Kwamtoro Secondary School Water Tank Project – Tanzania

Kwamtoro Secondary School Water Tank Project – Tanzania

Kwamtoro Secondary School Water Tank Project – Tanzania

Location
Chemba District, Dodoma Region, United Republic of Tanzania 

Community Description
Kwamtoro is a ward-level village with a population of around 3,500. Located in central Tanzania, Kwamtoro suffers from an extensive dry season seven months out of the year.

While the village itself has water systems in place, the Kwamtoro Secondary School, located 5 kilometers away, struggles to make do with the small rain catchment tanks it has in place. This being the school’s only source of water, it is important to enhance these rain catchment tanks in capacity and efficacy.

Project Description
This project is to increase the capacity of a current water tank at Kwamtoro’s Secondary School by 3,000 liters using the SSB (Stabilized Soil Brick) technology.

The SSB press allows for the construction of sturdy, low-cost bricks that require no heating and are ready to use the next day. The project incorporates the purchase of an SSB press and the training of villagers in the technology.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the block press and some of the materials, including the cement.

The school is providing roughly half of the needed materials to complete the project.

The plastering and mortar work will be performed by a village mason.

Students will be taught the technology by villagers who have been trained in machine operation.

Project Impact
270 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Eric Pfeifer

Comments
This project not only results in a needed increase in the capacity of the tank but also the purchase of the press and the training of villagers. This will promote further tank rehabilitation projects in the future.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 – This project has been funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation with the help of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Eric Pfeifer.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Eric of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Eric and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

NTC Well Rehab – South Sudan

NTC Well Rehab – South Sudan

NTC Well Rehab – South Sudan

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association , working with Water is Basic.

This is Project 7 of Phase 2 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program. Phase 1 of the program began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These Phase 2 projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.  This project has been COMPLETED.  See the  #Conclusion Report below.The Village    

Location
NTC, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan

Community Description
NTC is largely comprised of military personnel, and civilians who depend on farming, hunting, and animal rearing. Five miles away from the main city, Yei Town, NTC stands strong and united despite its diversity. The 300 household region had originally formed a committee to manage and maintain the borehole. However, the committee struggled and couldn’t endure.

Problem Addressed
Mary Gamba is a mother of seven with her youngest only 6 weeks old. Having a newborn, on top of her already demanding family, has made gathering water an extremely complicated task since the borehole broke (over six months ago).  Since the well broke, Mary has had to wake up at four in the morning to fetch water from the next available well, a 3-mile round trip, to avoid the overuse of the shallow well in the mornings. However, if she arrives too late, she has to gather water that has been stirred up with the excess particles at the bottom.

Sebit Malish, a member of the disseminated committee, had tried to collect the monthly household fees for the borehole when the committee was still in session. The village has one of the lowest fees in the region for borehole use, only 2ssp.  Many of the military personals are responsible for the loss in payment, refusing to pay Sebit some days. Other days, the soldiers forced his family to use the shallow well multiple miles away to keep the clean borehole water to themselves. Focused on what’s best for the community, Sebit knows they may need to gather more money from the families every month to keep the borehole open and consistently maintained.

Betty Menialla is another female resident, in NTC.  She is responsible for many of the domestic care activities in her family. At 17, it is becoming too difficult for Betty to find the time to finish her schoolwork every day as she becomes increasingly needed by her family, as her parents age.  She talks about her time in primary school when she was able to keep up with her studies and the education that the boys in her community were earning.  As Betty grew up and graduated to secondary school, the boys continued their education while Betty was required to spend more and more time helping with her family.  Among many other tasks, gathering water has become her sole responsibility.  With the borehole broken, fetching water has taken over the majority of Betty’s time while her studies have fallen behind.

Project Description
This project is to rehabilitate the well. It is being implemented in collaboration with Water is Basic, a locally owned and operated water drilling company. Over the last 8 years, Water is Basic has been a reliable company in South Sudan, drilling and rehabilitating boreholes.

First, the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. We believe that the problem is a pipe that is rusted through, but sometimes it is hard to be sure before taking the pump apart. The project will restore the GI pipes and the head of the borehole to reliable and working order.

Problem Impact
This project will impact 300 people.

Volunteer Directing Project
Steve Roese.  Steve has been involved in South Sudan since 2004.

Monitoring & Maintenance
Water Is Basic educates and empowers the community by helping them learn the importance of diverse and equal organization. The water committee becomes a reconciliation tool as mixed genders, tribes and religions work together to manage the community well. By aiding the village in developing a committee, and managing and maintaining their well, the village is able to collect and save money to dedicate to future repairs.

Comments
Funds to repair the borehole and educate the local community to provide empowerment for many who have felt defeated by local military personnel. Supplying the community with a repaired borehole and the education to implement solutions if problems arise, ensures that there is enough savings and knowledge to repair the borehole during potential future breakdowns.

While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it is in keeping with the goals and objectives of that program, and, as such, falls under Water Charity’s own Let Girls Learn + heading.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  If you wish to see more great projects like this one, please contribute to our South Sudan Well Rehab Program by clicking on the Donate button below.


NTC Borehole Repair Conclusion Report – South Sudan

We are pleased to report that the borehole and pump in this village were repaired to full functionality!  Our team came in, fixed the well, and established a water use committee to oversee the water point and make sure it stays functional.  The team educated the community members on further maintenance and hygiene practices to help the residents sustain the borehole for as long as possible. The borehole had a water leak in multiple GI Pipes and the cylinder rubbers were torn. A new cylinder and new GI pipes were installed.
NTC is a community, with over 300 occupants who have suffered for the past year from dehydration and water-borne diseases, all results of a broken borehole. Despite this, the residents are all determined and driven. Even with fighting that has displaced many, the community has remained optimistic, especially now with their borehole repaired.
Many of the people are overjoyed with the relief that only comes from not having to give their families dirty water any longer. Parents with young and newborn children have been spending most of their money on privately owned water to ensure their children’s safety.

  

The borehole committee has seven members who most recently introduced monthly collection fees to better sustain the borehole. With their money turning away from healthcare bills and expensive private water fees, the community will be able to better sustain the borehole with their own funds. 

 

Mary Gamba is the chairperson for the committee; she and her family live directly next to the borehole. Her youngest son, Lime, was born during the beginning of the water crisis. Now, her son is almost a year old and Mary is finally able to provide clean water for her family on a daily basis.

 

The gift is a child in the NTC community who was so taken aback by the Water is a Basic team that he dedicated himself to his schooling so he can become a borehole technician. He loves that he could one day help so many families and children in need. The gift is exceptionally focused on becoming a technician so that his family never has to go without clean water nearby again.

Yet another happy story to come out of the partnership between WC & WIB in South Sudan.  Dozens of wells fixed, with many more to come!   

   

   

   

Illimoko Well Rehab – South Sudan

Illimoko Well Rehab – South Sudan

Illimoko Well Rehab – South Sudan

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity, Water is Basic & the National Peace Corps Association.

This project is part of Phase 2 in our ongoing South Sudan Well Rehab Program. The program’s Phase 1 began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These new projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.

This project has been COMPLETED, and the #Conclusion Report can be found below this project description, or by clicking the link.  Due in part to the repaired borehole, the village has grown from 250 when the project was proposed to over 350 at this reporting, some months after the completion of the well.  Thus, this project has served even more people per dollar spent than originally envisioned.

Location
Illimoko Village, Yei River Region, South Sudan – located one mile off of Kaya Road.

Community Description

Illimoko is a small village, a conglomeration of 48 households and approximately 250 residents and counting. With an uneasy economy struggling from increased irregularity created by South Sudan’s current civil war, the number of residents in Illimoko fluctuate daily as many families are forced to move around in search of work. The main source of Illimoko’s income is made from small-scale farming, supported by the temporary workers that wander in and out of the community.

The village is right off the main road, on the way from Yei Town headed towards Koboko. Since the borehole was drilled in 2013, the neighboring church has been responsible for monitoring the water usage.

The recent outbreak between government forces has increased the distress in local communities, such as Illimoko. Being a part of Yei River County is an extensive concern for locals. A central and exponentially diverse community of South Sudan, this major hub is a central location for trade from Uganda and Congo. The basic availability of clean water provides much-needed relief to the stress and struggle this village has been through.

Problem Addressed
While Illimoko is home to one of Water is Basic’s drilling specialists, the additional management of water usage and maintenance has not kept one of the borehole’s pipes from rusting out and requiring repair.

Having a drilling specialist live locally has benefited the community well, as he has provided attentive care and vital education on maintenance, to others within the community. This has helped empower the community, making them feel that they are able to provide sustainable solutions to their problems.

Since its drilling, the residents have been diligent in collecting monthly funds for healthy savings.  Most families provide a monthly 5SSP (approximately 25 cents) to the borehole’s committee, to ensure healthy savings. A month before the pipe rusted out, the pastor of the church ran away with the community’s savings. Beyond losing their ability to provide clean water for their families, the community is struggling with the betrayal of someone whom they thought was a well-trusted individual.

Celina Opanni is one of the many individuals who is suffering from this physical and emotional loss. The 38-year-old is, practically, a single mother to six children as her husband is forced to work hours away in the Argo forest, the only steady and guaranteed work, for the government, around. This has left Celina lonely and distraught as she not only cares for her children on her own but maintains the family’s farm. Time is of the essence, as anyone with one or two children knows. But with six kids and an entire farm to operate, it is nearly impossible for Celina to add an extra three hours to her daily routine to commute back and forth to the closest shallow well. Even then, water is not guaranteed during the dry season as many families from surrounding areas rely on this shallow well, typically drying out what little is available. Celina says she often buys water from the GIZ Company so her kids can have clean water to drink. But with the water costing 2 SSP per jerry can (half of what the monthly fee for full-time use of the borehole, before it broke), there is too much of a financial strain on her family for water from the GIZ Company to act as a long-term, sustainable solution.

Project Description
This project is to restore the well to full service.  In collaboration with Water is Basic, a locally owned and operated water drilling company, the project should only take 1-2 days to complete.

First, the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. The crew will go on to replace the parts needed. and the pump head will be re-attached and checked. If everything is working properly, the last step is to check the water flow rate to ensure the borehole is deep enough and the pressure is appropriate for the community’s needs.

The next, major part of this project will be to help the community and committee make the necessary organizational and operational changes are made to prevent another mishap, like the one with the pastor.  These changes will include involving many people from the community into the committee to spread the feeling of empowerment. The treasury position will be separated between two committee members to ensure a check and balance system is set in place.

Project Impact
This project will benefit more than 250 residents. (note: the repaired borehole currently serves over 350)

Project Manager
Steve Roese, President of Water is Basic U.S.will oversee the project

Monitoring and Maintenance
Once Water is Basic is finished repairing the borehole, the non-profit will oversee the expansion and increased education of the committee, currently run by the church. There will be two treasurers, one member of the community and one member of the church, who will be responsible for keeping track of the fees earned to ensure the savings stay safe. The other members will be responsible for teaching proper WASH techniques and making sure that people are using these techniques around the well.

The well repair will give the community of Illimoko clean and healthy water, again. For a child, water is everything.  The repaired borehole will give new life to the community, helping them keep the funds normally used for medical bills that accumulate from treating water-borne illnesses. The repair will also give time back to families for work, education, and spending time with each other. The shallow well that the Illimoko residents are currently gathering water from will be navigated to local crops, lessening the amount of physical labor the residents use to water their crops.

More importantly, this clean water will help people like Celina Opanni use her hard-earned money for food or sending her children back to school. The kids of Illimoko will see immediate health benefits from having a constant source of clean water, giving the community greater control of their future by having a better understanding of how to raise and use the money accumulated from borehole-usage fees. The community will take part in the committee and have a large part in decision-making, ensuring better management, and lessening the control of anyone individual, to prevent the problem as previously experienced with the ex-pastor.  With great hope, the residents of Illimoko are looking ahead to begin investing in other community developments, such as building schools, diversifying income opportunities, and developing health facilities.

Comments
Water is Basic’s strength comes from the experienced local personnel. These individuals lead the non-profit’s mission with determination and skill, guiding the country to develop self-sustaining water systems, managed and operated by local villages. It is the mission of Water Is Basic, and these projects are being done with Water Charity under our joint South Sudan Well Rehab Program, to build communities and empower the Sudanese to implement solutions for their water crisis on their own.

Part of the program involves an internship program where local, promising secondary school graduates manage our projects for one year. Two recent graduates from Nehemiah Gateway University, in Albania, oversaw interns and the projects the interns were directing. In exchange for their work, the interns are given access to distance learning courses and are then assisted in applying for, and attending, their university of choice.
Phase II, which includes this project, is being supported by an anonymous donor, who will match your donations. Please click the Donate button below to keep this great program going.

   

   

   

Conclusion of Illimoko Well Repair – South Sudan

This project was completed through the partnership of Water Charity and Water is Basic, as a result of Grassroots Peace negotiations in South Sudan.

The village well in Illimoko, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan was repaired to full functionality and has brought an end to the villagers digging up unclean water in muddy holes.  Our team repaired the borehole by removing the old pipes and water pump and replacing them with new parts. In half a day’s worth of work, the community had fresh water once again.

We are pleased to report that all of the villagers in Illimoko now have access to clean drinking water.  This task was made much harder by the civil warfare that plagued the region, but it has been accomplished primarily through the bravery of the South Sudanese teams that refused to be deterred by the danger, and the end to the hostilities in the region.

In addition to the well repair, we also assisted in water use committee development and community sanitation. A committee was re-established.  Before the WC/WIB work there had been a water use committee that failed as one of the former members was dishonest in the handling of funds. This new committee was trained in how to best manage the borehole, and ensure that the funds from the monthly collection go towards their savings for future repairs.

Background

On June 4, 2017, a signed peace accord officially ended the armed conflict in Yei River State between warring factions – the South Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) and the SPLA – In Opposition (SPLA-IO) Yei River State. Mediated by Bishop Elias Taban, leader of the Evangelical Presbyterian Church (EPC), the accord calls for a permanent ceasefire, an assembly area for armed rebels and their security, a planned national dialogue and the securing and opening of all roads to and out of Yei Town.

Committed to ending the ongoing suffering of people in the country and in refugee camps, Water is Basic’s Bishop Elias Taban successfully brokered an agreement to bring peace and stability back to Yei River State and, in doing so, demonstrated the model for a grassroots “bottom-up” peace approach now serving as a catalyst for the entire nation. President Salva Kiir has requested this grassroots model be taken to all 32 states in South Sudan, beginning in Torit and Boma. Bishop Taban has gained significant influence with all parties involved and serves a valuable and particular role because the church is viewed as a neutral party.

Crucial to the return of people to their homes and rebels to assembly points is working well-managed water points.  Water Charity & Water Is Basic has been rehabilitating wells at an urgent pace.  This repair project was completed as part of a larger multi-phase program in South Sudan.

Project Impact

The borehole currently serves 350 household members. including 35-year-old, Jane Opani Edward. She reported that when the borehole was broken, she had to resume drinking from the contaminated Yei River where people bathe and wash their clothes. Because of this, her family experienced a high rate of sicknesses such as typhoid and diarrhea.

At times she would go to the neighboring boreholes where the fees were high and there was much quarreling and fighting due to overcrowding. With the repaired borehole, Jane Opani said she is very pleased because all of the difficulties her community faced in search of water are now gone.

Marakonye Primary School Well Rehab – South Sudan

Marakonye Primary School Well Rehab – South Sudan

Marakonye Primary School Well Rehab – South Sudan

This project continues Phase 2 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program.
The project has been completed. Scroll down to See #Conclusion Report below.

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and NPCA, working with Water is Basic.
If you wish to see more great projects like this one, please contribute by clicking on the Donate button below.

Location           
Marakonye Primary School, Yei River County, Central Equatoria State, South Sudan

Community Description
Marakonye is a village found in the northern part of Yei River County, four miles away from the main Yei Town.  The community of Marakonye has been around since the 1920s, mostly comprised of the Kakaw tribe of the Tike Forest.   For economic prosperity, the 20-household village works in lumbering and farming.  With both a primary school and a regularly and highly attended church, many individuals benefit from the borehole, located just outside the primary school.  The school’s attendance has dramatically decreased due to lack of water and the school’s transition to government funding.  Since 2011, the school has had to repair the borehole two times.

Problem Addressed
Alex Kiliona Peter is the headteacher of the primary school. He, along with his wife and six children, live four miles away from the school. The borehole was originally drilled for the school, but with a despondent surrounding community, it has been difficult to rally support and funds to fix the borehole. Alex is nervous, as school starts up again in February, and his 668 pupils have no way to obtain drinking water while in their classes. Alex remembers how the borehole broke during last semester’s exams and the treacherous conditions the students put themselves through as they sat through exams, dehydrated.

Nineteen-year-old Peter Lat is one of these pupils.  He lives a mile away from the school, and is completely dependent on the borehole for water during school and to bring home to his family after classes. Like Alex, Peter remembers the tough time preparing for his exams just as the borehole broke. Alex, like many students, was forced to travel a mile to get water. This caused Alex to be late to multiple exams and thus fail to move forward into the next grade.

Marry Asa is the cook for the teachers at the school.  With the extra need for water for cooking, drinking, and washing, Marry is struggling to collect ten jerrycans of water at a time. The lack of water has caused many of the teachers to become ill, keeping the students behind, and causing distress for Marry.

Project Description
Isaac’s Wells partnered with Water is Basic on this project to rehab the well at the Marakonye Primary School. This project should only take 1-2 days to complete.

First, the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. We believe that the problem is a pipe that is rusted through, but sometimes it is hard to be sure before taking the pump apart. The project will restore the GI pipes and the head of the borehole to reliable and working order.

Problem Impact
This project will impact 646 people directly; 640 students and at least 6 staff.  This well rehab will also impact visitors, future students, and the surrounding community.

Project Director
Steve Roese

Monitoring & Maintenance
Water Is Basic educates and empowers the community by helping them learn the importance of diverse and equal organization. The water committee becomes a reconciliation tool as mixed genders, tribes and religions work together to manage the community well. By aiding the village to develop a committee and manage and maintain their well, the village is able to collect and save money to dedicate to future repairs.

Comments
The program’s first phase began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These new Phase 2 projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.

Providing clean and close hydration for pupils, teachers, and school staff, provides a greater attentiveness, regular pupil advancement, and relieves the extraneous stress from those who depend on the borehole for use during school and for their families throughout the day. Providing a better environment for education helps keep medical costs low and empowers pupils to graduate and obtain jobs that allow them to put money back into the community and funds for borehole management.

Water is Basic is a borehole drilling organization in the Republic of South Sudan birthed and led by Sudanese religious leaders in response to the Country’s water crises. It is a Sudanese solution to a Sudanese problem with funding from Water Charity. The organization also utilizes thousands of volunteers who work to manage and oversee operations of wells once they are installed or restored.
While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it is in keeping with the goals and objectives of that program, and, as such, falls under Water Charity’s own Let Girls Learn + heading.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  

 

Conclusion of Marakonye Primary School Well Rehab – South Sudan

This well repair at the Marakonye Primary School was completed and carried out successfully through the partnership of Water Charity and Water is Basic, as a result of Grassroots Peace negotiations in South Sudan. It was started nearly one year ago and was interrupted due to the outbreak of war and guerrrilla fighting in the area.  For many tense months at the end of 2016 and early 2017 the Yei region, and South Sudan in general, teetered on the edge of civil war and genocide.  

 

On June 4, 2017, a signed peace accord officially ended the armed conflict in Yei River State between warring factions – the South Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) and the SPLA – In Opposition (SPLA-IO) Yei River State. Mediated by Bishop Elias Taban, leader of the Evangelical Presbyterian Church (EPC), the accord calls for a permanent ceasefire, an assembly area for armed rebels and their security, a planned national dialogue and the securing and opening of all roads to and out of Yei Town. 

 

Committed to ending the ongoing suffering of people in the country and in refugee camps, Water is Basic’s Bishop Elias Taban successfully brokered an agreement to bring peace and stability back to Yei River State and, in doing so, demonstrated the model for a grassroots “bottom-up” peace approach now serving as a catalyst for the entire nation. President Salva Kiir has requested this grassroots model be taken to all 32 states in South Sudan, beginning in Torit and Boma. Bishop Taban has gained significant influence with all parties involved and serves a valuable and particular role because the church is viewed as a neutral party.

 

Crucial to the return of people to their homes and rebels to assembly points is working well-managed water points. The Water is Basic/Water Charity partnership is pleased to be rehabilitating wells at an urgent pace. 


T
he numbers of wells deserted and now needing simple repair is in the hundreds to thousands. 
Project Description
The major problem resolved with the borehole repair is the student performance level increase, a factor that largely plays in determining if parents will transfer their students to other schools or out of school entirely. Students perform better when they are well hydrated and when they can spend most of their time in the classroom, not looking for something they are already struggling without. With the well in working order, the community is now able to transition its focus on raising an educated generation.

After assessing the situation, Water is Basic determined that the borehole was broken due to a rusted GI pipe. The overall repair took less than an hour.

 

The borehole serves seven hundred pupils and hundreds of community members, school administrators, and educators.

 

Because of the conflict in South Sudan, families have enough to worry about as they seek and hope for peace and security where they live. With the restoration of Marakonye Primary School well and the Community well, the threat of waterborne disease is one less worry that the people of Marakonye have to struggle with.

      

Bor Dinka Congregation Well Renewal – South Sudan

Bor Dinka Congregation Well Renewal – South Sudan

Bor Dinka Congregation Well Renewal – South Sudan

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association , in coordination with Water is Basic.

This project is Project 4 of Phase 2 of our South Sudan Well Rehab Program. The program’s Phase 1 began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These new projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. The CommunityWe continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States. This project has been successfully completed. Read the #Conclusion Report below!

Location
Yei Town, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan

Community Description
The Dinka congregation is inside Yei Town, with a robust and passionate congregation of 2,500 members. After South Sudan declared itself the newest nation in the world, the refugees who had fled into Uganda and the Congo returned, many stopping and staying in Yei rather than travelling farther back to their war-destroyed territories. Because of this, over half of the community is a diverse group of citizens with few original residents scattered amongst them. Many of the men are soldiers for the SPLA (Sudan People’s Liberation Army), the army of the Republic of South Sudan, which was founded as a guerrilla movement in 1983 and was a key participant of the Second Sudanese Civil War.

The rest of the community makes their livelihood from small businesses, selling anything they can scavenge, make, or grow. Since the population’s dramatic population increase, the density has forced many to live exceptionally close, making it difficult for sanitation to stay a top priority. Church YouthThis, atop of the lack of clean water, has had significant effects on the mortality rate of local children.

Problem Addressed
The borehole was originally drilled next to the Dinka Congregation site to help hydrate the construction workers during the Church’s construction.  However, with such a large population using the clean water as well, the borehole ended up breaking 18 months ago, leaving the community in dire need again, and forcing the construction crews to halt work on the new church.

The Church is being paid for solely with tithes that the congregation has slowly been saving, over the past years. Along with lack of clean water, the current devaluation of the South Sudanese pound has also become a factor in the building process.

Being in the center of town has its advantages, but it also has its disadvantages, such as long distances to the edge of town and beyond to the next available water source, although not even a clean one. Church youthEven with boreholes half a mile away, the waits are extraordinary, some days over three hours long. The women of this community spend many hours a day just waiting in line, plus they have to pay an extra 5SSP a month (compared to those living closer to the boreholes), making it more difficult to afford the water while attempting to raise funds to fix their local borehole.

Single mothers struggle most in this situation, forced to bring all their children with them just to fetch water, keeping these children from school or keeping themselves from the further necessary house work or farming to provide for their family’s food and education. With added prices onto the water that already takes more of their time to gather, many mothers find themselves forced to make a choice between their child’s health or education, and hydration or solid sustenance.

Project Description
This project will be in collaboration with Water is Basic, a locally owned and operated water drilling company tied to a U.S. based ministry.

Church youthFirst the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. The problem may be rusted pipes, but sometimes it’s hard to be sure before taking the pump apart. Once the problem is zeroed in on, the crew will go to work replacing the parts needed.

Once the pipes are replaced and back in place, the pump head will be attached and checked. If everything is working properly the last step is to check the water flow rate to make sure the borehole has been drilled deep enough and the pressure is high enough.

Project Impact
This project will benefit 2,500 people in the community. UPDATE: The well actually provides benefit for over 4,000 people now!

Project Manager
Steve Roese is President of Water is Basic U.S., an entrepreneur and pastor, Steve has been involved in South Sudan since 2004 where he has fought alongside his brothers and sisters for peace and opportunity. Rehabbing the wellHis motto is “whatever it takes” and he means it when it comes to building the new nation of the Republic of South Sudan.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The church leaders and surrounding communities will be involved in every step of this project. It is a long-held belief that development without community engagement is not sustainable. It is the hope of many that the community will sustain their borehole for the well’s longevity with this dedicated and passionate support.

Comments
Water Is Basic operates an internship program where local, promising secondary school graduates manage the projects for one year. Two recent graduates from Nehemiah Gateway University, in Albania, oversaw interns and the projects the interns were directing. In exchange for their work, the interns are given access to distance learning courses and are then assisted in applying for, and attending, their university of choice.

While not an official Let Girls Learn project, it is in keeping with the goals and objectives of that program, and, as such, falls under Water Charity’s own Let Girls Learn + heading.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  If you wish to see more great projects like this one, please contribute to our South Sudan Well Rehab Program by clicking on the Donate button below.

 

Laying pipesChurch congregatesFixing the WellFinished Well with fencing

Workers rehabbing the wellIn Class - Bor Dinka - South Sudan


Borehole working
​Borehole Fixed and Working for Bor Dinka, South Sudan!

Location
Bor Dinka, Yei Town, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan
GPS: N 04*05.57 E 030*40.45 At the nearby school

​Despite setbacks, civil unrest and life threatening danger, this work was completed on schedule, and we are happy to report that the children and displaced people at this location have clean water to drink and use.  Reporting has taken longer than we like, but the conditions were verging on a potential Rwanda style genocide for many months, so we are grateful that no one involved was hurt or injured.

Providing hydration physically and spiritually, the Bor Dinka Congregation is the heart of Bor Dinka. There was an existing borehole that was drilled by Water is Basic that broke down within six months of its original drilling. The community around the Dinka Congregation are mostly displaced peoples affected by the war.

The project resulted in improved access to clean water and improved the health of the entire community. The borehole will provide access to clean, safe drinking wateSchool Latriner for the 2000 people who attend the church every Sunday. Since the borehole broke, previously begun church construction ceased due to lack of sustenance for the construction workers. Now that the borehole is repaired, the church can be finished. Not only do the members of the congregation benefit from the well, but 1000 members of the neighboring community also benefit from not having to spend as many hours in their day trekking to the next closest borehole. A local primary school of 700 children and 19 staff members are also able to utilize the newly repaired borehole, providing a much-needed solution for almost 4,000 people.

 

The team of Water is Basic took a full day of dissecting the borehole to discover that the cylinder and GI pipes were rusted and disconnected. After removing the borehole head and every pipe, new 33-meter pipes were replaced to provide water to Bor Dinka, once again.

12 yr old Jorun

The borehole is managed under a team that consists of members from the church and community, to ensure a fair and honest governing committee. The committee also introduced collection fees of 5ssp to ensure an appropriate savings account is developed, for future repairs. However, many of the individuals are refugees who have little to no funds due to lack of jobs in the shrinking economy. 

 

Jorum Ayom Kilri, one of the local primary school attendees, is 12 years old. He is one of the many children displaced from the civil war. A native Ugandan, his parents left him and many other family members in Bor Dinka in hopes of keeping them safe. But, due to the economic crisis of the South Sudanese pound, Jorum’s parents haven’t been able to raise the money for Jorum and his brothers to continue with their schooling nor return to their settlement in Uganda. Because of this, Jorum settled in the Dinka region. Jorum is so happy to be in a place where he feels safe and taken care of. He has met many friends in the congregation and neighbouring communities, and has finally been able to join the Lomuku Primary School in Yei Town. With sucCommittee Member Bor Dinkah a kind and polite personality, Jorum was voted head pupil almost as soon as he began school in January. His consistent encouragement and positivity in his own future is contagious.

 

Michel Adira is the head teacher of Lomuku Primary School. He is delighted about how much the working borehole is able to benefit his students and staff. With dehydration comes drowsiness and lack of engagement. Now everyone can increase their productivity at school, resulting in a better education for all.

Along with hydrating many members of the community, the school is now able to open an agriculture program to help the students learn a trade that many of them will go on to perform for the rest of their lives. From harvesting to produce selling, these skills that the agriculture program will provide are irreplaceable. 

All in all, a job well done!

Conclusion of Northern Senegal WASH Tour – Senegal

Conclusion of Northern Senegal WASH Tour – Senegal

Conclusion of Northern Senegal WASH Tour – Senegal

This project has been completed. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.
WASH Tour soap making
From April 20–30, PCVs David Lederer, Kyle Shrivastava, and Melissa Hallisey traveled to five different volunteer sites in the North of Senegal to host day-long Water and Sanitation Hygiene (WASH) trainings. Targeting women’s groups and community health workers, the trainings focused on WASH behavior change.
With the help of hosting volunteers, Lederer, Shrivastava, and Hallisey were able to cater the formation to each site’s specific interests and needs. Overall, 103 women were trained in topics including: soap-making, marketing and pricing, diarrhea prevention and symptoms, Tippy Tap (hand-washing station) construction, and a mock-LIFE game to illustrate the financial benefits of proper sanitation practices.
The long term goal is to have more families be able to identify when to seek care for diarrhea, how and when to properly wash hands, and how sanitation is both a sound physical and financial investment. As a cross-sector project, working within the Health and Community Economic Development frameworks, this tour also aimed to improve the productivity and agency of women’s groups.
Peace Corps Senegal
PCVs Lederer, Shrivastava, and Hallisey would like to thank Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association for their support as well as PCVs Jill McIntosh, Emma Martz, Sarah King, Rebecca Singleton, and Emilie Nusse for their preparations and hospitality.
We would like to thank the PCVs once again for executing such a fine project, and again extend our gratitude to the Sullivan family and other donors who contributed.
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