$5,001 to $10,000

Kiang Central Water System Project - The Gambia

Kiang Central Water System Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kiang Central Water System Project - The GambiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxx, Kiang Central, Lower River Region,The Gambia

Community Description
Kiang Central is one of the six districts of the Lower River Division of the Gambia. It is comprised of about 760 people, including 137 children under 5, the majority of whom are ethnically Mandinka, along with few Fula constituents.

Most men do farming and most women do gardening and go to the rice field. Farming is the main source of income of most compounds, groundnut being the main cash crop and rice the staple one. The majority of farmers use traditional, subsistence farming methods with little or no modern equipment, and the scant surplus of crop, if any, that is not used for sustenance is usually sold for a small profit.

Xxxxxxxx has 42 compounds, a lower basic school that consists of two Early Child Development (ECD) classes through grade six, and a health center. The school serves Xxxxxxxx as well as some neighboring villages. Likewise, the health center is a major facility in the district and serves 33 villages.

Both the school and the clinic have boreholes that provide part of the village with non-potable water. The community has 4 stand taps extended by a community member from his compound to the village to supplement an uncovered well used by the community members for their daily domestic use.

Problem Addressed
There is a lack of clean water to solve all of the needs the village. The village borehole has not been functioning for the past few years. There is a cylinder problem coupled, with a leaking pipe network due to poor construction. The community invested over D100,000 to repair the system, but to no avail.

Kiang Central Water System Project - The GambiaEvery day, women and girls spend long hours fetching water, and sometimes waiting time involves fights over taking turns.

About two months ago, the private borehole that supplies 4 taps to the community, stopped functioning, and consequently, most of the village members now fetch water from a hand pump.

In a sample of 20 girls and women of ages ranging between 7 and above 50, the members spend a total of 83 hours/day (an average of 4 hours each per day) fetching water, 59 hours of which are spent by students.

The Officer-In-Charge (OIC) of Xxxxxxxx Health Centre confirmed that women and children are the most affected in the community by this serious, inadequate supply of clean water.

Project Description
This project is to improve the water capacity and quality in the village by building a water system, as follows:

Install four 250 Watts/24V solar panels
Install a GrundfossSQF5-8A AC/DC pump
Install a metal tower
Install four 2,000 L plastic tanks
Install 348 PVC pressure pipe extensions of 50 mm, connected to 14 one-inch complete taps
Construct a wastewater soakaway

Papa Sanneh, an engineer in Serekunda, surveyed the Village. The community will dig half-meter-deep trenches for installing the pipes, and provide the meals and support for Sanneh’s professional team.

Once the trenches are dug, the team will do the installation. Project funding will provide a substantial financing (~75%) for its implementation. The community will contribute about 25% in cash and in kind of the total cost of the project.

Once the system is installed, every adult in the village will pay 10 Dalasis/month as maintenance fee.

Kiang Central Water System Project - The GambiaDuring the installation period, the PCV along with counterparts from Xxxxxxxx Health Center will conduct 3 sensitization workshops on hygiene, sanitation, and maintaining the water system at the place where the community meets to take care of the village affairs, in Xxxxxxxx Lower Basic School, and Xxxxxxxx Lower and Upper Basic Junior Secondary School.

Project Impact
800 people in the community, plus students from nearby villages, will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
R. Osta

Monitoring and Maintenance
Sustainability of a clean water supply is the goal of this project. Participating in a project and carrying on the responsibility is a crucial part for its sustainability. The community will be able to sustain a clean water supply because it has a stake in the project. When a community is the fighting force behind change, it will become engaged, attentive, and respectful of others and the equipment.

The Water Committee will be responsible for monitoring the operation of the new water supply system. It will encourage community collaboration and develop a sense of accomplishment.

Let Girls Learn
This project qualifies as Let Girls Learn project because it addresses access to clean water, a basic need that is essential for quality life, the burden for which falls inordinately upon females. Girls and women will spend less time fetching water and more time taking care of themselves, and on capacity building, including studying, learning new skills and becoming able to generate income to have financial independence and security.

Fundraising Target
$5,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,500

 

 

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Komiguéa Borehole Project - Benin

Komiguéa Borehole Project - Benin

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninLocation
Komiguéa, Commune of N'Dali, Department of the Borgou, Benin

Community Description
The village of Komiguéa is 5 km from the large city of Parakou, in the northern half of Benin on the main road towards Niger. The population is composed of a mix of ethnic groups including Bariba, Biali, and Zerma, practicing religions including Islam, Christianity and animism.

Situated close to the equator, the climate is characterized as tropical savanna and is hot all year around. There is one rainy season from June to October, and a dry season from November to May.

Almost all of the residents earn a living in agriculture and animal husbandry, their main crops being soy, maize, cassava, yams, and cashews, and the domestic animals being cows, sheep, goats, pigs, chickens, rabbits, and guinea fowl. Many people also process agricultural products, primarily soy into tofu, cassava into gari, and shea nuts into shea butter. A smaller number of people practice market gardening during the rainy season, producing chili peppers, carrots, cabbage and lettuce among other things. Many people sell their agricultural products in nearby Parakou.

Komiguéa has a primary school, a secondary school serving the surrounding area, and access to electricity. However other infrastructure such as municipal water, health centers, and financial institutions are lacking.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninProblem Addressed
While many students do attend primary school, far fewer enter and complete secondary school because of lack of financial resources and administrative documents (namely birth certificates), and failure to perform well enough on the periodic entrance tests. Girls are particularly vulnerable to dropping out of school early because domestic obligations lead to them perform worse on tests, and because families tend to prioritize limited resources on boys' education.

Poverty and malnutrition are on the rise in the Komiguéa compared to previous decades due to drops in soil fertility, leading to falling agricultural productivity and reduced family income. Many families are forced to sell their land assets and venture further to find fertile land. Growing poverty and stagnating education combine with an exploding youth demographic, resulting in increases in challenges like youth unemployment and undesired pregnancies (leading to more girls leaving school).

These problems mean Komiguéa struggles to keep up with the regional, national and global pace of development, and they are all exacerbated by the lack of reliable potable water sources. While there are many wells and rainwater storage tanks due their low cost of construction, none of them provide potable water and they all run dry at the onset of the dry season.

The village has three boreholes equipped with foot-powered pumps, but they are laborious to operate, have a low flow-rate, suffer from frequent mechanical failures, and are also prone to running dry. As a result, especially during the dry season, the village's water sources are overcrowded and the acquisition of water becomes excessively burdensome.

Those looking to save time, money and effort resort to drawing drinking water from the wells and rainwater storage tanks, or even marshes and stagnant pools to satisfy their needs. These sources are often contaminated and cause illness, reducing physical capacity to farm and diverting financial resources to pay for treatment.

Women and girls are the ones who bear the greatest burden in acquiring water and therefore suffer the greatest consequences. The time and energy spent acquiring water is time and energy that could be spent on income generating activities or studying, so women are less able to afford essentials like food and education, and girls perform worse at school and are prone to dropping out.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninFinally, as Komiguéa is close to the large town of Parakou, the market gardeners have access a large market for their produce. Unfortunately, water is only sufficient for gardening during the rainy season when produce prices are at their lowest and the gardeners end up profiting little from the activity.

Project Description
The goal for this project is to alleviate the burden of water acquisition and create new economic opportunities for community members. This will be accomplished by constructing a borehole as a permanent water source that quickly and efficiently delivers potable water to community members for drinking and other domestic uses, as well as other activities such as irrigated market gardening and fish farming.

A location for the borehole has been chosen near the northern edge of the town in a low-lying area where drilling costs and the risk of running dry will be reduced. There is ample available land nearby which is already used by market gardeners and fish farmers. The water storage tank will be approximately 200 meters from the borehole in a spot along the main road that is convenient for community members to access water for domestic uses.

The first step is to drill the borehole, which will be done by a team based in Parakou. Next, a plumber will install the associated pumping and water storage equipment, which includes a 750 W submersible pump at the bottom of the borehole to bring water to the surface, a 750 W surface pump to move water horizontally to the location of the water storage tank and up into the tank, and the 5,000-liter water storage tank itself. A mason will construct a 6-meter-high tower made of reinforced concrete on which the tank will be situated.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninFinally, community members will install a 5 kW gasoline-powered generator to provide the electricity to power the pumps, and will construct a security fence to protect the borehole, generator and surface pump.

Echelle Africaine de Développement is a local organization that will assist in project implementation and long-term maintenance.

Project funds will pay for the drilling, plumbing equipment and labor, and water tower materials and labor. The community contribution will cover materials and labor for the security fence, pay for the gas-powered generator, and contribute to materials and labor costs for the plumbing.

Given the frequent power cuts in the community, the use of a gasoline-powered generator will ensure that there are no breaks in water access. The high-capacity elevated water storage rank will make water extraction easy and quick for domestic users. And the proximity of the borehole to ideal gardening and fish farming land will provide a substantial economic opportunity, making highly-profitable off-season vegetable and fish production possible.

This project will directly or indirectly benefit all members of the community. Many will use the water storage tank as their primary source of potable water due to its rapidity and ease of use, while others who use one of the other water sources will benefit via reduced traffic at the other sources.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninProject Impact
5,901 people will benefit from the project.

Volunteer Directing Project
Clinton Lee is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, having served in Benin from 2012 to 2015. He is a member of the National Peace Corps Association and the affiliate groups Friends of Benin and Minnesota Returned Peace Corps Volunteers.

Monitoring and Maintenance
In order to know whether this project has attained its goals of alleviating the burden of water acquisition and creating new economic opportunities, and in order to ensure sustainability of the project, the partner organization Echelle Africaine de Développement will perform a baseline and follow-up survey of households, as well as manage water sales and long-term maintenance of the equipment and infrastructure.

For the household surveys, they will gather information on the sources and costs of water acquisition. In addition, they will observe existing water sources to gather information on wait-times and monthly water source functionality. These surveys will be performed at monthly intervals before the completion of the water source proposed in this project, as well as after its completion to provide a view of the impact of the project.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninLong-term sustainability of the water source will be ensured by the partner organization, who will hire an employee to manage the sale of the water and perform basic maintenance of the equipment. Sales revenue will be used to pay for the employee's salary, maintenance and repairs requiring a technician, and future improvements.

Let Girls Learn
In this community, women and girls are the ones primarily responsible for the acquisition of water. When water becomes scarce and acquisition becomes more onerous, women and girls suffer the most. Worse, the time period when water is most scarce coincides with the school year. For girls trying to perform well in school, water acquisition is a significant drain on time and energy better spent studying.

Many girls are forced to begin collecting water well before sunrise in order to finish before school. Others, upon arriving home at the end of the school day go directly to the pump and work until after dark. Meanwhile, their male counterparts are free to study during these hours, and girls fall behind their brothers at school. This phenomenon creates the false impression among community members that girls are less intelligent or not worth the investment in their education, and the gender gap persists.

Komiguéa Borehole Project - BeninMuch needs to be done to achieve gender equality in Benin, but as long as women and girls are weighed down by poor water access, they remain handicapped from attaining their educational and economic potential. This project aims to reduce the burden placed on women and girls by allowing much faster and less energy intensive water acquisition. Girls will have more time to spend more time studying, they will perform better in school, they will begin to change the perception of their potential, and they will move closer to gender equality.

While this project is not a part of the official Let Girls Learn program, it contains the same elements.  Therefore, we have given it our Let Girls Learn Plus designation, and made it a part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide.

Fundraising Target
$5,800

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$740

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,060

 

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Mara Cell Water System Project - Rwanda

Mara Cell Water System Project - Rwanda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Mara Cell Water System Project - RwandaLocation
Mara Cell, Ruhashya Sector, Huye District, Southern Province, Rwanda

Community Description
Mara cell is located in Ruhashya sector, in Huye district, in the Southern province of Rwanda. It is a hilly and mountainous area, with the cell surrounded by forested areas and valleys. It is home to approximately 3,200 people. There is one primary school, serving approximately 700 students.

Life in Mara cell is difficult. Many people live in poverty, as a majority of people do sustenance farming to make their living. Farmers cultivate plantains, beans, and corn, or herd livestock, especially cows and pigs. Mara cell is known for having the best plantains in the sector.

There is no electricity or access to a clean water source in the cell. When fetching water, it is typical to travel 2 to 3 kilometers, spending 30 minutes to an hour doing so. Often, families have to find water in neighboring cells, or they fetch unclean water from the valleys.

Every Tuesday, groups gather to save and lend money, as the cell leader explains, with the hope that all citizens may be able to buy health insurance, at a cost of 3,000 RWF ($3.85 US) per person for one year. This is one community-driven action they are doing to reduce poverty in the area.

Mara Cell Water System Project - RwandaProblem Addressed
Mara cell is the most impoverished in the sector. It is rife with malnutrition, poor hygiene, and malaria.

One of the largest problems in the cell is that there is no access to water. People living in the area must travel to neighboring cells in order to fetch water, often spending up to an hour to do so. Because fetching water takes so long and water in the community is scarce, the citizens tend to prioritize water conservation over proper sanitation and hygiene, leading to increased disease, such as worms, diarrhea, and malnutrition.

Project Description
This project is to build a water system in Mara cell.

The project has been approved by the Ruhashya Sector Office, and will be carried out under the direction of a local water engineer. It can be broken down into three parts: (1) Extending pipeline to the cell office, (2) building the water source, and (3) conducting WASH training.

1. Extending the pipeline
The water pipeline will be extended from the closest water source in the neighboring cell, Ruhashya. The pipeline will extend all the way to the cell office, a central location from which future water sources can be added.

Mara Cell Water System Project - RwandaThe Mara citizens, as part of their “umuganda,” a day of community volunteering, will use hoes, picks, and other tools they own to dig the trenches for the pipeline. The piping will then be connected and buried.

2. Building the water source
The water source will be built, under the direction of the water engineer, by Mara citizens, who will donate their time and labor. They have also committed to financing or obtaining sand and gravel on their own. Some of the funds will be used to pay for labor fees for the water engineer and his counterpart.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the pipes and the construction materials to build the water source.

At the completion of the water source, the water engineer will give a training on how to properly maintain the water source.

3. WASH Training
In order to address the issue of disease burden in the community, community health workers in Mara cell will attend a training on WASH so that they may be more knowledgeable in teaching this topic to their neighbors.

The training will address preventive hygiene measures that are the frequent cause of health issues in the community. It will be led by Community Health Worker supervisor and the Health Center Titulair.

Mara Cell Water System Project - RwandaMara citizens have already been sensitized to improving their health, and decreasing the disease burden is one of the benefits that can come with improved access to water. With the access to a nearby water source, they are eager to learn how they can change their behaviors.

Project Impact
3,800 people will benefit from improved access to a clean water source.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Susan Robins

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Sector Social Affairs Officer has created a plan where the citizens of Mara cell will be charged 10 RWF for a 20 L jerrycan of water. The money collected will be used for maintenance and repairs.

During the first few months, the charge will be waived in appreciation for the work and materials that they have provided.

Fundraising Target
$6,100

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$6,100

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Progress: 

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - Ghana

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - GhanaLocation
Oyibi - Legon in Accra and Nsawam - Adaeso, in the Eastern region, Ghana

Community Description
This project will be implemented by planting trees along roadsides from Oyibi - Legon in Accra and Nsawam - Adaeso in the Eastern region of Ghana. These two locations were identified through a search to determine the areas of greatest need.

Problem Addressed
Many urban areas of Ghana are devoid of trees. Trees are a necessary part of the water cycle, whereby rainfall is captured and finds his way down into the water table.

In addition, trees are needed to:

o Help to combat climate change

o Clean the air

o Provide oxygen

o Cool the streets and city

o Increase energy conservation

o Prevent water pollution

o Prevent soil erosion

o Shield children from ultraviolet rays

o Save water, as shade from trees slows water evaporation from thirsty grasses

o Provide food and medicine

o Provide canopy and habitat for wildlife

Project Description
This project is to plant and maintain 20,000 trees in two areas of Ghana.

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - Ghana

The project is being implemented by Call to Nature Permaculture (CTNP), a Ghana-based NGO, led by Solomon Amuzu, its Founder and Director. CTNP previously implemented Water Charity’s Call to Nature Permaculture Project - Ghana, which resulted in a great increase in the scope of operations of CTNP by facilitating water storage and distribution. 

CTNP has already begun planting the seedlings, and is readying them to be transplanted. Once this is done, the trees will be maintained for one year by CTNP and selected community members. The responsibility for the trees will then be handed over to the various communities and the state.

The Albizia tree was chosen for this project because it is fast growing and strong, provides a heavy canopy, and produces huge numbers of flowers for pollination.

The trees are to be planted along roadsides for stretches measuring 25 km each from Oyibi - Legon in Accra and Nsawam - Adaeso in the Eastern region of Ghana. With the rising levels of heat worldwide this is a move toward alleviating effects of climate change.

The lack of trees has made the ground in many areas very hot and dry. Trees recharge ground water, and when it rains, water pours onto the plant leaves and follows the root structure. Surface water is able to make its way deeply into the ground and finally into the water table, thereby increasing the amount of water stored in the ground.

The project will require a mobile water supply to initiate and to maintain the trees, through periodic watering, for a period of one year, the time needed for the trees to develop a strong root system.

Water Charity funds will be used for the purchase of a used pickup truck, water tank, hose, and fuel for one year.

CTNP is providing the seedlings, and the labor for implementing the project.

Project Impact
3,850 residents will directly benefit. In addition, all the travelers to and from the nation's capital, Accra will indirectly benefit.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Michael McGaskey

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - Ghana

Monitoring and Maintenance
Solomon Amuzu will perform the regular monitoring and maintenance of the project in order to ensure its sustainability. He will document the results with an eye toward creating a model that can be replicated.

RPCV Michael McGaskey will assist with monitoring and maintenance of the project.

Comments
The project has as one of its major objectives the improvement of capacity of an active, successful, and forward-thinking local NGO. The effectiveness of the tree planting effort can provide a model for expansion of the concept to other areas of Ghana, and other countries in Africa.

A second project like this has been undertaken for Water Charity by Solomon.  Read about the 2nd Call Of Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project, and consider supporting both of these worthy efforts.

Fundraising Target
$5,950

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,950

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

 

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Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - Rwanda

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - Rwanda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Bubazi Health CenterLocation
Bubazi Cell, Rubengera Sector, Karongi District, Western Province, Rwanda, Africa

Community Description
The Bubazi Health Center’s catchment area encompasses two cells (Bubazi and Gitwa Cell) and 15 villages, and has a population of approximately 8,700 people. This project will benefit Bubazi Cell, which has a population of approximately 3,436 people and 7 villages: Kavumu, Kigarama, Gakomeye, Nyagahinga, Makurungwe, Gitwa and Kabuga Village.

Bubazi Cell has two schools: one Primary School and one Secondary School, with over 1,100 students attending (about 800 primary students and about 300 secondary students). There is also one nursery school with approximately 20 children in attendance. Students come from a wide range of cells to attend these schools. These are day schools, where some of the children walk well over 1 hour to attend. The school system is not able to provide food to the children and at this time there is no water available to the children.

The Bubazi Cell is located in the Western Province of Rwanda where the weather is mild, the terrain is mountainous and lush. It rains often with the rivers and streams flowing strong, yet very brown. The majority of the people still fetch their water from the rivers and streams.

The people are hard workers. They love to cultivate! Every day, without fail you will see women (and in the more remote villages, men and children) cultivating and planting from early morning until early afternoon. There is an abundance of vegetables, fruits and grains grown in the area (eggplant, cabbage, tomatoes, green beans, onions, garlic, avocado, bananas, pineapple, papaya, mango, corn, rice, soy and beans). This is due to the abundant rain and people who love to cultivate.

Bubazi Health CenterIn the early 1970’s a Swiss NGO established an Agricultural Project in the area of Bubazi Cell. They helped establish plantain farms and formal agriculture. To this day the people of this community are extremely knowledgeable about farming. Between 1972 -1976 the Swiss constructed the buildings of the compound that is now the Bubazi Community Health Center.

In 1990 the Swiss built two extensive and efficient water distribution systems. Locally they are known as Gakoma Source and Gatunguguru Source. Both of these water sources are prolific in their water supply. However, Gatunguguru Source appears to be especially vast.

The Gakoma Water Source distribution system originates from an underground source of water located at Gakoma Springs in a remote area of Gitega Cell. This distribution system has been repaired, thanks to Water Charity, through the implementation of Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source and now provides clear water, suitable for drinking, to 3,116 people in six villages.

The Gatunguguru Water Distribution System originates from an underground source of water located at Gatunguguru Springs in Muvungu Village, Gitega Cell. This distribution system, when in good working order will provide clear water, suitable for drinking to a minimum of 3,436 people in 7 villages as well as providing an abundance of quality water to Bubazi Primary School and Bubazi Secondary School.

Problem Addressed
Through interviews with the Bubazi Health Center staff, with Community Health Workers and with the village people, as well as through observation it is very clear that quality water access, poor hygiene and waterborne illness is a high ranking problem in the area. The underlying problem which contributes to poor hygiene and illness is access to clean water.

There is an abundance of water in the Bubazi area. The problem is that it is brown and full of parasites. Yet the people drink this unclean water.

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - RwandaThere is a high need for hygiene education in Bubazi and Gitwa Cells in order to align the minds of the people with the concept of hygiene. The W.A.S.H. (Water, Sanitation, Hygiene) Program would be valuable for this purpose. However, many of the people in the Bubazi area must walk long distances to fetch water for their families and then afterwards they should boil it. When one village woman was asked why she did not boil the water she fetched from the river before drinking it she replied with a weary expression of resignation on her face, “Who has the time?” Also the charcoal required for boiling water is very expensive. The problem is lack of access to quality water. It is not possible to have good hygiene and health if there is not access to clean water.

At one time the people of the Bubazi area had access to an abundance of quality water within their villages and at their schools. However, due to circumstances, access to this water has been lost. Both the Gakoma and the Gatunguguru water distribution systems were built in 1990. Sometime in the early 1990’s the Swiss NGO left Rwanda. Since the construction of these systems, 25 year ago, there has been very little maintenance of these systems.

This system consists of large, main water lines coming directly from the sources, with feeder lines branching out from the main line. These feeder lines feed into tap systems where villagers can easily fetch clean water. Many of the feeder lines are broken and most of the taps systems have deteriorated and are unusable. At one time these distribution systems provided water to 31 villages, possibly more. Most of these 31 villages no longer have access to these abundant water sources due to the deterioration of the distribution system. With the implementation of Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source quality water has been made available to 3,116 village people and to the Bubazi Health Center through the repair of the Gakoma distribution system. However, the Gatugunguru Water source and the 26 water fetching stations (fountains) that provide water to the 7 villages of Bubazi as well as to two Bubazi schools is still in severe disrepair. This leaves over 3,000 village people as well as the 1,130 children who attend the Bubazi schools without access to quality water.

Project Description
The goal of Bubazi Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source is to repair the Gatugunguru water catchment system, the entire main distribution line and all secondary lines from Gatugunguru Source to Bubazi Cell, its 7 villages and 2 schools.

Through the implementation of this project the following repairs will be made:

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - Rwanda1.The Gatunguguru Source catchment system will be repaired and protected.

2.The main line and all secondary lines will be repaired.

3. All the water catchment tanks, and feeder lines to storage tanks that are supplied by the Gatugunguru Source will be repaired.

4. All water fountains directly on the entire main line will be repaired and made operable.

5. The 26 water fountains (water fetching stations) located in the 7 villages of Bubazi Cell, and all distribution lines supplying these fountains will be repaired, made in good working order, and made available for the all people of the community for water access.

6. All feeder lines to the Bubazi Primary and Bubazi Secondary Schools will be repaired and four holding tanks on school grounds will be repaired and made in good working order. All fountains (water fetching stations) on school grounds will be repaired.

7. To set up a program for monitoring and maintenance of the Gatunguguru Source distribution systems.

The holistic goal and desired outcome is to provide the people of the Bubazi community the means to create healthy, vital lives for themselves. This will support the objective of the First Thousand Days project of improving the health and life expectancy of pregnant mothers and children as well as significantly lightening their work load.

In the Bubazi Community quality water access is the foundation of good health, followed by education and behavior change. It is difficult to ask people to change behavior when they do not have the resources to do so. This is a set up for failure. By making quality water accessible to the community we are setting the community up for success in the areas of good hygiene and good health.

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - RwandaProject Impact
This project will provide quality water to 3,436 village people and 1,130 school children (many of these children travel from villages outside of Bubazi Cell).

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
April Zachary

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Bubazi Health Center will be taking responsibility for the maintenance of the Gatunguguru Source and the Gakoma Source water distribution systems.

The Bubazi Health Center’s maintenance plan for the Gatungurguru Source and the Gakoma Source distribution system is as follows:

1. Each March, when the Health Center’s budget is planned, the health center will request funds for the year’s maintenance/repair of the water distribution system.

2. The health center will create a contract with a local plumber who will work for them on an on-call-basis for any repairs or maintenance needed for the system

3. The Executive Secretary of Bubazi Cell and the Bubazi Health Center Titulier will require each Village to create a Village Water Security Committee (VWSC). The committee will have a minimum of 3 people (more if possible) who will be responsible for the Water Security in their villages. They will provide quarterly Water Security Awareness Training to the peoples of their village. The training will have the purpose of inspiring the community to take ownership of the water distribution system and to participate in keeping it secure and strong. Parents will be asked to talk with their children about the importance of keeping their water system functioning efficiently (this will help prevent the occasional vandalism that happens to the water lines by the children). Parents and children will be asked to report to the Water Security Committee any broken pipes, non-functioning tap systems or anything that could be related to water security.

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - Rwanda4. The Water Security Committee will do a monthly inspection of all of the water catchment tanks and tap systems in their village areas. They will report any problems (or potential problems) to the health center.

5. Quarterly, the people will clean (de-weed, etc.) the exterior of all water catchment tanks and taps systems, and the grounds around them, in their village area. They will report to the VWSC anything that looks unusual or could become a problem to water security. 6. The plumber will do an annual inspection of all water catchment tanks and taps in the Bubazi Cell. 7. The Health Center Titulier will have an annual meeting with the Village Water Security Committees in order to discuss any potential problems to the water security, any improvements needed to the reporting systems and any changes that need to happen within the committee (member rotations, etc.)

Comments
This is a second stage of a two-part project for repairing the water distribution system in the Bubazi area. The first project, Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source, was successfully completed on March 10, 2016.

Upon the completion of this second project, Bubazi Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source, the entire water distribution system supplying quality water to the Bubazi area will be in good working order, with a maintenance/protection plan in place.

Friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer April Zachary may contribute using the donate button below.  Funds in excess of the project amount will go to other projects in Rwanda.

If you would like to help us with similar projects, please donate to the East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

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Badoudou Latrine Project - Senegal

Young female students carrying water

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Badoudou, Department of Foundiougne, Fatick Region, Senegal

Community Description
Badoudou is a small rural village of approximately 800 people, in the Fatick Region of Senegal.  Livelihood primarily consists of subsistence millet and peanut farming, but due to the village’s close proximity to the mangroves, fishing and gardening also generate income.  However, the community is still extremely poor.

The majority of households, which hold an average of 14 people, most of which are children, do not have access to essential facilities, such as latrines or water.

Badoudou has a French primary school, which also serves three surrounding villages.  Badoudou also has a daara, an Arab school, which serves and lodges more than 70 children from nearby islands, year round.  Both schools have committees dedicated to bettering the lives of their students.  

Additionally, the village has a health hut, a two roomed facility, staffed by one health worker to provide basic health care, such as first aid and malaria treatment, as well as a midwife to deliver babies.  The health hut also has a functioning health committee, which is committed to providing the Road in Badoudou community with the information and materials necessary to keep themselves healthy and prevent disease.

Badoudou is made up of almost 100% Sereers, a lively ethnic group with a beautiful culture.  For generations the village has been home to the same families, and thus the atmosphere of the community is very supportive, and all decisions are made collectively.  The people of Badoudou have determined their greatest need is for a latrine and WASH project after discussing the health status within the community, and are very committed to its success and grateful for the opportunity.

Problem Addressed
In Badoudou, community members are constantly sick with coughs, colds, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, and fever.  Young children experience this burden in excess, both in severity and frequency. It is most noticeable during the rainy season, when bacterial infections leave many out of work and school for days, and require mothers to walk their sick children the seven kilometers to the nearest hospital, too frequently. This can primarily be attributed to poor hygiene and sanitation, due to open-defecation and lack of hand washing.  Without the knowledge on hygiene and health, and the facilities to keep the community clean, the people of Badoudou are suffering too often and living in fear of disease.

After a health baseline survey was performed in Badoudou, results showed the community to have a high incidence of hygiene-related illness, especially amongst children under five.  In Senegal, diarrheal disease and pneumonia represent the top causes of death for children under five, behind malaria. Survey results also showed that 55 out of 67 households within the community did not have a latrine, and thus a majority of the population practices open defecation in their own yards, or in nearby fields.

Additionally, neither the French nor Arab school in the village has a latrine or hand washing station, leaving over 200 students without access to proper sanitation.  Finally, survey results showed that members of Badoudou do not have the knowledge of how hygiene impacts their health, and do not take important measures, such as hand washing, to prevent disease.  When asked about hand washing practices, the households generally only mentioned before meals as a critical time, and typically use a communal bowl of water with no soap.  No household presented a designated hand washing station.

After a community-wide meeting to discuss the survey results, all in attendance determined a latrine and hygiene project to be most beneficial for the community as a whole.  It has the ability to improve community-wide sanitation due to access to latrines, as well as to encourage healthier hygiene practices through health talks and school programs.  A large-scale WASH project is essential to improving the overall health status in this community.

Project Description
The Badoudou WASH Education and Latrine project is composed of three phases:

First, a curriculum has been developed to teach the students at both the French elementary school and the Arab school about the importance of hygiene for health, as well as how to adopt better practices. Activities include a course on germ theory, a WASH mural painting, soap making, hand wash station building, as well as a day of filming students’ skits and songs on related topics. The school directors, teachers, as well as some students will be leading these activities.

The second phase of this project is a series of similar health trainings for the rest of the community members.  A member from each household will be required to attend each training in order to be eligible to receive a latrine.  The topics include hygiene and related illnesses, hand washing and hygienic behaviors, soap making and hand wash station building, and finally latrine usage and maintenance.  These trainings will be led by volunteers in the community, members of the health committee, local NGO representatives, and the local hospital’s hygiene agent.
 
The final, and most important phase of this project, to which the vast majority of funding for this project will be dedicated, is building of improved latrines for community-wide access. Fifty-five households will receive a simple pit latrine.  These will be 2 x 2-meter square pits, lined with bricks, cemented over, and capped with iron bars and concrete.  This model is the most basic, yet hygienic and sustainable option.  The cement lining prevents the latrines’ contents from contaminating the surrounding ground, and thus keeps the community cleaner.  It will be durable throughout rainfall, is large enough to last years, and can be pumped out and reused in the future.  

Pit LatrineAdditionally, the two schools in the village will each receive one 2 x 2-meter pit latrine, but attached via PCV piping to a Turkish toilet, in a 1 x 1-meter stall for privacy. Each pit is to be dug by household and community members, while village masons will be constructing bricks and the rest of the latrines.  Funds for this project will go primarily towards the cement, concrete, and metal for latrine construction, as well as some labor fees.  In addition to digging the pits, the community will be transporting all materials, as well as contributing sand, water, and cash.

Project Impact
This project will impact 975 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Lindsay Reesing

Monitoring and Maintenance 
When the project is completed, improved health status, as well as improved health behaviors are expected across the community.  Aside from improved latrines, expected outcomes of this project include increased number of hand washing stations, as well as members using these stations at the necessary times.  Additional outcomes include women being educated on childhood illness prevention, a decreased number of children who had coughs, colds, and diarrhea, and an increased number of their parents seeking care.

As these outcomes are recognized within the community, and members believe in the success of the project, it is expected that they will take responsibility for their health and embrace behavior change to improve overall health status.

Each household will be monitored over the next year to assess this change through a series of home visits by community health workers.  Incidence of illness, as well as methods and urgency of treatment will be measured. WASH behaviors will be observed, and barriers to these behaviors determined.  Depending on the progress that has been made, additional trainings can be developed to re-ensure that community members have all the knowledge necessary, and are taking the proper steps, to keep their families healthy.

Comments
The community organization that is involved with this project is the Badoudou Health Committee.  As Badoudou's health committee also serves two other nearby villages, this project is an example to possibly be implemented again over the next few years.

Dollar Amount of Project

$5,500

Donations Collected to Date

$50

Dollar Amount Needed
$5.450

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Kiritiri Water Tank Project - Kenya

Villagers

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association, and falls under our East Africa Water & Sanitation Program..

Location

Kiritiri, Mbeere South, Embu County, Eastern Province, KenyaDry season

Community Description
Kiritiri, Kenya is a market community of several thousand located in Eastern Province. Recently, it was made a regional headquarters and the population has grown drastically. The area is south of Mount Kenya, far enough from the effects of the Mountain to get any benefit from the increased rain there. Kiritiri is located on the paved road leading to Kamburu dam, one of the largest hydroelectric dams in the country. Despite that, one in three planting seasons produce enough for excess to sell for income. Water is by far the community's largest concern. Other issues within the community are lack of income and poor housing.

Problem Addressed
When RPCV Jennifer Mueller lived in the community from 1997-1999, there were four water boreholes as well as some shallow hand-dug pits where water collected. Since then, however, 3 of the 4 boreholes have stopped working due to the water table lowering and since a recent political division, Kiritiri is now a district headquarters causing the population to grow considerably. Fifteen years ago, water could be purchased for 5 shillings a 20-liter jerry can, (a fee used to keep the boreholes maintained); the cost has increased to 20 shillings a liter in the dry season (accounting for supply and demand). The one borehole remaining just doesn’t have the capacity for the population growth.

rainy season

Project Description
The Maragwa Umoja group will start to build Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks, and then build water tanks to help with lack of water, poor housing, and lack of income. With the addition of cement to normal local subsoil, and needing little water and no firing to cure (using wood that is scarce), the bricks are then made into uniform interlocking bricks. The hand-operated press machines creating the interlocking bricks take less mortar, thereby reducing costs. The brick presses come in straight and curved forms, the curved specifically for water tanks and the straight bricks for foundations and water draw points. One bag of cement makes 100 to 150 bricks depending on the soil consistency. About 400 bricks are needed for a 5,000 liter tank.

Rainfall in the area and the average size of homes (tin roofs available for catchment area) would make 5,000-liter tanks the best option to sustain an average family of five through a dry season using the water for drinking and cooking. Any greater capacity would rarely fill fully.  The press machines are made in Nairobi, and are hand operated requiring no electricity and few parts with the potential to break. Should replacement parts be necessary, as they are built in-country, parts would be locally available. The tanks then need only a skin of waterproof cement on the inside to make them waterproof, and a roof to prevent malaria-carrying mosquitos from entering... as well as reducing loss from evaporation. 

Project funds will be used to build 10 tanks to get the project started, using them as training. When the business is off the ground and making profits, the group will then use that money to build tanks for the remaining 90+ members. Bricks will also be produced for sale to others in the community

local homeThe brick method allows tanks to be built for half to 2/3rds of the cost of plastic water tanks bought from out of the area. The straight bricks used for the support platforms can also be sold as housing bricks that do not melt away in the rain, as many conventional mud brick or wattle and daub houses do, expanding the business potential beyond just water tanks. 

With both machines, materials for water tanks and houses can be produced locally without transportation costs, as the machine can be moved to the building location instead of moving thousands of mud brick or stone. Costs of the ISSB bricks are a bit more than mud brick but less than the stone quarried out of the area, a local engineer estimates they should be sold for 15 shillings instead of 26 for stone. Mud bricks are about 10 shillings each, but are poor quality, and do not withstand the rainy seasons well.

Once the technology and access spreads across the districts it could reach 10,000 or more with the communities of Iriamurai, Siakago, and Gachoka all within a short distance and lacking water.

Project Impact
This project will directly impact 500 people and indirectly benefit several thousand in Kiritiri itself.
dry season
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jennifer Mueller

Monitoring and Maintenance
Each family receiving a tank, will be responsible for the care and maintenance of the tank.

The tanks are fairly easy to keep once built.  A little water needs to be kept in them to prevent the concrete from cracking over time and to keep it hydrated. Each year they do need to be cleaned of the roof debris that gets washed in as well as cleaning the roof before the rainy season to prevent debris and contaminants from entering the tanks. Once the tanks are in place, the 105 women of the group will have more time for their families and school as well as increased funds from not having to purchase water. As the profits from the business come in, money to build more tanks, pay school fees, improve their housing, and those directly doing the labor, will be paid wages they would not receive otherwise.

Comments

Water Charity has extensive experience with the ISSB technique and has done many projects that utilize them.  A good example is the Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program - Uganda.

The Maragwa Umoja self-help group is a women’s group registered with the government of Kenya, located about a quarter kilometer from the town, founded in 1999, to help improve their situation. They received a grant from the Department of Agriculture a few years ago to build a water pan by placing an earthen dam across a drainage way to help with the water problem in the area. Without any engineering design or assistance on the construction, the end result is that water evaporates quickly leaving them without in the dry season and even when it is there, it is too dirty to be drinkable from sediment and animal access. As water is such a common problem in the area, the group swelled from 20 members to over 105. With the increased membership this project will directly benefit at least 500 members of the group and indirectly benefit several thousand in Kiritiri itself as the demand for the available water sources are lessened.

Jennifer plans on traveling in the summer of 2016 (July at best guess right now) and staying for three months to establish the business side of the project, and oversee the completion of the first tanks.

Dollar Amount of Project
$5,900

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,900

This project has been completed, but we are still accepting donations.  To see the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

dry seasonkitchen in local home

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Kante Water Project - Togo

Youth carrying water

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC logos
This is a project under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama and the Peace Corps to expand access to education for girls around the world!


Location
Kante, Keran Prefecture, Kara Region, TogoWell dries up during dry season

Community Description
Kante is a town located in the Kara region of Togo. It is the administrative capital of the Keran Prefecture. Though the official language of Togo is French, the dominant language spoken among the local inhabitants is Lama.   Kante has a large population size of about 20,000, sparsely spread among its several neighborhoods, which can be considered independent villages. However, more than 85% of these inhabitants live in poverty or extreme poverty. A significant number of families live in small huts made entirely of mud, known as thatch roof houses, with an average of about 2-3 people per room, while the vast majority of people live in one, sometimes two bedroom houses made of mud, coated with sand and cement.

The dominant activity in Kante is subsistence farming. The main crops include, but are not limited to: corn, millet, yam, okra, and peppers. However, there is also livestock rearing, that includes cows, goats, sheep, guinea fowls, and pigs that are raised to generate income.

Problem Addressed
Life depends on water. A relatively healthy and prosperous life depends on a safe, potable, reliable and accessible water source. However, in Kante and surrounding villages, access to such a water source is extremely difficult during the rainy season, let alone the dry season. 

Pierre carrying water During the rainy season, most households get their drinking water from shallow potholes that are filled with run-off. This run-off is usually yellowish in color and filled with particulate matters. Often times, these water sources are shared with animals. Drinking from this water source often leads to illnesses such as diarrhea, dysentery, and in some cases death particularly among children less than 7 years old.

During the dry season, these shallow potholes dry out, leaving residents with the difficult task of traveling long distances to either buy water, or fetch it from a distant well. This is particular daunting for young women and boys during school year. This is because they not only have to get up early in the morning, sometimes 3 AM, or late at night, to fetch water. Then they also have to come back, do house chores, and make breakfast or dinner before doing their homework or going to school. This provides a reasonable explanation why most young women are more likely to fall behind in school or drop out compared to their male counterparts because of inadequate time to do school work. Even if they may have time to do school work, they may be too tired to concentrate. Also, lack of access to potable water nearby leaves young women vulnerable to attack such as domestic violence at home due to husbands being suspicious of amount of time taken to fetch water, and rape from outside while fetching water early in the morning or late at night.

Project Description
This project involves digging 8 public wells, installing 2 hand washing stations in two public schools, and repairing/rehabilitating of 3 community water pumps.

The site of each well was chosen by the various neighborhood/Village Development Committees with the help of a local hydraulic technician.  Community members in these neighborhoods will help with the construction of these wells, and with the supervision of a local drilling technician. All eight wells will be similar in nature, including the depth of the water table.

Before calculating the cost of repairing and rehabilitating the pumps, a technician went and diagnosed all three pumps to find out what parts were needed to repair the pumps, and also the cost of each part. All three communities agreed to proportionally share the cost of repair, with each community agreeing to contribute at least 25% of the total cost.      

The decision of the schools at which to install the hand washing stations was based on three main criteria: access to water to fill the water tanks, number of pupils in schools, and the percentage of students who stay in school during long breaks.

WELLS Seven of these public wells will be built in the same town, Kante, but in different neighborhoods: Yoote Wooro, Ate-Kante, Kpantchoute, Hourta, Worongo, Kouwir, and Ninta-Ninta. A local digging expert, with the help of local community members, will supervise digging. This local expert has a wealth of experience digging holes in this region. 

Before the digging process begins, a hydrogeological assessment will be conducted using hydraulic electrical measurement to determine the precise depth of the underlying aquifer. It is generally expected that water will be reached at a depth of 16 meters. However, the wells will be dug to a depth of about 21 meters to ensure a reliable source of water throughout the year. After the holes have been dug, the inner walls of the wells will be lined with concrete tubes, measuring about 1 meter in diameter. Above ground, the wells will be covered with a semi-concrete slab, a metal sheet, and enclosed with a brick fence measuring about three feet tall. The wells will all have covers to prevent dirt from entering.distant wells

Also, a cement drainage system will be constructed to direct water in to a nearby vegetable garden or a hole. A bucket and a rope will be used to pull water out of the well. Water Charity funds will be used to pay for skilled labor, to purchase of cement, and to transport  materials.

The various communities will provide volunteer labor during digging and construction, gravel, sand, food for workers, and storage of materials. The remaining well will be built in a village called Kpesside, near the only clinic in the area. The reason for this location is to help patients with their hygiene and sanitation needs, especially pregnant women before, during, and after delivering.

PUMPS Three hand pumps will be rehabilitated in three villages (Houlure, Anatowa, and Nambou). A local technician has already estimated the costs of rehabilitating/repairing these pumps. The costs were determined by diagnosing each pump, and deciding what parts should be replaced or renovated. A couple of these hand pumps have been out of service for more than three years as a result of lack of finance by the communities. As a result of this, community members have to walk for many kilometers to fetch water. Parts will be bought immediately for the repair work to begin. For the past six months, every household in the various villages has contributed some amount of money to meet the community contribution of 25% of the total repair cost. The various village development committees have been in charge of collecting the community contribution.

HAND WASHING STATIONS Two hand-wash stations will be built in schools in two villages called Houlio and Adeote. These hand wash stations will help students with their hygiene and sanitation needs. Students will use these stations to wash their hands before and after certain activities such as after using the toilet, and before and after eating.

Project Impact
This project will impact 5,348 people.
youth carrying water
Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Mokube Ewane

Monitoring and Maintenance
Monitoring and maintenance of the wells and hand pumps will be done by each community's Village Development Committee, or their Water Committees. The various Water/Village Development Committees have been trained on how to sustain their hand pumps and wells. For example, committee members and villagers have been educated on the importance of yearly monetary contribution for future repairs. The various schools’ Sanitary Committees, headed by the school principal, will maintain the hand washing stations.

Comments
The community organization involved in this project is Association Espoir Pour Demain (AED). They will be mobilizing the community.

Let Girls Learn 

This project will significantly help girls stay in school, by reducing the time and distance they spend fetching water before and after school. For example, instead of walking for three kilometers to fetch water, most girls in the various communities that will benefit from this project will cut their travel distance to fetch water by more than 50-90%, hence giving them more time to study, and stay in school.

This is part of our ongoing Western Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

Dollar Amount of Project
$8,100

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed

$8,100


ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE

Inpecting the hand pump

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Bubazi Health Center Water Project - Rwanda

Water Catchment Area

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Bubazi & Gitwa Cells, Rubengera, Karongi, Rwanda

Community Description
The project community is the Bubazi Health Center Catchment Area. The Bubazi Health Center’s catchment area encompasses two cells, 15 villages, and has a Water fetching stationpopulation of approximately 8,700 people. The two cells are: Bubazi Cell and Gitwa Cell.  Bubazi Cell has a population of approximately 3,436 people and 7 villages. Bubazi Cell Villages: Kavumu, Kigarama, Gakomeye, Nyagahinga, Makurungwe, Gitwa, and Kabuga.  Gitwa Cell has a population of approximately 5,271 people and 8 villages.  Gitwa Cell Villages include: Rubona, Bizu, Muremerea, Kibande, Gaseke, Rwakigarati, Gitega and Rusegeya.

History of Area Water Sources
In the early 1970’s, a Swiss NGO (the name is unknown) established an Agricultural Project in the area of Bubazi Cell. They helped establish plantain farms and formal agriculture. To this day the people of the community are extremely knowledgeable about farming. Vegetables are abundant. Between 1972 -1976 the Swiss (that is how the locals refer to them) constructed the buildings of the compound that is now the Bubazi Community Health Center.  In 1990 the Swiss built two extensive and efficient water distribution systems. Locally they are known as Gakoma Source and Gatunguguru Source. Both of these water sources seem to be prolific in their water supply. However, Gatunguguru Source appears to be especially vast.

The Gakoma Water Source distribution system originates from an underground source of water located at Gakoma Springs in a remote area of Gitega Cell. This distribution system, when in good working order, provides clear water, suitable for drinking, to four Cells (Gitega, Rohinga, Ruragwe and Bubazi) and thirteen villages.

The Gatunguguru Water Distribution System originates from an underground source of water located at Gatunguguru Springs in Muvungu Village, Gitega Cell. This distribution system, when in good working order, provides clear water, suitable for drinking, to four cells (Kayenzi, Ruragwe, Gitega and Bubazi) and eighteen villages.

The people of the Bubazi/Gitwa community are hard workers. They love to cultivate and dig. There is rain in the area nine months out of the year with a 3-month dry season. The climate is moderate and the terrain is lush. There is an abundance of underground, quality water at the Gakoma and Gatunguguru sources. The problem is access.

Problem Addressed
Both the Gakoma and the Gatunguguru water distribution systems were built in 1990. Sometime in the early 1990’s the Swiss NGO left Rwanda. Therefore, since the construction of these systems, 25 year ago, there has been very little maintenance of these systems. This system consists of large, main water lines coming directly from the sources, with feeder lines branching out from the main line. These feeder lines supply water tap systems where villagers can easily fetch clean water. Many of the feeder lines have broken and most of the taps systems have deteriorated and are unusable.

Broken line in the mainAt one time these distribution systems provided water to 31 villages, possibly more. Most of these 31 villages no longer have access to these abundant water sources due to the deterioration of the distribution system. Just recently the main water line from Gakoma Source broke due to a mudslide. In Bubazi Cell there are only three villages that now receive water from these sources. Another problem is that these water distribution systems never reached Gitwa Cell, which, is one of the two cells in Bubazi Health Center’s catchment area. The citizens of Gitwa Cell (population 5,271) are still fetching their water from the Cyimbiri River.

Project Description 
The Bubazi Water Project is divided into 2 projects, Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source and Bubazi Water Project 2: Gatunguguru Source.  This project will implement the larger of the two, Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source.

The work will be completed as follows:
1. The entire Gakoma Source main line will be repaired and protected.
2. All the water catchment tanks, and feeder lines to these tanks, that are supplied by the Gakoma Source will be repaired and put in good working order.
3. The water taps directly on the entire main line will be repaired and made operable.
4. All of the water taps (water fetching stations), and distribution lines supplying these taps in the 7 villages of Bubazi cell, that are fed by the Gakoma line, will be repaired, made in good working order, and made available for the all people of the community for water access.
5. All feeder lines to the Bubazi Health Center will be repaired and holding tanks on Health Center grounds will be repaired and made in good working order.

Above the ground pipe
The Project 1: Gakoma Source should take approximately 8 weeks to complete, progressing as follows: 
Week One: Site Installation – 5 days:
1. Engineer on site
2. Material storage and security arranged
3. Organization of the labor force
4. Materials ordered
Week One – Week Three – 12 days: Site Preparation
Week One – Week Three - 14 days:  Supply, installation and lying of pipes and fitting from the tank to terminals fountain
Week One - Week Five – 30 days:  Trench Excavation on the total length of GAKOMA Source system
Week Three – Week Five – 21 days:  Backfilling and compacting for the entire length of 500 m x 0.5 x 0.6 m
Week One – Week Seven – 40 days:  Rehabilitation of Tanks and Water Taps (15 single fountain (size 3 m x2 m, h=1.2 m, thickness = 0.20 m)
Week Six – Week Eight - 7 days:  Site cleaning

Claude Kaliza, the Engineer, will be the project manager.  He is reliable and efficien, and has already created an extensive report, at no cost, with pipeline maps, cost analysis and project timeline.

The community will be providing the labor for trench excavation of the total length of the Gakoma line, 500 m of excavation, and 40% of the backfilling and compacting of the entire length of 500 m.

Project Impact
This project will directly benefit 8,700 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
April Zachary

Water CatchmentMonitoring and Maintenance
The Bubazi Health Center will be taking responsibility for the maintenance of the Gakoma Source Water Distribution System. The Bubazi Health Center’s maintenance plan for the Gakoma Source distribution system is as follows:
1. Each March, when the Health Center’s budget is planned, the health center will request funds for the year’s maintenance/repair of the water distribution system.
2. The health center will create a contract with a local plumber who will work for them on an on-call-basis for any repairs or maintenance needed for the system.
3. The Executive Secretary of Bubazi Cell and the Bubazi Health Center Titulier will require each Village to create a Village Water Security Committee (VWSC). The committee will have a minimum of 3 people (more if possible) who will be responsible for the Water Security in their villages. They will provide quarterly Water Security Awareness Training to the peoples of their village. The training will have the purpose of inspiring the community to take ownership of the water distribution system and to participate in keeping it secure and strong. Parents will be asked to talk with their children about the importance of keeping their water system functioning efficiently (this will help prevent the occasional vandalism that happens to the water lines by the children). Parents and children will be asked to report to the Water Security Committee any broken pipes, non-functioning tap systems or anything that could be related to water security
4. The Water Security Committee will do a monthly inspection of all of the water catchment tanks and tap systems in their village areas. They will report any problems (or potential problems) to the health center.
5. Quarterly, the people will clean (de-weed, etc.) the exterior of all water catchment tanks and taps systems, and the grounds around them, in their village area. They will report to the VWSC anything that looks unusual or could become a problem to water security.
6. The plumber will do an annual inspection of all water catchment tanks and taps in the Bubazi Cell.
7. The Health Center Titulier will have an annual meeting with the Village Water Security Committees in order to discuss any potential problems to the water security, any improvements needed to the reporting systems and any changes that need to happen within the committee (member rotations, etc.)

Comments
Peace Corps Volunteer April Zachary reports: It is imperative that leadership be a driving forces behind a project this extensive and complex. Anastase Ntezimana has been the Titulier of the Bubazi Health Center for 10 years. He is passionate about bringing about positive behavior change within the lives of the people on the village level. He has made great progress within his community in the area of nutrition and pre-natal care. Waterborne illnesses and hygiene continue to be urgent problems within the community due to the lack of access to quality water. When Anastase was informed that in order for the water project to be a possibility he would be required to bring in a qualified engineer to do a study of the water distribution system he did not hesitate.

Within one week he had an engineer, Claude Kaliza, brought onto site to make the initial assessment. A day later we had his assistant, Emile, a Water Distribution Technician, brought in. Together, the water technician, a local plumber, and I walked the entire Gakoma Source distribution system (a five-hour round trip hike) The water technician had a special water system GPS system which identifies underground water lines. Three days later the water technician returned and we, along with the plumber, walked the entire line of the Gatunguguru Source distribution system (a four-hour round trip hike). During these exploratory hikes, local people familiar with each area and the locations of the water catchment tanks met us to show the way. This required coordination of the people through phone tagging. We had support every step of the way. 

During the months of August and September 2015 a Community Needs Assessment (CNA) was done in the Bubazi Health Center catchment area (Bubazi and Gitwa Cells) through interviews, surveys, conversations and observation. Through the CNA inquiry of the people of Bubazi and Gitwa Cell, water quality/ access and hygiene were consistently found to be the most urgent problems in the Bubazi area. The majority of the Bubazi Health Center staff (10 out of 13) rated water quality/access and hygiene as the most urgent issues in their community. Home visits were made during the CNA and at the end of each interview families were asked if there was anything they would like to add.

Here are some of their answers:  “Water is a big problem. If you could try to help us get materials, the people could work together to bring water.” “We need help in teaching the people good hygiene. Are you able to help and support us in teaching the people good hygiene? The water is a problem.” The toilets are a big problem. If you could try, if there is a way that materials could be provided the people would build the toilets.” 

During these visits it became very apparent that the people were willing to provide their labor in order to solve the problem of water quality/access and hygiene. They were offering their services before being asked. It was through these conversations with the people at the village level that we became conscious of this fact.

The holistic goal and desired outcome of the larger Bubazi Water Project (Project 1: Gakoma Source, Project 2: Gatunguguru Source and possibly Project 3: Gitwa Extension) is to provide the people of the Bubazi (and Gitwa) communities the means to create healthy, vital lives for themselves. In the Bubazi/Gitwa Communities, quality water is the foundation of good health, followed by education and behavior change. It is difficult to ask people to change behavior when they do not have the resources to do so – this is a set up for failure.

By making quality water accessible to the community we are setting the community up for success in the areas of good hygiene and good health. We will be following up this technical project with education projects:
1. Water Sanitation and Hygiene (W.A.S.H) program
2. Permagarden Training
3. Community Finance Initiative (CFI)
4. The First Thousand Days Program (working with education of pregnant mothers and mothers in prenatal care and infant/child nutrition, the first thousand days of a child’s life).

Friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer April Zachary may contribute using the donate button below.  Funds in excess of the project amount will go to other projects in Rwanda.

If you would like to help us with similar projects, please donate to the East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.


 

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Bikira Catholic Parish Community Water Projects - Uganda

Kitteredde Primary School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Bikira Catholic Parish, Masaka Diocese, Kasali Sub-County, Rakai District -- Uganda
Students carrying water
Community Description
The pump project will serve five communities, including three schools, one novitiate, and the Bannakaroli Brothers Community. The names of the schools are St. Joseph’s Secondary School (coed), Sacred Heart School (boys), and Kiteredde Vocational Institute (coed).  Students in the three schools range in age from 12 to 20 years old.  Girls form the majority of the population in the two coed schools.

More than half of the students are boarders at the schools, and the others walk to school from surrounding areas.  Most of the students come from poor farm families.  In addition to the students who live in the schools, the community is also made up of teaching and support staff, half of whom are women.
 
Problem Addressed
The current surface-type water pump was installed ten years ago.  Since then, the population of the institutions has doubled while the capacity of the pump has remained constant. Presently, the pump can’t produce enough water for the total population in the area. As a result of this situation, the only alternative water source where the Brothers and students draw water is highly congested with poor sanitation.  To make matters worse, during the dry spell these water sources dry up.  There is a major need for installing a submersible pump which will reach down to the water table and provide a clean and adequate water supply for the Brothers’ Community and the schools in the area.
Man using manual pump
Project Description
Water system: There are five institutions, which will share in using the system: a secondary school, a secondary technical school, a vocational school, a novitiate, and the Brothers’ residence.  The system will consist of the following components:

1.  Water Source:  The water will be pumped by submersible pump from underground through a borehole to an existing well, which has a reliable water table, which will meet the needs of the project.

2.  Characteristics of the well:  The present well will not change.  The engineer will only remove the galvanized pipes and the manual pump and replace them with plastic pipes and the submersible pump.  The present borehole was constructed in such a way that it can be used either manually or using a motor pump.  Therefore, there is no need to enlarge the existing bore hole.

3.  Main Tank:  Water from the underground will be pumped through the transmission pipes into the main tank.  From the main tank, water will be distributed to different institutions by gravity flow through the pipe network, which is already in existence.

4.  Submersible Pump: The engineer will install a Grundfos submersible pump with an output of 5,000 liters per hour, which is both reliable and powerful enough to pump water for the whole community.Students collecting water

5.  Network:  This is composed of pipes, which distribute water from the main tanks to various areas of the community.  The network includes one reserve tank for each of five communities.  The tanks now in place are old and need to be replaced.  These will be replaced later when the Brothers obtain enough money to do so—probably through fundraisers organized by the Brothers of St. Charles Lwanga Foundation in Chicago.

 6.  Power Source:  Electricity from the national power line will be used to run the pump.
 
Storehouse:  There is a need for a small storehouse where spare parts can be kept. This house is also necessary to protect part of the pump system including the switch, electric wires, and water meter from bugs, weather, and children.  The funds necessary to construct the house will be paid by the schools.

Elder in a wheelchairProject Impact
This project will benefit 2,200 people.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
James Salvatore

Monitoring and Maintenance
The maintenance and sustainability of the project will be the responsibility of Kiteredde St. Joseph’s Secondary and Technical school management committee and administration. According to the engineer, the average cost of maintaining the pump is around $55 per month. This expense will be included in the overall annual budget of the school, which will be paid for through school fees charged to the parents. Since the Bannakaroli Brothers administer the schools and their own community and novitiate, they will bear practically all of the responsibility for the implementation and the administration of the project.

 Comments
The Bannakaroli Brothers Community with the help of the engineer will oversee the implementation and administration of the project.

James is a Returned Peace Corp Volunteer who was posted in Piura, Peru from 1966-68.
This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.  If you like this project, please donate to our East Africa Water and Sanitation Program, of which this project is a component. 

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

Elders housed in the communityExisting well

Collecting waterStudents carrying waterStudents collecting waterSchool and tanks

SchoolSchool

SchoolSchool

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