient water to both communities nor the local Health Center and School. This project will address the supply of inadequate water and access to potable clean water in new settlements in Jxxxxx and Bxxxxxxx.

Project Description
This project will increase the capacity of the current water supply in Jxxxxx and Bxxxxxxx. Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the following activities:

• Drilling a new borehole adjacent to the current borehole and water tower.

• Install 5 additional water collection points (4 in Bxxxxxxx and 1 in Jxxxxx).

• Connect to the current pipe network the grant fund will support the extension of pipe network of 556 meters to reach growing new settlements in the two communities (Jxxxxx and Bxxxxxxx).

Solar Tap Extension Project - The Gambia• Conduct hygiene and Sanitation, financial management, technical training on the maintenance of the system by the PCV and counterparts and contractor representative respectively for new Water Committee that will comprise representatives from the two the villages.

Project Impact

3,248 people living in the two communities, including 1,335 who are boys and girls under the age of 14, will benefit from the project.
 
Peace Corps Volunteers Directing Project
D. Warren and B. Richardson are managing this project.
 
Monitoring and Maintenance
A joint water committee will be trained on managing water systems, water sanitation, and water systems maintenance to prepare them for the improved and newly-installed water systems and overall sustainability. Thereafter, they will maintain and repair the system as needed.
 

Let Girls Learn
This is a Let Girls Learn project, as it will accrue to the benefit of girls, upon whom the burden of retrieving water usually falls.

Project Funding
This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

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Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE

Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, Kwahu West District, Eastern Region, Ghana

Community Description
Xxxxxx is a rural community located just off the main Accra-Kumasi road only about a 30 minutes’ drive from the market town of Nkawkaw in the Eastern Region of Ghana. It is surrounded by beautiful mountains and bounded by a river on its north end which shares its name.

Xxxxxx is home to approximately 900 residents with an ever-growing population. The community is comprised of both Muslims and Christians and is divided by the main highway. Xxxxxx also tends to share and borrow resources from its surrounding communities such as markets, schools, and water sources.

The community is full of hard-working, dedicated people who mostly rely on farming to sustain their livelihoods. They grow such crops as cocoa, maize, cucumbers, bananas, and plantains.

Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaIt is a very traditional community where you are expected to greet and revere your elders, treat guests with the utmost respect, and attend religious services and ceremonies whenever possible. Men are expected to go into the fields to work and provide for the family while women maintain the household. People live a simple and humble life with a positive outlook on the future.

Problem Addressed
The community currently has five hand-pumped boreholes within its city limits; however only two are functioning. Two of the boreholes are completely condemned due to poor workmanship, and one recently broke down.

With the expanding population and the demand for water being shared by adjacent communities the remaining boreholes are not enough to address the current need. To add insult to injury, the remaining boreholes are located on only one side of the community. This is causing many residents to travel longer distances and cross the main road in order to collect water.

Furthermore, the task of collecting water is traditionally given to women and children in this community. Some children begin fetching water as early as 3 years old. At times when one or more boreholes are not working due to maintenance issues, women and children tend to travel farther for water as well as have to cross the main highway. This can prove to be very dangerous for the younger children.

During the dry season, water becomes even scarcer because some of the boreholes do not function at these times. This once again causes increased travel time and effort for those sent to fetch the water. These circumstances in turn decreases productivity of the community by taking time away from other things such as school or work.

There are also situations in which individuals decide to collect water from the nearby streams because of the water shortage. This, of course, can lead to a variety of health issues because these waters have not been treated for pollutants.

Project Description
This project is to re-build an existing borehole, install an electric pump, build a platform and install a water storage tank, and install piping to access points in the community.

Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaAn existing borehole, with a yield sufficiently high will be rehabilitated into a mechanized borehole, powered by an electrical pump, that will bring water up from the water table and store it in a Rambo 1,000 Polytank capable of holding 10,000L of water. This tank will be able to satisfy the water demand for Xxxxxx and its immediate surrounding communities as well as alleviate pressure on the electrical pump by allowing time between fillings.

The Polytank will be placed on a concrete stand with four pillars for support as well as a maintenance ladder situated 12 feet above the ground. At the source of the borehole there will be one overhead spout for those who will carry water on their heads without support and one regular spout at the base.

The company will also excavate and lay approximately 250 meters of Duraplast piping for two additional fetching points away from the source with regular spouts.

An additional soakaway pit, aside from the one already located at the existing borehole, will be placed at the end of the extension to prevent standing water near the distal spouts.

Just prior to construction an electrical meter for the borehole will be applied for, and activities designed to teach the community about proper borehole maintenance and sanitation practices will be organized with the drilling company.

Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaA pumping test will be performed at the time of construction to determine the type and size of the pump required to fill the Polytank. A typical pump for this size tank would be a 1.5 horsepower Interdab electrical pump.

In conjunction with Global Communities, a company that has done extensive work in the area of identifying water tables throughout Ghana, a reputable company called LINKS Drilling and Construction, Ltd. was identified. The company provided estimates for the cost of mechanizing an existing borehole. The estimate included having an environmental assessment and hydrological survey performed before any construction will be initiated.

Construction will last for approximately 6 weeks, requiring two weeks for the excavation and tower construction, 3 weeks for foundation drying, and one week for Polytank installation and connection. Throughout the duration of the project, and even after completion, the Water and Sanitation (WATSAN) Committee will continue to conduct community education activities related to water & sanitation and borehole maintenance as well as manage the community’s water and sanitation needs.

The community will provide the land and base of the borehole, conduct trainings and education sessions to the whole community, and engage in communal labor to keep the work site as well as the community clean and well maintained.

Project Impact
961 people will benefit from the project

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Zakiya Miller

Monitoring and Maintenance
The WATSAN Committee will oversee project completion and borehole maintenance after installation.

The Committee will collect funds from the community for the purpose of maintaining and repairing current boreholes as well as the utility costs and upkeep of the new mechanized borehole. The committee will meet monthly to discuss issues of sanitation in the community as well as to hold training sessions and activities on communal work days.

The committee will also be responsible for the continued collection of funds and to ensure that the funds are being spent responsibly on water and sanitation projects.

The Peace Corps Volunteer will work with the community to ensure that the WATSAN Committee is formed and prepared prior to mechanization of the borehole and that adequate funds have been generated to cover the costs of any repairs.

Comments
The borehole will increase the number of vantage points that can be used throughout the community. This will in turn increase water access in areas that are remote or where the population is growing.

The borehole will also decrease the time it takes to fetch water allowing more time for other productive things in the community. It will also reduce the economic strain on the community by lessening the tension placed on the already existing hand-pumped boreholes. This will decrease the likelihood of breakdowns and maintenance malfunctions which will allow funds to be saved more readily in the WATSAN account.

Let Girls Learn
The role of collecting water is primarily reserved for women and girls in the community. This role is expected to be fulfilled whenever there is a need and regardless of other duties that need to be performed.

There is already some gender bias which favors boy’s receiving education over girls when it comes to resources and school fees in the community. This bias can lead to a huge knowledge gap between men and women which can in turn put a greater economic strain on the community as a whole.

Furthermore, a lack of education makes women and girls more vulnerable to gender-based violence, sexually transmitted infections, unwanted pregnancies, and other diseases which can reduce their economic productivity even more over time.

This project will mitigate some of the obstacles young girls must face when trying to get an education by decreasing the time spent away from class sessions due to collecting water.  It falls under our  Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

This project has been supported by an anonymous donor.

Conclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

Conclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Zakiya Miller. To read about the start of the project, CLICK HERE.

Zakiya reports:

The project has installed a mechanized borehole with 4 vantage points located at the base, and an extension point some 250 meters from the main station with an additional 2 vantage points. This makes a total of 6 new vantage points in the community of Asuoso in the Kwahu West District of Eastern Region, Ghana.

Conclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaThis borehole with an electrical pump will alleviate some of the burdens associated with collecting water including women and children from crossing the dangerous highway to fetch water.

Community members expressed the need for increased water access due to the long queues and far distance residents had to travel to get water. School girls were also missing school instruction time due to the far distance and long waiting times the girls would have to endure to collect water for the school. This sparked the decision to rehabilitate one of the existing manual boreholes and transform it into a mechanized borehole with multiple fetching points.

Just prior to the project initiation one of the 3 functioning boreholes broke down making water even more scarce in the community. This breakdown was particularly concerning because it forced residents to cross the main highway in order to collect water. This was a very dangerous situation for women and young children who are often sent to collect water for the household.

This project took the collective effort of community members, hired contractors, and the Peace Corps to accomplish. The community helped to clear the land, provide water and accommodations for the workers, and organized community resources to help complete the project. This helped build their capacity and take ownership of the development. This project served as a galvanizing agent to build resiliency and self-empowerment within the community so that they can continue to better their quality of life.

Construction began on April 24, 2017 and ended on July 21, 2017. This resulted in one mechanized borehole with an electrical pump to deliver water to 6 different vantage points. Four of the vantage points being located at the borehole base and two additional vantage points approximately 250 meters out in a community extension.

The new borehole is providing increased water access to approximately 900 residents in the town of Asuoso.

Conclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaAfter clearing the land, the contractors began the scaffolding to build the Polytank stand and drilled the pipes into the existing borehole. Bricks were made to construct the Polytank stand and left to dry for about a week. The workers then returned to construct the stands and pillar for the Polytanks and extension. Plaster was added and left to dry for approximately one month due to heavy rainfall. The Polytanks were installed and the electrical pump was connected. The borehole was then tested for functionality. After all tests were performed, the borehole water was treated and then open for public use.

The primary goal was achieved by increasing water access to community members by installing a mechanized borehole over an existing borehole. The borehole has decreased fetching time by decreasing the distance residents have to travel to collect water as well as adding more vantage points for collection. This has in turn helped school aged girls gain more instruction time during the school day because it does not take them as long to fetch water for the school. Community members have been overjoyed by the addition of this new water source and they have promised to keep it well maintained.

We extend our thanks to Zakiya for completing this important project.

Conclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaConclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

Conclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaConclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

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Dassa- Zoume Department Water Project - Benin

Dassa- Zoume Department Water Project - Benin

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.  ​Check out the #video below!

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Awaya, Dassa-Zoume Communé, Collines Department, Benin

Community Description
Dassa-Zoumé is a city in Benin, on the Cotonou to Parakou railway and the main north-south highway. The commune covers an area of 1711 square kilometers and as of 2013 had a population of 112,118

Dassa- Zoume Department Water Project - BeninGxxxxx and Axxxx are two neighboring villages located in the city, in the Collines department of south-central Benin. They lie two kilometers apart from each other and are connected by a dirt road. There are 5 schools in total: a kindergarten and primary school in each village, and a secondary school that serves both communities.

Recently, electricity was brought to Gxxxxx. However, the residents of Axxxx still live without this luxury. These two villages are comprised of approximately 2,200 inhabitants, the majority of whom are cultivators and vendors.

The primary language spoken is Mahi and about 20% of the population also speak French.

Problem Addressed
The inhabitants of Gxxxxx and Axxxx are in need of a reliable and safe water source. This need can be further defined on two levels: in the school community, and within the residential community.

Dassa- Zoume Department Water Project - BeninAt the moment, there is no access to water on or near the 5 school campuses located within Axxxx- Gxxxxx. This causes health concerns related to the inability to wash hands after using the restroom or before eating, and staying hydrated. Additionally, the lack of a nearby water source limits the school’s ability to develop a school garden. As a result, the students, and staff members at these schools are at compromising their health, which in turn impacts their attendance and performance at school.

Within the residential community, villagers rely on open wells dug throughout the community. This again results in a series of health risks including waterborne diseases and related illnesses. Furthermore, during the dry season of December through May, the water supply from these wells is exhausted. Villagers, primarily young girls, are forced to walk long distances to the nearest pump to retrieve water for their families to drink, prepare food, wash dishes, do laundry, and bathe. These pumps are often overcrowded as villagers must wait in line for their turn at the pump. During the dry season, which coincides with the school year, young girls spend around 12 hours each week fetching water instead of studying and doing homework.

Dassa- Zoume Department Water Project - BeninProject Description
This project will restore the existing water tower that serves the villages of Gxxxxx and Axxxx by connecting it to the nearby electrical system.

Until recently, the water tower was powered by a gas generator that frequently required maintenance. Two years ago, the generator broke, rendering the water tower unusable.

With access to this new, more reliable power source, water will be delivered to the existing water taps dispersed throughout the two villages and at each of the five schools. The water provided by these taps will be cleaner and more conveniently located than the current system of wells and pumps. This option is more cost-effective and sustainable than replacing the existing generator.

First, the community members will construct a shelter to house a 30-amp three phase transformer that will source electricity from the power line access point, located next to the primary school of Gxxxxx. Then, the community will clear a path, 1.5 km long and 5 meters wide, leading from the primary school of Gxxxxx to the water tower pump located in Axxxx. Then, 80 teak wood poles will be installed to support and elevate the 1,700 meters of SBEE electric cables. An electrician will be hired to connect the electric wires to the transformer in Gxxxxx and to the water tower pump in Axxxx.

The chiefs of villages are managing the overall project and mobilizing the efforts of the community, which is committed to the success of this project. The members are prepared to contribute the labor necessary to clear a path connecting the water tower and transformer, as well as provide the labor needed to install the 80 teak poles. This community contribution equates to 25% of the total project cost.

Funds from Water Charity will be used to purchase the materials, and pay for transportation costs and the skilled labor of the electrician

Project Impact
This project will serve all of the 2,200 inhabitants the two villages

Dassa- Zoume Department Water Project - BeninPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
L. Murray

Monitoring and Maintenance
The completion of this project will be a significant step in making the water tower more sustainable. By replacing the expensive gas generator, which required frequent maintenance, with a more cost effective and reliable energy source, less upkeep will be required to keep the water tower operating.

In order to cover electricity costs and necessary repairs, representatives from each village will regulate the water taps and charge a small nominal fee for their usage.

Additionally, each year community members will clear and maintain the path of the newly installed power lines to avoid trees and undergrowth interfering with the electrical connection.

Let Girls Learn
This project will have a large impact on empowering girls to stay in school. Due to the gender roles of Benin’s culture, household chores, including fetching water, are deemed as the responsibility of girls.

During the dry season, which coincides with the school year, the wells run dry and young girls are forced to walk further distances and wait in lines at overcrowded pumps to find water. On average, young girls spend 10 to 12 hours a week fetching water for their family instead of studying their school lessons.

By reducing the amount of time young girls spend fetching water, we can increase the amount of time they can devote to their school work, and further compete with their male classmates.

Fundraising Target
$4,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$800

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,100

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Niani District Water Project - The Gambia

Niani District Water Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Niani District Water Project - The GambiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx Xxxxx, Niani, Central River Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Xxxxxx Xxxxx is a small village located in the Niani district of the Central River Region in the Gambia. The village contains 11 large multi-household compounds that are ethnically Wolof, with the exception of one Fula compound. Some features of the village include a small government health post on the outskirts, a mosque, and a small family run Quranic school. The nearest lower basic school is located in the next village 2 kilometers away and there is a full cycle school about 5 kilometers away.

The main source of livelihood is farming and the crops are mainly coos and groundnut. There is also a large focus on gardening outside the village near naturally occurring tributaries of water due to lack of water availability in the village. Due to its small the size, the village has a very strong sense of community and shared burden of work.

Niani District Water Project - The GambiaProblem Addressed
The only sources of water are 3 open wells located in the village and one tap that is located at the health post just outside the village.

During an initial community needs survey, every compound in the village listed lack of closed water source as a problem that they would like addressed. All but one of the compounds stated that they fetch their water exclusively from the open wells because the amount of water needed to meet each family’s demand, in conjunction with the distance from their compound to the tap, does not make it a feasible option for them.

All interviewees also stated that at least one child in their compound had suffered from diarrhea within the week prior and ranked diarrheal disease as one of their main concerns.

According to clinic records diarrheal disease accounts for 40% of the cases seen. The burden of water fetching inevitably falls to the women and girls of the village, so a large part of their days are taken up by drawing up the water and transporting it to the compounds. There are also large wait times since there are 3 wells to serve the water needs of the entire community of 300 people

Project Description
The project will provide a water system throughout the community, and convert an existing concrete-lined well in the village to a solar powered borehole.

Water Charity funds will be used to finance the implementation of the following activities to complete the project:

(i) Installing 336.4 meters of PVC pipe network connecting to the existing well,

(ii) purchasing and installing four taps,

(iii) purchasing of Grundfos SQ Flex 11-2 pump, four 250-300W solar panels, provision of metal tower and welding of the panels onto it to protect them from breakage and potential theft,

Niani District Water Project - The Gambia(iv) erecting and installing a 4,000L water tank,

(v) paying for the skilled labor to connect solar power source to the Grundfos pump and

(vi) installing a concrete slab to cover the well to close the water source, protecting it from contaminants.

The community will contribute 25% of the total cost through a combination of in-kind labor supervised by the contractor, food and lodging for skilled personnel, as well as an initial monetary contribution.

The collection of these funds and organization of the community labor force will be supervised by the village water committee composed of three men and four women from several compounds in the village.

The contracting company used for the project will be Waterpoint. The community labor contribution will be the excavation of trenches and laying of pipes to connect the borehole to the taps. Meetings of people that form the village water committee facilitated by PCV counterpart (and head nurse of the local health post) Tamba Sabally have already begun.

An initial fee of 100 dalasi per adult will be collected and contributed to the cost of the installation. Following the completion of the project, the water committee will supervise the collection of a 10 dalasi monthly payment to a village fund that will be kept to pay for future repairs or maintenance on the taps and borehole system.

Following completion, two specific trainings will take place in the village: One will be led by the PCV and staff from Waterpoint on proper tap maintenance and another led by health post staff on water sanitation and hygiene as well as proper water storage.

Project Impact
300 people, the entire village population, will benefit from the project.

Niani District Water Project - The GambiaNiani District Water Project - The GambiaPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
M. Judd

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV and counterpart will use the project logic model of intervention to monitor the implementation of the project activities and to track project performance. Similarly, the model will be used to evaluate the immediate outcomes (impacts) of the project as well as the long-term impact whether the intervention has achieved the expected objectives and goal of the project.

The PCV and counterpart will use Peace Corps water, sanitation, and hygiene data collection tools to collect the relevant figures during the project implementation. The volunteer has also recommended that a replacement volunteer be placed in Xxxxxx Xxxxx after her departure to provide support as well as continue monitoring and evaluation.

Sustainability of a clean water supply is the goal of this project. The PCV and the counterpart will further train the water committee members on basic financial administration and management procedures to ensure financial records are up to date and funds are available to pay for routine maintenance cost at all times.

Let Girls Learn
This project qualifies as a Let Girls Learn project because the goals include:

(i) Providing more time for girls to attend school and spend more time studying due to a decrease in the amount of time it currently takes to fetch water,

(ii) higher rates of school attendance for both boys and girls because rates of diarrheal diseases will decrease,

(iii) improved health among all members of the community due to access of clean water for drinking and cooking.

Funding
This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

Conclusion of Niani District Water Project - The Gambia

Niani District Water Project - The GambiaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Meghan Judd. To read about the start of the project, CLICK HERE.

Niani District Water Project - The GambiaThe project was designed to rebuild a borehole by adding solar power, and provide a water system to reach the entire community.

Meghan reports:

Final Project Report
The project provides a water system throughout the community, and converted an existing concrete-lined well in the village to a solar powered borehole. A month and half post completion of the construction every compound in the village (population 300) reports using clean water from the taps for all of their drinking and cooking.

Water Charity funds were used to finance these activities to complete the project:

(i) Lay 336.4 meters of PVC pipe network connecting to the existing well (water depth 9m).
(ii) Install four taps throughout the village,
(iii) Purchase and insert Grundfos SQ Flex 11-2 into the well, install four 250-300W solar panels which were welded into a metal stand next to the metal tower that holds the 4000L water tank. The original plan was to weld them to the top of the tower but this was not possible due to the placement of the tower and its proximity to a tree. Residual project funds were used to purchase 50m of chain link fencing which was installed by the community to protect the panels and tank stand from breakage and potential theft,
(iv) Build a tank stand and install a 4,000L water tank,
(v) Pay for the skilled labor to connect solar power source to the Grundfos pump, and
(vi) Following clearing of debris and investigation of water quality installed a two-part concrete slab to cover the well to close the water source, protecting it from contaminants.

Timeline of Work
Contract was signed with Waterpoint on August 16, 2017. Followed by a seven-day mobilization period, construction began August 24. The initial work was delayed one day because of travel issues crossing to the North side of the river because of high automobile traffic congestion due to the proximity of Tobaski (a religious holiday).

Conclusion of Niani District Water Project - The GambiaFollowing arrival digging and pipe laying work commenced. The main labor was done by community members supervised by the foreman of the Waterpoint work crew. The excavation and backfilling was completed within 5 days.

The remainder of the work crew was working on tank stand construction which included cutting the square metal pipes it is composed of and welding them together. On the last day of construction, the generator to power the welding equipment began to malfunction but they were able to complete the work they had planned so work remained on schedule.

On August 29 the contractors returned to their homes for Tobaski. The holiday began on September 1 and celebrations concluded on September 5. Then for the following four days maintenance was done on the welding machine which had had a breakdown shortly before they departed for the holidays.

On September 9 contractors return and all welding work was completed. The tank stand was painted and cemented into its final location. The water tank was installed and connected to the water source. The final two days of construction an additional team of workers including the electrician arrived and began work on the installation and connection of the pump to the solar power source.

On September 15 construction was completed and all 4 taps were (and continue to be) fully functional.

Conclusion of Niani District Water Project - The GambiaOn Sept 23 the water committee had a meeting to discuss the collection system that had been put into place. The final system was set up so that people contribute to the communal fund based on the amount of water they are fetching daily. The committee also discussed the need to protect the newly constructed equipment from children, animals, and theft so it was determined that with the chain link fencing that was bought with grant fund would be installed by the community.

On September 30 the community completed fence construction and since then there have been no problem with animals or children getting too near the panels.

As of November 5, the community has collected D3500 into a communal account designated for future repairs. The money is collected by the water committee cashier and stored in a community bank account. There has also been a 10% decrease in diarrhea cases seen at the local health post. Eight teenage girls have gone to the bigger cities to pursue secondary education and two girls have been newly enrolled in the local lower basic school. All of them as well as their parents have stated that the installation of the upgraded water system was a heavily contributing factor to these events. This is due to the fact that women and girls in the village have reported a 20% decrease in water related stress. Monitoring and evaluation continues on the project and will be taken over by the incoming replacement volunteer.

QUOTES FROM THE COMMUNITY (paraphrased from local language)
“You have really helped the women in Njoben. Waiting to fetch water was very difficult and took a long time, but with the taps it is much easier.”

“We know our water is safe now and nothing that can make you sick will enter in the well”

“I used to worry about what I would do when my younger sisters returned to boarding school and I had no one to help me cook and fetch water for the family while also taking care of my twin babies. But now that water is easier to get, I can worry less and be happy that they are going to school.”

“Clean water is the most important. Now that we have that we can work on making other things better”

We extend our thanks to Meghan for completing this important project.

Conclusion of Niani District Water Project - The GambiaConclusion of Niani District Water Project - The Gambia
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High School Water and Sanitation Project - Cambodia

High School Water and Sanitation Project - Cambodia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

High School Water and Sanitation Project - CambodiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxx Xxxx Village, Ou Prasat Commune, Mongkol Borei District, Banteay Meanchey Province, Cambodia

Community Description
Conveniently located on Cambodia’s National Road 5, Xxxxx Xxxx High School serves as the point of convergence of 24 villages of the bucolic and widely dispersed commune. Due to its proximity to the market, the pagoda, and the national highway, Xxxxx Xxxx High School educates the clear majority of the community’s youth ranging from grade 6 through grade 12.

Problem Addressed
There were 3 prior Peace Corps Volunteers in the village. Each of these implemented projects at the school during their service, including painting a world map and globe, sprucing up and adding books to the library, and building 4 latrines on the south side of campus.

The school director, Mr. Modell, counterpart, Mr. Sophall, and the PCV have identified a two-part concern to address:

High School Water and Sanitation Project - Cambodia(1) Xxxxx Xxxx High School educates nearly 1,400 students, who are taught by 70 teachers. For this large population, there are no hand washing facilities anywhere on school grounds. The lack of adequate facilities is a public health concern, leading to the spread of disease.

Additionally, the female students miss school when they are menstruating because they do not have a way to wash away blood from their hands, bodies, or clothes.

(2) The school has only 10 working toilets available. Six of them are on the south side of campus and 4 are located on the west side of campus. None of them accommodates the needs of female students, in that that they are not separated from the boys’ latrines and they do not have the walls and doors to provide security and privacy.

There are 2 toilets on the north side of campus that have never been used, because when a Japanese NGO built them om 2014, they did not also build a water source.

This means that all the grade 7 and grade 8 students have the option of either defecating outside or walking across campus to use a toilet. This leads to most of our male students choosing to go outside, and there being an excess of female students having to wait for the toilets on the south side of campus

Project Description
This project is to improve the water access and sanitation conditions of the school by building a water storage container, a guttering system, 5 latrine stalls and a changing room, and handwashing stations.

High School Water and Sanitation Project - CambodiaOn the north side of the campus, a water storage container will be located next to the 2 existing latrine stalls, behind the grade 7 building. The container will be 1 meter in diameter, 2 ½ meters tall, and will have a 1 meter deep base. This container will be made of concrete and will model the water containers on the south side of campus.

A 10-meter gutter system will be built to convey rain water run-off into the water storage container. While one water container is likely not sufficient for long-term water demands, the school director has already begun rallying the community to donate funds to build one additional container. These water containers will connect to the 2 existing stalls through plastic pipes that the contractors will lay under the ground leading to the latrines.

Once operational, these two stalls will be dedicated to the male students. In addition to the existing 2 stalls, the water source will also provide water to the additional 5 female stalls to be built and the hand washing facilities.

Next, the 5 new latrine stalls and one changing room will be built. They will be equipped with a private sink, for female students. The latrine structure will be built of clay brick and concrete. The block of five latrines will be 8 meters wide. The latrines will be 2.5 half meters deep and 2.5 meters tall.

The changing room is designed to be more spacious, at 2 meters wide and 2.5 meters deep. Each latrine stall will be covered in porcelain tile with a porcelain squat-style toilet for easy daily cleaning. Each latrine will also have a cistern with access to water from the water storage container via a spigot from the water pipe Each stall will also have access to a waste bin for disposal of sanitary napkins.

High School Water and Sanitation Project - CambodiaThe 6 stall doors (5 latrine stalls and one changing room stall) will be behind a wall to provide female students privacy and safety. The wall will have a depth of 2 meters and will be 10 meters wide. The roof of the building will extend to cover the wall area. Behind the wall, 10 hand washing spots for the female students will be built to clean their hands in privacy.

The hand washing station will be rudimentary, consisting of faucets to release water with a ledge for hand soap, and a 3-meter-wide mirror. The contractors will build a small trench along the wall with a slope out one end of the building for the water from handwashing to escape. The floor will be poured concrete such that any excess water can be swept out and the floors can be kept clean.

The contractors will build waste storage containers behind the new latrines. The containers will consist of 3 units, each made of 4 individual concrete pieces. These pieces will be assembled such that 3 pieces will lay underground, the remaining one above ground. The remaining piece above ground will have a small door, such that when the containers are full, they can be pumped. The latrines will be connected to the storage container via 100-millimeter pipes.

On the south side of campus, a hand washing station with 10 spots to wash will be constructed in front of the existing 6 stalls. Along the wall of the grade 9 building, the contractors will connect 10 faucets to the existing water storage containers. The water that is released will drain into a narrow, poured concrete trench.

High School Water and Sanitation Project - CambodiaThe work will be done by community members during the months of August, September and October, while school is not in session.

The education component will begin with WASH lessons while the facilities are being built from August to October. In the first week of the new school year, there will be a celebration for the new facilities. Community members, students, and teachers will post on social media about the new facilities and the importance of sanitation.

At the start of the school year, a WASH session will be held for all the teachers to attend. This session will provide a general overview of WASH practices and the health benefits. The school director will explain the importance of all the teachers and himself to be models for the students by actively exhibiting positive WASH practices and encouraging non-compliant students to also practice hand washing.

Then, Mr. Sophall, Mr. Modell, and the PCV will ask 24 teachers (four from each grade level - two male and two female) to attend 3 additional WASH sessions. This is so that they can each work with Mr. Sophall and the PCV to train their students. Once the teachers have demonstrated understanding of positive WASH practices, they will hold two WASH session for their students.

Finally, when the school year is wrapping up, Sophall and the PCV will prepare materials and lessons to teach the grade 11 students with their counterparts how they will teach the coming year's grade 7 and grade 9 students. Three sessions will be held to instruct the grade 11 students in how to help teach the next year’s sessions.

Project Impact
1,480 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
L. Aylward

Monitoring and Maintenance
This project will be monitored by the PCV while she is in country, the school director, the teachers, and community members.

Xxxxx Xxxx High School has an existing system to sustain their latrines. Each grade has a day of the week in which they are expected to clean the latrines. With the construction of additional latrines and the hand washing stations, this same system will be applied.

At the end of each school year, the designated teachers, under Mr. Sophall’s supervision, will instruct the current grade 11 students with 3 sessions. These sessions will be aimed to prepare these students to lead the next year’s sessions for grade 7 and grade 9, only to be assisted by the teacher if necessary.

Let Girls Learn
This project particularly benefits girls by aiming to remove the barrier to education that menstruating can cause. With the new latrines, changing room with private sink, and general hand washing stations, females will no longer have to leave school when they start menstruating. With access to female-friendly facilities, comes access to female-friendly education.

Funding
This project has been paid for through a grant from the International Foundation.

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Sandu District Water Project - The Gambia

Sandu District Water Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Sandu District Water Project - The GambiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx Kunda, Sandu District, Upper River Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Xxxxxx is an ethnically Mandinka village with a population of approximately 900, located within Sandu District of the Upper River Region in The Gambia, West Africa. There is a Lower Basic Cycle (up to grade 6) school located less than 2 km from the village where the majority of children attend school.

The village contains 30 compounds, and two hand pump wells used for domestic water supply. The economy of the area relies heavily on farming of peanuts with additional income generated from the selling of garden produce. The community generally farms for subsistence and includes crops such as peanut, maize, millet, beans, rice and other local vegetables.

Problem Addressed
The two hand pump wells in village are used all hours of the day in order to provide the daily water requirements of each compound. Due to the overuse of the wells, at least one well becomes damaged once per month, requiring costly maintenance and forcing villagers to look elsewhere for sources of water (including the nearby river). Using water for drinking from unsafe sources, such as the nearby river, has led to higher rates of waterborne illness and diarrhea.

Sandu District Water Project - The GambiaProject Description
This domestic water supply project will upgrade an existing hand pump well, add a storage tank, and build a water distribution system in the village.

In addition to deepening the well as necessary, the upgrade will include a 4,000 L water tank, a pump with four solar panels, seven taps distributed at major junctions and 462 meters of pipeline. This project will ease the burden of fetching water and provide safe and clean drinking water.

The PCV and counterpart activities include assisting the contractor (Water Point) in purchasing and construction of:

(1) one 4,000 L water tank with tank stand,
(2) 45 meters of well to water tank pipe and 462 meters of land pipe network with seven tap stands,
(3) four solar panels and solar support structure, and
(4) water pump

Other activities include training on proper maintenance and use of the water system, health talks with villagers on waterborne illness and water sources, and talks on time management to assist in girls’ education on study time versus water fetching.

The community has raised 26% of the cost to pay for the project, and will contribute labor in excavation to lay pipe down.

Sandu District Water Project - The GambiaProject Impact
900 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
S. Maccabe

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV and counterpart have set up and will work with a water committee in the community to help lead trainings and to monitor the outcomes of the project. Trainings to be conducted will include health talks on water sources and waterborne illness, time management for school children, and maintenance and proper use of the new water system.

Monitoring the outcomes of the project will include observing the percent of people utilizing the new water system's taps, checking the difference in school attendance before and after the project completion, recording the average study time of children before and after the project completion, and observing the number of meetings help by the water committee.

A group bank account was established to deposit maintenance funds received from the users of the taps. Each compound will require that the women who utilize the taps to pay 10 dalasi (local currency) each per month to help in maintaining the system.

Security against breakage and theft will be ensured with a chain link fence with wire and locks surrounding the solar panels and pumping system. Some of the maintenance fees raised by the community will also be used to maintain the solar structure as well as all parts of the water system.

Let Girls Learn
After many girls complete grade six, they often quit school to help with chores in the family compound. Women also spend a great amount of time fetching water that in turn reduces the time spent in gardens and time that can be used to pursue other interests in business.

This project has a particular benefit in allowing girls to remain in school by reducing the time needed to fetch water for daily use. When this project is completed, the burden of fetching water from only two sources will be reduced through the addition of seven additional sources, freeing up the girls to pursue their schoolwork.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

Sandu District Water Project - The GambiaSandu District Water Project - The Gambia

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High School Latrine Project - Ethiopia

High School Latrine Project - Ethiopia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

High School Latrine Project - EthiopiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, Tenta Woreda, South Wello, East Amhara, Ethiopia

Community Description
Xxxxxx is considered the central town in the Tenta region of East Amhara, Ethiopia, and is surrounded by six other communities. As the central town, it holds the only source of secondary education for the town of Xxxxxx and all of the surrounding six communities.

Due to the large community capacity of the area, Xxxxxx High School is ranked as the number one provider of education in the entire zone of South Wello. It supports the education of 3,221 students (1,385 female), 131 teachers, and 16 administrative staff.

Problem Addressed
Xxxxxx High School is deficient in hygienic latrine and wash facilities, especially for the female students.

The high school age is a particularly trying time for female students and this is the critical juncture, in their educational experience, where it has been shown that they tend to fall behind in their class work, attendance starts to decline, and drop-out rates increase. One reason for this decline is the lack of support at the school level when they have their monthly menstruation.

Currently, Xxxxxx High School only has one latrine, with four stalls, for the entire population of the 1,385 female students. This lack of a sufficient latrine facility and water source, for cleaning menstrual pads, is one deterrent for the attendance of female students.

High School Latrine Project - EthiopiaProject Description
The aim of this project is to construct one latrine and one hygienic wash facility for the female students of Xxxxxx High School.

The latrine will be comprised of eight stalls and a wash facility for the female students to use to wash their menstrual pads and to stay clean.

The project will also provide a water source for the school garden.

The PCV will work in conjunction with the Education Bureau, Youth Bureau, Agriculture Bureau, Water Bureau, and the High School administration to supervise the construction of the facility and to provide permagarden training and nutrition training.

Water Charity funds will pay for the materials and skilled labor. The community will provide local materials and unskilled labor.

Project Impact
1,385 female students will benefit directly from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
S. Alemayehu

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school administrative team will add the expenses for the new bathroom facility to their yearly budget, and pay for continued maintenance.

Funds from the school garden will help pay for upkeep and the purchase of provisions.

Let Girls Learn
This project addresses the need for girls to have safe and sanitary bathroom facilities, and creates a situation where it is easier for them to go to and remain in school. Thus, it comes under the Let Girls Learn program. 

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.

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