$250,001 to $1,000,000

Ethiopia Well Rehab Program

Ethiopia Well Rehab Program

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis program is designed to help the people of Ethiopia by rehabilitating wells and repairing pumps across the country. It is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

ETHIOPIA

Population: 90 million people

54% do not have access to safe water

89% do not have access to adequate sanitation

39% live below the poverty line

Life Expectancy:  55 years

GNI Per Capita:  $280 USD

443 Million:  The number of school days lost worldwide each year to

water-related diseases

1.8 Million:  Additional number of people estimated to lack access to clean water

in 2016 in Ethiopia due to El Nino related drought

 


The program will begin with the West Arsi region of Ethiopia.  Arsi Negele Woreda is located in the Great Rift Valley, an area of southern Ethoipia susceptible to drought and famine.  Water is, and remains, one of the most crucial issues of concern for these remote regions of Ethiopia.  People resort to drawing water from muddy pits, and are subject to a large variety of waterborne illnesses.West Arsi Map

Due to El Nino related weather effects in the fall of 2015, Arsi Negele has been hit hard by drought.  This drought is widely affecting the southern region of Ethiopia, and in particular Arsi Negele.  Traditionally, people living in Arsi Negele have collected water from traditional water sources, such as ponds and rivers, or some villages have been fortunate enough to have shallow wells drilled with hand pumps.  Traditional sources are not protected and the unclean water causes numerous health problems for the local communities.  Due to the drought, even these sources began to fail in the fall of 2015.  The combined effects of the failure of traditional water sources, as well as exacerbated problems related to the drought, has caused a serious and perilous water shortage in Arsi Negele..

This program will encompass the following 6 villages to start. Each of the villages delineated below will have their own projects under this program.  Furthermore, after these first 6 villages are served, Water Charity intends to continue the program in other needy locations, finding as many wells that need rehabilitation as we can.
Chart

With this program, six existing wells that are currently nonfunctioning will be rehabilitated.  The objective of well rehabilitation is to improve well performance, increase well capacity, clear silt deposits built up in the well, remove mineral build up encrusted on the pump screen, and repair or replace existing pumps.  This is a way of utilizing work already done in order to provide clean water at a lower cost.  By repairing or replacing hand pumps, we can serve as many people as a new well would at a fraction of the cost.

The well rehabilitation program will be followed by a further effort to drill 20 new shallow wells to serve the needs of the population, as well as finding more wells to rehabilitate

For this project, Water Charity is partnering with the local NGO WiLI (Water Is Life International), an organization active in the creation and support of Sustainable Living Groups (SLGs), as well as the improvement of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) practices. SLGs are Water Use Committeecommunity-based savings and credit institutions that are autonomous and completely managed by the poor themselves.

As they mature, eight to twelve SLGs may be organized into Cluster Level Associations (CLAs) to form a second institution of support.  They also create a stimulating context for new learning of healthy behaviors and practices such as drinking from improved water sources, using latrines, washing hands and managing microenterprises. These new behaviors drastically reduce the incidence of waterborne disease and put people on the path toward better economic and social development.  

WiLi has been working in Ethiopia since 2006 and has constructed over 300 wells, provided WaSH trainings for each community receiving a well and established over 400 SLGs that have transformed the lives of tens of thousands of Ethiopians.  These engagements are managed and implemented through a network of partnerships that builds the capacity of Ethiopians to address these challenging issues.

The powerful establishment of a thriving SLG program has brought dignity, hope, and economic empowerment to thousands in the region. To build on established relationships and achievements to continue these positive trends this project will strengthen the SLG program and the formation of CLAs, increase the number of safe water wells, and bring the nexus of these activities together through WaSH trainings and educational programs. 

 

The great need in West Arsi continues to be a call for action and response, and WiLi and Water Charity want to continue the vision of long-term development investment and involvement in West Arsi.  A cost-effective approach to provide clean and sustainable water to a community is to rehabilitate already existing wells and hand pumps.  current source

Summary of Program Objectives 
Rehabilitate 6 wells in the region near Lake Langano, in order to ensure a safe, accessible and sustainable source of potable water to approximately 500 people per well. 

Well rehabilitations are a cost effective way to renew a clean water source within a community. 

  • Subsequently Drill 20 new shallow wells.
  • Support the continued training activities of the SLG program into CLAs in order to benefit over 5,500 SLG members and their families.
  • Observe improved sanitation and hygiene behaviors within SLGs, such as Open Defecation Free communities and consistent handwashing, through hygiene and sanitation training.
  • Introduce the use of bio-sand filters.
  • Build the capacity of the SLG institutions to better serve themselves and become leaders in their own transformation.  

Ideally, this program will scale up to include more villages and regions afield from Wes Arsi, but this program, as big as it ever gets, will be focused on this efficient model, and the tangible goal of making life better for the people of this, and other difficult regions in Ethiopia.

Program Impacts
The approach of combining the WaSH sector with SLGs allows us to tackle a number of varying issues that pose the greatest challenges to the poorest of the poor in West Arsi.  This transformational approach targets the following:

  • Extreme Poverty Extreme poverty can imprison and paralyze people to a life of hopelessness and despair. The SLG movement restores personal dignity and creates opportunity and hopefulness out of the resource base that already exists in the community.  This is called asset based community development. The process is to create formal small groups to envision the future together and establish responsible planning and accountability to increase income. 
  • West Arsi Well RehabFood Security It is estimated that 5.2 million people in Ethiopia are experiencing scarcity of food and undernourishment.  West Arsi is included in this area.  SLG members will gain access to improved water sources and will be able to learn better nutrition and afford a healthier diet through alternative sources of income.  
  • Climate Change Adaptation  Over the past 40 years the cycles of rainfall shortage and drought in Ethiopia have worsened due to climate change.  In drought prone areas in the southern part of Ethiopia, drought has become an annual risk.  Water shortage is a direct result of climate change.  We are helping Ethiopians to adapt to the impacts of climate change by providing alternative water sources that are sustainable during drought periods.
  • Community Resilience and Disaster Response Social support is the foundation of strengthening a community’s resilience and ability to respond and adapt to disasters.  SLGs have proven to be key social structures that improve the ability of families and communities to respond to disasters in a successful way.  By strengthening and expanding our SLG programs, we promote community resilience and partner with communities for positive responses to disasters.
  • Health  Waterborne disease is the number one cause of infant mortality in Ethiopia, causing an estimated 300,000 deaths per year.  The best way to decrease infant mortality and improve the health of children and families in Ethiopia is through clean and safe water.  Our wells provide clean water sources so that death won’t be caused by dirty water, and our sanitation and hygiene education programs help decrease the transmission of water-borne diseases.

UPDATE:

All of the initial well rehabs in this program have been completed.  Conclusion pages are being posted under the individual project pages for each village well. We are in the process of assessing new wells that need rehabilitation in villages nearby and farther away.  Check back soon, as a SECOND PHASE of well rehabs will be underway shortly!

WELL REHABILITATION SITE SUMMARY

Village

GPS Coordinates

Elevation (m)

Depth (m)

Static Water Level (m)

Pump Type

Well Yield (L/s)

UTM East

UTM North

Kushe #1

475140

827438

1676

66

47

Extra Deep Hand Pump

2

Kushe #2

475851

828234

1649

69

38

Indian Mark-II

3

Gubeta Bomba

477271

830388

1618

72

18

Indian Mark-II

1

Buku Wolkite

473603

827858

1656

84

38

Indian Mark-II

2.5

Wondo Lemeche

476893

831783

1600

31

20

Afridev

1

Lalesa

470255

828879

1608

40

22

Afridev

1.5

Kids In Arsi

To contribute to this ambitious program, use the PayPal button below. We welcome corporate sponsorship.

 

NPCA & WC LOGOSAnd to those who have already contributed, thank you for changing the lives of so many of the poorest of the poor in Arsi Negele, Ethiopia, and for partnering with us to promote sustainable access to clean water!

This entire program falls under our larger East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.
These projects are made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

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Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

Let Girls LearnNPCA & WC LOGOS


First Lady Michelle Obama, in concert with the State Department, USAID, and the Peace Corps, has formed a powerful collaboration, Let Girls Learn (LGL), to expand access to education for adolescent girls around the world. The program aims to improve opportunities for the 62 million girls around the world who are not able to remain in school each year. The goal is to implement community-based projects, funded with donations from non-Federal entities, and was announced with fanfare by Michelle, President Barack Obama, and Peace Corps Director Carrie Hessler-Radelet.Let Girls Learn with Michelle

Water Charity is proud to be intimately involved in this program, not only doing the very first LGL project, but committing to do hundreds more.  We are raising money specifically for these projects, thus enabling the government agencies to direct the funds they are able to raise towards other projects, and have the entire program go further, and reach more people.  We already have dozens of these projects underway, and many more coming through every day!  This promises to be a hugely impactful program.

Water Charity's take on the LGL theme involves building bathrooms and bringing running water to schools that often have neither, as well as other water system projects that save girls from having to fetch water, and eliminate school days lost to waterborne illness.  With all the other pressures that might serve to keep girls from going to, or staying in school, we feel the last thing should be lack of access to sanitation and proper hygiene.  In many parts of the world, young girls drop out of school when they get their menses. Aside from pressure to start families at this age, the lack of clean bathrooms, proper toilets with doors, and running water are major factors in the high drop out rate.  Some girls simply miss school for their entire period every month... many never return.

The program was announced to target Albania, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Georgia, Ghana, Moldova, Mongolia, Mozambique, Togo and Uganda, with Thailand, The Gambia, and Ethiopia under consideration. 62 Million Girls Each YearAll of these countries are now involved in LGL projects, and later this year, the program will expand to include all of the countries where Peace Corps operates.  We here at Water Charity will be funding PCV led projects in as many of these places as we can, and have already hit the ground running.

Through our partnership with the National Peace Corps Association (NPCA), Water Charity has committed to the implementation of projects to build and improve 100 bathrooms, and install water systems, at schools in Albania, as well as another 100 such projects worldwide in the designated LGL countries. We are already on pace to supersede those figures.

In addition, we will continue to enable similar PCV projects in other countries, and implement RPCV projects that are in the spirit of and in support of the LGL mission.  These projects that are in the spirit of LGL, but not officially part of the program, we designate LGL+.  By clicking that link you can see those projects, while the full Let Girls Learn tag is applied to projects within the program, and can be perused seperately.  Both types will fall under this Water Charity Let Girls Learn Initiative, and can be followed from this page.  Projects with an arrow next to them have been completed and have conclusion pages up already.  Those with circles next to them are still underway.Carrie Hessler-Radelet

Access to a clean and safe bathroom is crucial for all children, but is especially important for young girls as they reach adolescence. NPCA and Water Charity helped develop, and provided the funding for, the first LGL project, the Svey Leu High School Latrine Project - Cambodia. That project, which has been completed, exemplifies the need for dedicated bathroom facilities and water systems that provide hygienic and sanitary conditions as well as privacy, safety, and dignity.

Male or female, no student should have to defecate in the open, or attend a school without proper bathrooms and running water. While our focus here is on the needs of the girls, all of our projects also include comparable facilities for the boys, teachers and parents as well.

We hope you will support us in this effort.  Donations can be made on the individual project and program pages. (Links to them are below) Our programs are collections of projects in their own right, as typified by our 100 Water Projects Program - Albania which, alone, will have 100 projects under it.

Donation to our projects go towards recouping the funds we have spent already on that project, as WC pre-funds all of our projects out of pocket and allows people to adopt them, in whole or in part, after they are already begun. The efficiency and agility of this methodology should be obvious, and, in this way, we never ask people to donate to projects that aren't already a reality--as is common in most philanthropy--but to support ongoing, proven, and even successfully completed projects with the knowledge that time is of the essence where water is concerned.

HERE the FLOTUS acknowledges our commitment to LGL. We thank her and her staff for the full paragraph about us on the .gov website (the 5th new announcement)!  And HERE, the Washington Post reports on it (end of 3rd paragraph).

This program is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

USAID LGL Ad

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100 Water Projects Program - Albania

100 Water Projects Program - Albania

This is an effort under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama & Peace Corps, to expand access to education for girls around the world!NPCA & WC LOGOS

100 Water Projects For Albanian Girls!


Water Charity is proud to announce that we have crafted a program to do 100 water projects in Albania over the next year. Due in large part to the vision of Teresa and Graham Anderson, the PCVs spearheading this effort, we have scaled up what would have been 10 school bathroom projects, into a major program to deal with the poor sanitation conditions in schools all around Albania. This ambitious goal is already underway in a dozen schools, and will likely surpass even our lofty goal of 100 projects.

Santa_Maria_Apollonia

This entire program falls under our Let Girls Learn Initiative. This is an effort on our part to step up, and pick up the gauntlet thrown by the First Lady in her call to further girls education around the world. Water Charity did the very first LGL project in Cambodia earlier this year, and aims to do a couple hundred more water projects that expressly aim to empower young women, and allow girls the myriad opportunities that an education can bestow.

NPCA and Water Charity have already helped develop, and provide funding for, a number of great water system projects that exemplify the need for programs like this. It is hard to overestimate the value of clean, functional, dedicated bathroom facilities.  They not only provide hygienic and sanitary conditions, but privacy, safety, and dignity as well.

Lack of proper sanitation facilities at a school contributes greatly to the drop out rate among adolescent women. Upon reaching their menses, many girls simply leave school, and others struggle on while missing a whole week out of every month. Most of them endure a lot of pressure to drop out of school to get married and start families.

Dancing girlsAlbania, as one of only two majority Muslim countries in Europe, has cultural attitudes towards women and their education that influence many Albanian women to give up on the idea of education completely.

Our goal with this program is to work with the schools to create an environment conducive to young women remaining in school.

The majority of these schools lack running water, and many have no functional bathroom facilities whatsoever at the moment.  Even where they do have toilets, they are often in horrible disrepair, or are not useable because there is no running water to flush them... and they are not connected to sewer pipes.

Thus, a large portion of these projects will be to refurbish or build new toilet facilities, complete with running water. We will not stop there, however. Water Charity intends to go on and support a large variety of projects that have LGL impact. As most people know, lack of clean water and adequate sanitation can make people susceptible to frequent waterborne illnesses, and being sick with such sicknesses, keep children out of school... not to mention threatening their very lives.

We hope you will support us in this effort to make a meaningful difference in this beautiful Mediterranean nation. Check out the various projects in the program below, and don't hesitate to donate to any projects that seem worthy to you. We are looking for a large donor to adopt this entire program as well, so contact us if you are interested.
This program is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.
Turkish toiletMoschee Vloraschool

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Ethiopia Borehole Program

Ethiopia Borehole Program - Ethiopia

 

Water Charity is proud to announce our Ethiopia Borehole Program.  This is a major initiative to drill new boreholes in the Sidama region of Ethiopia. The program is underway.  Click the links near the bottom of this page to read about the projects that are started.NPCA & WC LOGOS

This program is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

The drilling will be done by Selam Awassa Water Drilling works & Sanitation PLC, a local company that was donated drilling equipment by our friends Wine 2 Water, who have been gracious enough to make this connection for us.  In order to achieve maximum effect, and a high return on the dollar, this program is being done in partnership with these groups with an existing presence in the region, and a strong record of success in the field of well creation, management and repair. These will be our first projects in Ethiopia in quite some time, and we are thrilled to be working with people who have been actively engaged in doing water and sanitation projects in the area.

The woredas (counties) to be served by this program are Wondo Genet and Dalle to begin with, and as we can compound upon initial successes, we will expand the program to include other needy areas.  Click on the map to the right to expand it.  Each well will have its own project (and conclusion) page, which will be linked below.  This page will be updated as new projects are started and news from the field comes in.

Map of the regionThe regions in question are mountainous with an average elevation of 6,000ft.  60% of the people in the area do not currently have access to clean water.  According to the 2011 UNDP Human Development Report, Ethiopia is ranked as one of the least developed countries at 174 out of 187 in the United Nations Human Development Index.  It is estimated that one in four Ethiopians live on less than one dollar per day. Access to safe drinking water is particularly lacking in Ethiopia’s rural areas.  During the dry season more traditional sources of water are placed under pressure as hand dug wells and other perennial sources dry up.  Although Ethiopia is said to have one of the greatest water reserves in Africa, most of this lies untapped below the surface of the earth with water tables ranging from 50 to over 500 feet down.

Given this variety in depth, the difficulty and cost of doing wells in various areas varies tremendously.  A 180m deep well is going to cost more per person than a 90m... or 30m well.  The areas we have chosen to start this program are neither the hardest nor the easiest regions where this is concerned, but rather represent an area where the need is great, and the infrastructure to get projects done is present and running well.

Ethiopia’s main health problems are said to be communicable diseases caused by poor sanitation and malnutrition.  Water and sanitation-related diseases, particularly diarrhea, are among the top causes of death in the country, especially for children under 5.  In the woredas where our new wells will be drilled, there are frequent cases of dysentery, giardia, typhoid and other dangerous waterborne illnesses.

The majority of the population consists of subsistence farmers, growing crops such as sugar cane, false banana, coffee, and avocado.  The women and children in the communities are responsible for collecting water for their households from unprotected hand dug wells and contaminated ponds. Wells of the kind we will be installing (deep boreholes) provide year-round safe access to water, and will free up many hours of labor. 

The focus is to empower women who carry the burden of hauling water and making a living in a paternalistic society and who offer so much promise to transform communities. Communities and trusted partners are invited to participate in each stage of the work in order to create a sense of ownership, responsibility and stewardship. In this way, a framework and support system is established that can provide long-term benefits for individuals and communities.

A Water Use Committee (WUC) has been established for each water point so money can be collected for repairs.  This will ensure village participation, sense of ownership, and long term sustainability.

Cement pouredAs the wells are drilled, a health and hygiene training program will be organized. Hand washing, diseases transmission, pump care, and other key lessons will be taught. One of the community members is chosen by the WUC to be caretaker of the pump and will be responsible for small maintenance issues and security.  The new boreholes will dovetail with local community based organizations to build upon a community outreach program (Sustainable Living Groups) for the longevity and sustainability of the project. This, combined with WC's traditionally minimal overhead costs, creates a very comprehensive package that doesn't stop at simply drilling a well and installing a pump, but continues to engage with the community, and make sure these water points will continue to provide for the people for many, many years to come.

While this ambitious effort to create wells in a very needy region of a very needy country has a major donor already, we encourage everyone interested in helping out to do so.  The more money we collect for this program, the more people we can help.  This is an opportunity for people to contribute meaningfully to these communities without the massive overhead often associated with such projects.

You can view the individual borehole projects via links at the bottom of this page.

This program falls under our larger, comprehensive East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

 Village Mother

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Filters for Life Program – Worldwide

Filters for Life Program – Worldwide

The Filters For Life Program is Water Charity's flagship, worldwide endeavor to provide much-needed water filters for people around the world. With developments in filter technology over the last five years or so, we can now provide needy communities with long-lasting, effective water filters that can provide as much as 650 gallons of water a day each.  Point One bucket kitThese carbon nanotube filters are guaranteed to last for 1,000,000 gallons (and often last far longer with a modicum of maintenance)... and this technology allows for this at a very reasonable price.

The hollow membrane style (dialysis) filters offer a substantial improvement over the older biosand, ceramic, and activated charcoal filters we had been using.

They are small, light, and easily transported. Whereas, biosand filters are large and heavy.  The making of the various grades of sand, and the transportation of this heavy material accounted for a huge portion of the cost of a biosand installation.

The Sawyer filters we use are very durable and difficult to break... whereas the ceramic filters we had favored previously are notoriously prone to cracking, and thus eliminating their ability to protect people from pathogens.  They also had far slower flow rates, and could therefore serve less people per installation.

We are very excited about this program, which will include individual projects all over the world. The need for these filters is great, and there is almost no limit to the number of  filters we can distribute as the funds become available.

Taiphoon Haiyan Distribution
Keep in mind:

  • 80% of all disease is water-borne
  • 50% of all hospital beds worldwide are occupied by someone suffering from a water-related illness
  • Lack of clean drinking water kills more people globally than all forms of violence combined... including war.

There is no need for these statistics to be true anymore. We have all the tools we need to completely eliminate this suffering and waste of life. The predominant victims of this terrible situation are young children. Simple diarrhea is a leading killer of children under 5.  When it is so simple to prevent waterborne illness, there is no excuse for this. These kids deserve a chance.

As an addition to our current roster of successful programs in water and sanitation, which have included well drilling, rainwater catchment, toilet and hand-washing station construction, emergency relief, reforestation efforts and more--including a good number of filter projects--as well as our acclaimed Appropriate Projects initiative, this new program will be an umbrella for our worldwide push to get filters into the hands of those people who desperately need them. It includes most of the relevant projects, large and small... thus enabling people to donate to the overall effort.

For various reasons, some filter projects are tied into other initiatives or programs... generally where the filter installations are just a part of a larger effort.  Many rainwater catchment projects, for instance, have a filter component, but being that only a few filters are involved, and the larger part of the project are the gutters, the tanks and the distribution system... such projects don't technically fall under this program.

Water Drop WorldThe projects in this program, are larger distributions, and are upwardly scalable. As such, the more money we can raise, the more filters we can give out. Instead of creating and packaging the individual filter delivery projects one by one and funding them separately, it makes sense to raise as much money as possible and keep the filters flowing. In this way, we can also get larger grants from foundations and concerned organizations. We have hopes that, in time, this program can grow into one of the largest thing we have done.

For those interested in the filter technology we are presently using, please feel free to go to the Sawyer International website and peruse the relevant materials. We use primarily their Point One filter, but for hospitals, clinics and other sites we will also be making the Point Zero Two purifier available.  Both filters are engineered to have no holes large enough for even the smallest microbes to pass through. Point One = .1 micron engineering and Point Zero Two = .02 microns [note: The Point One is more than capable of handling the amoebas, cysts, bacteria, and protozoa that normally render water un-potable.]

This is an exciting program, and we hope you will see the need for it and join in. Water Charity is currently active in over 65 countries around the world. As the money comes in we will take the Filters For Life program into all of them and beyond.

If there are certain regions where you are especially interested in helping, it will be possible to donate specifically for those countries or areas. Just send us a message with your donation. However, we are hoping people will recognize that a general donation to the program itself will be the most effective way to get the maximum number of filters out in the shortest amount of time.

We are water... literally. The human body is about 70% water by mass, and a typical human cell is composed of 98.73% water molecules. Think about it.

CLICK HERE to see all the projects, or the links for the various individual projects in this program at the bottom of the page.

 

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Permagarden Training Initiative - Worldwide

Permagarden Training Initiative - Worldwide

Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association are pleased to announce the start of our new Permagarden Training initiative - Worldwide. Under the direction of Peter Jensen, training and support will be provided to Peace Corps staff, Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) and their local counterparts, Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs), and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) around the world.

Permagarden Training Initiative - WorldwideThe trainings will be centered around the “Terra Firma Method”, a time-proven training methodology developed by Peter Jensen, Permagarden Training Specialist, over a lifetime, but more specifically through many years as a Peace Corps trainer.

The Method
The Terra Firma Method is a simple, visual technique suitable for the training of families in low literacy populations. It requires little to no capital outlay by the family itself and can be accomplished without external inputs. It is easy to learn, do and teach.

The method is based on Five Steps, which revolve around a circle showing continuity. These steps are: Assess, Capture, Protect, Produce and Manage. Each step has corresponding tasks which are small and doable by even the most marginalized individuals and families.

A critical behavior change philosophy employed throughout the training and the ongoing outreach is The Rule of CLOSE. This Rule, also developed by Jensen, requires that all actions be close to the point of daily management, use ONLY locally accessible materials; are organic in terms of content and evolution; are small in size to appeal to anyone; and, are easy to see, do and teach others.

By implementing the method, families can achieve remarkably high productive yields of nutrient-dense grains, greens, fruit, root and legume crops throughout the year, regardless of dry or rain season. By Permagarden Training Initiative - Worldwideusing the Climate-Smart adaptation, mitigation and intensification principles (berms, double digging and intensive intercropping, respectively) it is possible to achieve family level nutrition security on a daily basis.

The youth, elderly and the disabled can become not only active participants but community-level educators as well, leading to even further psychosocial empowerment through resilience skills. By learning how to maximize even the smallest landscapes while minimizing the impacts of heavy rains and long droughts, large parcels of land are not necessary, leading to greater landscape resource management and income generation from value-added products close to the home. As the method requires no additional materials, such as fertilizers, special tools or irrigation, it can spread rapidly from neighbor to neighbor in any community, including densely populated IDP camps.

These family and school-based Permagardens can serve as the link between agriculture and nutrition as they directly address a broad array of agronomic, environmental, health, economic and social challenges. Through Permagarden actions, these issues convert into agroecological resilience on the small scale with eventual translation to the agroecosystem as a whole leading to sustainable resource management

Permagarden Training Initiative - WorldwideThe Initiative
The initiative has been started through the generosity of an anonymous donor, who has provided the funds to begin the program and ensure its success over the first year. In addition, he will match all outside donations, dollar-for-dollar, to enable rapid expansion.

Additional funding will be raised through the National Peace Corps Association Community Fund.

The initiative is designed to be unlimited in its scope and duration. Starting as a series of week-long trainings at Peace Corps posts in various countries in Africa, it is envisioned that the technology will be quickly spread to other continents with amazing results.

The skills taught will be easily implemented and result in lifelong changes in the lives of those touched. The results will span all areas, including health, education, food security, economic benefit, and preparation for and remediation of the effects of climate change.

Not the least of the benefits of this program will be the impact on the Peace Corps community. It will further the objectives of the Peace Corps, make the service of PCVs vastly more productive and satisfying, and create a platform for the continuing involvement RPCVs and the entire community.

This video below is a time-lapse of a 20 minute rainshower followed by 40 minutes of sunshine, compressed into 25 seconds.  It highlights that even during these brief showers, just 4 mm of rain falling from a 30 square meter roof will result in over 100 liters of water.  You can see how the "saturation pits" hold the water, keep it from running off and taking valuable topsoil with it, and then, ultimately, put it back into the earth where it is needed.

The initiative is now underway, with the Peace Corps Permagarden Training - Swaziland.

Your donation using the button below will be used for the next project.

 

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