Arkhangai Hospital Water Filter Project – Mongolia

Arkhangai Hospital Water Filter Project – Mongolia

Arkhangai Hospital Water Filter Project – Mongolia

Location
Tsetserleg, Arkhangai, Mongolia

Community Description
Arkhangai Aimag is a 55,300 square-kilometer province located in the center of Mongolia, with a population numbering 89,311. The province (aimag), divided into 19 soums and 99 baghs, is well-recognized for its mixture of mountainous regions, fertile pastures, wooded hills, abundant natural waterways, and a relatively cool Mongolian climate in comparison to other provinces.

Unfortunately, despite the natural beauty of the province, 78% of the total population that lives in soums and baghs, whose annual income primarily comes from raising and selling the meat and woolen textiles from livestock, still lack healthy resources. For this portion of the population, healthy food and sanitary water systems are virtually nonexistent.

 The Central Hospital of the Arkhangai Aimag is located in Tsetserleg. Over 100 outpatients pass through the hospital each day. The hospital has an inpatient capacity of 85 and on average houses roughly 35 inpatients daily.

Project Description
This project is to purchase 2 quality water filters, and install them in critical and highly-frequented locations at the hospital.

The project will be implemented under the direction of the Arkhangai Health Department.

The first filter will be located in the recovery ward of the hospital. This will allow patients who are recovering from severe illnesses, surgery, or other issues, the best quality of water available.

The second filter will be located in the first-floor waiting room, where a large number of patients pass through and spend time.

The ceramic filters contain elements that remove up to 99.99% of particles, cysts, parasites and pathogenic bacteria including e coli, cryptosporidium, giardia, and salmonella typhii. The silver-impregnated system also reduces chlorine, rust, sediment and organic chemicals.

Each filter will be able to process up to 24 gallons of water per day.

Each filter will purify a minimum of 6,000 gallons, depending on the source water. The carbon matrix interior provides additional support in removing chemicals like chlorine and other bad taste and odor elements.

The candles inside the filters need to be cleaned every 2 months and replaced every 2 years, at a nominal cost.

Two trainings will take place to educate the hospital staff. The first will be to educate maintenance workers and nurses on the proper upkeep of the filters and the process for ordering new candles.

The second training will educate the doctors and nurses about the importance of clean/safe water.

Project Impact
36,500 people who pass through the hospital each year will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Tim Jenkins

Comments
Giving the inpatients and outpatients clean water to drink will drastically improve their health and quality of care. The trainings will give the project a sustainable outcome.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 – This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Tim Jenkins of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Tim and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Ban Bua Yai Pre-School Water Filter Project – Thailand

Conclusion of Ban Bua Yai Pre-School Water Filter Project – Thailand

Conclusion of Ban Bua Yai Pre-School Water Filter Project – Thailand

This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Greg Patterson.

To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to install a water filtration unit at the Ban Bua Yai Pre-School.

Greg reports:

The water filter project was a success. The children now have clean drinking water, and it was hugely appreciated by the community.

The plumbing for the project was performed by the supplier of the water filter, so it was professionally installed.

The success of the project spurned the community to further improve the preschool, and since we have also constructed a bathroom for the school.

The clay pots used to catch water runoff from the roof have been removed and now the children only drink the filtered water.

Thank you Appropriate Projects.

   

We wish to thank Greg for completing this project, and again extend our gratitude to The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding.

Ban Bua Yai Pre-School Water Filter Project – Thailand

Ban Bua Yai Pre-School Water Filter Project – Thailand

Ban Bua Yai Pre-School Water Filter Project – Thailand

Location
Bua Sawang Sub-District, Pananikom District, Sakon Nakhon Province, Thailand

Community Description
The Sakon Nakhon Province is located one hour south of the Laos Border. Geographically, Bua Sawang is located in North-Eastern Esan, which is the central Eastern region of Thailand. It is an arid region that is primarily flat rice fields, with poor soil.

Because of the arid conditions only one crop is raised per year. This is one of the poorest areas of Thailand, and the people have very limited resources.

The Ban Bua Yai Pre-school serves the community of Ban Bua Yai (population 680) and Ban Bua Noi (population 246). This community is located in the center of the sub-district and is a model for the other four pre-schools. The school serves the children and also serves as a meeting hall for the community.

The groundwater, which the school currently uses for hand washing/toilet, is not safe for the children to drink. The latest water tests show E Coli and Cholera levels 276 percent higher than is acceptable for drinking. The village has received official notification from the sub-district office that the water supplied from the community well is non-potable and should not be used for drinking.

Rainwater runoff from the roof of the schoolhouse is captured and stored in vessels for use as drinking water for the school. However, the area can go months without rain, resulting in the water becoming stagnant and unhealthful.

Project Description
This project is for the installation of a water filtration unit at the Ban Bua Yai Pre-School.

The selected system, the Everpure H-1200 system, uses a micro-filtration system and a bacteriostatic system, and is advertised to eliminate 99.9 % of microbial agents. It is widely used in the area, and recommended by local experts for its effectiveness.

In particular, it is designed to remove, lead, cysts (such as Giardia and Cryptospridim), bacteria, volatile organic chemicals, MTBE, chlorine, dirt, and cloudiness.

The system has a 1/2 gallon/minute flow rate and each filter can process 1000 gallon of water. The system is easy to maintain and the cartridges are easily replaced.

Under the direction of the Sub-District Administration Office (SAO) of Bua Sawang and Teacher Kanitta Sornwongsa, the system, piping, and fittings will be purchased locally using project funds. In addition, local labor will be hired for the installation.

The SAO will make up any differences in the budget with in-kind donations of labor.

Project Impact
This project will benefit 37 people (two teachers and 35 students) at the school, and 50 community members per month who come to the school for community meetings.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Greg Patterson

Comments
This project will help improve the general health of children, staff, and community members who use the school. The community, school, and local government office have committed the project, ensuring timely completion and sustainability.

Dollar Amount of Project
$465.00

Donations Collected to Date
$465.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 – This project has been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Greg Patterson of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Greg and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Saintsagaan Water Filter Project – Mongolia

Conclusion of Saintsagaan Water Filter Project – Mongolia

Conclusion of Saintsagaan Water Filter Project – Mongolia

This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Matthew Renninger and Megan Bush.

To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to provide two high-quality water filters in public service locations.

Matthew reports:

We purchased both filters outlined in our project plan, translated the maintenance instructions, held a short training session, and installed them in the agreed upon sites.

Fortunately through shopping around and working through Peace Corps we were able to get a discount on the model we wanted, and next month we will be purchasing and installing 3 more systems at the local kindergarten and 2 more locations which will be selected after consideration of need.

Again thank you so much for your help in the facilitation of this project. It really will make a difference here, especially over the long term with the people who have access to the filters every day.

We again extend our thanks to Matthew and Megan for completing the project, and again wish to thank Daniel Renninger and Janet Bush for providing the funding for this project as well as for future projects in Mongolia.

Saintsagaan Water Filter Project – Mongolia

Saintsagaan Water Filter Project – Mongolia

Saintsagaan Water Filter Project – Mongolia

Location
Saint sagaan, Dundgovi, Mongolia

Community Description
Saint sagaan village is the capital of Dundgovi province in Mongolia. It is located about 270 km south of the country’s capital of Ulaanbaatar in the Gobi dessert. Ulaanbaatar is also the nearest large urban center.

The population of Saint sagaan is about 14,000. Many of the people are employed by the government, working at either the provincial or the district government level. The province’s main industry is animal husbandry and livestock products, such as wool.

There are no above-ground water sources anywhere near Saint sagaan. The groundwater is deep enough, however, to withstand the well-below-freezing conditions (-22°F, -30°C) experienced in winter, and the pipes of places with running water are winterized.

All the water sources in Saint sagaan are wells, and water is pumped up using modern technology. Some buildings and homes have running water and some do not.

The water pumped from the wells is not pure and has many parasites and minerals. The people regularly boil the water in order to make it safe to drink, but they are unaware of, or unable to do anything about, the minerals which are causing them to have health problems such, as kidney stones.

Project Description
This project is to purchase 2 high-quality water filters and place them in public service locations where they will benefit the employees and the visiting public.

The Health Department and the Children’s Center are government-run organizations. The workplaces were chosen for the placement of the filters because they have stable populations, and staff can be trusted to use the filters consistently and appropriately.

The filters do not require electricity, and their use does not require that the water first be boiled. They use a 7-inch ceramic filter within a high-quality stainless steel container. They each produce 24 gallons of filtered water per day.

The ceramic filter elements remove up to 99.99% of particles, cysts, parasites and pathogenic bacteria including e coli, cryptosporidium, giardia, and salmonella typhi. The silver-impregnated system also reduces chlorine, rust, sediment and organic chemicals.

The total filter capacity is a minimum of 6,000 gallons depending on the source water. The carbon matrix interior provides additional support in removing chemicals like chlorine and other bad taste and odor elements.

The candles inside them need to be cleaned every 2 months and replaced every 2 years, at nominal cost.

Trainings of key staff members will cover such subjects as filter upkeep, the importance of drinking water, and how to order new filters through the Health Department at the end of two years.

Project Impact
The project will benefit 40 Health Department staff plus about 100 people each day who visit the health center and the adjoining hospital.

The project will also benefit 15 Children’s Center staff plus about 35 visiting children per day.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Matthew Renninger and Megan Bush

Comments
This project utilizes the appropriate technology to resolve the local water quality problem that faces the community. With proper maintenance, the filters will continue to provide safe water for a large number of people far into the future.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00 + additional amounts for future projects.

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 – This project has now been jointly funded through the generosity of Daniel Renninger, of Oak Harbor, WA, USA, and Janet Bush, of Springfield, VA, USA, who each donated $500. The additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Matthew, Megan and/or other PCVs in Mongolia

Those who wish may continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Matthew and Megan of your donation. Additional funds will be similarly used to fund future projects.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – Philippines

Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – Philippines

Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – Philippines

Super Typhoon Haiyan, known as Yolanda in the Philippines, has been a true calamity for those who had to endure its awesome storm surge and 195 mph winds.

As most of you know, Tacloban city bore the brunt of what looks to be the strongest storm on record to ever make landfall. Lt. Col. Marciano Jesus Guevara of the Filipino military aid said that the biggest problem in Tacloban is a lack of clean drinking water. “Water is life,” he said. “If you have water with no food, you’ll survive.”

Within days after the devastating typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines, and while it was still ravaging Vietnam, Water Charity began this effort to get water filters to the victims. With over 800,000 evacuees still housed in makeshift housing, churches and community centers, and well before any refugee camps had been constructed, Water Charity was already organizing the delivery of life-saving carbon nanotube filters.

Our first shipment of filters was paid for out of our own pockets, and was flown to the Philippines personally by one of our colleagues to expedite distribution.

Far and away the best and most cost-efficient filter technology, these lightweight, durable and highly effective filters are engineered to less than a micron, and thus prevent all known pathogens, bacteria, cysts, protozoa, and even the smallest virus from passing through.

We started using this technology under our Filters for Life Program, so when the extent of the devastation became apparent, we were ready to step up and help with the relief effort.

The Sawyer filters are a practical, immediate, and long-term solution to the need for safe drinking water. They can last for over 10 years of heavy use, are washable, and are extremely versatile.

With filters ranging from $15 to $80 depending on usage, source water, and volume needed, there is no reason not to ensure that every single victim of this catastrophe can’t at least have the best quality water possible.

The need for water is acute, and will be for quite some time. Long after this event has passed from the news, there will still be people without villages to return to, and helping them with this most basic of necessities is the most efficacious way to contribute to their health and wellbeing.

Waterborne illnesses are the scourge of refugee camps the world over. 80% of all diseases are waterborne, and the damage they do is compounded in the close-quarters and makeshift nature of any such camp. Help us prevent cholera outbreaks, amoebic dysentery, giardia and the host of other illnesses that are all too common in these situations.

Please give generously to this ongoing program. We will accept what you can afford, but we will give special recognition for donations of $100 or more.

Esteemed Donors

The SLOW LIFE Foundation, United Kingdom – $10,000
CannedWater4Kids, Sussex, WI, USA – $1,000
Michael and Carla Boyle, Nelsonville, OH, USA – $500
Elmo Foundation, Charlottesville, VA, USA – $500
Dr. & Mrs. Gary Fraser, Redlands, CA, USA – $200
Carol Host, Glendale, CA, USA – $100
Elena Kramer, Raleigh, NC, USA – $100
Diane Ray, Chattanooga, TN, USA – $100
Robert & Sandy Barrett, Calimesa, CA, USA – $100
Gail Strasser, Perris, CA, USA – $100
Desmyrna Taylor, Loma Linda, CA, USA – $100
Irving Ostrow, Los Angeles, CA, USA – $100

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – Philippines

Conclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – Philippines

Conclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – Philippines

The emergency response aspect of this project has been completed. A total of 266 Sawyer water filters were delivered and put into use.

Conclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – PhilippinesTo read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was initiated to provide aid to stricken areas within days after Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines. Looking back, the impact on that country, with 99 million people, is hard to comprehend:

•    14.9 million people affected
•    4.13 million people displaced
•    6,100+ reported dead
•    26,233 reported injured
•    1.2 million damaged houses

The project was implemented by Water Charity in partnership with Wine to Water, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit engaged in water projects worldwide. It was managed by Kyle Lomax, Wine to Water’s International Projects Manager, and Doc Hendley, its Founder and President.

Kyle reports:

After Typhoon Haiyan struck, humanitarian aid from the international community sought to provide the most basic needs of survival (water, food, shelter, and medicine) to as many of the victims as possible. Many water systems were destroyed or contaminated with fecal coliform.

 Due to the extreme devastation, logistics, transportation, and the enormous number of people in desperation posed problems. Water bottles were air dropped, expensive water purification systems were set-up, and water trucks began moving to distribute water.

Unfortunately, this initial aid reached as few as one-quarter of the population in places like Tacloban City. In places on the outskirts of towns, more remote areas, and many smaller islands, no aid at all has yet been provided.

We chose to utilize an amazing water filter, called the Sawyer PointONE water filter. With the technology derived from kidney dialysis, Sawyer worked to improve this hollow fiber membrane technology, giving it better filtration rates and longevity. The result was “U” shaped micro-tubes, with tiny pore holes at 0.1 microns in size. This makes it impossible (99.99999%) for harmful bacteria, protozoa, or cysts like E. coli, Giradia, Cholera, and Typhoid to pass through the Sawyer filter.

It is the perfect filter to use for disaster response. Not only is the filter the most effective, it is very small (4×2 inches) and efficient (1 liter per minute flow rate). Each filter simply attaches to a container, usually a 5-gallon bucket, and is capable of producing over 200 gallons of clean water per day. It can provide water for several families for up to 10 years!

Conclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – PhilippinesAfter a situation assessment on the ground, four locations around Tacloban City were chosen:

1.    Diit, Mercyville (Barangay 99) – 100 filters
2.    Upper Nulatula (Barangay 6) – 100 filters
3.    Divisoria – 33 filters
4.    Purok 1 – 33 filters

They were picked because they were some of the most in need and getting only “temporary relief” in the form on Hypsol chlorine solution or water trucks. These relief services were only lasting for a short period. Then, the locals were forced to go back to getting standing water or going to their contaminated wells.

The approach to the implementation was “relationship” driven. We worked from the bottom up and the top down within the communities, called barangays, to develop relationships and gain trust.

It started off with meeting with the barangay captains to mobilize all the heads of the households to meet at the barangay hall, which usually has a basketball court, perfect for doing a training on the filter. Here we discussed the importance of clean water and sanitation, how it translates into better health and livelihood, and how to properly use/maintain/clean the filter. The goal was to make things fun and interactive, and, most importantly, to ensure that the filter would be properly used.

Filthy brown water was run through the filter and perfectly clean water could be seen by all. We drank the clean water along with the barangay captain and locals in the crowd. This allowed us to gain trust and make people feel comfortable to ask any questions and have discussions.

Then, we distributed the new filters and containers to the people, recorded their information, and let them know we would be checking to make sure everyone understood and used the filter.

In total, Water Charity provided 266 filters and containers, supplying an estimated 2,660 people with clean drinking water throughout Tacloban City! This is such a lasting impact that will totally transform these peoples’ lives forever. The cost for having this clean water comes out to be less than $0.50 per person, per year!

There remains a tremendous amount to be accomplished in the devastated areas, but the project has now moved on to a development phase. The extent to which we are able to continue with this important work is dependent solely on our success in raising funds to pay for the same.

We again wish to thank the SLOW LIFE Foundation for their contribution to this project. We also extend our gratitude to Michael and Carla Boyle, Elmo Foundation, CannedWater4Kids, Dr. & Mrs. Gary Fraser, Carol Host, Elena Kramer, Diane Ray, Robert & Sandy Barrett, Gail Strasser, Desmyrna Taylor, Irving Ostrow, and all of the other donors for providing the funding that made this project possible.

Conclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – PhilippinesConclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – Philippines
Conclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – PhilippinesConclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – Philippines
Conclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – PhilippinesConclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – Philippines
Conclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – PhilippinesConclusion of Water Charity Typhoon Haiyan Relief – Philippines

Svetlii Kindergarten Water Filter Project – Moldova

Svetlii Kindergarten Water Filter Project – Moldova

Svetlii Kindergarten Water Filter Project – Moldova

Location
Svetlii, Comrat raion, a semi-autonomous region of Gagauzia, Republic of Moldova

Community Description
Svetlii is a small village located in southern Moldova. It is part of the raion of Comrat, and is located in the semi-autonomous region of Gagauzia.

 Russian is the primary language spoken, in addition to a mixture of Bulgarian, Gagauzian, and Romanian in the region. The major employers are the schools, college, and local agriculture.

Svetlii’s population is 2,066, but a large portion of the population at any given time is working abroad, primarily in Russia and Turkey, to send remittances home. The village is home to one agricultural college, one primary and high school, a small health clinic, two kindergartens, and a few small convenience stores and one bar, as well as an Orthodox and a Baptist church. Svetlii is located on a major highway that links Chisinau to the south of Moldova and receives frequent thru-traffic.

Currently, the village is undergoing an overhaul in the underground pipe system, which will result in running water being brought to the second-half of the village. However, a recent water analysis describes the water as not meeting sanitary norms by the government, with high levels of ammonia, chlorine, and dry residues.

Currently, there are 50 children, ages 2 to 6 that attend the kindergarten. This year an additional class will be held in the kindergarten, bringing the total number to 75. They are served lunches and snacks for which the cooks have to boil all the water, which is a time-consuming and inconvenient task.

Project Description
This project is to install a water filter in the kindergarten kitchen.

The water filter will be installed next to the kitchen sink, which is used for cooking and drinking water. The system uses a two-process filtration system. The first is a pre-filter, and the second filter uses a multi-stage reverse osmosis system. The filtration will remove up to 99% of contaminants, including the high levels of chlorine, dry residues, and ammonia.

Project funds will be used to purchase the filter system. As part of the all-inclusive price, a local firm will deliver, install, and maintain the filter, which will be guaranteed for 10 years.

The mayor’s office of Svetlii will purchase additional cartridges as needed.

Project Impact
75 children and 15 staff members will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Natalie Rooks

Comments
This project results in the removal of contaminants from water used for drinking and cooking at the kindergarten. It will improve the health and well-being of the children, and also will add to the effectiveness of the staff in serving the needs of the kids.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 – This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Natalie Rooks of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Natalie and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Svetlii Kindergarten Water Filter Project – Moldova

Conclusion of Svetlii Kindergarten Water Filter Project – Moldova

Conclusion of Svetlii Kindergarten Water Filter Project – Moldova

This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Natalie Rooks.

To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to install a water filter in the kindergarten kitchen.

Natalie reports:

The water filter installation project at the Svetlii kindergarten has been successfully completed!

Upon receiving the money, the mayor contacted the filtration firm and altered the plans slightly. In addition to the agreed-upon filter and installation, the mayor agreed to pay an additional fee to allow for a storage tank that holds up to 30 liters of filtered water at a time. This will be useful in the future in case of lack of electricity and when the sole electric outlet in the kitchen needs to be in use.

The project was completed in a single afternoon. The contracted company transported the materials to Svetlii and installed the filter in the kitchen. An analysis was taken of the filtered water and proven to remove the contaminants. The kindergarten director, nurse, and cook were amazed at the difference in taste and in the clear color that the filtered water has.

School is now in session, and the wellbeing of the 75 children will be greatly improved by the clean water they will be eating and drinking. Additionally the kitchen staff will now benefit from the reduced requirement of boiling all water before cooking and drinking.

Thank you to Appropriate Projects for the funding of this small water filter installation project that will ensure that these health benefits of the children and staff continue into the future.

We wish to thank Natalie for completing this project, and again extend our gratitude to The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding.

   

    

Palatoa Native Community Filter Project – Peru

Palatoa Native Community Filter Project – Peru

Palatoa Native Community Filter Project – Peru

Project made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY & the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Location

Manu National Park, Palatoa River, Peru 

Manú is home to 10% of the world’s bird species, 5% of all mammals and 15% of all butterflies, as well as rare animals like jaguars and giant armadillos. Unesco has declared the park a World Heritage Site and biosphere reserve and says it is more biodiverse than any other place on the planet.  Peru’s Manu is one of the most biologically diverse places on earth. Home to over 1,000 species of birds, 300 species of trees, and countless other life forms, Manu showcases life at its most prolific.

  • Parque Nacional Manu, Rio Palatoa, Peru
    Manú alberga es el hogar de 10% de las especies de aves del mundo, al 5% de todos los mamíferos y al 15% de todas las mariposas, así como a animales raros como el jaguar y los armadillos gigantes. La Unesco ha declarado que el parque es Patrimonio de la Humanidad y reserva de la biosfera, y dice que tiene más biodiversidad que cualquier otro lugar del planeta.  El Manu de Perú es uno de los lugares con mayor diversidad biológica en la tierra. El hogar de más de 1,000 especies de aves, 300 especies de árboles y muchas otras formas de vida, Manu muestra la vida en su forma más prolífica.

Community Description

  • 39 Machiguen family units (over 220 indigenous people) of whom only 5 are in contact with western societies
    • 39 Familias Machiguengas  (más de 220 personas indígenas) de cual 5 families están en contacto inicial con las sociedades occidental

Problem Addressed

  • Bacteria and parasite infested water which needs to be treated with filters
    • Agua infestada de parásitos y bacterias tratado por filtros
  • The increased occurrence of bacteria and parasites may be related to contamination of the local nature due to  mining and destruction of the forest.
    • El aumento en la presencia de bacterias y parásitos puede estar relacionado con la contaminación de la extracción de Natura y la destrucción del bosque.

Project Description

  • Water Charity has sent a large number of Sawyer hollow membrane filters to Palatoa River native communities living in Manu National Park.  We are currently arranging for their distribution through our friends Javin Jimenez, and Ruben Semperi.  A number of community members are being conscripted to help install the filters throughout the households in the community. They will also demonstrate the proper use of the filters and ensure that they are maintained.  With a small amount of backflushing, these filters can last nearly forever.  They are guaranteed for over 1 million gallons and/or 10 years, but in our experience, the only way they stop working is if you smash them or decide not to use them anymore.
  • We plan on continuing to do projects of this kind with all native tribes in the region. Most of the Tribal communities in the region are dealing with similar water issues. Giving them the ability to easily clean the water from any source will give the people a greater degree of sovereignty, by allowing them to not be dependent on outside help, purchasing of drinking water from corporations that have taken local waters for profit, or reliant on insufficient water systems that currently exist.
    • Water Charity ha enviado una gran cantidad de filtros de membrana hueca Sawyer a las comunidades nativas del río Palatoa que viven en el Parque Nacional Manu. Actualmente estamos organizando su distribución a través de nuestros amigos Javin Jimenez y Ruben Semperi. Un número de miembros de la comunidad están siendo reclutados para ayudar a instalar los filtros en todos los hogares de la comunidad. También demostrarán el uso correcto de los filtros y garantizarán que se mantengan. Con una pequeña cantidad de lavado retroactivo, estos filtros pueden durar casi para siempre. Están garantizados por más de 1 millón de galones y / o 10 años, pero según nuestra experiencia, la única forma de dejar de trabajar es si los rompe o decide no usarlos más. 
    • Planeamos continuar haciendo proyectos de este tipo con todas las tribus nativas de la región. La mayoría de las comunidades tribales en la región están lidiando con problemas de agua similares. Al otorgarles la capacidad de limpiar fácilmente el agua de cualquier fuente, se otorgará a las personas un mayor grado de soberanía, al permitirles no depender de la ayuda externa, comprar agua potable de corporaciones que han tomado aguas locales con fines de lucro o depender de Sistemas de agua insuficientes que existen actualmente.

Project Impact

  • The severe health condition in the elderly and young children.  Boiling water to kill the various bacteria and parasite infestation have proven null results.  Extreme numbers are sick and conditions are becoming dire.
    • Condición de salud grave en los ancianos y niños pequeños. Hervir agua para matar las diversas baterías y la infestación de parásitos no ha dado resultados. Los números extremos están enfermos y las condiciones se están volviendo terribles.
  • We know that bacteria and parasites are affecting the populations through the water. Every day, the Machiguengas people and visitors use of the water increases health risk increases.  Drinking water contaminated with parasites causes serious health problems, such as severe pain, dysfunction and even leads to death, and this project will prevent that
    • Sabemos que las bacterias y los parásitos están afectando a las poblaciones a través del agua. Todos los días, el uso del agua por parte de las personas y visitantes de Machiguenga aumenta el riesgo de salud aumenta. Beber agua contaminada con parásitos causa serios problemas de salud, como dolor intenso, disfunción e incluso la muerte.

Project Administration

Evan Buckman, Javin Jimenez, Ruben Semperi

Monitoring and Maintenance

Protect Our Water: Communities Take Action (When Government Won’t) for Clean Water
  • Proteja nuestra agua: las comunidades toman medidas (cuando el gobierno no lo hace) por agua limpia

​Our volunteers on the ground will continue to work with and monitor the situation.  Should the need for more filter arise, we will be apprised of this and given ample opportunity to further assist the wonderful peple of the Manu.

Project Funding

This project was funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.  Additional donations will go toward other projects in Peru.