Conclusion of Pinellopi Pirro School Bathroom and Water Project – Albania

Conclusion of Pinellopi Pirro School Bathroom and Water Project – Albania

Conclusion of Pinellopi Pirro School Bathroom and Water Project – Albania

This Let Girls Learn project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Graham Anderson.

To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Graham reports:

After our successful project at Kopshti #3 in Fier, Pinellopi Pirro was the first school to involve the local mayor and its Bashkia (Town Hall) in its renovation of the school bathrooms. The school was being thoroughly renovated after decades of neglect and unavailability of public funds for these institutions. The focus on renovations in Albania is very much on appearance and what is visible, so the hygiene and sanitation of the bathrooms is often a low priority, or even ignored completely.

Thanks to the Let Girls Learn grant from Water Charity, this placed the bathrooms firmly in the schedule of the total school renovation. Because of the damage to the subfloors and the drains in the bathroom, this became a major piece of reconstruction and, although the target was completed before the school year started, this extra work threatened the success of the bathroom project.

The Bashkia workmen put in the extra effort, however, and were able to repair the infrastructure to allow the installation of 12 new Turkish toilets and 8 new hand basins with running water to all of them. Significantly, attention was paid to the security of the bathrooms and, instead of repairing 8 original wooden doors, a set of recycled aluminum doors were installed alongside the 6 new ones to ensure all the toilet cubicles now have secure, locking doors. This aspect of the project goes right to the heart of Let Girls Learn. Without this security, adolescent girls often avoid using the bathroom or, more likely when they are menstruating, avoid school completely, impacting their education and their future.

To complete the project, the workmen repaired the water deposit in the roof of the building to ensure 24-hour water availability, despite the water company schedule, and flushing toilets 24/7. All that was needed then was to educate the cleaners in how to maintain the bathrooms (proper techniques as opposed to flooding the place with water constantly, destroying the facilities), educate the teachers and children in the proper use of their renovated bathrooms and involve the parents in the commitment of maintaining the bathroom supplies. All of this education was delivered, indeed is ongoing, by the Public Health Department school nurse.

Not only does Pinellopi Pirro now take pride of place in the city’s Pedonale (the city street where everyone comes out for a stroll in the evening) by looking good from the outside, but now it’s bathrooms are clean and working and a safe place for the 900 students to use and not an inhibitor to their education. The influence on siblings and other community members is huge and this legacy should last for generations of Fier children, thanks to funding from Water Charity.

We are grateful to Graham for completing this excellent project.

   

100 Water Projects Program – Albania

100 Water Projects Program – Albania

100 Water Projects Program – Albania

This is an effort under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama & Peace Corps, to expand access to education for girls around the world!

100 Water Projects For Albanian Girls!


Water Charity is proud to announce that we have crafted a program to do 100 water projects in Albania over the next year. Due in large part to the vision of Teresa and Graham Anderson, the PCVs spearheading this effort, we have scaled up what would have been 10 school bathroom projects, into a major program to deal with the poor sanitation conditions in schools all around Albania. This ambitious goal is already underway in a dozen schools, and will likely surpass even our lofty goal of 100 projects.

This entire program falls under our Let Girls Learn Initiative. This is an effort on our part to step up and pick up the gauntlet thrown by the First Lady in her call to further girl’s education around the world. Water Charity did the very first LGL project in Cambodia earlier this year and aims to do a couple hundred more water projects that expressly aim to empower young women and allow girls the myriad opportunities that an education can bestow.

NPCA and Water Charity have already helped develop, and provide funding for, a number of great water system projects that exemplify the need for programs like this. It is hard to overestimate the value of clean, functional, dedicated bathroom facilities.  They not only provide hygienic and sanitary conditions, but privacy, safety, and dignity as well.

Lack of proper sanitation facilities at a school contributes greatly to the drop out rate among adolescent women. Upon reaching their menses, many girls simply leave school, and others struggle on while missing a whole week out of every month. Most of them endure a lot of pressure to drop out of school to get married and start families.

Albania, as one of only two majority Muslim countries in Europe, has cultural attitudes towards women and their education that influence many Albanian women to give up on the idea of education completely.

Our goal with this program is to work with the schools to create an environment conducive to young women remaining in school.

The majority of these schools lack running water, and many have no functional bathroom facilities whatsoever at the moment.  Even where they do have toilets, they are often in horrible disrepair or are not useable because there is no running water to flush them… and they are not connected to sewer pipes.

Thus, a large portion of these projects will be to refurbish or build new toilet facilities, complete with running water. We will not stop there, however. Water Charity intends to go on and support a large variety of projects that have an LGL impact. As most people know, lack of clean water and adequate sanitation can make people susceptible to frequent waterborne illnesses, and being sick with such sicknesses, keep children out of school… not to mention threatening their very lives.

We hope you will support us in this effort to make a meaningful difference in this beautiful Mediterranean nation. Check out the various projects in the program below, and don’t hesitate to donate to any projects that seem worthy to you. We are looking for a large donor to adopt this entire program as well, so contact us if you are interested.
This program is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

   

   

Sheq i Madh School Bathroom and Water ProjectK – Albania

Sheq i Madh School Bathroom and Water ProjectK – Albania

Sheq i Madh School Bathroom and Water ProjectK – Albania

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.
This is a project under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama and the Peace Corps to expand access to education for adolescent girls around the world!

Location
Sheq i Madh School, Fier, Albania

Community Description
Sheq i Madh is a 9 year (nente vjecare) school with 250 students and 15 teachers in the region of Fier. It is one of the smaller local schools

Problem Addressed
The bathrooms need refurbishment, and to have running water.  The general sanitation situation at the school is thoroughly inadequate.

There are four student toilets, and one for the teachers, but all need rebuilding and connecting to running water with a new deposit in the roof to provide 24 hour supply.

Project Description
This project will provide 5 new Turkish toilets, 4 hand basins (one already exists), and the plumbing for running water to them. In addition, a new water storage container on the roof, and an associated water pump will be installed to provide a continuous source of water.

Project Impact
300 people will directly benefit from the project.  In addition, family members, visitors, and workers who come to school will benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Graham Anderson

Monitoring and Maintenance
Fier Bashkia (Municipality) will be responsible for the maintenance and upkeep of the facilities.

Comments
This project is part of the LET GIRLS LEARN program sponsored by FLOTUS Michelle Obama.  It is intended to have a positive effect on keeping girls in school after they reach adolescence.  Lack of clean facilities is a leading cause of women dropping out of school. Water Charity is proud to have sponsored the very first LGL project and continues to be a leading contributor to the program, as evidenced by projects like this one.

As an LGL project, this falls under our 100 Water Projects Program – Albania, as well as our larger Let Girls Learn Initiative – Worldwide.

Dollar Amount of Project
$1,200

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,200


ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF THE PROJECT.
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication if that is something you would like.
This project has been completed.  However, we are still collecting donations. To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Sheq i Madh School Bathroom and Water Project – Albania

Conclusion of Sheq i Madh School Bathroom and Water Project – Albania

Conclusion of Sheq i Madh School Bathroom and Water Project – Albania

Conclusion of Sheq i Madh School Bathroom and Water Project - AlbaniaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Graham Anderson.

To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Graham reports:

At the beginning, the intent was to complete the bathrooms for this small school before the start of the school year. In reality, all the resources from the Bashkia (Town Hall) were diverted to other (school) projects and so nothing was done before school started. This problem was compounded when the investigation into what was needed showed that the floor of the whole bathroom block had collapsed. As time went by everybody adopted the same approach that is endemic in Albania, namely to accept the status quo, blame the government and expect nothing to change.

Six months further on, with the Water Charity funds, transmitted through the Peace Corps Let Girls Learn program, still in the bank, another inspection of the school showed the toilets had deteriorated further and that urgent work was needed before the grant money needed to be returned, unspent. Some tense negotiations rendered the availability of a work crew and the hard work began.

Conclusion of Sheq i Madh School Bathroom and Water Project - AlbaniaOnce everybody started pulling in the same direction, the whole project came together surprisingly quickly. The toilet block was gutted and all the doors and facilities were removed. Holes in walls and gaping windows were soon repaired and the 5 Turkish toilets were cemented into the floor. The tiling was done very quickly and the new basins connected to the water supply almost immediately. Instead of repairing the wooden doors, some recycled aluminum doors were found and installed, rendering the toilets secure and lockable, going to the heart of Let Girls Learn. Without this security, adolescent girls often avoid using the bathroom or, more likely when they are menstruating, avoid school completely, impacting their education and their future.

The water pump was installed to ensure strong pressure but, good news, the watering schedule was such that there was no need to install the water deposit that had been budgeted for the project, so we have been able to return that money for use elsewhere. The final piece of the puzzle has been to educate the cleaners on how to clean the bathrooms professionally, as opposed to flooding the place with gallons of water that ultimately damages the facilities. This education and that of the teachers and students in the proper use of the toilets together with the involvement of the parents in providing ongoing supplies for their upkeep has been done by the Public Health Department’s school nurse. Her work is clearly ongoing.

After a six-month delay, Sheq I Madh has functional bathrooms that a parent recently confided “had never worked even when I was at school”. This project directly affects 250 students and the influence on siblings and other community members is huge. The legacy of this project will live on for generations of schoolchildren in Fier.

We are grateful to Graham for completing this great project. He has just completed his Peace Corps service, and we wish him the best.

Conclusion of Sheq i Madh School Bathroom and Water Project - AlbaniaConclusion of Sheq i Madh School Bathroom and Water Project - Albania

Jani Vreto School Bathroom Project – Albania

Jani Vreto School Bathroom Project – Albania

Jani Vreto School Bathroom Project – Albania

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.
This is a project under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama and the Peace Corps to expand access to education for adolescent girls around the world!

Location
Leskovik, Korca, Albania

Community Description
Leskovik is a small town in southeastern Albania with just over 1,500 inhabitants. Due to the mountainous terrain and poor road conditions, Leskovik is quite isolated, with the nearest city being 2 hours away.  During the Communist era, it was a city of certain military importance due to its close proximity to the Greek border, but the population has since fallen dramatically.

However, Leskovik is still known for its wine and music. The school is the largest source of employment in the town and surrounding villages with 30 teachers and staff.  Jani Vreto is the only school building, with a total of 250 students in grades 1st-12th, approximately 120 girls and 130 boys.

Problem Addressed
The conditions of the school toilets present both safety and hygiene concerns for anyone using them, especially women and young girls. The restrooms in the school are in dire need of repair and replacement. Currently, there are two Turkish toilets for female students and staff, and two for male students and staff. There is no running water inside the school at all.

At the beginning of every week, large barrels are filled with water from the outside tap and one is placed in each restroom. With this water, students and faculty are expected to flush the toilets and wash their hands. Due to the height of these barrels, the younger students are unable to do either.  The stall doors cannot be secured; many are even unable to close.

Project Description
This project will ensure that all four toilets are functioning and that both sinks are hooked up to water for the student body and faculty. It will involve replacing four Turkish toilets, two sinks and faucets, four aluminum doors that lock, as well as fixing the plumbing so that there is a direct connection to running water. This will also require the bathrooms be equipped with a water deposit to ensure students and faculty have access to clean water throughout the school day. This involves installing the deposit inside, as the climate is too cold during the winter months to be placed outdoors.

The local plumber, who is under a contract through the municipality, will do the skilled work. Cleanup will be completed by the school faculty and parents.

The municipality, along with parents, will provide the school with other necessities that are currently lacking (i.e. soap, hand towels, toilet paper, trash bins) as well as cover all labor and transportation costs.

After the construction has been completed, a group of teachers will begin designing lessons about hand washing and the importance of personal hygiene. Homeroom teachers will be responsible for conducting pre-arranged activities that show how quickly germs are spread and illustrate the importance of using soap instead of only water.

Project Impact
This project will impact 280 people directly, 250 students and 30 teachers and staff.  The project also impacts guests to the school as well as future students.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Stacey Weidemann

Monitoring and Maintenance
The municipality will maintain the facility with regular inspections. Community members and faculty will ensure that the restrooms are well stocked with essential materials.

Comments
Many girls miss several days of school each month due to the lack of a safe restroom equipped with running water. Regularly missing school due to unavoidable conditions may cause girls to stop attending school altogether. By addressing this problem, girls will no longer need to miss school because of menstruation. The inability to lock the stall doors poses safety concerns that affect all who use the restrooms but in particular women and girls.

When PCV, Stacey Weidemann first discussed this project with other teachers, she was surprised by how much they had to say on the subject. There are no restrooms exclusively for faculty, but Stacey had never thought about how it affected the teachers. The physics teacher, who has been working at the school for over 30 years, said that she used the restroom once. She told Stacey she walks home now when she needs to relieve herself; she lives on the other side of town.

It’s easy to understand why faculty and students have avoided using the restrooms. Even though the toilets are at the end of the hallway, the stench from the restrooms fills up the entire first floor. By midday, it’s the first thing you notice upon entering the school.

This project is part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative, and its sub-program 100 Water Projects Program – Albania.

This project has been fully funded.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

    

   

Conclusion of Jani Vreto School Bathroom Project – Albania

Conclusion of Jani Vreto School Bathroom Project – Albania

Conclusion of Jani Vreto School Bathroom Project – Albania

This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Stacey Weidemann. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Stacey reports:

 At the beginning of the project, the school restrooms were in terrible repair. The toilets weren’t attached to water; students filled up buckets from a barrel of water in each restroom to flush toilets and rinse off their hands. They were not functioning restrooms at all. The lack of sanitation presented hygiene risks for both students and teachers alike. Many female students skipped school altogether when menstruating. All of these conditions had significant adverse effects on all students’ education and health.

Though this project had a slow start, as the municipality is approximately a two-hour drive away, it has been incredibly well-received. A small group of six 12th grade students volunteered to be given instruction and then to present their own lessons in each class on the topic of personal hygiene. They did this with the support of homeroom teachers and the local Peace Corps Volunteer. These lessons included interactive activities on how germs spread and information on why handwashing is important.

Once the plumber arrived, the renovation work was completed in the course of two weekends. The labor included installing new toilets with working pumps, new sinks, and a water deposit so that students and faculty would have access to water even during the harsher hours of the watering schedule in the warmer months. The stall doors were repaired and new locks were installed.

In total, nearly 300 students and faculty have directly benefited from this project. That number will continue to grow.

The village of Leskovik thanks Water Charity and the Let Girls Learn initiative.

We, in turn, express our congratulations and gratitude to Stacey for completing this excellent project.

   

Conclusion of Jani Bocova School Bathroom and Water Project - Albania Conclusion of Jani Bocova School Bathroom and Water Project - Albania

Mother Teresa School Bathroom Project – Albania

Mother Teresa School Bathroom Project – Albania

Mother Teresa School Bathroom Project – Albania

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.
This is a project under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama and the Peace Corps to expand access to education for adolescent girls around the world!

Location
Rreshen Town, Mirdita, Albania

Community Description
Rreshen Municipality is part of the Mirdita District and the Prefecture of Lezhe in Northwest Albania.  Rreshen Municipality consists of 14 villages and has a total population of approximately 20,000 inhabitants.  It is located 74 km from the capital of Tirana.

Mirdita is historically known as the only district in Albania that stopped the Muslim Ottoman Empire from expanding its power there, so it became the only Catholic district in the entire country.

Mirdita is a traditional tribal land; its name was recorded in 1571 and in English means “good day.” The town of Rreshen is a humble and small community with one main road that runs through the entire town.  Along this road could be found in coffee shops, clothing stores, hair salons, bank offices, small parks, a fresh market, and a grocery store. At the center of Rreshen is located the Bashkia, the Ministry of Education, the cultural building and a couple of coffee shops. The people of Rreshen are very friendly, kind and proud of their heritage and Mirdita’s history.

The town of Rreshen has one kindergarten, two elementary and middle schools (Mother Teresa and Pashko Vasa), one high school, and one vocational school.

Problem Addressed
Rreshen is typical of many towns in Albania, which have appalling school toilets. It is also typical, in that more boys than girls are in school. Girls in the schools are unable to use the toilet facilities, for both privacy and sanitation reasons, which means that many of them go to their home to use the bathroom, do not use the bathroom at all, or use a nearby bar. Whichever option they choose there is safety, attendance (once they go home they tend not to come back), and/or health implications.

Specifics Issues:

•The school is a two-floor structure, on each floor, there are 9 toilets; 3 toilets are dedicated to girls and 6 toilets for boys.

 •Since September 2014, the Mother Teresa School has a pending notice of violation from the Rreshen Public Health office; currently, the bathrooms at the school are not meeting the sanitary standards according to the health office.

•The 18 toilets at the school do not flush because they are missing a flusher cistern.  Only some students will flush the toilets using buckets of water, but primarily the janitors are the ones that flush the toilets by the end of the school day.

•The school needs a supply of water to flush the toilets; the water at the school is provided by the city on a scheduled basis, therefore the school uses cisterns to store water. The school needs a water tank to ensure running water to improve the meager conditions of the bathrooms, provide hygiene, and overall to keep student’s attendance at the school. Many girls refrain from using the bathrooms.  When girls are going through their menstrual period, many of them prefer to use the bathrooms at their home or go to a near coffee shop; some will return but others will not return to class. The teenage girls would prefer to use a western toilet because is cleaner, is away from the ground (prevents them from getting any bacteria), and is more comfortable.

•The faucets need to be replaced; most of them are broken or not working properly.  The school needs to provide working hand basins and faucets so the students can wash their hands after using the toilets. Hygiene is crucial to preventing stomach and intestinal diseases. The students mentioned that there is no clean water and soap to wash their hands, and the water in the cisterns is not completely clean; there are particles of dirt in the bottom of the cisterns.

•The girls at the school do not feel safe when going to the bathroom and do not have privacy; the two main doors when entering into the girl’s bathroom do not have a lock and the stall doors need functional locks. The lack of locks on the doors exposes the female students to harassment. The boy’s bathroom is next to the girl’s bathroom, which forces the girls to go to the bathroom in pairs, while one uses the restroom the other one watches the door.

•The bathroom for the boys in the second floor does not have a door, the boys do not flush the toilets, and the girls are exposed to the urine smell from this open restroom; there are no water cisterns in the boy’s bathroom. There is a need to add at least a door to one of the stalls in the boy’s bathroom for the teacher’s privacy.

•The last time the bathrooms at the Mother Teresa School had an upgrade was in 2005 at the expense of the Director and the teachers, but the current conditions of the bathrooms are now beyond their limits and they need external aid.

Project Description
This project is part of a community restoration project for the Mother Teresa elementary and middle school. The goal of this project is to improve the inadequate conditions of the 18 bathrooms at this school so that the students are able to use the bathroom facilities at the school and are not forced to go offsite to use the bathrooms at a Café business or at their home.  This project is a joint effort of the Bashkia, the school staff, members of the community, the Peace Corps, and the Water Charity.

The project restoration will be a combination of Western and Turkish toilets and will take an average of three days.  It will include the renovation of existing toilets, air pipes, water pipes, doors (adding handles to doors and locks on all stall doors), and faucets that are broken and are not meeting the sanitary conditions. Also, it will include the addition of two water tanks on the roof to provide running water all day, a flusher cistern for each Turkish toilet that is currently missing one, and two doors for the boy’s bathroom on the second floor.  The tile in each toilet floor area will be replaced, due to the removal of older sewer pipes to add new ones.

The Mayor of Rreshen, Ndrec Dedaj will support the project by covering the labor on the municipality’s payroll. Florjan Ndrejaj is a private plumber who helped initially with the project; however, the Bashkia has provided two plumbers, two builders, a carpenter, a tiling contractor, and an engineer to help us prepare the budget and do the assessment of what needs to be repaired and replaced in the bathrooms.  Mr. Pashka Ndoja is a private carpenter, a well-known individual within the community; he evaluated the conditions of the doors and told us what needs to be repaired and how we could replace some parts of these doors in a more cost-effective approach.

The Director of Mother Teresa School, Nora Kaqorri and the teacher’s staff will donate a total of 14,000 leke; this money will be used to buy paint, and toiletry supplies such as soap, toilet paper, and trash cans for each bathroom. This donation will be given in order to support the sustainable education program that the school will offer each week for two hours.  The student’s parents will also contribute to toiletry supplies, labor, and a monetary donation according to their financial possibilities.

Project Impact
This project will directly benefit 481 people; 446 students, 30 teachers, 3 sanitary employees, 2 security officers, parents, and guests.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Pier A. Vernaza

Monitoring and Maintenance
The supplies and maintenance of the renovated bathrooms will be the responsibility of the Bashkia Rreshen and the Mother Teresa School; the janitors, teachers and the Director will jointly collaborate in this effort to inspect and keep up to date on the maintenance of the bathroom facilities.  The school will provide through the “Ore Educative” program sessions to students about handwashing and sanitation. Peace Corps Volunteer Pier Vernaza and Bledar Jushi will accompany the plumber and the engineer of the Bashkia to purchase the materials listed in the proposed budget.

Comments
This project is part of the Let Girls learn program sponsored by FLOTUS Michelle Obama. The goal of this project is to keep girls in school and boys too. Lack of proper functioning bathrooms forces girls to drop school as teenagers.  It is a crucial responsibility for schools to provide clean bathrooms with functioning doors, and proper working toilets to allow girls a healthy and safe environment.

Another problem worth mentioning, due to the lack of proper bathrooms, it is not fair for these teenage girls to have to “hold” their need to use the bathrooms because of the lack of proper doors, and unhealthy and broken toilets.  These girls are compelled to return home or seek the nearest café place to go.  When seeking alternative places to go, the girls could (and this is not unusual) possibly be exposed to harassment or assault.  If the girls go home, it is unlikely that they will return. If the girls are “holding” it, this situation can lead to urinary tract infections and kidney infections.  If the infections are recurring they can lead to reproductive health harm.

Another problem that could arise from not using the bathrooms, is if the girls do not have properly functioning toilets to use, they may feel obliged to not drink liquids during the day and may suffer from dehydration.  Chronic dehydration can lead to problems such as gastritis, heartburn, arthritis, headaches, depression and weight problems. For school girls who are menstruating, not having a place to change their sanitary pads, dispose of them, and wash their hands very often leads to girls missing school while menstruating.

The project is part of WC’s Let Girls Learn Initiative – Worldwide which includes all the projects we do under the Let Girls Learn program.

This project will be happening thanks to the incredible striving “100 Water Projects” program that Water Charity is funding in Albania, as a major thrust of the LGL initiative. The ambitious scope is due in large part to the efforts of PCVs Graham & Teresa Anderson. In addition, this project has valuable support from the community members, the Director of the school, Nora Kaqorri, the teacher’s staff, the parents of the students, and the Mayor of Bashkia Rreshen, Ndrec Dedaj who altogether will provide more than the required 25% community contribution, which includes labor, cleaning and toiletry supplies.

Dollar Amount of Project
$1,846.57

Donations Collected to Date
$1,846.57

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 – This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Wilco Krul, of Einhoven, Netherlands.

Additional donations will go to other projects in Albania.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

   

Conclusion of Mother Teresa School Bathroom Project – Albania

Conclusion of Mother Teresa School Bathroom Project – Albania

Conclusion of Mother Teresa School Bathroom Project – Albania

This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Pier Vernaza as part of our 100 Water Projects Program – Albania, as well as our larger Let Girls Learn Initiative – Worldwide.

To read about the start of the project, CLICK HERE.

Pier reports:

The bathroom project has been completed.

The workers of the Municipality replaced all the old sewer pipes, air pipes, faucets, and Turkish toilets, installed the western toilets at the girl’s bathrooms, and placed new tiles at each toilet area in all the 18 toilets. Also, they installed the two doors in the boy’s bathrooms, and the cisterns on the roof of the school’s building.

I worked with my counterpart Bledi in preparing the video, fliers, and posters for the opening event for the bathrooms that took place on the week of April 6, 2015. We invited the Mayor of Rreshen.

To see the video, CLICK HERE.

Also, during the opening event week, we started the Glitter Hand Wash class that a nurse will offer to the younger students of Mother Teresa School. I will continue to give these classes on my own time as a reminder until these hygiene values ingrain in the minds of the students. It is incredible, that something so simple and commonsense behavior–for us–it is CRUCIAL to teach to children and even older teenagers. Cultures are a huge difference.

The Mayor of Rreshen Ndrec Dedaj, the entire community, the students, the Director of the School Nora Kaçorri, the cleaning ladies, the security and all the teachers are DEEPLY HAPPY AND GRATEFUL!! for your DONATIONS to improve the lifestyles of the girls and boys of this school.

We at Water Charity, in turn, express our gratitude to Pier for completing this project and extend our heartfelt thanks to a long-time supporter of Water Charity Wilco Krul for his extreme generosity.

   

31 Korrik 9 Vjecare School Bathroom and Water Project – Albania

31 Korrik 9 Vjecare School Bathroom and Water Project – Albania

31 Korrik 9 Vjecare School Bathroom and Water Project – Albania

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.
This is a project under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama and the Peace Corps to expand access to education for girls around the world!

Location
31 Korrik 9 Vjecare, Bashkia Mat, Dimer District, Burrel, Albania

Community Description
Mat is a municipality in Dibër County, northern Albania. It was created in 2015 by the merger of the following municipalities: Baz, Burrel, Derjan, Komsi, Lis, Macukull, Rukaj and Ulëz. The seat of the municipality is the town of Burrel, which had a population of 10,862 in the 2011 Census and represents a region of approximately 30,000.

The town of Burrel lies on a terrace of the Mat River, which has the appearance of a plateau, with visibility from all sides, areas, and villages in the province of Mat.  Bashkia Mat, previously Bashkia Burrel, has recently assumed the responsibility for the school buildings in the villages that are now within the Mat region.  These school buildings are in addition to the schools within the city of Burrel, which they had always been responsible for.  This is part of Albania’s decentralization process that is currently being implemented.

Problem Addressed
This school is without bathroom facilities due to a lack of water and non-functioning equipment.  The children do not have access to running water or use of lavatory facilities during school hours, resulting in poor hygiene and at times children, especially girls during their menstrual cycles, opt to stay home.

Bashkia Mat received notification of school buildings that should not be opened on the September 14, 2015 opening day, due to bathrooms that are non-functioning.  Access to bathrooms is essential to a positive learning environment, particularly for young women who will oftentimes stay home from school during times they are most in need of having access to a bathroom.

Many of the schools that now fall under Bashkia Mat’s responsibility have been in disrepair for many years.  Bashkia Mat will incur significant costs repairing not only the bathrooms but also many other areas of the school buildings.  Funding to assist with the bathroom portion of these repairs is greatly needed to ensure education for the Mat children, girls and boys.

31 Korrik, a 9 Vjecare School (grade 1-9) contains six bathrooms: one male and one female on each of the three floors with 3 toilets in each bathroom.  The bathrooms are in need of the following; toilets, toilet doors, and entrance doors, replacement of damaged windows, damaged sink tiles, water meters and all hardware and pipes necessary for the toilets and sinks to function.  The bathrooms need ceiling lights and environmental painting.  There is water in the building and the sewer system is working.  One of the two water tanks needs to be replaced and the bathrooms need to be connected to running water.
Project Description
The 31 Korrik School project will repair 18 toilets including the stalls and ceiling.   Three sinks will be repaired and reconstructed in a trough style with multiple faucets.  Door replacement will be made on 24 doors, 18 toilet doors, and 6 entrance doors. In addition, the walls will be painted to correct water and mold issues and any other electrical or lighting problems in the bathrooms will be repaired. Damaged and broken windows will be replaced.  Also, the second water tank will be replaced.

Project Impact
This project will impact over 900 people per year. There are 804 children in the school; (366 females, 438 males) and 24 teachers, plus support staff, visitors to the school and future students.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Barbara Richardson

Monitoring and Maintenance
Bashkia Mat is responsible for the monitoring and maintenance of the project following completion, including its repairs and supplies.

Comments
Bashkia Mat will contribute 29.26% of the total projected costs.

This project is part of the Let Girls Learn Program, a powerful collaboration between First Lady Michelle Obama and the Peace Corps which was formed to expand access to education for adolescent girls around the world. https://letgirlslearn.peacecorps.gov/.  Lack of clean facilities is a leading cause of women dropping out of school. Water Charity is proud to have sponsored the very first LGL project and continues to be a leading contributor to the program, as evidenced by projects like this one.

As an LGL project, this falls under our 100 Water Projects Program – Albania, as well as our larger Let Girls Learn Initiative – Worldwide.

Fundraising Target
$4,200

Donations Collected to Date
$150

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,050

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF THE PROJECT.
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication if that is something you would like.


 

   

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of 31 Korrik 9 Vjecare School Bathroom and Water Project – Albania

Conclusion of 31 Korrik 9 Vjecare School Bathroom and Water Project – Albania

Conclusion of 31 Korrik 9 Vjecare School Bathroom and Water Project – Albania

This project has been completed under the direction of Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Barbara Richardson, as part of our 100 Water Projects Program – Albania, as well as our larger Let Girls Learn Initiative – Worldwide.

To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Barbara reports:

In September 2015 we, Bashkia Mat and I received funding from Water Charity through the PCPP grant program. The goal was to provide functioning bathrooms for the children, teachers, and visitors of the school.

The project consisted of 6 bathrooms, each with 3 toilets. The goal was to provide water to each toilet and sinks in the bathrooms and included toilet water tanks, three faucets for each sink, doors for the bathrooms and the toilet stalls, windows, water tank, water meter, and materials to make all the connections.

The project was completed in early March 2015.

Following the completion of the bathrooms, I held a session with the 4th-grade class to discuss how they can keep the bathrooms clean and functioning and the proper way to wash their hands after each toilet use.

The children are loving their new bathrooms!

Thank you, Water Charity and Peace Corps for funding this much-needed project.

We, in turn, express our gratitude toward Barbara for completing this important project.

We are still accepting donations for this project.