$5,001 to $10,000

Los Laureles Water Project - Mexico

Los Laureles Water Project - Mexico

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Los Laureles Water Project - MexicoLocation
Barrio Los Laureles, Chiapas, Mexico

Community Description
Barrio Los Laureles neighborhood is located on the far southwestern edge of the Motozintla river valley. Even though the pipe that brings water from the high country to tens of thousands of homes in the city passes through their streets, they have been told by the water authority that it is impossible for them to have access to it. For reasons no one quite knows, Los Laureles does not appear in the city register. This is why years of trying to get help has led to excuses by the authorities, who claim that their hands are tied.

Los Laureles is home to 56 households with 293 inhabitants. Thirteen homes are headed by women, some with small children and others comprised of elderly widows who live alone with no support from family members who have moved away. The standard of living is poor, with men working in Motozintla as laborers in construction or other itinerant work. Some women wash clothes by hand for families in the city, a job that pays very little.

Located about a half-hour walk from the center of town, fare on local transportation is a major expense when children go to high school. As a result of their poverty, they do not have the means to purchase the materials they need to replace the old water line and extend it higher up the canyon to a better source of water.

Los Laureles Water Project - MexicoThe neighbors are well organized and have a community gathering place where they hold meetings. They report enjoying good relations among the families, which is apparent when visiting them. The water committee has a designated person called the "fontonero" whose job it is to maintain the water system and make sure that each family is properly conserving the water.

Problem Addressed
The people live next to the river where other water associations have large hoses that take what little water there is in the dry months to other neighborhoods in other parts of the valley. They have survived by obtaining water with their own hose that was originally put in place decades ago. But now the hose is so deteriorated that it no longer serves them. Their hose crosses over the river, and up to now, they have simply hung it over an old tree and let it hang the 150 or so meters to where it reaches the other side.

During the rainy season, given the extreme weather that is more common in recent years, flashfloods have ripped the hose away many times requiring them to have to replace the expensive hose. The men have noticed that the tree is decaying and will not withstand the weight much longer.

A major deforestation project 30 years ago damaged the watershed causing what had always been perennial springs to dry up. With the rainy season just over, the families that form Los Laureles water association are worried about how they will survive the coming dry months when only a trickle of water runs down the wide river bed of hot, dry rocks and sand.

It's not easy keeping a home and family without water especially when the wind whips up the dry riverbed and deposits a fine dusting of sand on everything. When the rains stop, you cannot raise tomatoes or chilies in your patio or plant fruit bearing bushes to add nutrition to your children's diet. The chayote plants that provide so much to eat in the summer dry up in a matter of days when the rain stops coming.

Los Laureles Water Project - MexicoProject Description
This project is to build a water system for the community.

The line will be extended to total of 3 kilometers up the canyon, and the old hose will be replaced. This will allow them to reach a better place in the river where they can dig a deep pool from which they will take up the water.

They have determined that the best way to secure the hose as it crosses the wide riverbed will be to build 4 strong concrete and rebar columns that will sustain the weight of the hose when full of water while also withstanding floods during the rainy season. They will reinforce it with a strong steel cable that will support the hose as it hangs between the columns.

A more effective "pichancha", the filter that keep debris from clogging the hose that is placed in the river at the source, will be built. Typically, people use an old plastic bottle that they poke holes into with a hot nail and then strap to the end of the hose. Sexto Sol's design for a more effective filter is made of PVC parts that are available locally. It has been used successfully in other water projects saving communities much labor from having to unclog the line.

The community has many years of experience organizing work crews and working cooperatively for the benefit of the neighborhood. The people say they are ready to work together to get this work completed quickly.

Los Laureles Water Project - MexicoProject Impact
293 people will benefit from the project. There is also an elementary school in the community.

Project Director
The project will be administered by Tamara Brennan, Ph.D. of The Sexto Sol Center for Community Action, an award-winning non-profit that has had a permanent presence in the region since 1997.

This project is the 13th water system project in the ongoing Sierra Madre Water Program, a comprehensive effort to improve water access in the underserved and impoverished Sierra Madre de Chiapas region of Mexico, spanning the border with Guatemala.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The water committee will monitor the functioning of the system, and perform maintenance and repairs. Sexto Sol will periodically check to ascertain that the system is working properly.

Fundraising Target
$6,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$6,900

Los Laureles Water Project - MexicoLos Laureles Water Project - Mexico

Los Laureles Water Project - Mexico

Los Laureles Water Project - MexicoLos Laureles Water Project - Mexico

 

Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Mxxxxxx B Borehole Project - Tanzania

Mxxxxxx B Borehole Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Mxxxxxx B Borehole Project - TanzaniaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Mxxxxxx B, Masasi District, Mtwara Region, Tanzania

Community Description
The community of Mxxxxxx consists of two separate villages, Mxxxxxx A and Mxxxxxx B. Within these two villages is a primary school, two shops, and about 900 homes. Most of the community members are subsistence farmers whose yearly income is once a year from cashew sales to the government.

It is an amazing community, where the people gladly help and take care of each other. Most go to the farm around 4:30 in the morning due to the heat of the day. Even with the harsh savanna tropical climate they always find a reason to be cheerful and have fun.

Problem Addressed
The region experiences a fairly short rainy season from December till April. During the remaining 7 months, there is very little rain and the current shallow well does not fulfill the communities water needs.

Many community members are forced to purchase water from a neighboring village over 10km away at an expensive price. It is very common during the dry season for community members to be passing out due to heat exhaustion and lack of water consumption.

Mxxxxxx B Borehole Project - TanzaniaProject Description
This project is to drill a borehole in Mxxxxxx B.

In early October of 2017 the community members of Mxxxxxx had a team of water engineers from the Ruvuma Basin Drilling Company come and use the electric copper wire method for finding water. The data found two locations with an abundance of water that are located 30 yards outside of the village center. Both locations have an estimated drilling depth of 70m.

The engineers have purposed using a DTH (Air Hammer) method for digging. Because of the thickness of the aquifers and main use of the boreholes, the final borehole diameter should be no less than 5”.

The drilling, testing, and installation of the pump will be done by the drilling company, in accordance with the location, depth, and improvements approved by the community.

Purchase/transportation of materials, building of a concrete water catchment basin, and regular maintenance and upkeep will be done by the community under the direction of Mxxxxxx Water Conservation (MWC), a water conservation group formed in the village.

Mxxxxxx B Borehole Project - TanzaniaProject Impact
3,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
M. Valenti

Monitoring and Maintenance
The drilling and installation company will conduct a multi-day seminar on proper routine well maintenance as well as help the village create a maintenance schedule.

MWC will be in charge of collecting 50 Tanzanian Shillings per bucket, to be saved for use on the routine maintenance, as well as to have available for repairs. The goal of the money collection is to eventually save enough to build a pump well at the second location.

The community has also taken the lead on planning and fundraising for this project, amounting to about 25% of the project cost, in order to take ownership of the pump. The Shillings will be recorded into a ledger daily that will also be used to show daily well use. The community has also explored several other options about obtaining water and know how serious of an issue their lack of water is.

Let Girls Learn
The new water pump is located a lot closer than the shallow well or other areas where water is found. The bulk of the water gathering duties, at home and at school, will still fall on the girls. However, the proximity of the well and the abundance of water will allow the girls to spend more time in the classroom.

Fundraising Target
$5,600

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,600

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Solar-Powered Borehole and Water System Project - The Gambia

Solar-Powered Borehole and Water System Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Kxxxxxxxx, Jarra West, The Gambia

Solar-Powered Borehole and Water System Project - The GambiaCommunity Description
Jarra Kxxxxxxxx is an ethnically Mandinka village in the Lower River Region of The Gambia. The population of the village is ~1,200 people. There are 52 compounds total in the village, and that number is on the rise.

The village also houses a Lower Basic School, where many young school children attend daily to learn. Around 300 students from ages 4 to 12 attend this school.

Problem Addressed
Kxxxxxxxx's water source is powered by a Government powered grid system, which is extremely inconsistent. In theory, this tap-system is supposed to provide water to the village in the mornings and evenings. Unfortunately, this is nowhere near the case with the village’s tap- system.

The village has gone without water for over two weeks on multiple occasions. This event leads to a course of unfortunate events, including students leaving school early due to lack of water, and people drinking from uncovered wells, which leads to increased cases of diarrhea throughout the community.

With the implementation of this project, the hope is that the village community won’t worry about where to go when there is no water available in the village. In addition, kids will no longer be sent home early and miss class because they have no access to such a vital component of life, such as water.

Solar-Powered Borehole and Water System Project - The GambiaProject Description
The project will be to erect and install a solar-powered 4½" x 25-40m borehole system within the village of Kxxxxxxxx. Upon completion, the water system will include a borehole well, 3 taps at major junctions throughout the community, 4 solar panels, and one 4,000L water tank. This will provide clean water to all the compounds in the village, as well as to Kxxxxxxxx’s Lower Basic School students.

By installing a solar powered tap system, it ensures that even when electricity doesn’t come villagers can still gain access to a clean source of water and students in Kxxxxxxxx don’t have to leave school due to the lack of clean water. Every human being should have consistent access to clean water, as it is so essential to daily life all over the world.

A contractor from the capital city named, Water Point will be responsible for this contract. They will be called upon to drill the well, install the borehole and erect the solar panels and tank system.

Water Charity funds will be used for labor, materials, supplies, and transportation.

The villagers in Jarra Kxxxxxxxx plan on investing heavily in the success of this project. First of all, they will raise a portion of the money for the project on their own. In addition, many of the villagers will assist in the labor. Many have experience working with concrete, plumbing and electrical work.

In addition, the villagers will form a water committee, which will work to raise a water fund to ensure money in case the pump needs repairs in the future.

Project Impact
1,200 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
R. Khan

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community is heavily invested into making sure this project stays around for a very long time. To ensure sustainability, first the community and the PCV will get together to create a water committee. The tasks of this water committee will be straightforward. Firstly, the committee will collect monthly fees from the village for potential maintenance costs. In case something does happen they will have funds to replace faulty parts.

In addition, they have plumbers that will be part of the water committee and fix things that may possibly need fixing. This water committee will also be involved in trainings about water hygiene, proper pump usage and fiscal responsibility of the funds collected each month. They will enhance the management practices as well as ensure sustainability of the project beyond the project lifecycle.

The capacities built during the project implementation of the counterparts and community members will also contribute to sustainability of the project.

Comments
This project will lead to the following benefits: (I) Increasing clean water availability to the villagers of Jarra Kxxxxxxxx (II) Higher rates of school attendants for girls and boys due to access of clean water, which should decrease rates of diarrhea. (III) Increase the income of the families because of fewer workdays missed due to sickness and money spent on medication. (IV) Decrease chance of children crossing the main highway to fetch water and potentially be hit by vehicles.

Let Girls Learn
This project is a Let Girls Learn project, and it will directly have an effect on girls staying in school. As previously mentioned, when water is not available at the school, all the children are sent home early from school. 48% of the students at the school are indeed female. The previous term, students missed over two weeks of coursework solely because water was not available in the school. These numbers are very disheartening as the availability of water should never be a variable that keeps students out of school. With the installation of this water system we have full confidence that next term the students of Kxxxxxxxx Lower Basic School will miss no school days due to lack of water.

Fundraising Target
$8,300

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$201

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$8,099

Solar-Powered Borehole and Water System Project - The GambiaSolar-Powered Borehole and Water System Project - The Gambia

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Sandan District Latrine Project - Cambodia

Sandan District Latrine Project - Cambodia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Sxxxxx Village, Sandan District, Kampong Thom Province, Cambodia

Sandan District Latrine Project - CambodiaCommunity Description
Located 75 kilometers north and east of Kampong Thom provincial town in central Cambodia, Sandan District is a sprawling administrative district encompassing nine communes, each with anywhere from five to thirteen villages.

To the north lies the Prey Long forest, stretching across northern Kampong Thom Province into Preah Vihear and Stung Treng provinces, the largest evergreen forest in Southeast Asia and home to a remarkable variety of flora and fauna, as well as several indigenous communities on the southern fringes in Sandan District. The land begins to roll with small hills in the east, where rubber and cassava farms have brought relative prosperity to several small towns. To the south and west, the land is wide and flat, dominated by rice fields and occasional patches where the remnants of the once-sprawling Prey Long forest still remain.

In the center of this landscape lies a cluster of villages collectively referred to as Sandan town. At their heart is Sxxxxx Village itself, which houses the various administrative buildings and offices for Sandan Commune as well as Sandan District: the district seat, education office, and police and army posts; a commune hall and agricultural development office; the district health center and high school.

Benjamin Rost - CambodiaProblem Addressed
Despite tremendous progress in recent years, Cambodia still faces significant challenges in the WASH sector. Less than half of the national population has access to basic sanitation, and 41 percent still practice open defecation -- a figure that rises to 51 percent when looking at exclusively rural populations (JMP, Progress on Drinking Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene, 2017).

The practice of open defecation is associated with diarrheal diseases and overall poor health indicators, particularly among children, and working to end open defecation is crucial for Cambodia if it is to achieve the targets for WASH, nutrition, and maternal and child health established in the 2015 Sustainable Development Goals.

Sxxxxx Village boasts higher-than-average rates of latrine coverage, but 36 (of 109) households still lack adequate sanitation solutions, and diarrheal illnesses, especially among children, remain a leading cause of health center visits and missed days of school and work.

Sandan District Latrine Project - CambodiaProject Description
This project aims to build local capacity and ownership of Sxxxxx Village as Sandan District’s first Open Defecation Free (ODF) village. The project combines a social marketing campaign and social mobilization with subsidized latrines for the 36 remaining households that lack the resources to afford a latrine at the standard cost, and will result in the declaration of Sxxxxx as an ODF village.

During the first stage, villagers will participate in VHV-led education sessions around the ill effects of open defecation and an introduction to the fecal-oral cycle. A local builder will lead introductory sessions on latrine construction and maintenance. Villagers will work with the builder to select the best latrine option for their home, and will additionally develop latrine maintenance and sustainability plans.

The infrastructure component of this project consists of the construction of latrines for 36 households in Sandan Village. A local business will provide the materials and labor at a discounted cost for a full latrine sub- and superstructure: a three-cylinder septic tank (one meter in diameter) and cover; a latrine base (one meter by one meter) with brick foundation; a tiled floor and ceramic bowl; and a superstructure of wood and tin.

Sandan District Latrine Project - CambodiaThe final stage of the project will involve additional WASH education sessions on topics such as handwashing and household WASH. Houses that have functioning latrines will receive plaques that demonstrate their support for and commitment to maintaining Sandan Village as an ODF community.

A Village Health Volunteer (VHV) has taken the lead in community mobilization and encouragement, and will play a crucial role in facilitating the educational sessions on latrine maintenance and WASH topics. Each household constructing a latrine through this project will make a monetary contribution of $25.00, as well as contribute labor during the construction itself, so as to increase households' ownership of and investment in their individual sanitation solutions.

A local craftsman has spent considerable time and effort already in designing the ideal set-up of latrine and superstructure for households, and has agreed to discount materials costs so as to make latrines more accessible for the village's poorest residents.

Throughout October and November, the VHV and the PCV will hold three sessions for participating families. The first will be open to the community at large, and will consist of education around the dangers of open defecation and an introduction to the fecal-oral cycle.

Sandan District Latrine Project - CambodiaThe second session will be for the 36 families that will be constructing latrines. The local builder will join to discuss latrine construction and maintenance, and contracts will be drawn up for each household that detail the specific type of latrine each household will be receiving, from a set list of different options. Each household will also work to craft its own latrine maintenance plan. The final session will involve the PCV, the VHV, and the builder going house to house to review final construction plans.

Building will begin in mid-/late-November and continue into December. Families will assist with the building in order to take more direct ownership of their new latrines, as well as to help keep costs down and accelerate the timeline required to construct 36 new latrines.

Water for the latrines will come from wells, as is standard practice in the area: buckets are filled with water and placed inside the latrine superstructure. Regular cleaning and ensuring that there is always water in the buckets will be included in education sessions on latrine maintenance and handwashing, as well as in households' maintenance plans.

From January through March, three follow-up sessions will be held to discuss additional WASH topics and to help trouble-shoot any initial problems or concerns that families have with their new latrines. These sessions will be open to anyone from the community, and will cover topics such as latrine cleaning and maintenance, handwashing with soap, household WASH practices, and the linkages between WASH and nutrition.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
B. Rost

Monitoring and Maintenance
As part of participation in the project, households will complete latrine maintenance plans that they will adhere to and reference over the coming months and years in order to maintain a standard of usability and quality. The head latrine builder will additionally lead a session on latrine maintenance, covering such topics as what to do when a septic tank fills up or how to replace or repair certain latrine components, and will be available in coming years to work with villagers to make any large-scale repairs.

Buy-in from local leaders -- the VHV leading the project, the Village Chief -- are crucial to the continued monitoring of Sandan's ODF status. The plaques declaring an ODF household will be distributed after an initial assessment as to whether a household has adequate sanitation facilities, but as latrines age and new houses are built, both the VHV and the Village Chief will be responsible for ensuring that ODF standards continue to be met by both individual households as well as the community as a whole.

The health impact of this project will continue to be monitored at the health center, in terms of community members visiting for diarrheal illnesses. Informal follow-up assessments will ask villagers as to the health and economic benefits that they have received from living in an ODF community.

Fundraising Target
$6,700

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$250

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$6,450

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Nkomero Cell Water Project - Rwanda

Nkomero Cell Water Project - Rwanda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxx Village, Nkomero Cell, Mukingo Sector, Nyanza District, Southern Province, Rwanda

Nkomero Cell Water Project - Rwanda Community Description
Between 1996 and 2013, Action Aid – a program of USAID, provided water access to Nkomero Cell from Nyakokoma mountain via pipes, tanks and taps, a distance of approximately 2 kilometers.

In 2013, a new hospital was built a few kilometers away and the water was rerouted to the new hospital, depleting water access from Nkomero cell. As a result, the existing infrastructure has fallen into disrepair and is going unused.

This project will focus on the two villages where the pipes directly run through – Yyyyyyy and Xxxxxxxx. Xxxxxxxx village is located at the center of Nkomero cell.

In total Nkomero cell contains 10 villages. In the central village Xxxxxxxx, there are many facilities central to the cell, Including: Nkomero Primary School (1268 students), Nkomero Secondary School (512 students), a poste de sante (small health clinic), police station, and cell office.

Problem Addressed
All the facilities have tanks that fill up during the rainy season, but during the dry season water access becomes a major issue. Once the water from the rainy season is depleted, the police station, school, and health center, along with all the community members must rely on fetching water.

The distance to the closest water source, streams that run at the bottom of the valley, imposes a significant burden on women and girls who are the primary water carriers for their families. The cost of hiring someone is 3,000 francs a month for one jerry can a day but most families use up to 3 jerry cans a day, making this not feasible. (A cow alone drinks one jerry can a day.)

During the dry season students are often required to fetch water during school so that the school kitchen will have enough water to cook the daily meal. This job is divided amongst classes so as to minimize time out of the classroom but the head teacher estimated that students are losing about an hour a week from fetching water.

Students fetch water during the day for the cooks to cook and clean the school with only. There is no water for the students to drink regularly during the day nor to use to wash their hands. Hygiene and water are directly linked. Fetching water is also incredibly time consuming. Both villages are densely populated and this causes high congestion even at the existing places where water is accessed.

Project Description
This project is to provide a water system to serve the villages of Xxxxxxxx and Yyyyyyy.

Nkomero cell, located in the southern region of Rwanda, contains 10 villages. The project will target two villages with existing piping and tanks. The village of Xxxxxxxx is home to approximately 667 people and Yyyyyyy, the neighboring village, is home to approximately 867 people who do not have accessible, clean water.

These two villages were chosen as a priority because the first village, Yyyyyyy is where the water source is located, and Xxxxxxxx is located at the center of the cell containing facilities used by all other villages including a small health center, two schools and a police station.

Nkomero Cell Water Project - Rwanda In addition, there is an existing main water line from the Nyakokoma mountain through the villages to E.S. Nkomero Secondary School. The project will build a secure water source in Yyyyyyy Mountain, 2 kilometers from Nkomero center.

The construction of the water source uses local techniques to first dig a trench then install a plastic sheet to collect water from the mountain. The filtration process consists of using local materials such as small rocks, charcoal and sand. The water will be collected at the source and confined in a nearby catchment which will be attached to the repaired main pipe line.

Beyond Yyyyyyy and Xxxxxxxx village, the project will have even farther-reaching effects because students come from all over Nkomero cell to attend school in Xxxxxxxx at E.S. Nkomero Primary and Secondary School. Often in the rainy season students living in various villages outside of Xxxxxxxx will bring a container to school and fill up their small container at the end of the day, if there is water in the rain tank, to take back to their families.

When there is more consistent water access at the school students who live in communities without water access can continue to support their families. While this project focuses on two villages, it provides support for the entire cell.

The project will be completed over the course of 3 months. Implementation of the water infrastructure is below.

Month 1: Site installation – engineer planning, purchasing and delivery of materials; Labor- excavation and backfilling of 1.5km, laying of pipes

Month 2: Labor- excavation and backfilling of 1.5km, laying of pipes,

Month 3: Labor- excavation and backfilling of 1.5km, laying of pipes, construction of manhole and tap, site cleaning

There are a number of expected and potential challenges. A majority of labor will be completed during umuganda. This will occur about twice a week. Unforeseeable circumstances like rain or low attendance may occur. Supervision and project management on these days will be vital.

The project will also involve coordination between a number of people including the PCV, engineer/technician, cell officials, village officials and the Head Teacher.

Nkomero Cell Water Project - Rwanda Project Impact
1,534 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
L. Adelstein

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community leaders have come together and decided that guards will be secured in each village. These guards will be villagers but they will change every so often.

In addition, there will be talks lead by local leaders to reinforce the importance of water access within the community and the roles that each village can play in making this a safe and healthy environment for everyone. A committee will also be elected by the community to protect and preserve the community project.

Comments
Water access in the village affects every aspect of life. It means healthier villagers, cleaner homes, and less time and energy spent on gaining access to an essential resource. This project will also profoundly support the efforts of the local school and poste de santé.

Water is imperative for hygiene at the poste de santé which services many villagers who cannot get to the hospital or larger health center. The poste de santé also sets an example for hygiene and water hydration.

The school will also greatly benefit from water access – students will no longer have to miss school to fetch water. The water is used to make lunch. Greater access means that students can drink water during the day. They can wash their hands. And clean the classrooms.

The head teacher of E.S. Nkomero also pointed out the importance of the school garden. Currently the land by the school is going unused because there is not enough water but when there is enough water the students and school staff can work together to grow many different types of crops. This can assist with school lunches and help to decrease the price of lunch, which at 4,000 francs a month, is a financial burden on many families.

Fundraising Target
$7,100

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$110

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$6,990

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Kiang Central Water System Project - The Gambia

Kiang Central Water System Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kiang Central Water System Project - The GambiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxx, Kiang Central, Lower River Region,The Gambia

Community Description
Kiang Central is one of the six districts of the Lower River Division of the Gambia. It is comprised of about 760 people, including 137 children under 5, the majority of whom are ethnically Mandinka, along with few Fula constituents.

Most men do farming and most women do gardening and go to the rice field. Farming is the main source of income of most compounds, groundnut being the main cash crop and rice the staple one. The majority of farmers use traditional, subsistence farming methods with little or no modern equipment, and the scant surplus of crop, if any, that is not used for sustenance is usually sold for a small profit.

Xxxxxxxx has 42 compounds, a lower basic school that consists of two Early Child Development (ECD) classes through grade six, and a health center. The school serves Xxxxxxxx as well as some neighboring villages. Likewise, the health center is a major facility in the district and serves 33 villages.

Both the school and the clinic have boreholes that provide part of the village with non-potable water. The community has 4 stand taps extended by a community member from his compound to the village to supplement an uncovered well used by the community members for their daily domestic use.

Problem Addressed
There is a lack of clean water to solve all of the needs the village. The village borehole has not been functioning for the past few years. There is a cylinder problem coupled, with a leaking pipe network due to poor construction. The community invested over D100,000 to repair the system, but to no avail.

Kiang Central Water System Project - The GambiaEvery day, women and girls spend long hours fetching water, and sometimes waiting time involves fights over taking turns.

About two months ago, the private borehole that supplies 4 taps to the community, stopped functioning, and consequently, most of the village members now fetch water from a hand pump.

In a sample of 20 girls and women of ages ranging between 7 and above 50, the members spend a total of 83 hours/day (an average of 4 hours each per day) fetching water, 59 hours of which are spent by students.

The Officer-In-Charge (OIC) of Xxxxxxxx Health Centre confirmed that women and children are the most affected in the community by this serious, inadequate supply of clean water.

Project Description
This project is to improve the water capacity and quality in the village by building a water system, as follows:

Install four 250 Watts/24V solar panels
Install a GrundfossSQF5-8A AC/DC pump
Install a metal tower
Install four 2,000 L plastic tanks
Install 348 PVC pressure pipe extensions of 50 mm, connected to 14 one-inch complete taps
Construct a wastewater soakaway

Papa Sanneh, an engineer in Serekunda, surveyed the Village. The community will dig half-meter-deep trenches for installing the pipes, and provide the meals and support for Sanneh’s professional team.

Once the trenches are dug, the team will do the installation. Project funding will provide a substantial financing (~75%) for its implementation. The community will contribute about 25% in cash and in kind of the total cost of the project.

Once the system is installed, every adult in the village will pay 10 Dalasis/month as maintenance fee.

Kiang Central Water System Project - The GambiaDuring the installation period, the PCV along with counterparts from Xxxxxxxx Health Center will conduct 3 sensitization workshops on hygiene, sanitation, and maintaining the water system at the place where the community meets to take care of the village affairs, in Xxxxxxxx Lower Basic School, and Xxxxxxxx Lower and Upper Basic Junior Secondary School.

Project Impact
800 people in the community, plus students from nearby villages, will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
R. Osta

Monitoring and Maintenance
Sustainability of a clean water supply is the goal of this project. Participating in a project and carrying on the responsibility is a crucial part for its sustainability. The community will be able to sustain a clean water supply because it has a stake in the project. When a community is the fighting force behind change, it will become engaged, attentive, and respectful of others and the equipment.

The Water Committee will be responsible for monitoring the operation of the new water supply system. It will encourage community collaboration and develop a sense of accomplishment.

Let Girls Learn
This project qualifies as Let Girls Learn project because it addresses access to clean water, a basic need that is essential for quality life, the burden for which falls inordinately upon females. Girls and women will spend less time fetching water and more time taking care of themselves, and on capacity building, including studying, learning new skills and becoming able to generate income to have financial independence and security.

Fundraising Target
$5,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,500

 

 

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Komiguéa Borehole Project - Benin

Komiguéa Borehole Project - Benin

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninLocation
Komiguéa, Commune of N'Dali, Department of the Borgou, Benin

Community Description
The village of Komiguéa is 5 km from the large city of Parakou, in the northern half of Benin on the main road towards Niger. The population is composed of a mix of ethnic groups including Bariba, Biali, and Zerma, practicing religions including Islam, Christianity and animism.

Situated close to the equator, the climate is characterized as tropical savanna and is hot all year around. There is one rainy season from June to October, and a dry season from November to May.

Almost all of the residents earn a living in agriculture and animal husbandry, their main crops being soy, maize, cassava, yams, and cashews, and the domestic animals being cows, sheep, goats, pigs, chickens, rabbits, and guinea fowl. Many people also process agricultural products, primarily soy into tofu, cassava into gari, and shea nuts into shea butter. A smaller number of people practice market gardening during the rainy season, producing chili peppers, carrots, cabbage and lettuce among other things. Many people sell their agricultural products in nearby Parakou.

Komiguéa has a primary school, a secondary school serving the surrounding area, and access to electricity. However other infrastructure such as municipal water, health centers, and financial institutions are lacking.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninProblem Addressed
While many students do attend primary school, far fewer enter and complete secondary school because of lack of financial resources and administrative documents (namely birth certificates), and failure to perform well enough on the periodic entrance tests. Girls are particularly vulnerable to dropping out of school early because domestic obligations lead to them perform worse on tests, and because families tend to prioritize limited resources on boys' education.

Poverty and malnutrition are on the rise in the Komiguéa compared to previous decades due to drops in soil fertility, leading to falling agricultural productivity and reduced family income. Many families are forced to sell their land assets and venture further to find fertile land. Growing poverty and stagnating education combine with an exploding youth demographic, resulting in increases in challenges like youth unemployment and undesired pregnancies (leading to more girls leaving school).

These problems mean Komiguéa struggles to keep up with the regional, national and global pace of development, and they are all exacerbated by the lack of reliable potable water sources. While there are many wells and rainwater storage tanks due their low cost of construction, none of them provide potable water and they all run dry at the onset of the dry season.

The village has three boreholes equipped with foot-powered pumps, but they are laborious to operate, have a low flow-rate, suffer from frequent mechanical failures, and are also prone to running dry. As a result, especially during the dry season, the village's water sources are overcrowded and the acquisition of water becomes excessively burdensome.

Those looking to save time, money and effort resort to drawing drinking water from the wells and rainwater storage tanks, or even marshes and stagnant pools to satisfy their needs. These sources are often contaminated and cause illness, reducing physical capacity to farm and diverting financial resources to pay for treatment.

Women and girls are the ones who bear the greatest burden in acquiring water and therefore suffer the greatest consequences. The time and energy spent acquiring water is time and energy that could be spent on income generating activities or studying, so women are less able to afford essentials like food and education, and girls perform worse at school and are prone to dropping out.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninFinally, as Komiguéa is close to the large town of Parakou, the market gardeners have access a large market for their produce. Unfortunately, water is only sufficient for gardening during the rainy season when produce prices are at their lowest and the gardeners end up profiting little from the activity.

Project Description
The goal for this project is to alleviate the burden of water acquisition and create new economic opportunities for community members. This will be accomplished by constructing a borehole as a permanent water source that quickly and efficiently delivers potable water to community members for drinking and other domestic uses, as well as other activities such as irrigated market gardening and fish farming.

A location for the borehole has been chosen near the northern edge of the town in a low-lying area where drilling costs and the risk of running dry will be reduced. There is ample available land nearby which is already used by market gardeners and fish farmers. The water storage tank will be approximately 200 meters from the borehole in a spot along the main road that is convenient for community members to access water for domestic uses.

The first step is to drill the borehole, which will be done by a team based in Parakou. Next, a plumber will install the associated pumping and water storage equipment, which includes a 750 W submersible pump at the bottom of the borehole to bring water to the surface, a 750 W surface pump to move water horizontally to the location of the water storage tank and up into the tank, and the 5,000-liter water storage tank itself. A mason will construct a 6-meter-high tower made of reinforced concrete on which the tank will be situated.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninFinally, community members will install a 5 kW gasoline-powered generator to provide the electricity to power the pumps, and will construct a security fence to protect the borehole, generator and surface pump.

Echelle Africaine de Développement is a local organization that will assist in project implementation and long-term maintenance.

Project funds will pay for the drilling, plumbing equipment and labor, and water tower materials and labor. The community contribution will cover materials and labor for the security fence, pay for the gas-powered generator, and contribute to materials and labor costs for the plumbing.

Given the frequent power cuts in the community, the use of a gasoline-powered generator will ensure that there are no breaks in water access. The high-capacity elevated water storage rank will make water extraction easy and quick for domestic users. And the proximity of the borehole to ideal gardening and fish farming land will provide a substantial economic opportunity, making highly-profitable off-season vegetable and fish production possible.

This project will directly or indirectly benefit all members of the community. Many will use the water storage tank as their primary source of potable water due to its rapidity and ease of use, while others who use one of the other water sources will benefit via reduced traffic at the other sources.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninProject Impact
5,901 people will benefit from the project.

Volunteer Directing Project
Clinton Lee is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, having served in Benin from 2012 to 2015. He is a member of the National Peace Corps Association and the affiliate groups Friends of Benin and Minnesota Returned Peace Corps Volunteers.

Monitoring and Maintenance
In order to know whether this project has attained its goals of alleviating the burden of water acquisition and creating new economic opportunities, and in order to ensure sustainability of the project, the partner organization Echelle Africaine de Développement will perform a baseline and follow-up survey of households, as well as manage water sales and long-term maintenance of the equipment and infrastructure.

For the household surveys, they will gather information on the sources and costs of water acquisition. In addition, they will observe existing water sources to gather information on wait-times and monthly water source functionality. These surveys will be performed at monthly intervals before the completion of the water source proposed in this project, as well as after its completion to provide a view of the impact of the project.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninLong-term sustainability of the water source will be ensured by the partner organization, who will hire an employee to manage the sale of the water and perform basic maintenance of the equipment. Sales revenue will be used to pay for the employee's salary, maintenance and repairs requiring a technician, and future improvements.

Let Girls Learn
In this community, women and girls are the ones primarily responsible for the acquisition of water. When water becomes scarce and acquisition becomes more onerous, women and girls suffer the most. Worse, the time period when water is most scarce coincides with the school year. For girls trying to perform well in school, water acquisition is a significant drain on time and energy better spent studying.

Many girls are forced to begin collecting water well before sunrise in order to finish before school. Others, upon arriving home at the end of the school day go directly to the pump and work until after dark. Meanwhile, their male counterparts are free to study during these hours, and girls fall behind their brothers at school. This phenomenon creates the false impression among community members that girls are less intelligent or not worth the investment in their education, and the gender gap persists.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninMuch needs to be done to achieve gender equality in Benin, but as long as women and girls are weighed down by poor water access, they remain handicapped from attaining their educational and economic potential. This project aims to reduce the burden placed on women and girls by allowing much faster and less energy intensive water acquisition. Girls will have more time to spend more time studying, they will perform better in school, they will begin to change the perception of their potential, and they will move closer to gender equality.

While this project is not a part of the official Let Girls Learn program, it contains the same elements.  Therefore, we have given it our Let Girls Learn Plus designation, and made it a part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide.

Fundraising Target
$5,800

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$740

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,060

 

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Mara Cell Water System Project - Rwanda

Mara Cell Water System Project - Rwanda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Mara Cell Water System Project - RwandaLocation
Mara Cell, Ruhashya Sector, Huye District, Southern Province, Rwanda

Community Description
Mara cell is located in Ruhashya sector, in Huye district, in the Southern province of Rwanda. It is a hilly and mountainous area, with the cell surrounded by forested areas and valleys. It is home to approximately 3,200 people. There is one primary school, serving approximately 700 students.

Life in Mara cell is difficult. Many people live in poverty, as a majority of people do sustenance farming to make their living. Farmers cultivate plantains, beans, and corn, or herd livestock, especially cows and pigs. Mara cell is known for having the best plantains in the sector.

There is no electricity or access to a clean water source in the cell. When fetching water, it is typical to travel 2 to 3 kilometers, spending 30 minutes to an hour doing so. Often, families have to find water in neighboring cells, or they fetch unclean water from the valleys.

Every Tuesday, groups gather to save and lend money, as the cell leader explains, with the hope that all citizens may be able to buy health insurance, at a cost of 3,000 RWF ($3.85 US) per person for one year. This is one community-driven action they are doing to reduce poverty in the area.

Mara Cell Water System Project - RwandaProblem Addressed
Mara cell is the most impoverished in the sector. It is rife with malnutrition, poor hygiene, and malaria.

One of the largest problems in the cell is that there is no access to water. People living in the area must travel to neighboring cells in order to fetch water, often spending up to an hour to do so. Because fetching water takes so long and water in the community is scarce, the citizens tend to prioritize water conservation over proper sanitation and hygiene, leading to increased disease, such as worms, diarrhea, and malnutrition.

Project Description
This project is to build a water system in Mara cell.

The project has been approved by the Ruhashya Sector Office, and will be carried out under the direction of a local water engineer. It can be broken down into three parts: (1) Extending pipeline to the cell office, (2) building the water source, and (3) conducting WASH training.

1. Extending the pipeline
The water pipeline will be extended from the closest water source in the neighboring cell, Ruhashya. The pipeline will extend all the way to the cell office, a central location from which future water sources can be added.

Mara Cell Water System Project - RwandaThe Mara citizens, as part of their “umuganda,” a day of community volunteering, will use hoes, picks, and other tools they own to dig the trenches for the pipeline. The piping will then be connected and buried.

2. Building the water source
The water source will be built, under the direction of the water engineer, by Mara citizens, who will donate their time and labor. They have also committed to financing or obtaining sand and gravel on their own. Some of the funds will be used to pay for labor fees for the water engineer and his counterpart.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the pipes and the construction materials to build the water source.

At the completion of the water source, the water engineer will give a training on how to properly maintain the water source.

3. WASH Training
In order to address the issue of disease burden in the community, community health workers in Mara cell will attend a training on WASH so that they may be more knowledgeable in teaching this topic to their neighbors.

The training will address preventive hygiene measures that are the frequent cause of health issues in the community. It will be led by Community Health Worker supervisor and the Health Center Titulair.

Mara Cell Water System Project - RwandaMara citizens have already been sensitized to improving their health, and decreasing the disease burden is one of the benefits that can come with improved access to water. With the access to a nearby water source, they are eager to learn how they can change their behaviors.

Project Impact
3,800 people will benefit from improved access to a clean water source.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Susan Robins

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Sector Social Affairs Officer has created a plan where the citizens of Mara cell will be charged 10 RWF for a 20 L jerrycan of water. The money collected will be used for maintenance and repairs.

During the first few months, the charge will be waived in appreciation for the work and materials that they have provided.

Fundraising Target
$6,100

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$6,100

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Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - Ghana

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - GhanaLocation
Oyibi - Legon in Accra and Nsawam - Adaeso, in the Eastern region, Ghana

Community Description
This project will be implemented by planting trees along roadsides from Oyibi - Legon in Accra and Nsawam - Adaeso in the Eastern region of Ghana. These two locations were identified through a search to determine the areas of greatest need.

Problem Addressed
Many urban areas of Ghana are devoid of trees. Trees are a necessary part of the water cycle, whereby rainfall is captured and finds his way down into the water table.

In addition, trees are needed to:

o Help to combat climate change

o Clean the air

o Provide oxygen

o Cool the streets and city

o Increase energy conservation

o Prevent water pollution

o Prevent soil erosion

o Shield children from ultraviolet rays

o Save water, as shade from trees slows water evaporation from thirsty grasses

o Provide food and medicine

o Provide canopy and habitat for wildlife

Project Description
This project is to plant and maintain 20,000 trees in two areas of Ghana.

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - Ghana

The project is being implemented by Call to Nature Permaculture (CTNP), a Ghana-based NGO, led by Solomon Amuzu, its Founder and Director. CTNP previously implemented Water Charity’s Call to Nature Permaculture Project - Ghana, which resulted in a great increase in the scope of operations of CTNP by facilitating water storage and distribution. 

CTNP has already begun planting the seedlings, and is readying them to be transplanted. Once this is done, the trees will be maintained for one year by CTNP and selected community members. The responsibility for the trees will then be handed over to the various communities and the state.

The Albizia tree was chosen for this project because it is fast growing and strong, provides a heavy canopy, and produces huge numbers of flowers for pollination.

The trees are to be planted along roadsides for stretches measuring 25 km each from Oyibi - Legon in Accra and Nsawam - Adaeso in the Eastern region of Ghana. With the rising levels of heat worldwide this is a move toward alleviating effects of climate change.

The lack of trees has made the ground in many areas very hot and dry. Trees recharge ground water, and when it rains, water pours onto the plant leaves and follows the root structure. Surface water is able to make its way deeply into the ground and finally into the water table, thereby increasing the amount of water stored in the ground.

The project will require a mobile water supply to initiate and to maintain the trees, through periodic watering, for a period of one year, the time needed for the trees to develop a strong root system.

Water Charity funds will be used for the purchase of a used pickup truck, water tank, hose, and fuel for one year.

CTNP is providing the seedlings, and the labor for implementing the project.

Project Impact
3,850 residents will directly benefit. In addition, all the travelers to and from the nation's capital, Accra will indirectly benefit.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Michael McGaskey

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - Ghana

Monitoring and Maintenance
Solomon Amuzu will perform the regular monitoring and maintenance of the project in order to ensure its sustainability. He will document the results with an eye toward creating a model that can be replicated.

RPCV Michael McGaskey will assist with monitoring and maintenance of the project.

Comments
The project has as one of its major objectives the improvement of capacity of an active, successful, and forward-thinking local NGO. The effectiveness of the tree planting effort can provide a model for expansion of the concept to other areas of Ghana, and other countries in Africa.

A second project like this has been undertaken for Water Charity by Solomon.  Read about the 2nd Call Of Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project, and consider supporting both of these worthy efforts.

Fundraising Target
$5,950

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,950

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

 

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Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - Rwanda

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - Rwanda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Bubazi Health CenterLocation
Bubazi Cell, Rubengera Sector, Karongi District, Western Province, Rwanda, Africa

Community Description
The Bubazi Health Center’s catchment area encompasses two cells (Bubazi and Gitwa Cell) and 15 villages, and has a population of approximately 8,700 people. This project will benefit Bubazi Cell, which has a population of approximately 3,436 people and 7 villages: Kavumu, Kigarama, Gakomeye, Nyagahinga, Makurungwe, Gitwa and Kabuga Village.

Bubazi Cell has two schools: one Primary School and one Secondary School, with over 1,100 students attending (about 800 primary students and about 300 secondary students). There is also one nursery school with approximately 20 children in attendance. Students come from a wide range of cells to attend these schools. These are day schools, where some of the children walk well over 1 hour to attend. The school system is not able to provide food to the children and at this time there is no water available to the children.

The Bubazi Cell is located in the Western Province of Rwanda where the weather is mild, the terrain is mountainous and lush. It rains often with the rivers and streams flowing strong, yet very brown. The majority of the people still fetch their water from the rivers and streams.

The people are hard workers. They love to cultivate! Every day, without fail you will see women (and in the more remote villages, men and children) cultivating and planting from early morning until early afternoon. There is an abundance of vegetables, fruits and grains grown in the area (eggplant, cabbage, tomatoes, green beans, onions, garlic, avocado, bananas, pineapple, papaya, mango, corn, rice, soy and beans). This is due to the abundant rain and people who love to cultivate.

Bubazi Health CenterIn the early 1970’s a Swiss NGO established an Agricultural Project in the area of Bubazi Cell. They helped establish plantain farms and formal agriculture. To this day the people of this community are extremely knowledgeable about farming. Between 1972 -1976 the Swiss constructed the buildings of the compound that is now the Bubazi Community Health Center.

In 1990 the Swiss built two extensive and efficient water distribution systems. Locally they are known as Gakoma Source and Gatunguguru Source. Both of these water sources are prolific in their water supply. However, Gatunguguru Source appears to be especially vast.

The Gakoma Water Source distribution system originates from an underground source of water located at Gakoma Springs in a remote area of Gitega Cell. This distribution system has been repaired, thanks to Water Charity, through the implementation of Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source and now provides clear water, suitable for drinking, to 3,116 people in six villages.

The Gatunguguru Water Distribution System originates from an underground source of water located at Gatunguguru Springs in Muvungu Village, Gitega Cell. This distribution system, when in good working order will provide clear water, suitable for drinking to a minimum of 3,436 people in 7 villages as well as providing an abundance of quality water to Bubazi Primary School and Bubazi Secondary School.

Problem Addressed
Through interviews with the Bubazi Health Center staff, with Community Health Workers and with the village people, as well as through observation it is very clear that quality water access, poor hygiene and waterborne illness is a high ranking problem in the area. The underlying problem which contributes to poor hygiene and illness is access to clean water.

There is an abundance of water in the Bubazi area. The problem is that it is brown and full of parasites. Yet the people drink this unclean water.

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - RwandaThere is a high need for hygiene education in Bubazi and Gitwa Cells in order to align the minds of the people with the concept of hygiene. The W.A.S.H. (Water, Sanitation, Hygiene) Program would be valuable for this purpose. However, many of the people in the Bubazi area must walk long distances to fetch water for their families and then afterwards they should boil it. When one village woman was asked why she did not boil the water she fetched from the river before drinking it she replied with a weary expression of resignation on her face, “Who has the time?” Also the charcoal required for boiling water is very expensive. The problem is lack of access to quality water. It is not possible to have good hygiene and health if there is not access to clean water.

At one time the people of the Bubazi area had access to an abundance of quality water within their villages and at their schools. However, due to circumstances, access to this water has been lost. Both the Gakoma and the Gatunguguru water distribution systems were built in 1990. Sometime in the early 1990’s the Swiss NGO left Rwanda. Since the construction of these systems, 25 year ago, there has been very little maintenance of these systems.

This system consists of large, main water lines coming directly from the sources, with feeder lines branching out from the main line. These feeder lines feed into tap systems where villagers can easily fetch clean water. Many of the feeder lines are broken and most of the taps systems have deteriorated and are unusable. At one time these distribution systems provided water to 31 villages, possibly more. Most of these 31 villages no longer have access to these abundant water sources due to the deterioration of the distribution system. With the implementation of Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source quality water has been made available to 3,116 village people and to the Bubazi Health Center through the repair of the Gakoma distribution system. However, the Gatugunguru Water source and the 26 water fetching stations (fountains) that provide water to the 7 villages of Bubazi as well as to two Bubazi schools is still in severe disrepair. This leaves over 3,000 village people as well as the 1,130 children who attend the Bubazi schools without access to quality water.

Project Description
The goal of Bubazi Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source is to repair the Gatugunguru water catchment system, the entire main distribution line and all secondary lines from Gatugunguru Source to Bubazi Cell, its 7 villages and 2 schools.

Through the implementation of this project the following repairs will be made:

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - Rwanda1.The Gatunguguru Source catchment system will be repaired and protected.

2.The main line and all secondary lines will be repaired.

3. All the water catchment tanks, and feeder lines to storage tanks that are supplied by the Gatugunguru Source will be repaired.

4. All water fountains directly on the entire main line will be repaired and made operable.

5. The 26 water fountains (water fetching stations) located in the 7 villages of Bubazi Cell, and all distribution lines supplying these fountains will be repaired, made in good working order, and made available for the all people of the community for water access.

6. All feeder lines to the Bubazi Primary and Bubazi Secondary Schools will be repaired and four holding tanks on school grounds will be repaired and made in good working order. All fountains (water fetching stations) on school grounds will be repaired.

7. To set up a program for monitoring and maintenance of the Gatunguguru Source distribution systems.

The holistic goal and desired outcome is to provide the people of the Bubazi community the means to create healthy, vital lives for themselves. This will support the objective of the First Thousand Days project of improving the health and life expectancy of pregnant mothers and children as well as significantly lightening their work load.

In the Bubazi Community quality water access is the foundation of good health, followed by education and behavior change. It is difficult to ask people to change behavior when they do not have the resources to do so. This is a set up for failure. By making quality water accessible to the community we are setting the community up for success in the areas of good hygiene and good health.

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - RwandaProject Impact
This project will provide quality water to 3,436 village people and 1,130 school children (many of these children travel from villages outside of Bubazi Cell).

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
April Zachary

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Bubazi Health Center will be taking responsibility for the maintenance of the Gatunguguru Source and the Gakoma Source water distribution systems.

The Bubazi Health Center’s maintenance plan for the Gatungurguru Source and the Gakoma Source distribution system is as follows:

1. Each March, when the Health Center’s budget is planned, the health center will request funds for the year’s maintenance/repair of the water distribution system.

2. The health center will create a contract with a local plumber who will work for them on an on-call-basis for any repairs or maintenance needed for the system

3. The Executive Secretary of Bubazi Cell and the Bubazi Health Center Titulier will require each Village to create a Village Water Security Committee (VWSC). The committee will have a minimum of 3 people (more if possible) who will be responsible for the Water Security in their villages. They will provide quarterly Water Security Awareness Training to the peoples of their village. The training will have the purpose of inspiring the community to take ownership of the water distribution system and to participate in keeping it secure and strong. Parents will be asked to talk with their children about the importance of keeping their water system functioning efficiently (this will help prevent the occasional vandalism that happens to the water lines by the children). Parents and children will be asked to report to the Water Security Committee any broken pipes, non-functioning tap systems or anything that could be related to water security.

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - Rwanda4. The Water Security Committee will do a monthly inspection of all of the water catchment tanks and tap systems in their village areas. They will report any problems (or potential problems) to the health center.

5. Quarterly, the people will clean (de-weed, etc.) the exterior of all water catchment tanks and taps systems, and the grounds around them, in their village area. They will report to the VWSC anything that looks unusual or could become a problem to water security. 6. The plumber will do an annual inspection of all water catchment tanks and taps in the Bubazi Cell. 7. The Health Center Titulier will have an annual meeting with the Village Water Security Committees in order to discuss any potential problems to the water security, any improvements needed to the reporting systems and any changes that need to happen within the committee (member rotations, etc.)

Comments
This is a second stage of a two-part project for repairing the water distribution system in the Bubazi area. The first project, Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source, was successfully completed on March 10, 2016.

Upon the completion of this second project, Bubazi Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source, the entire water distribution system supplying quality water to the Bubazi area will be in good working order, with a maintenance/protection plan in place.

Friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer April Zachary may contribute using the donate button below.  Funds in excess of the project amount will go to other projects in Rwanda.

If you would like to help us with similar projects, please donate to the East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

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