Completed

Minova Water Filter & Training Project - Democratic Republic of Congo

Women's Center - Congo

Our 1st Water Filter Training Project in the Democratic Republic of Congo

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

 

Village of MinovaLocation
Minova, DRC

50 km west of Goma, on the northwest shore of Lake Kivu, in South Kivu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo

Community Description
The village has about 30,000 inhabitants, plus 5,200 internally displaced people in camps (refugees). There are another 30,000 or so in three surrounding villages.

The surrounding area is mountainous, with numerous volcanoes. The volcanic soil is fertile, but does not hold water well.

     War Torn Area

  • For the past 20 years, war has raged throughout the area, mostly over control of natural resources, including coltan.
  • In 2012, Congolese government forces, backed by United Nations troops, fought and lost a major battle with M23 (and perhaps other) militia forces in Goma.
  • Congolese troops retreated to Minova, where besides other destruction and killings, they raped at least 139 women and young girls as young as nine years old.
  • Following an international outcry, a trial of 37 low-ranking soldiers was held in Goma, Dozens of survivors testified.
  • Only two were found guilty of rape.
  • The events and the trial are depicted in the 2015 Academy Awards shortlisted short film The Testimony. http://www.thetestimonyfilm.com/  (It can be seen on Netflix.) Photos from the trial can be seen here: http://www.dianazeynebalhindawi.com/the-minova-rape-trials-congo-2014/

  Woman With Baby   Women Coming Together

  • Almost all the women had been farmers.
  • Most of the husbands of the women who had been raped deserted them, leaving them without funds to send their children to school, or enough labor to tend their fields effectively. Food became scarce, and hunger common.
  • HIV had been relatively uncommon in Minova. However, the war – and rape – brought HIV to the community.
  • A community leader named Masika Katsuva, who was among those raped, stepped forward to help organize a group of the women in agriculture (180 in all), to give them a voice, and to help them come forward at the rape trial. She also set up a center for women and children abandoned by their families.
  • Masika’s story is told in the 2014 feature-length documentary film Seeds of Hope. http://www.seedsofhopefilm.co.uk/ Watch the trailer on the website.
  • Masika’s organization APDUD received significant international support before and during the trial.
  • International support of APDUD fell off significantly after the trial.

In February 2016, Masika died, leaving APDUD in some disarray. Her daughter Desanges hopes to revitalize the organization, and at only 23 years of age, has already done a lot to promote the organization and organize local women.

It is through Masika's women's center organization APDUD, and working with Desanges Kamate Kabua, Congolese NGO leader Herman Chirahambali, and our friends at Friendly Water For The World, that Water Charity will be conducting this support and training in much needed water filters. Herman met Dr. Kambale who does training and work for Friendly Water, and recognized the need for this project immediately.

Problem Addressed
The area is prone to large amounts of waterborne illnesses.  Cholera, dysentery, and a host of other pathogenic microbes pollute all the available water sources, and sickness due to these microbes is a huge problem.  Children under 5 are especially vulnerable to such illnesses. Worldwide it is the 2nd leading cause of death for children, and in the DRC, Diarrheal Diseases are the #1 cause of death (according to the CDC and the WHO)! 

Desanges and kids!Project Description
Water Charity will fund a biosand filter workshop led by trainers Dr. Kambale Musubao and Aristote Lubao Mbairwe (who work with our friends at Friendly Water Congo), for the women of Minova.  At least 35 women will be provided with a 5-6 day training on how to construct, use, and care for their own biosand filters. These filters, when used correctly, can basically last forever... especially the cement mold types we will train them to make. 

We will provide them with a few molds, and materials enough for all of the women to make their own filter.  Manuals and printed training materials will be given out in Swahili, English, French, Kinyarwanda. Furthermore, they will receive business training by which they will build filters, and sell them (as well as water) to the people of the Minova area.  

There will be an office established at the Women's Center whereby the women of the program can advertise and sell their product... and in time, they can even begin to conduct their own trainings to spread the technology.

Funds raised by selling water and filters will go towards purchasing more molds, more materials and more tools.  Filters and water are in high demand, so there is every reason to believe that this effort will be sustainable, effective and successful.  We expect that more women will come wanting to learn how to make these lifesaving devices, and the Women's Center will be happy to share this with them.  Thus, in a short time, the ability to make effective water filters will spread across the region.

All in all, a very sustainable effort with a great deal of positive "ripple effect!"

Project Impact
The project has the potential to help and impact all of the 65,000 plus people in the Minova area (Minova town, refugees, and the 3 neighboring villages).  The direct, immediate beneficiaries include all the families and friends of the women of the Women's center, as well as everyone who purchases a filter or water from them.  This number is hard to pinpoint, but it should amount to 5,000 or more people in the first year alone.

Volunteers Directing Project
Herman and Desanges will be running the project on the ground, and management of the project will be under the direction of David Albert, Board Chairman of Friendly Water for the World, with Water Charity overseeing. 

Herman Chirahambali

  • ​Herman is a former school principal. His career came to his end when soldiers came and occupied his school, destroying all desks and burning all books. His mother was killed when rebels pillaged his village. His sister died of AIDS, the result of war-related rape. His wife died giving birth to his second child, who also died.
  • Today, Herman is a volunteer for a non-profit that teaches environmental stewardship through language. They teach female farmers native literacy classes and also run an after-school English language program for children. They reach hundreds of women and children, yet still struggle to raise the $6.00/month they need to rent their classroom while operating with no computer and only a few books.

Minova Farmer Woman

Desanges Kamate Kabua

  • Daughter of Women's Center founder and current organizer and leader of APDUD.
  • It was her drive to help the families of Minova that led to FW and WC becoming involved in this wonderful project.

Monitoring and Maintenance
Eliphaz Bashilwango (FW representative) will be tasked with reporting, in concert with Herman and Desanges, who will be there on the ground to make sure the project achieves its goals.  Should further training and assistance become necessary, any of these individuals will be able to contact WC & FW and request such aid.

Comments
This noteworthy project is part of our Training and Support Initiative, and is a sister project to our even larger and more comprehensive DRC filter project in Nyiragongo, which is being started promptly. It is our desire to have a continuing and substantial effect on these communities, so expect even more projects of this nature there, including training the women to build rainwater catchments and fero-cement water tanks!

This project has been fully funded by a donor who wishes to remain anonymous.  If you would like to see us expand, scale up and do more projects like this one, use the DONATE button below, and your donation will go to more training projects like this one.  Use the comments if you wish your donation to be used for DRC projects specifically.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

Rape victims group

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Wondo Genet Well Rehab Program - Ethiopia

Fetching water in Wondo Genet

Phase 2 of our Ethiopia Well Rehab ProgramPromoting Transformation and Hope among the Most Marginalized in EthiopiaNPCA & WC LOGOS

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

Non functioning wellLocation
Five villages in the Wondo Genet region of Ethiopia, spread across three Kebeles (counties).  Kube, Wuchale 1, Lomicha, Wuchale 2, and Abosa.

Community Description
Wondo Genet is in the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples' Region (SNNPR) of Ethiopia, about a four-hour drive south of Addis Ababa. It also is part of the Sidama Zone located in the Great Rift Valley.  Wondo Genet is bordered on the south by Malga, on the west by Awasa Zuria, and on the north and east by the Oromia Region. Based on the 2007 Census, this woreda has a total population of 155,715, of whom 79,664 are men and 76,051 women; 23,125 or 14.85% of its population are urban dwellers.

This region has been suffering from an interminable drought, as well as intractable poverty.  As such, they desperately need assistance to meet their basic living requirements.  The people of these 5 villages have wells which have fallen into disrepair, and are currently unusable... thus making their hard lives even harder.

Problem Addressed
A WaSH survey conducted by the district water office shows that there are 60 existing wells that are not functioning and need repair to provide water to the respective communities. To meet demand, 81 new wells need to be constructed.  Studies have shown that operation and maintenance of water supplies fail after a short period of time because of poor operation and lack of effective maintenance. The district water office has no budget for maintenance and cannot effectively provide technical support. Delay or negligence in operation and maintenance of water facilities negatively impacts the wellbeing of the population, forcing them to travel long distances and wait in lengthy queues for potable water.  Many people resort to dangerous undeveloped water sources, most of which amount to nothing more than a muddy pit.  Naturally, this causes severe, and often deadly, health concerns with a high incidence of waterborne illness.

Project Description
This project is to rebuild 5 wells, one in each of 5 villages. 

Gathering water with donkeyWater Charity has initiated the repairs by partnering with local NGOs to drill the wells deeper, replace handpumps, and otherwise enact repairs that will bring water back to the people of these villages.

Our friends at Water is Life International have people on the ground and a substantial infrastructure for doing WaSH work in the region, including a number of well-drilling rigs donated by our partners at Wine to Water.  By partnering with these groups, WC is able to do these projects at a fraction of their normal cost, without having to have our own personnel waste valuable funds in transit.

Before the repair work begins, an intentional process to engage the community and the government is followed in order to avoid a handout-mentality that can create dependency.  After receiving government permission, a Water Use Committee (WUC) has been elected in each community to take responsibility for the use and maintenance of the repaired well.  The WUC is comprised of four women and three men, which ensures that women will have a strong voice and position to manage the well.  The management of the well by the WUC usually includes charging a nominal fee to the users, in order to maintain a fund for repairs.  This fund is then used for maintenance and repairs to keep the pump operational. In this way our repaired wells are unlikely to meet the fate of many such wells in the region, and should be functional far into the foreseeable future.

Gathering water from a streamA productive and functioning well brings joy to the community as it promotes a healthier life, eases the physical burden of the community, and returns time to women (as the duty of fetching and carrying water traditionally falls to them).  It is vital to the sustainability of the well that the community is involved in the project throughout the entire process for design, planning, and implementation of the project.  WaSH training is provided to the WUC so they can become permanent trainers in the community. The idea is improved sanitation and hygiene behaviors within the community, such as Open Defecation Free areas and consistent handwashing, through the hygiene and sanitation training.

Hydrogeological conditions on site indicate that groundwater is in accessible depth (20 to 30 meter below the ground), has adequate hydraulic conductivity and storage volume and good quality.

Project Impact
Approximately 1,500 people will directly benefit from these repairs... as well as anyone who visits these villages.

Project Management
Josh Elliott, of Wine to Water, is providing administrative oversight for these projects.  And Water is Life technicians are managing the implementation and training aspects.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The WUC set up in each village will be responsible for the monitoring and maintenance of their well.  This will be overseen by WiLI personel who will continue to work with the villagers and train their SLT's.

Undeveloped Water SourceComments
As we have more funding for this program, and its parent programs, Water Charity is committed to continuing this work, and hopes to be able to fix all of the broken wells of Wondo Genet eventually.  As such, we ask you to donate generously.  Every dollar raised in excess of the cost of these rehabs will be spent on further rehabs in the region. 

In this program, as with all WC projects, we have used existing funds to start this project immediately. We only ask for donations once projects are already underway. In this way we can be extremely responsive and speedy in delivering aid where it is needed. Even a short delay in implementation can be costly when dealing with waterborne illness. Other charities reverse this, but we feel time is of the essence. In this way, donating to this program is actually reimbursing us for funds we have already allocated.  The more money we have on hand, the more projects like this we can start.

Dollar Amount of Project
$11,000

This project has been fully funded by an anonymous U.S. donor.  To help us provide more programs like this one, please Donate to our Ethiopia Well Rehab Program.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.


Waiting for water

 
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Conclusion of Jon Village School #41 Hygiene Project - Kyrgyzstan

Conclusion of Jon Village School #41 Hygiene Project - Kyrgyzstan

This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Marguerite Leeds. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to improve water access and sanitation at the school.

Conclusion of Jon Village School #41 Hygiene Project - KyrgyzstanA summary of Marguerite’s report is as follows:

Scope of work:
This project was a 50-50 cost share between community sources and Water Charity funds. The community partners were excited to be so deeply invested. Together, Water Charity, the village Government, and community members built an exterior hot-water hand washing station in front of the Jon village school, a 2-shower shower-room, and a hot-water dish-washing station in the school kitchen. Additionally, we gave a training-of-trainers to spread hygiene information within the school and allow effective use of the new infrastructure.

Specific work done:
A septic pit was constructed, a pump was added to the existing on-site water cistern, a small building was constructed to house the showers, an exterior hand-washing station was installed, 2 hot-water heaters were installed, 2 interior sinks were installed for hand and dish washing, and all items were linked together with new, functional pipes.

Conclusion of Jon Village School #41 Hygiene Project - KyrgyzstanAfter completion of the above infrastructure, all teachers from the school were given a tour and training. This training included correct hand washing technique, critical timing for hand washing, discussion of the value of handwashing, distribution of a local-language curriculum (electronic and beautiful published materials) for hand washing promotion, and a schedule for their own in-classroom sessions, monitoring, and evaluation of students to confirm delivery of lessons.

Work progression through each stage: The plan for this project was a very quick construction timeline during the summer break followed by a year-long hygiene promotion program. Unfortunately, construction lasted through the fall semester into the spring. For this reason, the desired program was not provided, but instead substituted with training-of-trainers in March 2017, and schedule for internal monitoring and evaluation. In this way, a lasting and sustainable solution for low-hygiene has been implemented in Jon village.

End Results:
The end result is modern conveniences in accordance with basic sanitation standards. All are in working order and fit local needs and expectations. Everyone in Jon village, especially at the school, is very excited. Simple excitement is already helping to promote hygiene. Better yet, accurate information has been distributed and will be disseminated in a sustainable fashion. The excitement, energy, and values built by this project have lead community leaders to apply for and receive a large ARIS grant for community-wide water infrastructure. In the future, the school project will be hooked up to community water sources ensuring flow and usage of the constructed items.

We are grateful to Marguerite for completing this excellent project.

Conclusion of Jon Village School #41 Hygiene Project - KyrgyzstanConclusion of Jon Village School #41 Hygiene Project - Kyrgyzstan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion of Jon Village School #41 Hygiene Project - KyrgyzstanConclusion of Jon Village School #41 Hygiene Project - Kyrgyzstan

 

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Colombia Lifewater Project - Estacion Villa - Colombia

Colombia Lifewater Project - Estacion Villa - Colombia

This Colombia Lifewater Project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity, the National Peace Corps Association, and Superstar WC Volunteer RPCV Jeremy Mak.

Location
Estacion Villa, Colombia

village woman and waterCommunity Description
Estacion Villa, a small underserved community in Northeast Colombia located at N 10°17,794’ W 74°11.444’. The population is comprised of approximately 375 people from an estimated 45 households that straddle an unpaved dirt road located 35 kilometers from Fundacion Magdalena, the nearest town. Surrounding the village are ranches, but most of the families in the village itself are of modest means and extremely poor. The area was also terrorized and deeply affected by a 10-year period of violent occupation and abusive control by FARC guerrillas.

Signs of poverty are apparent in many forms in Estacion Villa. Several houses are of basic stick framing and mud houses, and some sleep as many as 8 to a room. Secondly, while there is electricity, most houses can afford only very dim ambient light and there is no running water or plumbing in the conventional sense. The majority of households rely on open wood fires for cooking. In terms of employment, several families are landless and struggle to find work. While there is a small primary school, there is little else in terms of public services, programs, or safety nets. Some households resort to temporary jobs on surrounding ranches or migrant work in places like Barranquilla or Fundacion.

POOR Water Quality of Estacion Villa, ColombiaProblem Addressed
One of the village’s biggest problems is water—both in terms of access and quality. Villagers drink contaminated rainwater, but when it is depleted, they rely on consuming unfiltered pond water. Rainwater is collected off corrugate metal roofs and stored in makeshift cisterns and storage containers, mostly located outside of the home. The government delivered 1,000-liter water tanks to households recently, but without proper training on how to install the tanks with fittings or how to correctly place, use, and maintain them, the tanks either are not being optimally utilized or not being used at all.

Moreover, due to their rudimentary design, homemade rainwater collection systems using these tanks and other containers lack “first flush” mechanisms that remove roof contaminants like dust, leaves, and bird droppings. Many water storage containers and tanks are uncovered and exposed to the elements, insects, and animals, further compromising the purity of rainwater with visible pollutants.

In 2006, the government dug an unlined catchment pond (the local names for pond arejaguey and represa) beside the village and installed a gravity-fed water system that delivers water to each house along the main road. The pond has a diameter of about 100 yards, but the depth and water catchment capacity is unknown. The pond--full of microorganisms, fish, and aquatic plants—is unfit for direct consumption. Cattle and roaming animals freely access it, and run-off from cow tracks drain into the pond.

An electric pump draws water up to an uncovered ferro-cement tank. A local told us that it holds 45,000 liters, but our estimate puts its max capacity closer to 10,000 liters, which is then gravity-fed to houses in the street below. The storage capacity of the central tank is relatively low compared to the approximately 45 houses it serves. In comparison, most homes have one or two 1,000 liter tanks.

The water system itself provides no filtration or disinfection/purification, and house pipes have no faucets, but rather are open-ended thin flexible hoses crudely connected to larger PVC feeder mains. The system’s pump is turned on every few days without pre-indication of time, and households must store water whenever it comes. The water that reaches homes has a brownish color to it, and sediment and organic bits of material is dispensed as well.

WATERING CROPSAt focus groups held with female heads of households, all mothers stated that they didn’t boil their water or otherwise filter it first, as no health authority has ever advised them to do so. (Secondly, boiling water would be incredibly labor intensive for those needing to collect firewood, or exorbitantly expensive for those households using gas stoves). Unfortunately, skin infections, hives, and stomach ailments attributed to the water are a widespread problem, which the community has largely been relegated to accepting as a fact of life.

When the jaguey dries up (as it does seasonally), the village relies on trucked water that is delivered at no cost by the government. This water comes from nearby towns of San Angel, Algarobo, Santa Rosa, and Fundacion, but villagers complain of the salty taste. They can buy more palatable river water, but each 40 liters cost 2,000 Colombian pesos (approximately USD 65 cents). Resorting to dirty pond water or trucked and bagged drinking water is becoming more of a constant reality as rains decline and when the jaguey dries. Especially over the past few months, a painful rain shortage has been felt.

Project Description
This project aims to provide all families in Estacion Villa with access to Sawyer Point One household filters, along with training required to install, use, and maintain them. Each filter is long-lasting, incredibly durable, and extremely effective at removing bacteria down to 0.1 microns—the same ones that cause dysentery, diarrhea, E. Coli, cholera, and typhoid. With proper care, they may never need to be replaced. You can see more information on these filters HERE.Assessing the situation

Following a house-to-house verification survey, and a mandatory two-hour long interactive training, we aim to distribute the filters along with hermetic water containers, solar lights, and mosquito nets.

Community Organization
Columbia Lifewater Project

Project Impact
It is anticipated that this project will serve up to an estimated 375 people with a durable solution to clean water for improved health outcomes.

RPCV Directing Project
Jeremy Mak

Monitoring and Maintenance
While the recipients of the filters, solar lamps, and mosquito nets will be responsible for their maintenance, Jeremy and his fiancé will be in contact with and check up on them.  As the villagers will be trained in proper upkeep (backflushing etc.) for their filters, it should be relatively problem-free for many, many years to come.

Comments
A comprehensive collection of pre-project photos can be found HERE.

This project is being led by Gambia RPCV Jeremy Mak, who has successfully completed several water and sanitation projects with Water Charity support over the past 6 years, including Sawyer filter distribution projects in Gambia (2015), and Uganda (2016). You can see previous examples of his Water Charity projects HERE (Gambia) and HERE (Uganda).  This is Jeremy’s first project for Water Charity in Columbia.  All 30 or so pages worth of Jeremy Mak projects can be perused by following this link: http://watercharity.com/Jeremy-Mak.

This project has been funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE

Village Familia
Preparing FILTERS

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Digaly Sanitation Project - Senegal

Digaly Sanitation Project - Senegal

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Diagaly, Communauté rurale Barkedji, Département Linguere, Region Louga, Senegal

Digaly Sanitation Project - SenegalCommunity Description
Diagaly is a small village in the Linguere Region of Senegal. It is 6 km from a major paved road, and is home to about 3,000 residents. The community is strongly defined by its nomadic livestock herding history. Receiving between 190-350 mm of rain per year and daily temperatures reaching 110-115 degrees Fahrenheit on the average day during the months of March-June makes Diagaly a challenging place to live.

The village is made up of two ethnic groups, Wolof and Pulaars. The Pulaar ethnic group is traditionally Nomadic, and in many ways that makes them more vulnerable now. Their living situations often reflect the transient lifestyle they are known for. This often translates into less permanent living structures and reveals the unpredictability of the coming year as they see it.

The Wolof population generally lives in the more compact village center that is much more permanent than their Pulaar neighbors. This means they have more reliable access to water and to the market or small shops.

While the village is relatively remote, it serves as the economic hub for about 13 smaller, surrounding villages. Livestock and subsistence farming dominate the lifestyle. Despite the large population, there is only a public French elementary school and a Franco-Arab school that serves the 8-13-year-old range. After this, students will generally travel to nearby cities to continue their studies while living with friends or family during the school year.

Digaly Sanitation Project - SenegalDuring the rainy season, there is a large influx of people who come to farm or bring herds of cattle up from the south to take advantage of the grazing lands. Diagaly is also home to a Master Farm which is a Peace Corps/USAID project to create pilot farms to serve as educational centers and demonstrate new technologies. This serves the community of Diagaly and the surrounding villages as a place to learn, share, and acquire materials like seeds or vegetable transplants that were previously out of reach for more people. In puts on multiple trainings a year and has open doors to anyone interested in learning or discussing challenges.

Problem Addressed
The Pulaar community has little in terms of permanent infrastructure, which can be traced to their traditionally nomadic lifestyle. This part of the community is largely, if not entirely, without access to latrines and continue the practice of walking out to the bush to relieve themselves. Children, in general, do not walk so far, and relieve themselves just outside of the family compound. This has huge implications for health in the community and puts all at risk. With the extreme heat and arid conditions, diarrheal diseases associated with fecal contamination can quickly lead to dangerous dehydration and potentially death.

Currently, the main educational institutions of Diagaly do not have proper sanitation facilities. The Master Farm, the French School, and the Franco-Arab school are all held back because the people they serve must walk long distances to either find a latrine, or to openly defecate nearby, which endangers others at the educational facilities. The lack of latrines also serves as a barrier to those using these educational facilities. It takes time away from learning as students and teachers leave class for extended periods to go to the bathroom.

Digaly Sanitation Project - SenegalProject Description
This Project will build sanitation facilities at the Master Farm and Franco-Arab school as well as return latrines at the French school to working order.

The Master Farm (which serves about 200 people a year) will build one latrine and one washing stall in the same structure that is connected to a basin.

The Franco-Arab School (which serves about 110 people, including teachers) will build two latrines in one structure that is connected to a single basin. They will also bring a water source to the school, which will include 200 m of piping, a water meter, and a water spout.

The French School (which serves about 250 people, including teachers) will replace 9 wood plank doors, 7 Turkish toilets, some cement repair to the stalls, and 15 m of piping to provide a water source to the latrines.

Each institution is responsible for managing its project. The parent associations of both the French School and Franco-Arab school will work closely with the PCV to create an action plan, hire the mason, acquire materials and oversee the work as it is executed. The pilot farmer from the Master Farm will work with the PCV to follow the same steps as the two schools.

Each institution will also install a Tippy Tap, which is a device made for washing hands. This will be built by a blacksmith in Diagaly and be showcased at these 3 visible locations to encourage washing hands and the spread of the technology.

In the month prior to and following building these facilities, Peace Corps Health Volunteers from the region will help put on trainings that sensitize the community to the issue of open defecation and train each institution on proper maintenance for the latrines.

Project Impact
560 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Adam Keally

Monitoring and Maintenance
This project will include consistent Follow-up, as the PCV works closely with each institution. They will each elect a member of its organization to be responsible and accountable for the maintenance of the latrine. That person will receive training from the Peace Corps Health Volunteers and the mason on how to maintain a clean, functioning latrine.

Let Girls Learn
Girls are more widely affected by the lack of sanitation facilities, making it a bigger barrier to their education and equality in the long run. Having clean, functioning latrines with running water will help remove barriers that keep girls out of school. Girls are significantly more likely to drop out of school than boys in Diagaly, making it important to address the obstacles they face.

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it does fall into Water Charity's LGL+ grouping of projects that have a pronounced element involving helping girls go to, and stay in, school.

Fundraising Target
$1,200

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$1,200

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the G3 Foundation, of Costa Mesa, CA, USA.

Additional donations will be used for future projects in Senegal.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

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Agnam Tonguel Water System Project - Senegal

Agnam Tonguel Water System Project - Senegal

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Agnam Tonguel Water System Project - SenegalLocation
Agnam Tonguel, Podor District, St. Louis Region, Senegal

Community Description
Agnam Tonguel is a rural community situated along the national route N2, between the larger cities of Taredji and Ndioum. It is primarily a farming community, using a tributary to the Senegalese River to irrigate the fields and relying on rice and vegetable production for economic security. Being in the region of Podor, the environment is incredibly arid.

The people of Agnam have always presented their largest challenge as access to water. There is water for farming in the form of a tributary, one kilometer away, but no source of it locally aside from well water. The water table is not deep, and fortunately local wells are abundant (9 total).

Problem Addressed
Consistent need has been expressed and demonstrated for an improved water system, coming in the form of running water at local faucets. The current water sources are not adequate for multiple reasons. Primarily, the wells remain uncovered. This exposes wells to contamination, via bird droppings, trash, or buckets/ropes that are lost into the wells. Women pull water two to three times per day, typically in incredible heat. The demanding physical labor inherent in pulling water commodifies water in the village.

There is a purely economic usage of water in the village. It is for bathing, drinking, and ritual washing, but there is no water for critical health activities, such as handwashing with soap, and microfarming, in the form of gardens and agroforestry.

The local health post, used by villagers for check-ups, health talks, and delivery of babies, has no running water. This presents unique challenges in promoting effective health behaviors. Doctors and health extension workers cannot wash their hands before or after working with clients, and running water isn't available for delivery. This makes the procedures far more prone to complications.

The site of the future mosque also has a need for running water, as it is the site of daily ritual washing. The mosque is also an economic force in the village, which will be able to provide access to running water for families who do not have individual faucets.

Agnam Tonguel Water System Project - SenegalProject Description
This project is to provide running water to 25 compounds, the health structure, and site of the future mosque.

The project includes the installation of the main pipeline, terminal points at the compounds, faucets for the health structure and mosque, and counters to measure water usage.

The new Agnam Tonguel main line will tap into a major water line, running along the N2 highway and coming from the Mboyo Djeri pump-house, less than 2 km east. Mboyo Djeri has given full approval for Agnam Tonguel to use this water source, and a one-time fee of 50,000 CFA was paid in early 2016 for access to the water in the east side of the village.

The new main pipeline of Agnam Tonguel will be PVC pipe, 110 cm in diameter, which is sufficient to provide an adequate water flow for the entire village to be outfitted with faucets.

A trench fitting this large pipeline will be built by a professional digging team and aided by village volunteers. The trench will extend 550 meters from the access point near the highway, through the heart of the village and finishing slightly up slope at a cluster of compounds. Agnam Tonguel volunteer diggers will also create two smaller trenches, one leading to the health structure and one to the mosque site, of 100 meters and 50 meters respectively, as part of their in-kind labor contribution. These two branching trenches will be fitted with smaller pipes for the two individual public faucets.

Agnam Tonguel Water System Project - SenegalAfter pipes are lowered into the earth and connections are established and proven to be effective, the professional team and Agnam volunteer team will cover the subterranean pipe network. The large pipe will be capped at its terminal point, near the northern edge of the village.

The master plumber will provide private faucets in compounds that have cash prepared at the time of initial install, although these individual pipes are not to be paid for with project funds. The plumber will continue to maintain communication and work in the village, as individual families accumulate enough money to pay for their branches.

The village is providing the land for the project, and will pay nearly half of the master plumber's fee and the fee of the work supervisor. The homes along the main road of Agnam have also agreed to host the laborers for the extent of their work in village, where they will be provided three meals a day. Finally, a large sheep will be offered by the village, in proportion to the size of the project, to be sacrificed and eaten at the inception of the digging, as is tradition in nearly all Muslim communities.

Workshops will be given on the storage of water, handwashing, and water treatment for drinking, as well as the economic benefits of farming.

Project Impact
Over 2,000 people will benefit from this project, including 275 in individual compounds, and the people who attend the public facilities.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Conor Byrnes

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community has plans in place to pay for their individual water bills, along with those faucets which will be open to the public. This will ensure that funds are available to maintain and repair the improvements.

Fundraising Target
$2,800

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$2,800

Total Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the G3 Foundation, of Costa Mesa, CA, USA.

Additional donations will be allocated to the Senegal Country Fund for use in the next Peace Corps project.

This project has bee completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

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Shkolla 9-vjeçare Rubik Bathroom Project - Albania

Shkolla 9-vjeçare Rubik Bathroom Project - Albania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

100 Water Projects Program - AlbaniaLocation
Rubik, Mirditë District, Lezhë County, Albania

Community Description
Rubik is a municipality located in the mountainous Mireditë District, in the central-north of Albania, along a national roadway which links Tirana/Lezhë County with Rrëshen/Kukes County and the new Albanian-Kosovo Highway. Surrounding Rubik are eleven villages: Fang, Katund i Vjeter, Bulshizë, Rasfik, Fierzë, Munaz, Rreja e Velës, Livadhëza, Vau Shkjezë, Rrethi i Eperm, Bulgër, and Rreja e Zezë. Roughly 3,500 people reside in Rubik, most of whom work as teachers, own small family businesses, farm, or travel to a nearby town to work as local government officials.

Only one road, about two kilometers long, runs through this small town. Both sides of the road are lined with cafés, small businesses, apartment buildings, and fruit/vegetable stands. At the south end of the road is Kishё e Shelbuemit (the Church of the Ascension, in English). Rubik is also made up of one health center, one soccer field, countless gardens, one high school, one kindergarten, and one 9-year school.

The 9-year school is where the project will take place. Without fail, visitors from other towns comment on the cleanliness and beauty of the building. Approximately 280 students attend school, one third of which are from the neighboring villages, with a staff of about 20. Students and staff members, like the rest of the community, are closely integrated and bound in love or friendship. Proud locals boast about the town’s camaraderie, with good reason.

The students experience a positive, open learning environment; however, this project will address the issues associated with safety and health. Although the 9-year school is clean and presentable, it houses a deplorable bathroom due to lack of funding. Students, especially adolescent female students, are deterred from using the bathroom facilities and as a result, feel unsafe, feel embarrassed, and are more likely to skip school or become less hygienic.

100 Water Projects Program - AlbaniaProblem Addressed
Shkolla 9-vjeçare Rubik is the only 9-year school in Rubik. The building is also required to be open after school hours, during the weekend, and during winter/spring/summer break to be used as Rubik’s community center. Shkolla 9-vjeçare Rubik is a two-floor building with one bathroom located in the south wing of each floor (2 bathrooms total).

The condition of the 2nd floor bathroom is acceptable; however, the condition of the first floor bathroom is deplorable. The first-floor bathroom includes two small rooms, for students, with four toilet stalls in each room and one small private room, for teachers, with one toilet. The issues associated with the bathroom are as follows.

- Safety and Privacy: None of the stalls have doors or curtains and neither of the student bathrooms have a sign to designate which stalls are to be used by boys and which stalls are to be used by girls. Female students usually do not use this bathroom for fear of a male student or teacher entering the room. Because of this, students and teachers are forced to use the bathrooms in pairs – one person uses the bathroom, while the other person stands as a “look out” to ensure no one enters the stall being used.

- Hygiene: After using the toilet, none of the students or teachers are able to wash their hands. Of the five total sinks, only one is able to provide water. The one working sink leaks large amounts of water onto the tile floor and creates a slipping hazard for all who enter the room. The bathrooms are also missing soap dispensers, towels, and trash cans.

- Sanitation: Two of the nine toilets have a functional flusher cistern. The other toilets are used and sometimes flooded with urine or feces. Not only does this situation create an unpleasant smell throughout the south wing, anyone who uses the bathroom is at risk of becoming ill.

Other Safety Concerns: The glass windows of all three rooms are broken, none of the ceiling lights work in any of the three rooms, and exposed electrical wires hang at the entrance of teacher’s bathroom.

- School Attendance: Because students, specifically girls entering the age of puberty, do not feel comfortable with using the bathrooms at school, these students often go home to use the bathroom. Although some students do return to school, far too many stay home. Consequently, students miss an average of about eight classes per week. By addressing these issues, we will create a clean and safe environment that the community of Rubik will be proud of.

Shkolla 9-vjeçare Rubik Bathroom Project - AlbaniaProject Description
The goal of this project is to restore the main bathroom of Rubik’s 9-year school, promote healthy living, and join the Let Girls Learn mission.

The project will be completed with the help of the local government hall, students, parents, school staff members, and community members. Rubik is currently governed under the Rreshen Bashkia, who has agreed to supply the work labor needed for this project. The necessary materials will be acquired with the help of Water Charity. Together, we will accomplish the following objectives:

- Bathroom Renovation: Local professionals will repair five sinks, replace the light fixtures, restore the broken glass windows, remodel the toilet stalls’ concrete entrances, install doors for all eight toilet stalls, add toilet paper holders to each stall, replace two Turkish toilets, and repair seven flusher cisterns.

- Let Girls Learn/Health Education: Each class of students will participate in interactive health lessons lead by local health professionals and Peace Corps Volunteers. The lessons will initiate discussions about proper hand washing techniques, anti-flu practices, the importance of privacy, respect for public property, and respect for peers. Extra classes will be provided for girls who want to learn about menstruation.

- Community Development: Students will create posters with positive health messages for the community. Parents will help paint and clean whatever is necessary for the renovation.

Community members offered to donate hand-washing supplies. School staff will help deliver health lessons throughout the year to remind students about the importance of hygiene and respect. Involving the community in this project will build local trust and pride.

Project Impact
281 students and 20 school staff members will directly benefit from the project. Others in the community will benefit during the time the school is used as a community center.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jordan Arvayo

Monitoring and Maintenance
To ensure sustainability of the project components, a continuous education lesson plan is incorporated. After the renovation, before being able to use the facilities, students and school staff will participate in mandatory education session as described above. For those who are not able to attend the sessions, students will create summary posters to display around several areas in the community.

The school staff will collaborate and be responsible for the upkeep of the bathroom area. On school days, cleaning staff will empty the trash cans in the morning and mop the floors at the end of the school day. Teachers ad Teacher Aides will monitor the bathroom during the breaks, between classes. After school hours, on the weekends, and during holiday breaks, when the building is being used as a community center, the Community Center Administrator will inherit responsibility for the maintenance of the bathroom.

Let Girls Learn
Girls are reluctant to continue their schooling when toilets and washing facilities are not safe, not private, or not clean. Usually, uneducated girls fall into a cycle of poverty and inequality. By providing better sanitation services in school, we protect every girl's right to receive an education and build a bright future for themselves.

The renovation of the bathroom, paired with the education component, will provide a multitude of benefits for the female students of Shkolla 9-vjeçare Rubik.

Girls will obtain a safer, more private, clean facility. The running water, trash cans, toilet paper holders, toilets, and sinks will allow every girl to practice good hygiene before, during, and after menstruation.

In addition to the lessons about hygiene and respect, an opportunity will be given to all female students to participate in discussions about the menstrual cycle. These discussions will describe why menstruation happens, how to maintain good hygiene, what to do if menstruation begins during a school day, fears about menstruation, and why it is important to attend school.

This Let Girls Learn project is inspired by Water Charity's Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide, which encourages girls to remain in school. This project is also part of the 100 Water Projects Program - Albania.

Fundraising Target
$2,000

Donations Collected to Date
$2,000

Dollar Amount Needed

$0 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the Robert Victor Sager and Beatrice Mintz Sager Foundation.

Additional donations will be used for other projects in Albania.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Shkolla 9-vjeçare Rubik Bathroom Project - AlbaniaShkolla 9-vjeçare Rubik Bathroom Project - Albania

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Miguel Aleman Water Project - Mexico

Miguel Aleman Water Project - Mexico

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Miguel Aleman Water Project - MexicoLocation
Miguel Aleman, Chiapas, Mexico

Community Description
The community of Miguel Aleman, population 330, is located west of the town of Belisario Dominguez. The 58 homes are scattered along the steep slopes on either side of a small seasonal river.

Families in Miguel Aleman raise corn, beans, squash and chickens to sustain their families while small scale coffee farming has traditionally offered them a nominal yearly income. However, the widespread failure of the coffee crop in Chiapas and Guatemala for the last 4 years has left them struggling to survive the loss of what for many was their only source of income. This has caused more immigration of men out of the community to find work while the women are left to maintain the household without the ease of having water on demand.

Problem Addressed
In the fall of 2005, Hurricane Stan caused extreme flooding and landslides that destroyed many sections of what had been a well-functioning water system comprised of galvanized steel pipe that had served the community for many years.

The families affected do not have the means to purchase the materials needed to repair it themselves given the poverty in which they live. To date, like so many communities affected by the disaster of 2005, their multiple requests for help from the municipal government have not resulted in assistance from the local or state authorities. The prolonged situation has been a source of much difficulty and aggravates the challenges of maintaining families while living in poverty.

Project Description
This project is to restore water to the community by replacing and upgrading the water line that was lost in the Hurricane Stan disaster.

The original source of water for the community comes from a mountain nearby and is clean with good flow even at the end of the dry season. The distribution tank was undamaged by the hurricane. Long sections of pipe are still in place, held up by solid concrete supports in many places. What remains to be fixed are multiple sections where the pipe washed away in the flood.

Miguel Aleman Water Project - MexicoThis project proposes to provide the members of the water committee with the materials they need and the technical help necessary to repair these gaps and to re-establish the flow of the water to the community. Instead of replacing the expensive lost pipe with more of the same, we are opting to install more flexible and less costly 2" hose which will make it possible for the community to install and maintain it themselves without requiring special machined parts. One section will use PVC pipe where the line crosses the river and heavy hose would not be a viable material to use. In the event that one day the section of PVC pipe should need to be replaced, the cost would be within reach of the community if each family were to contribute a small amount.

Project Impact
All of the 330 members of the community will benefit from this project.

Project Manager
The project will be administered by Tamara Brennan, Ph.D. with technical supervision provided by Francisco Barrios. Both are from the non-profit Sexto Sol Center for Community Action.

Monitoring and Maintenance
Technical direction, logistical help, monitoring and maintenance will be provided by Sexto Sol.

Fundraising Target
$2,900

Donations Collected to Date
$2,900

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of Michael and Carla Boyle, of Nelsonville, OH, USA.

Any additional donations will be directed toward new projects in Mexico.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

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Miguel Aleman Water Project - MexicoMiguel Aleman Water Project - Mexico

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Bassar Borehole Repair Project - Togo

Bassar Borehole Repair Project - Togo

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
District of Bassar, Kara Region, Togo

Bassar Borehole Repair Project - TogoCommunity Description
Bassar is a relatively large district in the West Kara Region of Togo. There are two larger towns, Bassar and Kabou, and all other villages are rural, agrarian, and more impoverished.

The community has selected 8 pumps in the district to repair in a variety of communities. One pump was chosen in both Bassar and Kabou; the neighborhoods that utilize those pumps have combined close to 4,500 inhabitants. These areas are very densely populated and the mechanical stress on each pump affects water security for the entire community. When one pump is poorly functioning, there is a significant increase in mechanical stress on the surrounding pumps, increasing also their likelihood of mechanical problems.

The remaining 6 pumps are in a variety of rural communities. The total population in these villages is around 10,000. 3 villages are 3-20 kilometers from Kabou, the remaining 3 are 2-57 kilometers from Bassar.

In the Canton of Kabou, two villages are very agrarian, have a combined population of around 2,500 and are only accessible by motorcycle. One of these villages has no functioning pump at all, and water is only available in a neighboring village 2 kilometers away or in a nearby river. The other has only one poorly functioning pump, and the next closest pump is in Kabou 3 kilometers away.

The remaining village has is agrarian but accessible by car, incredibly motivated, and has a population of around 1,500. The community has both many corn and yam fields, but also has many self-guided gardens surrounding the pump, as well as very successful and organized animal husbandry practices. They have an incredible understanding of nutrition and health considering their generally low level of education, and have taken many steps as a community to improve their health and quality of life. They have two pumps, one functioning the other functioning poorly, the one functioning poorly located next to the elementary school and surrounded by their community garden.

Bassar Borehole Repair Project - TogoIn the Canton of Bassar, there is a wider variety in both distance from Bassar and primary populations using the pumps chosen for repair. There is one pump in a village of about 3,500 people, about 2 kilometers from Bassar. The pump is centrally located and is used much more than the other pumps as a result of its location. The second pump is at an elementary school in a neighboring village. There are close to 1,000 students who attend the elementary school, all of whom use the pump, but it is also used by the surrounding neighborhood, with a population of around 500 people.

The final and farthest pump is 57 kilometers from Bassar, has a population of about 1,000 people, and has only one, very poorly functioning pump. The nearest village is 7 kilometers away, but there is a river that runs directly through the village. Unfortunately, as a result of this, the rates of waterborne diseases are very high and the village is 7 kilometers from their closest health clinic as well. Because they are among the more impoverished villages included in this year’s projects, many of these diseases go untreated, and morbidity and mortality is unnecessarily high.

There is also a population of migratory people who live in the forests surrounding this village who have access to the pump. The population of this community is changing, but it is estimated to be around 100 people at any given time. While they don't live in the village itself, they would directly benefit from the pump repairs as well.

Problem Addressed
Togo is a developing country in West Africa, and as such struggles with high rates of (1) disease, (2) food insecurity, and (3) gender inequality. While some connections are more direct, pump repairs will have an impact on all three of these major development impairments in the Bassar District of Togo.

Two of the villages selected this year rely almost exclusively on river water and are two or more kilometers from their closest health clinic. Northern Togo also has much poorer sanitation practices than in the South. In some of the villages selected this year, there are no latrines present at all. Open defecation coupled by poor access to water increases the transmission of many diarrheal diseases. In Togo, diarrheal diseases are one of the largest causes of infant and childhood morbidity and mortality.

Food insecurity is more of an issue in Northern Togo as well. The rains are less frequent than down south, and as a result of this in many northern villages fruits and vegetables are only readily available for a fraction of the year. This sparsity of nutrients results in much higher rates of malnutrition in these communities. Poor nutrition has been shown to decrease the ability of our immune system to fight disease as well as poor performance academically.

Bassar Borehole Repair Project - TogoGender inequality is also a major problem throughout Togo. Women and girls are commonly the only people who get water, sometimes kilometers away for each basin of water. Northern Togo also generally has larger family sizes, which correlates directly with number of basins required each day. Because this responsibility, as well as all other household responsibilities, falls on women and girls, their autonomy is significantly decreased.

Of the 8 pumps selected, 5 are very poorly functioning. 4 of them have another pump within 1 kilometer, whereas the fifth is the only pump in the village. Two of the pumps are not functional at all, and they are both the only pump in the village. The last is a complete installation of all mechanical pieces, although the hole has been dug and water has already been found.

Project Description
This project is to rehabilitate 8 boreholes in the Bassar Region.

The Togo | Clean Water Project is an ongoing initiative in Northern Togo, started almost 10 years ago. It is a collaboration between Peace Corps Volunteers and the Bassar Community Water Committee.

A Peace Corps official counterpart was identified, Kader, who is a hydraulics engineer. He started working very closely with the volunteers in the area and has since developed a team of hard working and trustworthy mechanics. The team is made up of 5 mechanics, Kader, and the volunteers in the area who are participating in the project that year. Since its beginning, Kader and his team have fixed hundreds of pumps in the region.

The Togo | Clean Water Project is a multifaceted approach to improving each of the three struggles discussed above, accomplishing more than the simple repair of the pumps. All villages selected have an existing and functioning water committee, that meets regularly and collects money from the community. They must keep in contact with the mechanics so they can do biannual maintenance, reducing the likelihood of large and expensive repairs in the future. Because the team of mechanics live in the same region, this creates sustainability long after the repair is completed.

Each pump is visited by the Volunteer and the two main pump mechanics prior to the start of the project. For each pump the mechanics determine its depth, and the number of pipes required to sufficiently maintain water access. All of the pumps will get brand new piping and mechanical parts, but only one will get a completely new pump head.

As for details of the repairs themselves, seven of the pumps will have everything replaced except for the external head and hand lever.

  • Pump 1: Depth is 45 meters, complete restoration of pump Mechanics
  • Pump 2: Depth is 45 meters, complete restoration of pump Mechanics
  • Pump 3: Depth is 30 meters, complete restoration of pump Mechanics
  • Pump 4: Depth is 45 meters, installation of new pump
  • Pump 5: Depth is 36 meters, complete restoration of pump Mechanics
  • Pump 6: Depth is 48 meters, complete restoration of pump Mechanics
  • Pump 7: Depth is 30 meters, complete restoration of pump Mechanics
  • Pump 8: Depth is 36 meters, complete restoration of pump mechanics

While the mechanics do the physical pump repairs, the team of Volunteers leads a community-wide education/training session with a local language translator. One component is health specific in which hand washing, water storage and food preparation techniques are discussed. Diarrheal diseases, their effects on the community, and the relative burden felt in the region of Togo are discussed. The importance of soap, or ash if soap is not easily available, is discussed. The impact of hygiene on health, including the health of others, particularly children, is discussed. The last component of this portion of the training is a physical demonstration of the proper hand washing techniques.

The Volunteers also talk about nutrition in respect to food security, the importance of a variety of fruits, vegetables, and meats for everyone, and the positive effects of good nutrition and overall health. The development of gardens and the use of plants with high nutritional impact, such as Moringa, are discussed.

Each community is also given 20-30 Moringa saplings to plant around each pump. This is for added nutritional value, but also can be used as a source of income for the communities which they can put towards future pump repairs.

The final component of the Volunteer training is regarding gender equality. A skit is performed which highlights the difference in workload between girls and boys, and the overall effect that has on their academic performance. After the Volunteers finish the skit itself, the head pump mechanic talks to the communities in local language about the long-term effects this disparity has on families, but also the communities as a whole. He is very passionate about gender work in Togo, and we have found that communities are more engaged in these discussions when it comes from him as opposed to the Volunteers. He is a very strong asset to the project, both in the physical repairs of the pumps as well as his passion for these issues.

Project Impact
15,000 people will benefit from the project

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Marguerite Clougherty

Monitoring and Maintenance
The final stage of the pump project is follow-up. Three months following each repair, the pumps are visited by Kader, the other head mechanic, and the primary Volunteer. They check to make sure the pumps are still in good condition and working properly, as well as check in with the water committee to ensure they are still collecting money for maintenance visits. In the event a pump is not working, the mechanics repair it again free of charge for the first year. If the pump is working, the mechanics will revisit each pump every six months for bi-annual maintenance and a check-

Each village collects money either by the basin or by person per month. This ensures they have money for the maintenance visits as well as for future repairs should the pump break again.

Let Girls Learn
It is very challenging for some women to have time for income-generating activities, and it is very challenging for girls to have ample time to study and excel in school. These are two major factors in the delayed development of all of the communities.

While this is not an official Peace Corps Let Girls Learn project, we have designated it Let Girls Learn Plus, as it carries with it the same goals, objectives, and methodologies to create conditions that make it easier for girls to start and remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$6,700

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$6,700

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been fully funded by an anonymous donor.  

Additional donations will go to other projects in Togo.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE

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Sithian Siring School Bathroom Project - Senegal

Sithian Siring School Bathroom Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Sithian Siring, Department of Dabo, Kolda Region, Senegal

Community Description
Sithian Siring is located in the region of Kolda in the southern part of Senegal. The ecoregion classification is known as the Guinean Forest Savanna Mosaic characterized by alternating regions of dense forest and secondary savannas.

The climate is hot and humid, with average maximum temperatures above 86°F throughout the year. Rainfall is usually over 60 inches to the far south.

This region predominantly consists of subsistence farmers who derive their income primarily through farming. The main ethnic group are the Fula people which are known mainly as herdsmen and have only recently been involved in traditional agriculture practices.

Sithian Siring is located nearly 8 km from the national road which provides the main economic opportunities for the area.

The population is around 145 people, varying slightly during times when children go away from school and dry season when younger males leave to work in larger cities. The main cereal groups grown are sorghum and corn, with groundnuts being grown as a cash crop.

Problem Addressed
The primary school is located between the villages of Sithian Mamadou Giro and Sithian Siring. Students from both villages attend the school, servicing approximately 75 students. There is not a proper bathroom, so sanitation is nearly impossible without students and teachers taking valuable time to go back to the village to use the restroom.

Sithian Siring School Bathroom ProjectProject Description
This project is to build a bathroom at the school.

The project will be carried out under the direction of the Sithian Siring Women's Group, working with school administration. They have already helped clear and prepare the land.

For the building materials it was decided that concrete blocks would provide the most solid structure. The doors will be made from metal, as wood quickly deteriorates.

The basic design, using a squat toilet, will ensure functionality and longevity. A tippy tap hand washing station will be simple, familiar and long lasting.

The mason has been contacted and the site is already determined. The plans have been developed and all work has been planned.

Water Charity funds will pay for the materials. These will be purchased by the Peace Corps Volunteer. Transportation of the materials to the construction site has been arranged.

With timing at the end of rainy season, rain delays could pose a potential challenge but even in rain, the construction will be completed in a timely and professional manner.

Project Impact
The project will benefit 75 students.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jacob Watson

Monitoring and Maintenance
The latrine will be monitored and maintained by school staff.

This project has been funded by a donor who chooses to remain anonymous.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

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