Health Center

Refugee Aid Initiative - Worldwide

UNHCR Camp for Syrian Refugees

WATER CHARITY INITIATIVE TO HELP REFUGEES WORLDWIDE

​A large percentage of Water Charity projects help refugees and internally displaced people. Our typical projects often make a huge difference for people contemplating leaving their homes. Having clean water can be a major factor in deciding not to flee your home to begin with.

And, we have done a good number of projects that have explicit refugee components to them over the years. Click Here to see some of our projects with major refugee elements.

Now, in this time, we are seeing an unprecendented number of people risking their lives with only a thin hope of making it somewhere they imagine to be better. People are setting out on rigorous, potentially deadly journies with nothing but what they can carry, crossing deserts, risking drowning at sea, finding themselves at the mercy of human traffickers, and there are many casualties in this humanitarian crisis. A growing number of these people are "climate refugees" who leave their homes (at least in part) due to changes in the climate making their homes unlivable.Massive Refugee Camp

In addition to our normal work, Water Charity is attempting to provide assistance to these displaced people on a greater scale.  We are setting up projects now to deliver direct assistance at refugee camps where possible.

We all know that life in a refugee camp is no vacation. People who have already suffered trauma, atrocities, abuse and victimization find themselves, at the end of a long and difficult exodus... in a place that is often deplorable and depressing. Furthermore, many refugees are doomed to stay in these places for interminable amounts of time, with little hope of ever getting out and restarting their interrupted lives.

What to do about this is beyond the scope of what Water Charity can deal with at this time... but we CAN commit to trying to make the conditions in these camps better.  

As such, we are pleased to be expanding this initiative designed to create water, sanitation, public health, and solar lamp programs for refugee camps around the world. The inspiration for this effort was seeing the situation at the Eritrean refugee camps in the Tigray region of Ethiopia.

In case you didn't know, an amazing diaspora of Eritreans have fled the small nation in northeastern Africa... many of them unaccompanied children of 10-12 years of age. (In fact, 51% of refugees worldwide are children.)

Ethiopia

Ethiopia is unable to extend much help to their displaced neighbors, as their own citizenry are dealing with droughts, famine, uprisings, and severe water crises.  While not completely forgotten, these refugees are forced to depend on whatever the UNHCR (UN Refugee Agency), and a small group of NGO's can muster to give them. They have severe shortages of many things we take for granted... including space to lay their heads, proper sanitation facilities, and lighting in their dwellings.

These are not problems restricted to the camps in Ethiopia, though.  Many areas of the world have tragic, sprawling encampments of people displaced for a wide variety of reasons, often in a political limbo where they can't go home, can't settle in the host country, and have little or no way to leave.

In addition to helping out with water filtration, water storage, hygiene facilities, and the like, we are also engaged in distributing solar lamps.  While many refugees are able to receive some education in these camps, they are unable to read or study at night if they can't afford a kerosene lamp or some other smoky, air-polluting device that brings with it long-term health issues. While seemingly not directly tied to our water & sanitation mission on the surface, having a safe, dependable light source leads to increased personal health and security. Having a solar lamp available to them makes it easier to find and use restroom facilities in the dark. 

The ability to read after dark, ties in with our global "Let Girls Learn" campaign as well.

Eritrean Refugee KidsWe are hoping this initiative will spawn many programs, and allow us to bring aid to camps across the globe. Sadly, there is no lack of people needing help... and the number of displaced peoples is reaching new records. According to the UNHCR, there were at least 65 million refugees last year... the first time we have crossed the 60 million mark on record. And if anything, this year has only been worse.

Measured against Earth’s 7.5 billion population, these numbers mean that 1 in every 115 people globally is now either an asylum-seeker, internally displaced, or a refugee – a level of risk for which UNHCR knows no precedent. In all, there are more forcibly displaced people today than the populations of the United Kingdom, France or Italy.

Please support this initiative to help us start as many programs and campaigns in as many refugee camps as possible.  As they are implemented, you will be able to donate directly to each of our individual efforts.  You can expect the same level of transparency and reporting that we are famous for.  Every project we do is posted on our site in a timely manner with photos, video (where possible), updates (when needed), and conclusion reports upon completion. We bring to this endeavor our stellar track record of succesful and sustainable, low-cost WASH development work.  Our field-leading efficiency, due to our unique model, will ensure that we get the most bang for our buck... and that the largest amount of people possible will be served.

It is hard enough being a refugee, without a home, stateless and overlooked... the least we can do is make sure they have clean water to drink, a safe place to defecate, and the ability to wash themselves. And if, due to our relations with the manufacturer of the wonderful d.light, we can provide a little bit of extra light along the way, so much the better.

For more insight into this issue, consider watching our friend and filmmaker Chris Cotter's "The Eritrean Exodus: Refugee" after watching the trailer below. It is a great film, and is available on iTunes and other such services.
 

www.theeritreanexodus.com

 

This initiative is being carried out in conjunction with our partners, the National Peace Corps Association. NPCA & WC Logos

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Health Center Well Project - Cameroon

Health Center Well Project - Cameroon

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Health Center Well Project - CameroonLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, Bafia District, Centre Region, Cameroon

Community Description
Xxxxxx is a large rural village covering 27 kilometers in the Centre Region, just outside of Bafia. There are dirt roads scattered throughout the area, many of which are in rough condition, making travel difficult and expensive.

The population is 58,348 among 35 villages. They are spread out, but there are several market days for people to buy and sell their local harvests. The major language is French, the official language in the region. However, most people, when speaking with one another in the community, use a form of patois.

Some of the challenges are poverty, poor education, health disparities, and lack of clean water. Despite the fact that people live with very little, they have an incredible will to get by with what they have.

There are problems with limited access to water, electricity, and treatment for sickness. While all this can be discouraging, people have amazing resilience and ability to not only get by, but get by with kindness and positivity.

Health Center Well Project - CameroonProblem Addressed
Poor water availability and quality is a main problem when it comes to the health of many people in the village. Especially, during the dry season, finding safe water is a daily struggle and a necessity for life.

The health center usually has patients bring their own water, which causes a huge sanitation problem. Deliveries are often made with little water available. This can cause health problems and lead to people spending more time in the health center, less time at school or work, and more money spent

Project Description
This project is to build a well at the health center.

The well will be centrally located, near the primary school. The project is expected to take 3 weeks.

The well will be hand dug to approximately 21 meters, and lined with rebar and cement. An immersed electric pump will be installed.

A platform will be built, and a 3,000-liter storage tank will be installed. Water will be pumped to the tank, treated to remove contaminants, and fed by gravity to the access points.

The local council, working with the Mayor’s office, will contribute 25% of the funds necessary for construction.

Health Center Well Project - CameroonThe health staff will hold sessions on WASH issues.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
J. Pelusi

Monitoring and Maintenance
The newly-formed water committee and local technicians will ensure the proper functioning of the improvements. A monthly use fee will be collected to ensure that funds are on hand for repairs when needed.

Comments
The health center, the school, and the community at large will have better access to clean water, reducing illness and improving wellbeing.

Let Girls Learn
Girls have the primary responsibility for retrieving water, often from distant places. This takes time that can be better spent in school, studying, and doing household work. This project relieves them of this major burden, and makes it easier for them to remain in school, and is therefore a part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide. https://watercharity.com/let-girls-learn-initiative-worldwide

The Water Charity participation in this project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

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Dahra Latrine Project - Senegal

Dahra Latrine Project - Senegal

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Dahra Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

District of Dahra, Region of Louga, Senegal

Community Description
The village is approximately 30 km from the nearest town and has a population of roughly 3,000. It is made up of two ethnic groups, Wolof and Pulaar, and, dependent on the time of the year, you can find a sizable Sereer population.

The community is made up of 6 neighborhoods, and each neighborhood has at least 2 members who are volunteer community health workers. This means that they spend time extending education to the community about things such as malnutrition, malaria, exclusive breastfeeding, and vaccinations.

Problem Addressed
Currently, there is not a restroom or a water source in the middle school. As a result, many students have stopped attending school, or their attendance has dramatically decreased.

The health post serves approximately 7,000 individuals, including people from neighboring smaller communities, health post staff and their families, and even nomadic herders. It has only two fully operational restrooms.

Project Description
This project will provide seven latrines and one water access point (robinet).

The seven latrines will all be VIP latrines, consisting of cement privacy structures, roofs, and locking doors. Five of the seven latrines will have Turkish basins, and the final two will have western toilets seats.

Dahra Latrine Project - SenegalFive of the latrines, and the one robinet will be constructed at the local middle school, while the last two latrines will be added onto the health structure.

Once these structures are completed, students at the middle school will complete WASH trainings during class with the village's community health workers and the volunteer. The students will also be exposed to further WASH behavior change activities through their participation in the Junior Health Committee Club.

In addition, community health workers will hold bi-monthly trainings on proper WASH practices at the health post to educate the citizens that will be benefitting from the new latrines at the health post.

The community will contribute in the form of cash contributions to the project.

Objectives of the project include providing students at the middle school, as well as the patients at the health post, with access to improved water and sanitation as well as providing education on the importance of good sanitation practices.

Project Impact
3,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Sydney Hurst

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school and health post will elect separate committees to handle the care and cleaning of the latrines, contributing to the sustainability of the project by maintaining the latrines in good working order.

Should there be a problem, the latrines and robinet are both being built by masons in the community, so they will be able to fix them in the future.

The community will sustain this project by consulting the Latrine and Robinet Addition Committee, which will see to the cleaning, maintenance, and all other tasks regarding the latrines and robinet.

Dahra Latrine Project - SenegalThe education of proper hygiene and sanitation practices will be enacted and sustained by continuing to discuss the topic and working as closely as possible with the youth. Most recently, the community has planned to begin a youth club that will focus on health issues, being a primary way to increase the sustainability of the material side of the project as well as the educational side of it.

Let Girls Learn
Five of the seven latrines that are being built will be located at the local middle school. This will provide female students with the proper environment needed to fully focus on their studies. The five latrines will be separated based on gender, two for male, two for female, and one for teachers. This separation will allow for maximum privacy and safety for the female students.

This project is part of the Let Girls Learn program started by FLOTUS Michelle Obama in partnership with Peace Corps. The goal of this project is to keep girls attending to school. It is a part of Water Charity’s Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

Fundraising Target
$ 2,750

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$305

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,445

 

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Tchore Borehole Project - Togo

Tchore Borehole Project - Togo

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Tchore Borehole Project - TogoLocation
Tchore Center, Canton of Tchore, Kara Region, Togo

Community Description
This community received its political autonomy in 2012. The village is the seat of the regional chief, and all disputes or social affairs take place in his courtyard. There is a small clinic which provides first-aid, medicine and midwife services. This clinic services the seven surrounding villages which make up the political limits.

The market in the center of town goes from morning to night every Tuesday, with plenty of local beer and fried doughnuts. Next to the market is the elementary school, with a kindergarten. The pace of life is very slow, but not boring.

Problem Addressed
The most fundamental problem of the community is the scarcity of water. The rains stop in mid-November and do not begin again until May. During this seven- month interval, the river dries up and so do the three wells. The only water to be found comes from holes in the ground, which is hardly enough to sustain life.

The mid-wife at the hospital uses dirty groundwater to wash newborn babies and to clean the vaginal tracts of new mothers. The use of dirty water leads to elevated rates of dermatologic and infectious diseases.

Women and girls are exhausted by the competition for resources because they have to wake up early and go far to fetch water. Many women spend their whole day trying to accumulate enough water for their families.

A main source of income for women is the preparation of local sorghum beer, but women use dirty water and the community often suffers from intestinal worms and parasites.

Tchore Borehole Project - Togo

 

Project Description
This project is to build a borehole with a hand pump in proximity to the community hospital and elementary school.

The well will be dug to about 40-60 meters and be enclosed by a cement wall. After the technical work, the community will plant trees around the pump in the hopes of retaining water and beautifying the environment around the well.

An open community meeting will be held to choose a water committee to oversee the management of the well. This committee will decide the method of payment for water, and how to collect this money. There will be members designated as daily maintenance agents and several women will be trained by the pump technicians on preventative maintenance and small repairs.

Water Charity funds will go to renting heavy machinery, drilling the well, purchasing the materials (such as pipes, pump hardware, cement) and the paying of skilled labor.

The community will add approximately $2,000 to the project's total funds, along with sand, gravel, manual labor and lodging of the skilled laborers.

The company contracted to perform the work is E-Forage Togo, a local business based in Kara.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from the project.

Let Girls Learn
This project will allow girls to stay in school because it brings water closer to them, reducing the amount of time it takes for them to retrieve water for the daily needs of their families.

In addition, clean water will reduce illness, allowing them to devote more energy to their studies and attend school more regularly.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Riley Pavelich

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community has formed a committee for monitoring and maintaining the pump. Members of this committee have been designated for cleaning and upkeep, collecting fees, and repairing breakdowns quickly.

People wishing to use the pump will have to pay a nominal fee, and the money raised will go into a specific bank account. The company installing the well will train a group of women to make small repairs and to service the pump regularly to prevent eventual problems.

Comments
Riley notes:
“This project is possible through the participation of Water Charity and two generations of Peace Corps Volunteers. As the current volunteer, I see the desperate need for a protected source of water. The previous volunteer, once home in the US, fund-raised more than $2,000 and sent it to the president of the Village Development Committee (who is a good friend of his).”

This project is being paid for through the generosity of an anonymous donor. If you would like to support additional great projects such as this one, please contribute to our Western Africa Water and Sanitation Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

Tchore Borehole Project - TogoTchore Borehole Project - Togo

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Sil Latrine Project - Senegal

Sil Village

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Sil, Department Koupentoum, Region of Tambacounda, SenegalMen and boys in the village

Community Description
Sil Village has a population of approximately 2,000 people, although this fluctuates quite a bit when the farming season ends. The main form of income generation is selling peanuts as cash crops.

Sil acts as a logistic, religious, and social hub for the surrounding communities which are populated by about 10,000 people. The people are 100% Muslim, mostly split between two different "brotherhoods". One of these brotherhoods, the Maurids, is headed by a Marabout whose family started the village three generations ago. This family holds hereditary title of both the positions of Village Chief and Marabout.

PCV Derek Rush reports that, "Living in Sil has been an extraordinarily trying experience for me. Not only have I experienced a great difficulty with language, but the culture has given me more than a few moments of frustration. For example, when I first arrived in village I tried desperately to find meaningful work and to get people organized. Meetings would start two hours late some days and others would not happen at all because I would plan them on days such as Sunday, which also happens to be the day of the weekly market. Slowly, as my language and understanding of the people improved, both my work and integration into the community have become easier, though daily challenges still exist."

TrainingsProblem Addressed
Traditionally, most latrines in the village have been constructed by digging a pit and then covering the top with either a cement platform or logs that are then topped with soil. Due to the sandy condition of the soil though, these latrines frequently experience collapses when the rains come and families commonly resort to open defecation in the bush until a new one is constructed. What is needed is brick walled pits to support the latrine to prevent this.

Some of the difficulties facing this community are its geographic location and the difficultly accumulating capital for such projects. The village is located 30 kilometers from the main highway and mostly reliant upon the sale of peanuts for income. Because of this, financing construction projects is a difficult prospect.

Project Description
After doing a brief survey of latrines at the site, and having several discussions with village leaders, a plan was formed to build simple lined pit latrines for families that were willing to come to the planning meetings and related trainings. Of the more than 50 families who initially showed interest in the project only fourteen have consistently come to all the trainings and meetings.

The trainings consisted of two 45 minute to one hour long talks covering the importance of latrines, how diseases spread from open defecation, hand washing, and how to build a Tippy Tap.

The objective for this project is to provide fifteen latrines; fourteen to families and one installed in the Health Post that is meant for the mostly Pulaar women who refuse to use the Turkish toilets and have frequently dig cat holes in the facility to defecate into.

Villagers

The intent is that these latrines will lead to a more sanitary environment that has fewer cases of diarrhea and other illnesses caused by open defecation. In addition I hope that families will also adopt improved hand washing techniques for the same end.

Community Organization
Sil Latrine Group and Sil Health Post

Project Impact
This project will impact 75 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Derek Rush

Monitoring and Maintenance  
Derek will be personally supervising this entire project from the purchase of the materials, construction of individual latrines, and follow-up home visits. These visits will be conducted to see how families are using the skills and knowledge which were taught at the community meetings.
 

Comments
This project has been nearly six months in the making. Derek admits that he learned a lot through this project and considered cancelling it several times due to lack of community participation and lack of experience.  After he engaged in several long conversations with his community work counterpart, participating families, and health post staff in the village, they successfully collected all of the community contribution.  People are beginning to collect the necessary sand and gravel to make the cinderblocks that will be used.

Dollar Amount of Project
$660

Donations Collected to Date

$0

Dollar Amount Needed
$660

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

Riding horsesold latrine

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Village Costesti Bathroom Project - Moldova

Building to be repaired

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Village Costesti, Raion Ialoveni, Moldova

Community DescriptionLibrarian near site of the new bathroom
The Village of Costesti is a large village 25 kilometers south of the city of Chisinau. The population is 12,068; 5,900 are male and 6,168 are women. It is considered to be a middle-class village and one of the largest cities in Moldova. Being middle class does not exclude Costesti from the problem of eroding population.  There are approximately 2,036 people working outside of the country to support their families.  Population erosion causes a negative effect for most of the 2,646 children in Costesti, who are being raised by single parents, grandparents or other family members. Also, this has a huge impact on senior citizens who are left behind and sometimes forgotten by their children who have left in pursuit of a better life.
 
Costesti is an agricultural village with rolling hills of vineyards.  All of the homes have gardens in the yard. Moldova’s central and southern regions are one of the main destinations for grape storage, offering many refrigeration storage facilities. The village center is composed of a small market place, a small medical center, and Mayor’s office.

The largest building is the Casa de Cultura, an important building utilized for community cultural events and weddings. The library and NGOs are located in the same structure, but are independent to the bathroom and water amenities.
 
The library is a popular place for the children in Costesti, offering the only place to congregate with their friends. Computers and Internet draw many children and adults to the library. On a weekly basis, there are 350 people who visit the library to use technology, read a book, check out books or attend computer and English language classes. 

Prior to July, 2015 the Mayor of Costesti wanted to close the library saying it was an additional unnecessary expense for the village, and cut funding.   It wasn’t until the new Mayor, a former high school director, was elected, that the library has had hope for a future. The library is slowly coming to life by the determination of the librarian. However, growth has been a struggle with the lack of sanitation.  
 
Equipment damaged due to flooding The other wing of the building was the former home of a women’s career training center. These women were survivors of human trafficking. The training center was equipped with sewing machines, irons and machinery for woodworking. This equipment was ruined by flooding that was caused by an outdated sewage system, and the project was forced to close.

Currently, on the first floor, a social canteen feeds over 25 seniors every morning.  On the second floor, there was a youth-friendly health center, a training center, and a small medical clinic, but they were forced to leave due to the unsanitary conditions.  A new bathroom was installed in this wing. However, due to the sewage backup it remains inoperable in winter and when it rains.
 
These two wings of the Casa de Cultura have a future of becoming a social center for Costesti and neighboring villages with the installation of a new sewage system. The woman’s career training will return, more youth training can be held in 2nd floor and the seniors will have better sanitation and safety. The community's ultimate goal is for this building to be the social center for youth, children, families and seniors for Costesti and neighboring villages.

Problem Addressed
Currently visitors to the library are using the outside latrine, a 200-meter walk down an unpaved path behind the Casa de Cultura. After using the outside latrine, visitors have no place to wash their hands, spreading germs to books and keyboards.  Current bathroom behind Casa de Cultura

The community is asking to have a space for the young adults to participate in life skill classes, dance, or create. Parents of Costesti are asking for a place to bring the children. Seniors need a place to sit and relax. Repairing the sewage in this building will be the first step in providing a safe and sanitary place for these citizens.

It was suggested to install the bathroom in the corridor of the library opening it up to the public who will visit this site.

Past experience with the installation of a new bathroom proved unsuccessful, causing flooding which closed two social projects in the building. To provide toilet facilities to this building the sewage system must be upgraded and connected to the main sewage line in the village. Thus, the first project is to fix the sewage problem, providing sanitation and safety to citizens utilizing the social canteen and attending events held by Avante (NGO). 

Project Description
This project is to install a bathroom for the visitors at the library, and to redirect the old sewage system from the NGO building to a newer system, solving the problem of flooding.  This will leave the Casa de Cultura with bathrooms year-round in both wings.

current sewage connection from west wing home of NGOsThe community contribution will be the connection of the sewage system to both bathrooms located in the NGO side of the building and the proposed bathroom for the library.

Re-directing the sewage system will stop the flooding that had caused damage to the equipment used by the social integration of women project, and the loss of Avante medical assistance project. The building houses two NGOs that had lost the ability to continue these two projects due to the flood. Once this system is fixed the NGOs will re-instate these projects and will proceed in starting a new youth center in the building.

In designing the project, the installation of the bathroom was reviewed and it was determined that more rings would need to be added to the current sewer system, and eventually run PVC pipe through the main sewage system to the road 35 meters from the library. The village responsibility will be the rings to expand the sewage system and a concrete cover to minimize odors from the sewage. 

The village engineer, who is familiar with the project, suggested the re-direction of the old system in the social services side of the building directly to the street. Doing this will eliminate the flooding issue, and save the extra expenses of concrete removal and  PVC pipe. 

The installation of the bathroom is close to the current plumbing in the Casa de Cultura. With any installation of plumbing there is always the risk of problems. To minimize this risk the company that installed the bathrooms in the Casa de Cultura will install the new bathroom.

Step one is to develop documentation and technical design of the bathroom and sanitation.  This will be completed by the Mayor's engineer specialist and registered as a technical project complete with Mayor's stamp.  This will be completed in March-April, 2016 and Mayoralty Costesti is responsible for this step. Currently the mayoralty has a specialist who is responsible for the project and knows a company who can provide such services.

Step two is to identify the company or personnel that will be responsible for the construction and installation.  The timeline for this step is April, 2016.  The person responsible for this step is NGO Alternative, Maria Borta (librarian).  In the village Costesti there are several companies and individuals providing such services.  

Step three is the procurement of equipment and construction materials needed.  This will happen in May, 2016 with Cynthia Katocs and Maria Bivol being the responsible parties.  Procurement of equipment and materials necessary for construction will be done in coordination with the construction company.

Step four is the construction and installation of a sanitary bath.  The timeline for this is May, 2016 and the construction company will be children standing where the proposed bathroom will be built responsible.

Step five is connecting the water to the central sewer system, which is planned for June, 2016.  The construction company is responsible for this step.

Step six is for the sewage system and library bathroom to be operational.  This is planned for June, 2016 and the group of project implementation is responsible for this step.  

Step seven will be a club training for young women's leadership and participation in community life in June, 2016 by Cynthia Katocs and Maria Bivol.

Project Impact
This project will impact around 500 people, and likely a lot more, as the Casa De Cultura becomes more used by the community.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Cynthia Katocs

Monitoring and Maintenance 
Visitors to the library and enrollees to the Women Social Integration Project will be asked to keep the facilities clean, and social workers will maintain them.  The mayor's office will be responsible for maintaining the sewage system.

Comments
This project will improve the working conditions of 11 social workers and the 450+ monthly beneficiaries visiting the building by installing a bathroom and renewing the drainage system for the public library, health clinics, and Non-Governmental Organizations.  This should increase the number of beneficiaries to social services and the library, and will help reinstate the Women Social Integration Project, thus increasing the number of people using the facilities.  

Dollar Amount of Project
$2,500

Donations Collected to Date
$300

Dollar Amount Needed
$ 2,200

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

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Botou Health Post Water Project - Senegal

Youth in Botou

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Botou, Tambacounda, SenegalSenegalese women gardening

Community Description
Botou is a small, rural Bambara village 10 km northeast of Tambacounda, a region in southern Senegal. There is no electricity, although the lines and poles are up.  There is a water tower with functioning spigots in many of the compounds in the village.  The village is comprised mostly of subsistence farmers cultivating corn, peanuts, cotton, millet, and sorghum.

There is a health post that serves over ten villages in the surrounding area, which has recently received a professional nurse to oversee the basic health needs of the communities.  The health post focuses on maternal and child health, malaria prevention, and other basic health needs.  

As a sustainable agriculture extension agent in Botou, Peace Corps Volunteer Lianna Reed helps to improve food security for her community. Lianna reports that she works with the community members to improve gardening practices, diversify crops and fruit trees, and increase their overall knowledge about improving their income generating activities. While she doesn't work especially with the health post, she does visit there often, and has taken many of her siblings to get medicine there. It has become a very busy post given that it is the closest health facility without spending money to go to the regional hospital in Tamba.

Sinks at the health centerProblem Addressed
The problem is that the health post, while it has been open and working since October, 2014, has no running water.  Every two days, water is brought to the hospital on a donkey cart in bidons, the ICP (nurse) lives at the health post with her children and women give birth there... but without water, which is difficult to say the least. They have been asking for water since Lianna arrival in Botou in December, 2014, and she has been working tirelessly with the community to get the pipes extended from the existing water tower.

Project Description
The project will extend the existing pipes 400 meters from the current public water spigot to the hospital.  

The hospital already is equipped with the piping needed to get water to the sinks and other faucets in the health post.  The villagers will be digging the trench for laying the piping (400 m) and then Mahdu Fofana, a plumber in Botou (and the man who oversees the water tower) will be installing the pipes and connecting them to the health posts faucets.  

The village is also providing some piping that they got from the water facility in the regional capital.  Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the remaining pipes and connection pieces needed to bring the water to the health post.

Project Impact
This project will impact 1,000 in Botou, plus 2,000 from surrounding villages, for a total of over 3,000 people.Lianna and a local farmer

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
 Lianna Reed

Monitoring and Maintenance 
ASUFOR (Water Association in Botou) will be responsible for the monitoring and maintenance of the water system with the PCV checking in to ensure the water is being maintained.

Comments
ASUFOR is the community organization involved in this project.  The project will increase the capacity of the health workers, provide a stable water source for the ICP, and enable a garden to provide food for the health post community.

Dollar Amount of Project
$950

Donations Collected to Date
$300

Dollar Amount Needed
 $650

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Youth in BotouSink and Toilet that need water

Well siteThe Compound

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Funds Needed : 
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Lavie Water Project - Togo

Villagers cleaning out the water hole

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Canton of Apedome, Lavie, Kloto Prefecture, TogoWaterfall Water Source

Community Description
Lavie is located in the prefecture of Kloto, just 13 kilometers away from Kpalime, in a mountainous region that borders Ghana.  Lavie is composed of two cantons, Apedome and Rhume, each with a population of about 6,000 inhabitants. Lavie neighbors a popular tourist village named Kpime, famous for its beautiful waterfalls and hikes. This community is surrounded by beautiful green mountains and is abundant in fruits and vegetables. The climate is tropical, and the community consists of lush green, tropical trees, flora, and fauna. It is famous for the tree nurseries, as many individuals from around Togo visit the community for hard to find species of trees.

Collette Van Dyke, the Peace Corp Volunteer directing this project reports:

“I feel so at home in my community, and just wake up feeling lucky to be in such a loving and beautiful place. When I wake up in the morning, I have the blessing of being able to see the green, misty mountains in the distance, and breathe in clean, unpolluted, fresh air. The vegetables and fruits I buy at the local market are always fresh and natural, as my village is abundant in tropical and wild collections of fruits and vegetables. When I walk outside of my compound, I follow a beautiful red dirt road with green lush surrounding me.  Neighbors, friends, school children, always greet me and ask how I are doing when I walk down the street. My favorite time of the year is mango season (around March-April) during which my host brothers and sisters and I sit under the shade of the mango trees, to eat mangoes and talk. To put it simply, life in Lavie is happiness to me.”

The majority of the community members speak French, but the predominant language is Ewe. There are also smaller groups of Kabiye, Moba, and Kotokoli throughout the village. We are a medium sized community with roughly 12,000 inhabitants in total, and many schools, kindergarten to high school.  There are NGOs working nearby. The majority of individuals in the community rely on crop cultivation for food and income generation. The entire village of Lavie is equipped with electricity and running water, making living a bit more comfortable. Because the region receives heavy amounts of rainfall throughout the year, the fertile land is able to produce abundant amounts of cash crops such as coffee, yams, bananas, and pineapples. While this heavy rainfall is a blessing in this respect, it also poses problems for the water source, as will be explained further below.

Dirty water the villagers currently utilizeProblem Addressed
The heavy rainfall the community receives every year causes problems for the water source. Erosion leaves piping exposed, bruised and vulnerable to breakage. The main water source is a waterfall located up in the mountains. When rain falls, a collection of debris, dust, dirt, leaves, twigs, and feces fall in to that open water source, and channel out to community members.

To put it simply, this community lacks clean, hygienic, potable water. The village currently relies on an old, broken down system of water that was constructed over 60 years ago by USAID. The water filter that the entire community relies on consists of a simple plastic container with punctured holes, to keep out leaves and twigs, but does not actually purify water.

The entire community essentially drinks brown, unfiltered water that is channeled through dirty, aging, deteriorated and molding piping. Due to erosion from rainfall, the pipes are exposed, punctured, and burned from years of hot sun exposure. Because of this exposure, the elasticity of these pipes is weak and when rocks, rainfall, or humans step over the exposed piping they are easily cracked and broken. When a pipe is cracked, which happens often, water spews from the pipe, causing a blockage that prevents water from running to the rest of the village. Community members are then forced to shut down the entire water system, starting from the water tower, until the punctured pipe is taped back together. This is a process that takes several hours, and deprives community members of water for periods at a time.

The local health clinic is constantly treating patients due to water-related illnesses. This problem has a huge effect on students, especially girls, who are consistently absent from class due to unsanitary water. The lack of a clean water source creates barriers for female students to keep up throughout the school year, which greatly jeopardizes their potential to graduate and pursue a career. A clean water source would reduce the influx of patients at the already understaffed health clinic and diminish absentee rates at schools. Additionally, the water system serves 2 neighboring villages, with an additional population of 2,000 inhabitants.

Project DescriptionMan checking the pipes
This water sanitation project will implement the following in the water dam, which is located at the base of the waterfall used as the water source: 

First the five old rotten pipes located at the dam will be replaced with five stainless steel pipes. 

Next a new water filter will be inserted in the dam, which will transform the water into a potable source. An iron fence will be erected around the filter to block leaves and other particles from dirtying and entering the filter. 

Next a cement slab will be constructed with an iron filling that will cover the third dam filling and filter to prevent debris and particles from clogging the filter from above. 

A floodgate will be installed at the base of the wall of the dam, or spigot, that will allow water to evacuate from the dam to allow for cleaning.  In addition, a vacuum (motor pump) that electrically evacuates water will be installed so inhabitants are not forced to jump into the dam and manually evacuate water with buckets and shovels (a process that takes at least 4 hours).  Then two connection pieces will be installed that will connect the water spigot to the piping.

The following are the steps to complete the project and timeline.

1) Withdrawal of money (Colette Van Dyke) (1 day)
2) Travel to Lome to buy materials (Water Commission Board Members- Mr. Kpetsu and Mr. Agon) (2 days)
3) Return to Lavie with materials (1 day)
4) Announcements and mobilization of community, by district. Community Development committee will execute this (1 day)
5) Collection of sand and gravel with the community, students, farmers, general community members, water board members(1 day)
6) Transport of materials from the village up to the dam. Various members of the community (1 day)
7) Construction of cement slabs for the dam, 3 local carpenters (3 days)
8) Installation of piping and connection pieces, water technician. (1 day)      
9) Installation of filter and metal caging, water technician (1 day)
10) Installation of flood gate, water technician (1 day)
11) Follow up, Colette Van Dyke (one week)

The community will participate in all aspects of manual labor involved in this project and will provide food and water for those working. The community will help mobilize its members to work and oversee the completion of the project in an organized manner. The community is the driving force behind this project, as they have urged Collette since her arrival, to help them improve their water source.

countrysideAfter conducting a needs assessment with the entire community, they listed their water filtration system as the number one pressing need. They are motivated and ready to help in any way they can to ameliorate their water source.

This motivation was witnessed first hand when APCD, Paul Siyanda, came to visit the community. The members of the community were able to organize a community-wide water cleanup day in which they emptied and cleaned the dam. Each times the rainfalls and the water system stops, community members have no choice but to work together to clean, fix, and unclog our filter and dam. This community collaboration is essential to sustaining the water, and subsequently life in village. Otherwise, the community cannot continue to survive.
Clean water is a base element of life that should be available to everybody, but is sadly a problem people are grappling with each day.

The funds will go directly towards all the materials and parts needed to replace old, deteriorated materials (filter, piping, water valves, floodgate, etc.) with new and durable materials. General community members, the Village Development Committee Board, Water Association Board, students, parents, and teachers will assist in implementing the water system. Having those who will benefit from cleaner water involved in the implementation process invest them in the success and sustainability of the end product.  Additionally, cleaner water leads to better health, allocating more free time and energy to other activities such as working in the fields, teaching, learning, working, etc.

Project Impact
This project will impact 14,000 people, as well as any visitors to the area.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Colette Van Dyke

Monitoring and Maintenance
filtering waterThe community will be able to sustain the benefits of this project by enforcing a strict monthly community contribution plan. Each household will contribute 100 cfa each month that will go towards water repairs, materials, and water clarification. The Water Development Board Members are committed to collecting this contribution each month, and will take turns amongst each other to implement this. The local water technicians will then use this money to maintain and make repairs when needed. If a person refuses to contribute, their water source can and will be shut off. The water commission and technician in the community will oversee, and do manual checkups to make sure materials are protected, maintained, and taken care of for future years.

Comments  and Let Girls Learn:

According to Colete:

This problem has a huge effect on students, especially girls, who are consistently absent from class due to our unsanitary water. According to the registry at our local hospital clinic, approximately 127 girls were reported to have fallen ill with giardiasis, dysentery, diarrhea, gastroenteritis, or typhoid just in 2014. In 2015, 169 cases of these waterborne diseases among girls were reported in our registry. The lack of a clean water source creates barriers for female students to keep up throughout the school year, which greatly jeopardizes their potential to graduate and pursue a career. A clean water source would diminish absentee rates at our schools, especially among the girls. In general, clean water through a new and improved system, will save the entire community money and time that could be used towards raising families or sending children to school, which paves the way for a brighter future.

When I arrived in Lavie in May 2015, two days into my welcoming the community members took me up to their water source to explain where the most development was needed. This took me aback, as it usually takes weeks for community members to reveal community needs.   I was pleasantly surprised by their motivation and devotion to this project. After they had detailed all the problems with their water system, I promised them I would do my best to help them out. Afterwards, one of my work partners whipped out a bottle of the local drink (sodabe), and we all toasted to the year ahead of us, and that I could bring good work and blessings to their community.

On our hike back down from the water dam, one of my work partners spotted a porcupine hiding amidst the brush. He smiled and looked back at me, and I looked back at him, puzzled. He excitedly told me he had just spotted a porcupine, and I thought "cool! so what?" What made it special was what he told me next. He explained to me that in Ewe culture, a porcupine is a symbol of hope for those who are in pain or in need of help. When the quills of a porcupine are engaged, they are filled with air, allowing them to float. This buoyancy is symbolic of the ability to stay "above water", to remain calm in the face of emotional waters. In other words, when life casts you problems, you invoke porcupine energy to keep you afloat upon troubled waters. My work partner then told me that perhaps it’s a sign that I am a source of new hope for Lavie. I mulled over this the entire hike down. I was just presented with my first major task, a water sanitation project, and I was hoping I could be that "hope" for her new community.  I hoped that I could lessen the suffering even just a little. I had no idea how I was going to tackle such a project, but I hoped that I could invoke this "porcupine energy" to keep me afloat and balanced, to help find a clear solution amidst my community's problems.

Today, I can happily say that Water Charity is that solution, that hope for my community. I'm sending a big Thank You to Water Charity for all the work you do!

Dollar Amount of Project

$1,300

Donations Collected to Date

$0

Dollar Amount Needed

$1,300

 

 

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Mtii Health Clinic and Dispensary Construction and Well Project - Tanzania

Village children

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Mtii, Mtae Ward, Lushoto District, Tanga Region, Tanzania

Community DescriptionWoman villagers
The community of Mtii, located within Mtae ward close to the Lushoto area of Tanzania, is a beautiful sub-village with its own village officials. The population of Mtii is a little over 2,518, with 708 being women of childbearing age and 1,120 being children under the age of 15.

Problem Addressed
The biggest dilemmas that villagers face are those of health care and water. The closest dispensary is over an hour and a half walk through mountainous terrain, with no way for a car to pass.  Currently, the majority of pregnant women give birth at home without trained professionals, leading to a low birth survival rate, about 1 in 4 newborns do not survive.  Children and elderly have a difficult time attending to their health needs because they cannot make the long trek to the dispensary.

In the past, the village government has tried to build a dispensary, constructing a foundation and some walls, but was unable to finish due to lack of funding. 
 

clinic foundationProject Description
This project is to finish construction of the dispensary and clinic, and to build a well to provide for the water needs of the facility. The building construction will be completed.  A 20,000 liter well will be built for water storage, attached to the municipal water source, and piped to the building.
 
The anticipated outcome is that the dispensary will provide all health services and medicines for residents as well as a source of water for sanitation, hydration and hygiene. The beneficiaries will be all men, women and children in the village. This project will start in January, 2016, and be completed in April, 2016. 

The project committee includes the community change agent, a female village chairperson, the village official, a village delegate, and the ward chairperson. The project committee intends to oversee and monitor construction and implementation of the dispensary and well and cover any maintenance fees of the well with funds from the village government. They will ensure sustainability of the dispensary and well after the volunteer leaves by meeting monthly to discuss progress or issues.
 
The community is thoroughly involved in this project because the understand the importance of having accessible healthcare and water. The project committee has a complete plan for the dispensary and will begin construction on the foundation of the building.
    
The project committee is motivated to improve their community and increase birth survival rate, educate villagers about family planning, proper hand washing and sanitation and improve the overall health and wellbeing of their village.  The committee will oversee the buying of materials for this project, monitor the construction of both the dispensary and the well and will continue to evaluate both after completion to ensure the sustainability and success of the project. They have already met three times to discuss materials needed and update timelines. They will continue to meet bi-weekly throughout construction of the project and then monthly after completion to discuss fixing any issues and the general progress of the dispensary and well. The community contribution for this project is mostly in the form of volunteers to help transport materials and with construction. The money to buy certain items will come from the village and water office funds collected from the community.

To implement this project, the project committee has divided the tasks among themselves. All of the members of the project committee, except for one, live in Mtii and Mtii centerare able to easily monitor progress and oversee the construction of this project.  They will be responsible for getting and transporting supplies and for keeping the masons and carpenters on track. The first phase of implementation will take place in January, 2016, and will include buying all materials necessary from Lushoto town or Mtae village and transporting them to the project location.

The second phase beginning in late February, 2016, will include construction of both the dispensary and well simultaneously. The well is located nearby to the clinic with water pipes connecting the two.
     
Phase three includes monitoring and evaluation. This phase will include the completion of the construction process and the evaluation of the completed project addressing any issues that may have occurred. This will happen in April, 2016. In order to evaluate the projects’ success, the committee will record how many citizens are going to the clinic for treatments, medicine or clinic days each month because of its close location in the village and how many babies survive birth because women are choosing to deliver at the clinic with trained staff instead of at home. Also, they will determine if the water from the well is enough to sustain
the clinic on a daily basis.
 
All items were priced according to experts in their fields such as the carpenters, masons and plumbers. The experts contacted the stores where the items will be bought and then met with the project committee members to write down all specific items and prices. Community members will volunteer to transport all materials from the buses, trucks or stores in Mtae village to Mtii.

The main items covered by Water Charity funding are doors, windows, ceiling boards, paint, rods, wires and cement. The community has contributed the price of construction workers to build the dispensary, all volunteers who will help transport materials and with construction, bags of sand and piles of stones; some travel expenses, as well as pipes to connect to the well. Eventually the community will also contribute porcelain sinks and soap for the dispensary.

Project Impact
This project will impact 2,518 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Mia Young

Village leadersMonitoring and Maintenance
The project committee intends to oversee and monitor construction and implementation of the dispensary and well and cover any maintenance fees of the well with funds from the village government. They will ensure sustainability of the dispensary and well after the volunteer leaves by meeting monthly to discuss progress or issues.

The project committee has taken full responsibility for sustaining the project after completion and after the volunteer has left. Because the anticipated outcome of this project is a dispensary, after completion of the building, the committee members including village officials and a ward chairperson will contact their government to send the doctors and nurses. This process is separate from this project and will be the responsibility of the members of the project committee. To address any problems that may arise in the future, the project committee has agreed that all maintenance issues within the dispensary or the well will be paid for from the village government funds coming from community members.

Also, the plumber will volunteer to fix any piping issues related to this project with funds from the water office, also paid for by the community members. The project committee will meet once a month after the project is completed and more times if necessary to discuss the progress of the dispensary and the overall wellbeing of both the dispensary and well. Eventually, a dispensary committee will be created consisting of the doctor and/or nurses and village officials and will continue to oversee the welfare of the dispensary and water well.

Comments
This is Peace Corp Volunteer, Mia Young’s second project.  Click here to see her first Tanzania project. The community organization involved in this project is the Mtii Village Government.  The beneficiaries of this project will be all men, women and children in the village. This project will start in December 2015 and be completed in March 2016. The community contribution will be 25% of the cost.
 
Community contribution includes two masons, cement bags, stones, sand, pipes and volunteers to transport supplies and help with construction. The project committee includes Amina, the community change agent; Upendo, a female village chairperson; Athumani, the village official; Asha a village delegate and Richard, the ward chairperson.

In the short term, this project will provide a building that will serve as a dispensary and clinic for the people of Mtii village. Also, there will be a 20,000 liter well, which will be connected to a water pipeline already existing in the village. This well will store water so that the dispensary will have reliable running water year round for all sanitation and hydration needs.

The anticipated long-term outcomes will be increased birth survival rate due to women delivering in a medical facility with trained professionals, better health care for children due to ease of access to clinic days and medicines, an increase in the number of women using family planning techniques such as contraception, and a decrease in malaria deaths and the spread of HIV and serious illnesses because of the relative location of the health facility to get testing, treatment and education.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.  You can still donate to this project, and all further funds will go to helping start more projects in the region.

If you wish to help with more great projects such as this one, please donate to the East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

stones

Country: 
Progress: 

Bazar-Korgon Rehabilitation Center Bathroom Project - Kyrgyzstan

Rehabilitation Center Children

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC logos

Location

Bazar-Korgon village, Jalal-Abad oblast, Kyrgyzstansoccer match

Community Description
Bazar-Korgon (which translates as "Bazaar-Fortress") is a medium-sized town of roughly 35,000 inhabitants in southern Kyrgyzstan, in the Jalal-Abad oblast. It is an ethnically diverse town, with many people of Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Tajik, Uighur, and Russian descent. This area is the hottest area of the country, located in the Fergana Valley, which is in stark contrast to the rest of the majority mountainous country. This town is known as the gateway to Arslanbob, the world's largest natural walnut forest, which the locals take great pride in. Here the people are proud to discuss the beautiful surrounding nature, nomadic heritage of the Kyrgyz people, national hero Manas of old, and the impact left from times as a part of the Soviet Union. People here are incredibly friendly and welcoming. All you need to do is take a stroll through the bustling bazaar, which is the namesake of the town, and you will be invited to "chai-ich" (drink tea) at half a dozen vendors' homes.

Problem Addressed
The rehabilitation center in Bazar-Korgon hosts children with chronic conditions and illnesses/injuries that require extended supervision. About 600 children stay at the rehabilitation center each year, with a typical range of 1-3 weeks that each child stays. Communicable diseases can further jeopardize these children’s health status. The infrastructure in the building is from the early 1980's, and in very dilapidated condition.

The rehabilitation center is a large building, with four bathrooms and a kitchen facility, yet none of the toilets, sinks, or related piping is in functioning condition. The children must all use the same outdoor pit to go to the bathroom, leading to unsanitary conditions, and hardships in the wintertime.

cracked pipeProject Description
This project will replace the toilets, sinks, and related plumbing in the four indoor bathrooms and in the kitchen. Also, this project provides for monthly educational seminars about preventable communicable diseases in order to improve the sanitary conditions at the rehabilitation center, and reduce the rate of communicable disease occurrence.

The community originated the idea for the project, and is fully supportive. Water Charity is covering the cost of the infrastructure materials and training materials, while the community is providing all remodeling labor. The director of the rehabilitation center had a professional come out and take measurements, and provide a detailed budget of all necessary materials needed for the remodeling job, along with related pricing for the infrastructure supplies.
 
This project consists of two main components: the actual infrastructure remodeling, and the training component. For the infrastructure, first, all the necessary supplies (toilets, sinks, piping, etc.) will be purchased and brought to the rehabilitation center. The project is to install 8 toilets, 11 sinks, all related piping so they function properly, and a small amount of materials to provide training after the remodeling. Then, the volunteer laborers will tear out and dispose of all old infrastructure, which exists in various forms of disrepair. After this, all the new items will be installed.

The second component of the project is the educational seminars.   A health volunteer who works in Bazar-Korgon as well and Nicholas will assist in the preparation of communicable disease lessons in the Kyrgyz language. They will collaborate with medical staff at the rehabilitation center, teaching them the information so that they may give the presentations, with volunteers there as support..

Project Impact
This project will impact 600 resident children annually.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Nicholas Ruhly

Monitoring and Maintenance
The director of the rehabilitation and Nicholas will be on site to monitor the progress of the remodeling, and will be in attendance at the monthly trainings. The new infrastructure will provide sanitary facilities for the rehabilitation center many years.

The community is providing all remodeling labor, and has also pledged to help maintain the new system without cost for two years after installation. Beyond that, if small items occasionally need repair/replacement, the rehabilitation center has its own small funds that it will use for upkeep of the infrastructure. The training piece will be easily sustainable by the medical staff at the rehabilitation center. Nicholas will provide the training information and initial materials to the staff in the Kyrgyz language, and they will reuse items, like posters and markers, for many presentations. These types of materials are very low cost, and can be replaced by the center when additional supplies are needed in the future.
sinks
Comments
This project builds skills and capacity within the local medical staff at the rehabilitation center. It increases their knowledge of communicable diseases and how they are spread, and allows them to better educate and care for the children who stay there. They will be able to carry on these trainings after volunteers are no longer on site assisting. Also, with the rehabilitation center director taking the lead with this project, she is learning valuable things about doing development work and applying for aid.

Dollar Amount of Project
$1,600

Donations Collected to Date
$530

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,070

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE. We are still accepting donations, which will be used to help us fund the next project in Kyrgyzstan.

Bathroom

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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