Filters

Youth "Water Cadre" Training Program - Uganda

Richard showing water before & after filtration

Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association, together with Friendly Water, present YOUTH FOR WATER: Creating a Water Corps

Location:
Mityana, Uganda

Problem Addressed:
Children of Mityana, Uganda gathering and drinking water.Mityana District in west central Uganda has some 80,000 households and more than 350,000 people (54% aged between 0-17 years and 21.4% aged between 18-30). Two-thirds of them live in rural areas.  Unemployment is the norm, and among youth who are not in school, the unemployed are the clear majority.

Nearly 70% of these people, and far higher for rural residents, lack access to even ostensibly clean water.  Three-quarters of the population live more than five kilometers from any public health facility.

Waterborne illnesses are the norm. More than 8,300 people are receiving HIV-related services; likely more than double that are affected. Deaths from opportunistic infections related to contaminated water are common, even among those receiving anti-retroviral drugs.  Health systems are entirely overwhelmed.

Project Description:
Mityana Rotary President Richard Kyambadde is building a Center for Clean Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene in western Uganda. While the center isn’t finished yet, the people of Mityana District can’t wait for clean water!  To this end, this project will train 150 youths to make and distribute BioSand Water Filters.

With the assistance of the district water committee on which he serves, and his Rotary, Richard plans to train 10 groups (15 per group) of unemployed youth in fabrication, distribution, installation, and maintenance of BioSand Water Filters, as well as in teaching community sanitation and hygiene. There will be one group for each of the subdistricts in the region, with workshop space provided by local authorities.

Subdistricts of Mityana, Uganda
Busimbi, Butayunja, Ssekanyonyi, Bulera, Kikandwa, Malangala, Manyi, Kalangalo, Namungo, Manyi and Mityana TC


Each group will be equipped with a pair of Molds, tool kits and all the necessary start up material in kind and delivered to the construction site.  Each group is expected to be self-sufficient in the first three months, as demand for clean water is very high in an area where it is simply otherwise unavailable. The training will take place over a seven-month period.

Once this new “water cadre” is created, there will be additional trainings in fabrication of rainwater catchment/ferro-cement tank systems, MicroFlush toilets, spring- and well-head protection, interlocking bricks, and soapmaking. All of these activities will take place at the new Friendly Water Center. The idea is to create an ongoing “Water Corps,” with youth at least partially employed in ensuring clean water, community sanitation, and hygiene-related services to the entire District.

Training a group, Uganda
Project Impact:
The project aims at tackling the twin problems of lack of clean water and mass unemployment. A business plan for selling BioSand Filters has already been developed, and each of the ten subdistricts is providing workshop space for the project. Diagram of BSFThe objective is not only to ensure clean water and employment for some, but by working so intensively with youth, to change consciousness around water-related issues in the entire District.
 
Immediately:  150 youth will be trained in this skill, with 4 filters made in each group during the training (40 filters).  The filters will be used at the center and community places, and will help as many as 100 people each.
 
After 3 MonthsThis initial project will yield a total of 500 BioSand Water filters which will be installed in 500 homes, reaching approximately 2,100 people in a period of not more than 3 moths. 
 
Long term:    The first batch of the filters will be sold at 100,000 in Ugandan currency, with  customers paying  a down payment of 50,000 each, and the last installment in two months.   The proceeds from the BSF will be managed by the group`s treasurer. Collections will be used to purchase materials for the next production and payment of salaries.  The groups will be assisted to develop a self-reliant model through a period of 6 months.  This will form phase one of this project   Phase two will involve construction of affordable latrines using interlocking stabilized soil blocks.  Future phases will involve rainwater catchment, water storage tank construction, and training of other youths.
 
​While it is impossible to say how many people will be affected by this work, we estimate that something like 20,000 people will be touched in the first year.  (either by clean water, income or both)  Many households will be spared the indignities of both unclean water AND extreme poverty.  Once the Water Cadres and the Water Corps at large are established, it is quite possible that this first step might result in the entire district benefitting!


Person Directing:
A young man of 27, Richard Kyambadde has been Friendly Water for the World’s Uganda Country Representative since he was 20. He is President of his local Rotary Club, member of his District’s water committee, and is completing a degree in environmental management, all while working on the Friendly Water Center in Mityana. He has trained groups in India, Rwanda, and the Congo-DRC, and has traveled as far as South Korea while doing this work. He wants it to be known he is HIV-positive, and is international chair of Friendly Water’s Building New Lives Campaign, which works to transform people with HIV into the water protectors of their communities, with projects currently in five countries.

Monitoring:
Each group will have a trained monitor, who will go into homes to ensure BioSand Filters are installed properly and are being used correctly. Reports from each group will be done in 90 days, at which time business plans will be adjusted as necessary. There will be “before” and “after” health surveys.
Children Drinking Unclean Water - Mityana, Uganda

BUDGET for Youth "Water Cadre" Training Program - Uganda

Item Definition

Qty

Price/Unit  (USD)

AMOUNT (USD)

Provided by Rotary Mityana

Provided by the trainees

Provided by Water Charity

 

 

BSF construction

Steel Molds

20

 500

10,000

 

0

10,000

 

Tool kits

10

470

4700

 

0

4700

 

Startup material (send, cement, gravel, tubing, Crisco, metal sheet, sieves)

10

250

2500

 

2500

 

0

 

 

0

 

Transportation of materials to the training site if applicable

 

 

50

 

0

50

 

 

Educational Costs

BSF training Manual

 

150

 

10

1500

 

0

1500

 

Training materials (sand, cement and gravels)

02

500

500

 

 

500

 

Certificates

150

2

300

 

0

300

 

Note books and pens

150

0.5

75

 

75

0

 

 

Trainers costs

Trainers honorarium

2

200

2000

 

 

0

2000

 

 

Trainees costs

Meals for Trainees

5x150x3

44

3

2250

 

2250

0

 

Transport of trainees

150

44

10

1500

 

1500

0

 

 

Evaluation and follow up

Follow up visit

6 Months

 

200

 

1200

 

 

1200

 

Transport

 

 

250

 

 

 

 

This project has been implemented through the generosity of an anonymous Water Charity donor.  Your contribution using the Donate button below will allow us to continue to expand this amazing project.


Friendly Water Training Uganda
 

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Oaxaca Earthquake Relief & Water Filter Project - Mexico

Oaxaca Earthquake Relief & Water Filter Project - Mexico

This project is made possible by the partnership of Water Charity & the National Peace Corps Association

A massive earthquake off the Pacific Coast of Mexico in September of 2017 caused widespread damage, and many people were killed in this region.  There was a lot of press and a good deal of aid directed to Mexico City, rightly so, but many people failed to realize that people closer to the epicenter were being ignored by and large.  Due to the work of volunteer Denise Lechner, Water Charity has been able to put together this project to help the still struggling people of South-Eastern Oaxaca. She is to be aided in this effort by our Project Base friends Nate and Sam, who have raised some of the money for this project already.

LOCATION
San Mateo del Mar is located on a sandy ridge between the Pacific Ocean and the “Laguna Superior” (Superior Lagoon) in the area of Oaxaca State known as the Tehuantepec Isthmus.  This is the southernmost are of the state, bordering with Chiapas.
Google Earth of the Oaxaca Region
Zoom in on San Mateo del Mar

COMMUNITY DESCRIPTION
San Mateo del Mar is considered the second most marginalized municipality in Oaxaca State and the 12th nationwide. It is home to the people from the Ikoots ethnic group, commonly known as Huaves. There are 14,252 people in the municipality and their main economic activity is small scale fishery.
Woman of San Mateo del MarFishermen of San Mateo del Mar
Community of San MateoThe Laguna

PROBLEM ADDRESSED
On September 7th 2017, an 8.2 earthquake in the Richter scale hit the States of Oaxaca and Chiapas. According to the National Seismological System the most affected area was the Tehuantepec Isthmus located in Oaxaca, bordering Chiapas, both considered the most seismic of the country. [1] 12 days later, another big earthquake hit the center of the country affecting this area as well.

According to the first statistics, there were at least 110,000 properties affected in Oaxaca and Chiapas, without considering the damage produced by the second earthquake. [2]

In San Mateo del Mar, due to its location on a sandy ridge, the earth went through a liquefaction process during the earthquake damaging a total of 1887 homes affecting approximately 9000 people (about 60% of the population).
Earthquake Destruction Oaxaca
Beside the overall infrastructure destruction, one of the main concerns in San Mateo del Mar is related to water issues. The lack of services such as piped water and drainage systems, has people depending on water wells to obtain their water, and use septic tanks for sewage. With the earth movement, many septic tanks broke and contaminated the water wells and the lagoon.

The immediate solution from the government was installing big drinkable water tanks in different areas of the main town, but someone from CONAGUA (the government department that deals with water issues) has told us that the government doesn’t have the capacity to solve the problem in the long run, and that the ideal would be to help with filtering systems since it is most likely that the groundwater aquifers are polluted.
Earthquake Destruction San Mateo Del Mar
Three months after the earthquake there is still no permanent solution, just a few temporary bathrooms have been installed, and there’s started to be shortages in the water tanks. Many people are still defecating outdoors.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION
250 Sawyer Point One Bucket Filters are being delivered to San Mateo Del Mar.  They will be distributed by Denise, along with her colleagues.  There will be trainings to teach people how to properly use these filters and maintain them.  With occasional backflushing, they last for 10 years or more and are guaranteed up to 1,000,000 gallons.

These 250 filters are to be distributed in the three main communities of the area: The "Third Section" or "Head Town" of San Mateo del Mar (Section most affected by the earthquake in the main town), San Pablo and Colonia Juarez.
San Mateo Del Mar DwellingWoman in Water
This effort will be completed by mid-January, and will be aided by the arrival of Sam Hardy and Nate Jones, our wingsuit flying daredevil friends from Project Base.  Water Charity has been building a partnership with them for a couple years now, and the fact that they were flying nearby in Mexico and are friends with Denise created a perfect situation for them to come and lend a hand.  We expect they will gather some of their famously stellar footage, so check back!
San Mateo Home
Since September 11th, Cultural Anthropologist Denise Lechner and Pediatrician Anja Widmann have been in San Mateo del Mar to do relief work. Since then, they’ve been working in the three main communities affected: The Head town of San Mateo del Mar and the neighborhoods of San Pablo and Colonia Juarez.

Denise and her team, have continued to help with temporary shelters, workshops to make cots and distribution of staples and other necessities.

There have been a small number of filtration systems received in the area, that were installed in households, but the filters WC is donating will make a big difference, as the vast majority of people are still dealing with unimproved water sources.

We’ve managed to have a permanent team in San Mateo helping us with the distribution and the follow up of our projects while we are not in the community.  The way the workshops are designed, it allows the people who received the training, to teach others on the same subjects, reaching a much larger amount of people. We’ve been working mainly with schools, and with organized groups in the small sections or neighborhoods.

PROJECT IMPACT
While the initial filters would be installed in schools that need them, and health centers, we’ve noticed that the people suffering most with the water problems live far away from these places... so we are organizing three or four neighboring families to receive each filter. This way we would be impacting a total of at least 2250 to 2,500 people since families are large.

VOLUNTEER DIRECTING PROJECT
​Denise Lechner

MONITORING AND MAINTENANCE
The filters are to be installed in the first couple of weeks of January, and we will do a couple of workshops in two or three communities for people to learn how to use and care for them.  The women of the community already hold regular meetings and are working with our team, so this will be a relatively easy task.  The filters themselves require very little maintenance.  Occasional backflushing with the included backflush syringe to remove sediment build up is all that is required.  Otherwise the filters are quite robust and can last for 10+ years without issue.
Women of San Mateo del Mar

The initial workshops are connected to the distributions, and then our permanent team in the community will be going to check their use, and issues that may arise. Follow up pictures of these visits will follow.

COMMENTS
​This project is part of our Filters For Life Program, and relies on the Sawyer Hollow Membrane Water Filter technology.

This project has been funded by the Paul Bechtner Foundation.  Please contribute to our Filters for Life program using the Donate button below, and your donation will be used for our next water purification project.


Community Meeting San Mateo del Mar, Oaxaca, Mexico 
Working after the Earthquake to repair roofs etc.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Caribbean Clean Water Hurricane Relief Program

Path of Hurricane Maria, 2017

Caribbean Clean Water Hurricane Relief Program

Puerto Rico, St. Maarten, Dominica, Antigua & Barbuda

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION, working with SAMARITAN'S PURSE

 

Aftermath of Irma in St. Maarten
 

As most of you know, a series of destructive storms hit the Caribbean this year with a ferocity and intensity that was truly catastrophic.  The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season was a hyperactive, deadly, and extremely destructive season, featuring 17 named storms!  Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Jose and Maria did the majority of the damage, though, setting records and leaving a wake of devastation in their wakes.

Hurricane Maria was regarded as the worst natural disaster on record in Dominica and Puerto Rico, and caused catastrophic damage and triggered a major humanitarian crisis in Puerto RicoEye of the Hurricane (Maria).  In Maria's wake, Dominica's population suffered from an island-wide water shortage due to uprooted pipes, nearly every roof on the island was damaged, and 100% of the banana and tuber plantations were lost.  In Puerto Rico, the hurricane completely destroyed the island's power grid, leaving all 3.4 million residents without electricity, and an outbreak of leptospirosis materialized in the weeks following the hurricane, as standing water remained and became contaminated with animal urine and feces.

In the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, which was also a Category 5, development on the islands of Barbuda and St. Maarten (also St. Martin) was described as being "95% destroyed" by respective political leaders, with 1,400 people feared homeless in Barbuda. In many areas, every building was damaged or destroyed, including the shelters!  The winds at Irma's peak were in excess of 185 mph, the strongest to hit the area on record.

Water Charity has done a lot of disaster response over the years, and we believe very strongly that water filters save lives.  In the wake of a natural or man-made disaster, people are displaced and in the shelters and camps that spring up, waterborne illnesses can spread very quickly.  In many cases, deaths from cholera, typhoid, dysentery and the like can surpass that of the disaster itself by orders of magnitude.  Water Charity was helping in Haiti after their 2010 earthquake, when a cholera outbreak took hold that went on to affect nearly 700,000 people (more than 6% of the population)!  It is only recently coming out that the number of deaths from that event are probably at least 3x as great as what were reported at the time.

Caribbean Clean Water Hurricane Relief Program

The Solution

In order to help as quickly and efficiently as possible, Water Charity teamed up with our friends at Samaritan's Purse to deal with the water issues from the outset, and get filters where they were needed.  We are happy to say that these filters were among the first to be distributed and placed in the afflicted areas. 

There are 3 types of filters, 4 Islands covered, and 5 projects in our relief program, so far.  We are proud to say that more than 100,000 people are drinking clean water due to this program now, and we would like to expand it if we can raise more money.

Here, we will give an overview of all the various projects in the program.  Each of them will also have their own dedicated page on this site where you can go to see more detailed information, pictures and video from the work and so on.

SAWYER FILTER DISTRIBUTION (Puerto Rico, Dominica, St. Maarten)

​Those of you who know Water Charity will know about our longstanding and frequent use of the Sawyer "hollow Sawyer Distributions so farmembrane" water filter technology. See our Filters For Life Program for some examples.  Many of our distributions fall into other programs, but you will see that we were one of the earliest adopters of this method and product, and have helped Sawyer build out an entire international relief effort to match their commercial efforts.  This has caused an explosion of use around the world, a huge drop in price, and a lot of people having access to safe water who wouldn't otherwise.

Fast forward to 2017, prices for filters are now less than 1/4th of what they were when we started using them, and they were a deal back then. They have many advantages over the ceramic and carbon filters we used to use. They are light, small, last forever (guaranteed for a million gallons, and they go way beyond that), require almost no maintenance and are engineered so the carbon nanotubes do not let anything larger than .1 micron (or .02 for the extreme model) through. No living pathogen is smaller than .1 micron, so it is a brilliant solution.  See a testimonial from Kenya here.

Now, in many homes across Dominica, Puerto Rico, and St. Maarten, Sawyer filters are providing hurricane-affected families with clean water. These personal filtration systems filter more than 150 gallons of water per day. In certain remote areas of Puerto Rico—where residents were trapped by blocked roads and had neither running water nor power—some people resorted to drinking from local streams. Using a helicopter, our disaster response staff airlifted thousands of Sawyer water filters and buckets to these remote communities. Once residents received the filters, they had ongoing access to clean water.

  • 5,500 Sawyer Filters installed in Puerto Rico (also see Community Filter Installation below)
  • 1,000 Sawyer Filters installed in Dominica
  • 88 Sawyer Filters installed in St. Maarten (also see Community Filter Installation below)

BarbudaBARBUDA COMMUNITY FILTER UNIT

Barbuda is a sparsely populated island in the nation of Antigua & Barbuda, that was hit rather hard by Irma. Much of the population of the island has simply left, but the people who stayed had very serious water needs.  The Parker Unit (desalination) was chosen to meet the needs there.  It is a workhorse, community-wide device that is designed to be in constant operation.

The Parker unit is installed at the Fisheries Complex. This location was chosen because it is secure, at the main arrival point for boats, and an ideal access point for the saltwater. The Parker unit produces about 500 gallons of clean water on an average day. The water is being used by everyone on the island, which currently is approximately 300 people.

*UPDATE* Last week (December 4-10), this unit filtered and produced 3,940 gallons of clean water which has been about average since Irma struck.


PUERTO RICO COMMUNITY FILTER UNIT

​In addition to the Sawyer Filters we have distributed, this program has also built a large Living Water Treatment System capable of providing clean water for thousands of people a day.  It has been installed and online since Puerto Rico LWS locationbetween Irma and Maria serving 800 households nearby as well as people from around the region.

The Living Water Treatment System was installed in Canovanas municipality, Campo Rico Barrio, which was devastated by both hurricanes Irma and Maria. Irma caused severe flooding in the flood-prone valley, followed by Maria’s winds that destroyed many homes in the exposed mountainous areas. The municipal government identified the population in Campo Rico as among the most vulnerable in the community. The exact location of the filtration system was determined according to proximity to a constant and sufficient water source, a secure location for the system to operate, and easy accessibility for the local population to come receive water. The system is installed at the base of a hillside with an estimated 800 households. The location is immediately adjacent to the main road passing through the southern half of the municipality, so there was constant heavy vehicle traffic that had access to collect treated water. The Water Charity & Samaritan’s Purse partnership was the first aid organization to arrive in Canovanas—even ahead of the government response.​

  • Over 58% of all residents in Campo Rico lived below the poverty line in 2016.
  • 72% of the head of households have less than a high school education.
  • Many immigrant families in the area are not eligible for FEMA funding.

St. Maarten filter locationsST. MAARTEN COMMUNITY FILTER UNIT

In addition to the small Sawyer filter distribution we did for St. Maarten (see above), we also installed a large community filtration system that was able to generate water for 2,500 people a day.  Reverse osmosis is a technique that allows for complete removal of all pathogens, and was a good choice for the specific conditions on Sint Maarten/ Saint Martin.

Samaritan’s Purse installed four community-size reverse osmosis treatment systems in St. Maarten: • Two at Pelican Key Pier • One at Simpson Bay Coast Guard base • One at Oyster Bay.  Water Charity was responsible for the one at Oyster Bay. These locations were selected in coordination with the municipal water authority on St. Maarten to supplement their water trucking capacity. Each of these locations were at the fringes of the damaged water distribution system, among larger populations without clean water, able to be secured, and had access to non-turbid sources of seawater. We estimate that our water system served a population of approximately 1,200 people during the critical period after Hurricane Irma, and before municipal potable water distribution could be restored on the island.

Puerto Rico Living Water System
Puerto Rico Living Water System​

This disaster response program has been a big deal, and we are committed to continue helping the people who suffered from Hurricanes... even after the events have faded from the media coverage.  We would like to expand our help, and are currently looking into ways to aid the hard-hit US Virgin Island St. Croix.  Updates will be posted here when available, and we will nest book pages for information on the 5 projects currently comprising this program.  

Please consider supporting this work.  Every donation counts.  With more money, we can help more people.  Having lost their homes, and livelihoods, the least we can do for them is to make sure the water they drink is not causing loss of life as well.

Initial funding to implement this program has been provided by the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

 


Helicopter deliver of bucket filters
Puerto Rico Helicopter Deliver of Sawyer Bucket Filters

Barbuda Parker Filter InstallationSt. Maarten Reverse Osmosis System
Barbuda Parker Filter Installation​                                               St. Maarten Reverse Osmosis System               

 

Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

BioSand Filter Training Program - Liberia

BioSand Filter Training Program - Liberia

New Groups Being Trained in Liberia to Make Filters!

 

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION working with Friendly Water for the World.

Location: Paynesville, Liberia

Problem Addressed

Flag of LiberiaThe first and second Liberian Civil Wars took place from 1989 to 2003, and destroyed much of this very small country. A combination of tribal hostilities, personal power grabbing, and interference from neighboring countries left some 250,000 dead, and a million displaced, and most of the water and power infrastructure destroyed. The country has been faced with trying to rebuild trust and infrastructure at the same time. It hasn’t been easy.

WHO reports that only one out of every four Liberians gets water from an “improved water source” – this doesn’t mean that the water is safe, only that it comes out of a pipe. In the countryside, the percentage would be far lower than that. It is estimated that as many as one out of every five Liberians die of a condition related to unsafe water and inadequate sanitation. Many rural and urban areas are almost entirely without toilets. Cholera and other waterborne illnesses are common. 80% of the population lives in poverty; unemployment is extremely high, and the cause of continued unrest.

Between 2014-2016, there were almost 11,000 cases of Ebola reported, and close to 5,000 deaths. However, it should be noted that many cases went unreported. At the start of the outbreak, there were only 50 doctors in a population of 4.3 million. Liberia was declared “Ebola free” in early 2016.  However, even at the height of the Ebola epidemic, far, far more people were dying from waterborne illnesses. And while much foreign assistance was received, little of it has gone to improving water and sanitation conditions.

Today, there are over 4.7 million people in Liberia, and WASH continues to be the biggest issue.  There is hope, though... as Water Charity is part of a multi-NGO effort to bring clean water access to every person in Liberia by December 2020.  See our Rivercess Well Repair Program - Liberia for details.

Project Description

Getting water from turbid source, LiberaiFour groups will be trained in the fabrication, distribution, installation, and maintenance of BioSand Water Filters, and in the teaching of sanitation and hygiene.

The Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP) is a training program designed to enable participants to respond to potentially violent situations in new and creative ways. First developed by Quakers and others working in U.S. prisons in the 1970s, it has since proliferated around the world. The first training was organized in Liberia in 2010, and it has spread. Many of the participants are students, and are also seeking employment opportunities, and are excited about BioSand Filter projects.

Camp for Peace Liberia (CFP-Liberia) was established in 2005 by a group of visionary youths with the goal to transform the lives of young people through community-based education and awareness in response to the manifest need for sustainable peace and development. CFP-Liberia was incorporated in 2010 as a non-profit organization with an overarching goal to contribute to the development, empowerment and self-sustainability of young people in Liberia. It focuses on the promotion of the culture of nonviolence, reconciliation, promotion of education, and creating awareness of accountable governance and social transformation. It creates opportunities for young people to be equipped to deal with their Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and to participate socially and economically in Liberia’s post-war development. CFP also provides micro-credit to enable youth to establish their own enterprises. To focus on its vision, mission and goal, CFP is supervised by a management team comprising of 75% young people including a vast number of volunteers who offer activities through a network of trainers.

AVP and CFP-Liberia will be trained as a single team.

RICCE – The Rural Integrated Center for Community Empowerment (RICCE) empowers rural communities to participate in decision-making in Liberia, with emphasis on issues that impact on their lives and threaten community peace and security. To do this, RICCE facilitates community based peacebuilding and conflict resolution processes, and works for the promotion of biodiversity and transparency in natural resource management. RICCE was established by development specialists, engineers, health professionals, grassroots activists and professors at the University of Liberia who were alarmed by the conditions of rural residents in 2005. At the time it was observed that the rural people were neglected when it came to political decision-making, economic opportunities, better schools, hospitals and basic protection of fundamental human rights. These conditions still exist today, contributing to conflict in Liberia. RICEE is also involved in advocating for women's rights, promoting female empowerment through programs that allow them to participate in leadership and decision-making processes.

Peaceful Lutheran Church in Paynesvile, on the outskirts of Monrovia, will be hosting the training, and will be sending a team to be trained, with a workshop to be set up there.

Woman with pail of water, LiberiaRescue Women Liberia is a non-governmental organization established in 2015 by group of gender activists. The organization is involved in promoting basic human rights of women including access to justice, sexual and reproductive health, combating gender-based violence, and promotion of clean water and sanitation. Currently they do not have funding, but have been involved with voluntary community service in health education in communities and schools, awareness on gender based violence in and around Montserrado County.

Project Impact

The project is likely to have considerable impact. Fifty people will be trained, and four ongoing workshops set up and equipped. Health and employment will immediately improve among the 50 families. Taken together, the four groups have substantial contacts with NGOs throughout Liberia, with demand for Filters likely to be high among their constituents. The four groups will also have considerable contact with small community-based organizations throughout the country.

There will be a significant reduction in waterborne illnesses, increased employment, and new small business opportunities generated. The four groups, taken together, should be able to create significant synergies in the development sector.

Immediate Beneficiaries:

-          50 Individuals trained
-          200 members of their families

Community Beneficiaries (in first two years):

-          Four groups build and distribute 500 BioSand Filters each in first two years = 2,000 Filters
-          Each Filter serves on average 10 people – 20,000 people served
-          50 Filters go schools and orphanages – 3,500 children served

Future Beneficiaries:Bio Sand Filter System

-          Programs expand and require more than two molds each
-          Large orders likely to be received from other NGOs working in Liberia

Impacts:

-          Waterborne illnesses curtailed
-          Health improved
-          Child morbidity and mortality reduced
-          Medical/pharmaceutical expenses curtailed
-          School attendance increases
-          Community productivity enhanced


Person Directing
The training will be directed by Friendly Water for the World Technical Advisor Wayne Medrud, with assistance from Alisa and Ken Malloch, both of whom has significant experience with missions in sub-Saharan Africa. Philip Quoqui, Director of AVP in Liberia, will serve as interim country coordinator.

Monitoring 

Each group will have a trained monitor to visit homes post-installation and keep records. A first report from each group will be due 90 days after they start operations. Following the reports, each group will meet to adjust their business plans as appropriate. The coordinator will keep track of the activities of the four groups.

Comments:

The joint training and operation of these four groups together create an opportunity to make a real difference in the lives of the long-suffering people of Liberia.

Liberia Training Budget Breakdown

Description Amount raised by Water Charity Quantity Cost per Item  Funders Budget Justification:
Liberia Project -  4 groups          
Steel Molds  $4,800.00 8 $600.00 Water Charity Each mold makes one filter/day.* Equip all four groups
Toolkits $1,900.00 4 $450.00 Water Charity Needed for Filter Fabrication*
Starter Materials $1,000.00 4 $250.00 Water Charity Sand,gravel,cement,tubing for first 20-25 Filters
Printing and Copying Materials $800.00 4 $200.00 Water Charity  
Travel for Trainers - Wayne $1,800.00 1 $1,800.00 Water Charity  
Honorarium - Wayne $400.00 1 $400.00 Water Charity **
Lunch/Tea for Trainees   50 $25.00 Local Community Lunch and Tea for five days**
Training Space   1 $200.00 Paynesville Church **
Trainers - Accommodation/Food $1,800.00 3 $600.00 Water Charity  
Internal Transportation $400.00 1 $400.00 Water Charity  
           
(Two trainers - Alisa and Ken Malloch - are paying their own transportation)        

*Molds and Toolkits are provided on long-term loan

**Local community contributions are required. 

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor. Please donate to Water Charity to allow us to expand our efforts in Liberia.

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AVEC Water Filter Training - Democratic Republic of Congo

AVEC Water Filter Training - Democratic Republic of Congo

AVEC – Northeast Congo

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION working with Friendly Water for the World.

Location: Nzulo KAMURONZA, Northeast Congo

Problem Addressed:
There is currently a major cholera epidemic in the Democratic Republic of Congo, with 20 of 26 provinces affected. There is no clear count of the number of cases, as only those who show up at health centers are counted, but it is likely that there are 100,000 cases, and perhaps close to 2,000 deaths.

Nowhere is the epidemic worse than in the hilly areas to the northeast of the city of Goma. Because of mining operations (many of them illicit), water from the few streams there are is virtually undrinkable. People make do gathering water from small ponds and even puddles, or from ground-level cisterns. Waterborne illnesses seriously weaken the population, constantly ravaged by war and civil strife.

Project Description:
Initiated in 2009 when the great humanitarian Zawadi Nikuze began aiding survivors of war-related rape, the Peace Center for Healing and Reconstruction of Community (CPGRBC) has been a leader in building a framework to respond to inter-ethnic violence and rebuild social links, and to Drawing Filters in Classassist communities in seeking solutions to their own problems in the Congo. All of this takes place in the context of continuing war and civil strife, and as backdrop, a new, massive outbreak of cholera.

Over the past eight years, CPGRBC has created and sustained 120 peace committees and 23 village savings and loan associations (AVECs) (banks are not trustworthy), built a management office in Goma, and trained four new groups in BioSand Filters/community sanitation and hygiene. The original group of rape survivors that Friendly Water for the World trained in Goma has played a major role in fighting the cholera epidemic there. CPGRBC has also recently acquired new space to build a headquarters and training center.

The plan is for CPGRBC to train and equip four new groups, each representing one of the AVECs. These groups already meet weekly, so they are organized to take up the challenge, and to market BioSand Filters to all of their members. They will also include community sanitation and hygiene as part of the peace/conflict resolution curricula. CPGRBC is experienced in monitoring and evaluation, and is an excellent, trustworthy partner.

Project Impact:
The project is likely to have substantial impact among the populations CPGRBC serves. Already existing CPGRBC BioSand Filter projects in the region have made massive differences in people’s lives, both in the provision of clean water and new employment opportunities. Other projects in chicken and goat production have been generated, and many people now have enough income to be able to afford to send their children to school. People with HIV are now able to fight off opportunistic infections.

What makes this project special is that those trained come from the CPGRBC savings and loan associations. Banks in the area are unstable and untrustworthy. By banding together, members of the associations have new access to credit, all within the context of their local community. Once the new teams are created, there will be ready market for BioSand Filters among their own members, and those in need will be able to access funds to purchase them. This may become a new model program, and could later expand to all 23 savings and loan associations.Bio Sand Filter

Immediate Beneficiaries:

-          60 Individuals trained
-          300 members of their families

Community Beneficiaries (in first two years):

-          Four groups build & distribute 600 BioSand Filters each in first 2 years = 2,400 Filters
-          Each Filter serves on average 10 people – 24,000 people served
-          60 Filters go schools and orphanages – 4,200 people served

Future Beneficiaries:

-          Program spreads to as many as 19 other AVEC groups
      

Impacts:

-          Waterborne illnesses curtailed
-          Health improved
-          Child morbidity and mortality reduced
-          Medical/pharmaceutical expenses curtailed
-          School attendance increases
-          Community productivity enhanced

Person Directing:
Aristote Bwaire has long experience working with CPGRBC since its inception, and in carrying out BioSand Filter training programs with CPGRBC throughout the region. He will work with Friendly Water for the World’s Medical Officer, Dr. Kambale Musubao and Congo-DRC Country Representative Eliphaz Bashilwango.

Monitoring:
Each group will have a monitor trained to go into homes and check on Filter installation and use. The groups will report 90 days after the workshops are set up, and business plans adjusted as appropriate. CPGRBC will be responsible for communicating results. Funds are included in the project for follow-up.

Trained with filters, Congo

Budget 

PROJECT COSTS
  Transport facilitators 2X5 days @ $15 ea = $150  
  Certificate 40 @ $2.5 ea = $100  
  Molds 8 @ $650 ea = $5200  
  Sand, gravel, cement 4 groups @ $250 ea = $1000  
  Tool kit 4 groups @ $450 ea = $1,800  
  Facilitation (2 people) @ $150 ea = $300  
  Printing modules 40 modules @ $7ea = $280            

LOCAL CONTRIBUTION (BENEFICIARIES)   
  Training Materials = $1OO
  Coffee break 40 persons @ $3 x 5 days = $600  
  Room rental 5 days @ $50/day = $250  
  Transport of participants 40x5 days @ $10 ea = $1,000  
Local Participation$2,950  

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor. Please donate to Water Charity to allow us to expand our efforts in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. 

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Simanjiro Maasai Training Initiative - Tanzania

Boy filling container in Simanjiro

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Girl Filling Water - SimanjiroLocation:
Simanjiro district, Manyara region, north-central Tanzania

Problem Addressed:
Simanjiro is a semi-arid district of some 185,000 people south of Mount Kilimanjaro and the Arusha region. Most of its inhabitants – 85% Masasi, plus some Bantu groups – are pastoralists. There are constant water shortages, and it is not uncommon for women to get up in the middle of the night and walk for as long as nine hours to fetch water from ponds or shallow wells, where the water is shared with cattle. The water is unclean, with constant outbreaks of waterborne illnesses, particularly typhoid, bacterial dysentery, and, before the rainy season, cholera.

Project Description:
Community Life Amelioration Organization (CLAO – Mwanza, Tanzania), with the enthusiastic support of local government authorities, plans to train six groups of 10 people, mostly Maasai, from six different wards in Simanjiro. Three groups will be mixed (male/female) and three groups all-women, with the Girl Pouring Water - Simanjiro, Tanzaniaidea of comparing their effectiveness in fabricating and distributing BioSand filters. 

The six groups with ten beneficiaries from each of six wards will be trained and provided with starting materials. Participants will be trained on fabrication, installation, distribution and maintenance of BioSand water filters. Also, education on water, hygiene and sanitation will be provided, as well as basic skills on keeping records, financial management, and basic business planning.

Project Impact:
This project will be beneficial to 60 community members from 6 wards (each ward, 10 participants) of Simanjiro District; 30 of them will be women who will form 3 groups among 6 groups.  The actual number of beneficiaries will grow exponentially as the filters, clean water and knowledge of how to build them are spread.  It is possible the reach of this project could extend to 10's of thousands of people eventually.

Among the expected results, in addition to reducing waterborne illnesses, is increasing school attendance (many children miss school because of waterborne illnesses), and the community’s capacity to engage in other economic activities. Once better health is achieved, CLAO hopes to move forward by training groups to build rainwater catchment/ferro-cement tank systems, reducing ‘the long walk to water’. This will become increasingly viable once local authorities have experienced a successful partnership to improve the lives and health of their constituents.

There will be an increase in knowledge regarding hygiene and sanitation, as well as the importance of clean drinking water. Enhanced job creation and self-employment will reduce burden on family members and government in general through improved living standard. Waterhole - SimanjiroEnough income will be generated to start other small projects. Disease burden will be reduced. The district will experience economic growth.

Person Directing: 
Robert Kennedy Mahili and Obed Gidion, leaders of CLAO, will direct the training. They both have extensive experience in the field. They will be joined by Friendly Water for the World’s treasurer Ginny Stern, who is currently in Tanzania with the Tanzanian Teaching Fund.

Monitoring:
In collaboration with local authorities, group leaders, and the CLAO team, a communications plan will be established to ensure flow of information among groups trained and trainers for technical support, challenges, and progress of the project. Each group will have a trained monitor. CLAO representatives will meet with each group after 90 days, to evaluate progress, and make necessary modifications to the business plans.


Budget Details:

No

Item description

Quantity

Unit price $

Total price $

Funder

1

Steel molds

12

550$

6600$

 WC

2

Set of toolkit

6

450$

2700$

 WC

3

Mold Transport

1

250$

$250

 WC

4

Set of Starter material

6

250$

1500$

 WC

5

Certificates 

60

3$

180$

 WC

6

Printing manual

60

4$

240$

 WC

7

 Trainers honorarium

4

300$

1200$

Participants contributions

8

Trainer Transport

1

300$

300$

 WC

9

Trainees transport fees

60

@5$×60×5 day

1500$

Local authority

10

Trainer accomm, food, communication

4

@30$×4×6 days

720$

 WC

11

Participants lunch and tea

60

@6$×60×5days

1800$

Local authority

12

Venue

1

50$×5 days

250$

Local authority

13

Training materials (flip sheet, pens, note books)

FF

350$

350$

 WC

14

Monitoring and evaluation

FF

400$

400$

 WC

Simanjiro, Tanzania

Expected Results

Short-term

-          This will increase the knowledge of the trained members and the community in general on hygiene and sanitation

-           Knowledge on treatment of water before drinking will help to reduce water related diseases

-          Education on Consequences from using unsafe water and benefits from using clean water will lead to health improvement

-          Knowledge on job creation and self employment to participants will reduce burden to the family members and government in general hence improve living standard

Long-term

-          Start of small projects in order to increase their incomes.

-          Reduction of unemployed people in Simanjiro district and Tanzania in general.

-          Reduction of diseases from unsafe water by distribution Bio Sand water filters.

-          Contribution to community’s economy and the whole country in general.

-          Increased number of people with access to clean water.

-          Economic growth of the District since people will be healthy.

Sustainability 

From the profits of this project, trained groups will invest in other different businesses and they will keep providing clean water to community via BioSand water filters distribution. On the contrary, the idea will be sold to other NGOs working in and out of Simanjiro district to adopt and distribute the idea to those who have no access with water.

UPDATE: Simanjiro, Tanzania Filter Training
 


Footage of dancing and jubilation concluding our training.  Full conclusion report to be posted soon!

 

Project Funding: 
This project has been funded through the generosity of a donor who chooses to remain anonymous.

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9 Training Programs for the Serengeti - Tanzania

9 Training Programs for the Serengeti - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION, working with Friendly Water for the World.

Nine BioSand Filter Training Programs for the Serengeti, Tanzania

Boy with bucket mid-pondLocation: Serengeti, Tanzania

Problem Addressed:
The combination of national development and global climate change has not been kind to the people of the Serengeti in northern Tanzania. The remaining forests, which helped hold the water to the soil, have virtually all been cut down, and turned into charcoal which is then shipped off to the cities. The forests are rapidly being replaced by water-hungry tobacco agriculture, intensively farmed, with massive use of only semi-regulated pesticides.
 
Meanwhile the people of the Serengeti suffer. There is no clean water, with the only water there coming from shallow ponds or from behind agricultural dams. Some 97% of the population now earns less than $1 a day. Changes in climate also seem to have altered disease patterns, with cholera and typhoid now becoming much more prevalent, in addition to endemic amoebic and bacterial dysentery. Tsetse flies have returned with a vengeance.

The government does not have the funds to provide clean water to all the villages. The aim of these 9 training projects is to improve health and alleviate suffering due to waterborne illnesses by providing clean, safe drinking water to families especially vulnerable children across the Serengeti region of Tanzania.

Project Description:
The primary method of achieving the goal of providing clean water is to train villagers on proper sanitation and hygiene and on the construction of BioSand water filters.  9 trainings are scheduled for 8 groups.

OGathering water in Tanzaniaur services include providing materials to construct the filters, train people on the construction of the filters, distribute the filters to the target population, train villagers on sanitation, and the proper use and maintenance of the filters.  Systems are placed to monitor and evaluate the usage and effectiveness of the filters​.  And, in addition, the people are also taught business skills which will help them establish income and job generating economies in the sale of filters, clean water, and the training of others in this technology.

The cost to provide a filter to a family is a small investment in comparison to cost of illness in terms of health and economic issues. The program saves children’s lives through providing a basic necessity of life.

Water Charity's partner in many training projects in the region, Friendly Water for the World, has been partnering with an extraordinary non-governmental organization in the Musoma/Mara Region of Tanzania – Hope Revival Children’s Organization (HRCO), under the leadership of Stephen Marwe – that has been doing extensive social work with children (especially orphans), widows, people with HIV, and unemployed youth. They have pioneered several highly successful BioSand Filter/community sanitation and hygiene programs in the region, and now want to extend the work throughout the Serengeti, with assistance from the local government, and community-based organizations that they have already helped establish.

The main goal of training the groups is to change peoples’ lives by improving  the standard of health through the use of BioSand water filters since the water sources around the area are not that safe. The community will be educated on the importance of using BioSand water filter in avoiding waterborne infection and save money over water boiling, which also spares forest destruction, and profiting from selling filters.

The plan is to train and equip eight groups in the Serengeti to cover a large geographical area in a short period of time, and also to set up a support network among them, to prevent groups from feeling isolated, and so they can aid each other in promotion of the importance of clean water and sanitation.
 
Four of the groups who are in relatively close proximity to each other will be trained together, with significant support from local authorities. Woman collecting waterOf the four groups to be trained together, two will be made up of people with HIV, one a women’s group, and one a group of unemployed youth.
The other four groups, who live in more outlying areas, will be trained individually. In total, some 180 participants will receive training, and workshops will be set up in eight locations.

General activities will be education, fabrication of filters, selling, installation and monitoring by follow up households to ensure proper usage of filters.

  1. Mobilization of young mothers, school dropout, widows and youths from all wards
  2. Training in demonstrating bio-sand filtration systems, health and hygiene
  3. Small business seeding and
  4. Providing documents regarding construction of bio sand filtration systems
  5. Capacity building on entrepreneurship.
  6. Training preparation manual
  7. Establishment of technology and entrepreneurial library for all vulnerable women, orphans and youth
BONCHUGU GROUP
The Bonchugu Group is one among the groups formed by HRCO in Serengeti with the mission and objectives of fighting overwhelming poverty through traditional dance, performing for the tourists.  They also do cultivation for income.  They have a campaign to eliminate childhood marriage and Female Genital Mutilations (FGM) as well.

After sharing the idea of BioSand Filter technology with the group, they were very touched by it, and are enthusiastic for the training.  They understood immediately how this would improve their lives.
Project partners:  Local authorities from Sedeko Ward in Serengeti District.​   Project location: Sedeko Ward Serengeti District, Tanzania

ITUNUNU GROUP
This group advocates for women and children rights in Gatasamu Ward in Serengeti working with traditional cultures existing in the area. The group has a big interest of having the bio sand water filter to assist the local community using clean and safe water, making a sustainable project to make profit out of it by selling clean water and filters.

Project partners: Local authorities from Mugumu Ward in Serengeti District.​   Project location: Itununu Ward - Serengeti District, Tanzania
 

MUGUMU ART CULTURE GROUP

​Another group that has lined up to receive the training.  More than half of those served by the program are children. Deaths due to water borne illness are particularly high in children under 5 years of age. Illness i3 kids gathering watern older children and adults results in their inability to work, inability to attend school, and extra costs for medication. The Project is an important program for these villages because it will eliminate water borne illness and provide a most important resource, clean water!
Project partners: Local authorities from Mugumu Ward in Serengeti District.​    Project location: Mugumu Ward - Serengeti District, Tanzania

 

TWIMANYE GROUP​
This group in an outlying area, requests our service to improve the ability of families to care for children and achieve goals of self-sufficiency. This will increase the knowledge of the trained members and the community in general on hygiene and sanitation.  Knowledge on treatment of water before drinking will help to reduce water related diseases.  Knowledge of job creation and self-employment these participants gain will reduce burden to the family members and government improve their living standard.
Project partners: Local authorities from Mugumu Ward in Serengeti District.​    Project location: Mwibagi Ward - Serengeti District​, Tanzania

4 GROUPS TRAINING
This training will include 4 groups, of which two will be from People Living with HIV, one other group will be formed by widows, and another one will be formed by youths who are school dropouts and young mothers

After the training, each group is expected to initiate a project (bio sand water filter fabrication), which will include the selling of filters in order to generate income.  This will have the effect of saving lives as the project (and its ripple effects) will lead to the reduction of water related diseases, and improve health. Members will become ambassadors of the WASH, and change makers, as they educate their communities about water issues.
Project partners: Local authorities from Mugumu Ward in Serengeti District​     Project location: Serengeti District, Mara region, Tanzania
 

Project Impact:
Almost immediately the families of the 180 participants will have access to clean water. Each group will likely set up microfinance schemes so that people in their subdistricts will be able to afford clean drinking water, especially as medical and pharmaceutical expenses currently being borne will be substantially reduced. Child absence from school will significantly decrease, productivity will be enhanced. And there will be significant increases in employment.
Immediate Beneficiaries:
- 180 individuals trained
- 900 members of their families
Community Beneficiaries (in first two years):
- Nine groups build and distribute 500 BioSand Filters each in first two years = 4,500 Filters
- Each Filter serves on average 10 people – 45,000 people served
- 60 Filters go schools and orphanages – 4,200 children servedWater source, Serengeti, Tanzania
Future Beneficiaries:
- Programs expand and require more than two molds each
- Auxilary businesses start up – chicken and goat raising; soapmaking
- Programs in rainwater catchment initiated
Impacts:
- Waterborne illnesses curtailed
- Health improved
- Child morbidity and mortality reduced
- Medical/pharmaceutical expenses curtailed
- School attendance increases
- Significant increases in employment
- Community productivity enhanced

Person Directing:
Stephen Marwa, director of HRCO, will direct the programs, with three staff under his direct supervision. Friendly Water’s Kenya and All-Africa Representative Eric Lung’aho Lijodi, will act as advisor to the program.
 
Monitoring:
One person from each group will be trained as a monitor, able to go into homes and check on installation and proper use. There will be a report due 90 days after each workshop is established, with changes made to each group’s business plan as appropriate. Funds have been allocated for follow up by HRCO staff.

The follow up will be done on monthly bases as well as recording the productions, sales and challenges faced by the project. The information gathered will be submitted to the country representative to the Management Committee and later be used to inform relevant stakeholders and project supporter’s partners on how the project is meeting its intended objectives as well as to provide a road map for improvements. The final Evaluation will be conducted to evaluate project impact and provide information of poverty reduction, education, access to information, and target group response and project sustainability for future scale up.

Sustainability
As per the monitoring and follow up, the sale of the filters will be accumulated and enable future projects.  This "added advantage" to the project is enhanced because the groups will be trained in entrepreneurship skills that will enable them to be quite a bit more self-reliant.  It also means that there will be a sustained and keen interest in maintaining the project. 

Comments:
HRCO dreams of transforming the health of the entire region. Their proposal is audacious, but based on our past experience, it is well within our joint capabilities to accomplish.  

This program of 9 training projects is the latest in a long string of successful programs and projects that WC and FW have undertaken together.  It falls under our Training & Support Initiative.  Other FW collaborations can be viewed by clicking here.

Our budget for this project is well under $30,000.  Please contribute to this tremendous effort using the Donate button below.


Tarime people with HIV making filters

 
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Gusii Community Network Training - Kenya

Kisii, Kenya

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION, working with Friendly Water for the World.

Gusii Community Network (GUCONET) BioSand Filter Construction Training

Location:Lake Victoria Basin
Kisii, Kenya (near Lake Victoria - click map to enlarge)

Problem Addressed:
Lack of safe and clean water is rampant in most rural communities in Kenya, as well as in urban slums. Water may be available but it is not safe for human consumption. Outbreaks of typhoid, cholera and other water-related diseases are, and have become part of life of, the people living in these areas, especially in southwestern Kenya, which also has among the highest HIV rates in the world.

The Gusii are a minority Bantu tribe located only in southwest Kenya. They make up a large majority of the population of the city of Kisii, and have more than a million members. Because of their minority status, they are almost entirely ignored when it comes to government health and environmental services. Much of their water comes from Lake Victoria, and is contaminated, bringing with it high levels of amoebic and bacterial dysentery, typhoid, and occasionally, cholera.

Water source, Kisii, KenyaProject Description:
GUCONET is an international network working for the sustainable development of the Gusii community. Clean water is a very high priority for the GUCONET secretariat, as they have identified clean water as a major way to lower the disease burden on the community already strapped for health care resources.

Six established groups already identified will send 10 participants each to a five-day training in BioSand Filter fabrication, distribution, installation, and maintenance. They will also learn to teach community sanitation and hygiene. At the conclusion of the training, six separate workshops will be set up, with all necessary tools, steel molds, and starter materials. During the training the teams will undergo a brief introduction on small scale business management. The teams will be able to make filters and sell them to the entire Gusii Community hence making them self-reliant.

The work of the group will be overseen by the GUCONET secretariat.

Project Impact:
The first direct beneficiaries will be the 60 participants who are trained, and their families, who will now have access to both clean water and increased incomes. The groups they come from will be the next line of beneficiaries, and it will spread from there to the entire community. Waterborne illnesses will be curtailed and health improved; people with HIV will live longer; school attendance will increase; medical expenses will be reduced; community productivity will be enhanced. It should be noted that GUCONET has other initiatives in the areas of agricultural improvement and education, and this effort should facilitate greater success in these areas as well. We expect BioSand Filters to proliferate rapidly within the Gusii community.

current water sourceImmediate Beneficiaries:
-          60 Individuals trained
-          300 members of their families

Community Beneficiaries (in first two years):
-          Six groups build and distribute 400 BioSand Filters each in first two years = 2,400 Filters
-          Each Filter serves on average 10 people – 24,000 people served
-          60 Filters go schools and orphanages – 4,200 people served

Future Beneficiaries:
-          Programs expand and require more than two molds each
-          Four groups to be trained in south Kisii – process begins again.
 

Impacts:

-          Waterborne illnesses curtailed

-          Health improved

-          Child morbidity and mortality reduced

-          Medical/pharmaceutical expenses curtailed

-          School attendance increases

-          Community productivity enhanced

Person Directing:
Eric Lung’aho Lijodi, Friendly Water’s Kenya and All-Africa Representative, will lead the training, together with three experienced members of the Kambiri Water and Sanitation Group.Woman collecting water, Kenya

Monitoring:
A group will have a monitor who is trained to visit and check on Filters after installation. A report will be sent 90 days after each group is operational. The GUCONET secretariat will be responsible to ensure reports are forthcoming. After the reports, the business plans for each group will be reviewed, and changes made. The budget for this proposal include funds for two follow-up visits by Eric.

Comments:
Water Charity has done a fair number of these training projects, and we believe that the long term "bang for the buck" is very high on them.  Teach a man to fish etc.  The ripple effect from training people who go on to train others is uncountable.  People will benefit from these projects that we will never know about.  People will drink water from filters that were made by people who never met any of our trainers. 

Furthermore, this knowledge will also benefit everyone it comes in contact with along the way economically.  People will sell clean water and sell filters.  Profits from this get reinvested into more tools, molds and materials.  The ability to teach other needy people to do the same is key.

Helping people to help themselves makes sense.  

It should be noted that we already have a request to train four more groups, mostly people with HIV, in south Kisii. We have put them on hold until we see this training succeed, as we hope they will become a “satellite” project of the GUCONET one.

​To see other projects done with Friendly Water Trainers, click here.

Budget Detail:

No.

Item Description

Quantity

 

Unit Cost

(USD)

Total

Source of funds

1.

Steel molds

12

430.00

5160.00

WC

2.

Tool kits

06

450.00

2700.00

WC

3.

Starter Material

06

250.00

1500.00

WC

4.

Certificates

60

001.00

0060.00

Local Community

5.

Trainees material

60

005.00

0300.00

WC

6.

Participants Transport

60

005.00

0300.00

Local Community

7.

Participants meals

60

005 x5

1500.00

Local Community

8.

Venue

01

050.00

0250.00

Local Community

9.

Trainees Acomm.

60

020 x 5

6000.00

Local Community

10.

Trainers Acomm./meals

03

050 x 8

1200.00

WC

11.

Trainers Transport

03

100 .00

0300.00

WC

12.

Trainers Honoraria

03

300.00

900.00

WC

13.

Transport for molds

12

020.00

0240.00

WC

14.

Follow up

 

 

1000.00

WC

This project has been paid for through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

Water some of the Gusii are drinking now
Collecting Water (kusii, kenya)

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