$2,001 to $5,000

Xxx Xxxxxx Community Water Project - Senegal

Community Water Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Xxx Xxxxxx Community Water Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxx Xxxxxx, Kedougou, Kedougou Region, Senegal

Community Description
Xxx Xxxxxx is a rural farming village wedged in the lowlands between the Gambia River and one of its tributaries. There are remnants of the once lush landscape, with small groves of wild Shea trees, Maad fruit, teak, palm, and baobab. Rice and corn fields surround the village and make a carpet of neon green in the first weeks after seeding.

It is a Jaxanke community, an ethnic minority, and a group that has been persecuted in the past, and is now neglected by the government. In the Jaxanke language, a common greet is, "mun be diyalin?" which translates as "what is sweet?" The typical Dar Salaam response is "Barro doron," or "work only," in English. Clearly, they are motivated and desire work.

Being a group that is an ethnic minority, Xxx Xxxxxx is often overlooked by the government. This equates to a population that is uneducated and unable to access resources that other communities are entitled to. For instance, the village does not have a government-built, cement structure for a school, which many of the surrounding, majority Pular communities have, even though the bamboo shack, that now functions as a school room, houses more students than most buildings in the neighboring villages.

Xxx Xxxxxx is a community that is seeking a more prosperous life, but has a hard time imagining one in Senegal. They see trees chopped down, and encroaching deforestation that destabilizes land and makes finding fuel more difficult. They know it is hard to find a well-paid job without a basic education, yet, still seek jobs abroad. Every young man must at least attempt a trip to Europe, where they see images of prosperity, regardless of the perils en route and the unskilled labor that awaits them.

Those who remain inexhaustibly toil in rice fields, dependent on increasingly unpredictable rains, scavenger the bush for wild meat and cooking fuel that is increasingly rare, and pray that their efforts will be rewarded in this life or the next.

Xxx Xxxxxx Community Water Project - SenegalProblem Addressed
Xxx Xxxxxx, like many rural communities in Africa, lacks sufficient water. The exploding population relies on one hand pump well as their only source of tested, clean, and potable water. Although other wells exist across the community, they all run dry during the two months of extreme heat and dryness.

This timing is also referred to as "Starve Season" because gardens die, forageable food is depleted and storage supplies are low. In an attempt to increase their access to food, and generate a small income, some women use the one pump to water their garden beds throughout the dry season. It is often a futile effort. Women get fed up with waiting in long lines at the pump each day to fill their watering buckets, and give up on their vegetables before they fruit.

To compound the problem, young women are required to wait hours in line to fill their families' drinking water buckets, which keeps them from valuable daylight hours when they could otherwise do their homework or play with friends.

Project Description
This project is to deepen a well, build three basins, install a solar water pump, and teach improved gardening techniques.

The PCV, Community President Mamadou Minté, and Women's Group President Mariama Ba will ensure a timely implementation of all projects, including:

-Create tree nursery with fruit and live-fence species; implemented by Xxx Xxxxxx Women's Group and involves filling tree sacks and watering them.

Xxx Xxxxxx Community Water Project - Senegal-Build elevated basin foundations and dig trenches for PCV pipe; implemented by the men of Xxx Xxxxxx and involves filling tires with packed earth.

-Transport Materials from Kedougou to Xxx Xxxxxx; implemented by the young men of the community who work with donkey carts.

-Deepen Well; implemented by Babacar Keita a well digger who will deepen the well five meters and secure it with molds.

-Construct Basins; implemented by mason Babacar Djallo and his apprentice.

-Install Solar Pump; implemented by Technician Cherno Djallo and team and includes creating a cement box to protect equipment, and well cover.

-Transplant Trees; implemented by the women of Xxx Xxxxxx and includes both a live fence and small orchard.

-Construct Garden Beds; implemented by members of the Xxx Xxxxxx Women's Group.

-Improved Gardening Technologies Trainings; implemented by the PCV. and PC Master Farmer Mamadou Minté including trainings in composting, double digging, pest management, spacing, seed selection and storage, etc.

Project Impact
267 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
W. Benjamin

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV will oversee, monitor and report on the project. It is likely that he will be replaced by another volunteer once his contract is completed.

To ensure that this is a sustainable project, a section of the community garden will be dedicated to low-maintenance, collective crops that can be sold as a group and stored in the Xxx Xxxxxx Women's Group's cash box. This fund will be used to maintain the improvements, and perform necessary repairs.

Two women, from opposite sides of the village have keys to distinct locks, to ensure that funds are not being misused. Unlike a motor-pump that runs on gasoline, this solar powered well will not require daily expenses to pump water into the watering basins.

Let Girls Learn
This project will free up time that young girls traditionally spend waiting line to pump potable water for their families, making it easier for them to remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$3,200

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,200

 

Xxx Xxxxxx Community Water Project - SenegalXxx Xxxxxx Community Water Project - Senegal

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Iramba District School Water Project - Tanzania

Iramba District School Water Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Iramba District School Water Project - TanzaniaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxxxx, Iramba District, Singida, Tanzania

Community Description
Most members of the community are subsistence farmers.

Xxxxxxxxxx Secondary School is in the Iramba District of the Singida Region.

Xxxxxxxxxx is also home to 4 schools – 2 secondary schools, 1 primary school, and a primary school teacher’s college. Xxxxxxxxxx Secondary School serves all secondary students in the Xxxxxxxxxx ward.

Problem Addressed
There is no source of water on campus. The school currently gets water from the community pump which is a 20-minute walk from the school. These trips to retrieve water take time away from other school activities, especially class time. Fetching water is often a disciplinary action, which causes students to miss more than a period of instruction.

Iramba District School Water Project - TanzaniaProject Description
This project is to build a rainwater catchment system at the school.

Rainwater collection gutters will be installed on 3 buildings. A concrete base will be built near each building, upon which a plastic tank will be placed. Piping will connect the gutters to the tanks, resulting in a total capacity to store 18,000 liters of water.

The project committee consist of Gunda Gunda, the head of school, the chair of the school board, the Peace Corps Volunteer, Liberia Kawishe, the second master Mr. Ngagilo, and the academic master Everst Mponzi.

The community will contribute 25% of the total project cost, in cash from parents and the community and in labor.

Project Impact
575 people will benefit from the project.

Iramba District School Water Project - TanzaniaPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
J. Juran

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school maintenance committee will be responsible for the proper use, maintenance, and repairs of gutters and tanks after installation, and will cover all costs.

This project is sustainable because gutters and tanks require low maintenance, and no additional training is necessary for the school to take on these responsibilities.

Comments
This is an excellent, cost-effective project, which will provide water on campus, and significantly reduce loss of instruction time due to fetching water.

Fundraising Target
$2,350

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$260

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,090

 

Iramba District School Water Project - TanzaniaIramba District School Water Project - Tanzania

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Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal

Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Well and Solar Pump Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, Tambacounda, Senegal

Community Description
The community is made of 8,200 people, most ethnically Pulaar, who are proud to live in what was pre-colonially the capital of the Boundou region (now Tambacounda). The community is composed mostly of women, children, and elderly, as many young men have migrated to find work.

More than 60% of the Xxxxxx population lives below the federal threshold of poverty, leading to food insecurity. The economic decline among the population is explained by:

1. the low post-colonial productivity of their primary economic activity, agriculture because of:

a. significant loss of soil fertility due to desertification,
b. lack of availability of agricultural training, therefore
c. an inaccessibility of many small operators to credit, and

Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal2. the lack of technical training in other sectors:

a. the only training for young people available is within the family, for that ever-shrinking percentage lucky enough to have been born in a family with prior skills (and this of course is rare for women, who start families early), and
b. stories of success from Dakar and abroad lure the men to pursue career options elsewhere, often after having started a family of his own. Thus, young men leave behind young wives with no employment skills, and young children, who are food insecure.

Problem Addressed
The problems to be addressed are water availability in the fields. There is a single well, which only provides water during the rainy season.

There are 8 gardens in Xxxxxx, which are not sufficient to meet the demand for vegetables of its 8,200 citizens.

Project Description
This project is to build a well, with a solar pump, to serve the water needs of the community.

A small community of volunteers in have given 2 hectares of registered land for the creation of a market garden, intercropped space for staple grains, and a fruit tree farm.

35 committed members have signed an agreement form to work for shared plots, attend ongoing trainings until August this year (with a break until November when cold season gardening begins).

Also, the agriculture club (15-19 students, which has helped the PCV plant and maintain trees) at the local high school will be attending all trainings.

1. From April 2017 - June 2017, a hand dug well will be constructed. At an excavation of about 1.5 meters in diameter, a local well company (head mason Mr. Sumare and 3-4 of his workers in tandem with one local metal worker) will dig two meters per day. The two meters dug will be supported by concrete poured from the top (between the sides of the excavation and temporary framework made of rebar) that becomes the permanent lining to the well, daily. This process will be repeated until the water table is reached at 30-35 feet.

The bricks will be made on site. The metal worker is scheduled to come every few days to make the new rebar rings and hooks for the next 4-6 meters until the water table is reached. Then, concrete rings, built by the head mason on site, will be sunk below the water line. Then, small gravel will be sunk to the bottom of the well as a sort of filter. The top of the well and below the ground for 3 meters will consist of a concrete and large gravel barrier for people to stand on while accessing water. This will channel draining water into a basin and keep rain or contaminated water from going into the well.

A tree nursery will be started in April, with a hands-on training and distributed maintenance calendar for members of the group.

Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal2. In June 2017: After the completion of the well, a local volunteer from The hydraulics office will test the water for contamination, and conduct a safe irrigation training for 35 group members, high school students and any interested community members. This office will construct an “irrigation only” sign, to be installed on the day of training. The health PCV will train on dangers of unsafe drinking water, and importance of hand washing.

3. In June 2017: a solar pump will be transported and installed by a company in Dakar that specializes in solar pumps. Amadou Gakko, a solar pump technician will train 35 people, and additional high school students and interested community members on use, maintenance, and sustainability of the solar pump. Another PCV will give lesson on the dangers of uncontrolled slash and burn practices, so that local farming can scale up, as well as live fencing (with live fencing seed distribution).

4. In July 2017, pre-rainy-season staple crop lessons will be taught, cultivation of land will be carried out, and trees from the nursery will be planted. Post-rainy season (August 2017), 35 community members will harvest local crops and market garden, and distribute among 595 inhabitants.

Project Impact
Over 500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
M. Lee

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV, and group lead Sada Dieng will be present every day to oversee progress. The responsibility for maintenance of the project will go to the 7 volunteers, with whom the PCV is conducting project management training with her counterpart using PDM (Project Design and Management) Peace Corps curriculum in March. However, until August (year one of the project) the PCV will be working closely with the volunteers to launch the project successfully, teach record keeping, and teach financial and business management so that the project may sustainably continue for years to come.

In addition, business planning by Sada Dieng and youth member Dienaba Thiam has demonstrated the group's ability to cover any maintenance costs, be it the purchase of repairs or new tools that may arise after grant funds are exhausted. The community group will manage this fund, having been trained on project management by PCV.

Certain educational activities, like live fencing, will lower maintenance costs and increase the sustainability of this project and the future projects started by members of the group. The inclusion of local experts including technicians, health and water specialists, farmers, and business people in planned teaching events will create a series of stakeholders who can maintain the momentum of technology dissemination after the initial project is completed.

Comments
The arable space will be maximized by an accessible supply of water. The project will result in increased access to fresh local food, which will boost the economy and increase the nutrition of the local population.

Fundraising Target
$4,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$150

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,350

 

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Dahra Latrine Project - Senegal

Dahra Latrine Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Dahra Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

District of Dahra, Region of Louga, Senegal

Community Description
The village is approximately 30 km from the nearest town and has a population of roughly 3,000. It is made up of two ethnic groups, Wolof and Pulaar, and, dependent on the time of the year, you can find a sizable Sereer population.

The community is made up of 6 neighborhoods, and each neighborhood has at least 2 members who are volunteer community health workers. This means that they spend time extending education to the community about things such as malnutrition, malaria, exclusive breastfeeding, and vaccinations.

Problem Addressed
Currently, there is not a restroom or a water source in the middle school. As a result, many students have stopped attending school, or their attendance has dramatically decreased.

The health post serves approximately 7,000 individuals, including people from neighboring smaller communities, health post staff and their families, and even nomadic herders. It has only two fully operational restrooms.

Project Description
This project will provide seven latrines and one water access point (robinet).

The seven latrines will all be VIP latrines, consisting of cement privacy structures, roofs, and locking doors. Five of the seven latrines will have Turkish basins, and the final two will have western toilets seats.

Dahra Latrine Project - SenegalFive of the latrines, and the one robinet will be constructed at the local middle school, while the last two latrines will be added onto the health structure.

Once these structures are completed, students at the middle school will complete WASH trainings during class with the village's community health workers and the volunteer. The students will also be exposed to further WASH behavior change activities through their participation in the Junior Health Committee Club.

In addition, community health workers will hold bi-monthly trainings on proper WASH practices at the health post to educate the citizens that will be benefitting from the new latrines at the health post.

The community will contribute in the form of cash contributions to the project.

Objectives of the project include providing students at the middle school, as well as the patients at the health post, with access to improved water and sanitation as well as providing education on the importance of good sanitation practices.

Project Impact
3,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Sydney Hurst

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school and health post will elect separate committees to handle the care and cleaning of the latrines, contributing to the sustainability of the project by maintaining the latrines in good working order.

Should there be a problem, the latrines and robinet are both being built by masons in the community, so they will be able to fix them in the future.

The community will sustain this project by consulting the Latrine and Robinet Addition Committee, which will see to the cleaning, maintenance, and all other tasks regarding the latrines and robinet.

Dahra Latrine Project - SenegalThe education of proper hygiene and sanitation practices will be enacted and sustained by continuing to discuss the topic and working as closely as possible with the youth. Most recently, the community has planned to begin a youth club that will focus on health issues, being a primary way to increase the sustainability of the material side of the project as well as the educational side of it.

Let Girls Learn
Five of the seven latrines that are being built will be located at the local middle school. This will provide female students with the proper environment needed to fully focus on their studies. The five latrines will be separated based on gender, two for male, two for female, and one for teachers. This separation will allow for maximum privacy and safety for the female students.

This project is part of the Let Girls Learn program started by FLOTUS Michelle Obama in partnership with Peace Corps. The goal of this project is to keep girls attending to school. It is a part of Water Charity’s Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

Fundraising Target
$ 2,750

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$305

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,445

 

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Progress: 

Touba Mouride Latrine Project - Senegal

Touba Mouride Latrine Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Touba Mouride Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
Touba Mouride, Fatick Region, Senegal

Community Description
Touba Mouride has around 2,100 people, living in 217 households. A primarily ethnically Wolof town, it is largely devoted to agriculture practices, including raising peanuts, millet, and corn. In addition, it has a large women’s garden. A small subset of the village is Pulaar, living in a small community outside Touba Mouride, but still included in the village census.

Touba Mouride is filled with hard-working families who are committed to improving their health status. There is a highly functional health hut and committee, and the health hut serves 15 surrounding villages.

Problem Addressed
A baseline survey showed that of the 56 household sampled, 50% have a latrine that is only a simple unlined dug hole for a pit, 25% have a latrine with a pit lining, and 25% have no latrines.

Project Description
This project is to build 30 new family latrines in the community. The latrines will be simple slab pit-style, with each family providing the simple reed structure or room structure.

The latrines will be built away from major water sources, such as wells, as well as cooking areas, to avoid contamination. The work will be done by two experienced masons and their team of skilled workers.

Touba Mouride Latrine Project - SenegalEach latrine pit will be 2.5 meters deep, and 2 meters on each side. The pit walls will be lined with bricks made from cement and sand, along with mortar between the bricks. On all four corners there will be columns which will provide structural integrity.

The plate over the hole will be built with cement and lined with rebar so prevent collapsing. The bottom plate of the pit will be built in the same manner as the top due to the weight that must be supported.

The sand will be provided by the participating members of the community.

A series of health talks will be conducted with all beneficiaries. Topics will include hand washing at the five critical times, childhood illnesses related to WASH, disadvantages of open defecation, and latrine maintenance. The topics will be illustrated by a mural.

Project Impact
300 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Lauren Hall

Monitoring and Maintenance
Home visits will be conducted to be sure the families receiving latrines have adopted the behavior changes and are using the latrines properly.

Fundraising Target
$3,100

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$175

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,925

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Medina Yoro Foulah and Niaming Latrine Project - Senegal

Medina Yoro Foulah and Niaming Latrine Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Medina Yoro Foulah and Niaming Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
Medina Yoro Foulah and Niaming, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Two communes in the Kolda region of Senegal are included in this project. The first consists of nine villages with an estimated total population of 3,100 inhabitants; the second consists of 45 villages with an estimated total population of 150,000 inhabitants.

These populations are very young: almost 50% of the population is under the age of 18. The main ethnic groups are Fulakunda, Pula-Foutah, Wolof, and Serrer.

It takes approximately 3 hours by car to travel from these communes to the regional capital, along an unpaved dirt road that can sometimes become impassible during the rainy season of July through October.

Agriculture and animal husbandry compose the bulk of economic activity in the two communes. Almost all adults, as well as many children and teenagers, are involved in some kind of agricultural or gardening activity, either for sale at the weekly Sunday market or for personal consumption. People primarily plant and harvest millet, corn, peanuts, mangoes, bananas, egg plants, okra, and chili-peppers. Other vegetables such as tomatoes and carrots are consumed within the community as well, but they are usually imported from other areas.

Both communes are located in the poorest region of the country, with the majority of the population living below the poverty line of $1.90 per day according to the World Bank. This is evident in every aspect of life: people cannot always afford food, clothing, medication or other basic necessities. Two examples can be found in education and health: a large number of students cannot afford tuition for middle or high school; and many people cannot pay the 200-300 CFA (roughly 35 US cents) to see the doctor when they suspect they (or their children) have malaria.

Medina Yoro Foulah and Niaming Latrine ProjectProblem Addressed
Between them, the communes support two pre-schools, 15 elementary schools, one middle school, and one high school. The extreme poverty of the two communes has meant that, as of now, only nine of these schools (all at the elementary level) have been able to afford to provide their students with functioning latrines. Two other schools have latrines, but they are in a state of such complete disrepair that they cannot be used by the students. The rest of the schools have no latrines at all.

The children in these communities relieve themselves in the bush and do not wash their hands, a hygiene problem that can negatively impact both the children and their communities. Diarrhea and other illnesses related to a lack of hygiene are common.

Beyond general hygiene problems, the lack of functional latrines exacerbates gender imbalances, particularly at the higher levels of schooling. Teen girls who have reached puberty often choose to stay home during their period for lack of adequate hygiene resources. For example, in one of the communes, the ratio of boys to girls in school drops from 50/50 in primary school to 70/30 in high school. Furthermore, some classes at the high school level have no female students at all.

Project Description
The project targets schools in a number of rural villages in the Medina Yoro Foulah district of the Kolda region of Senegal. The plan is to rehabilitate 13 latrines in the village of Medina Yoro Foulah (four at the pre-school and nine at the elementary school), and to construct 16 new latrines in the following locations: four each in Sare Demba and Sinthiang Yoro Douda, and three each in Touba Mboyene, Sinthiang Sadio, Demanoufa, and Kour Sally.

The Peace Corps Volunteers in the two communes plan to address these issues through the rehabilitation of the existing latrines, the construction of new latrines where none existed previously, the implementation of joint hand washing / soap making classes for students and their parents, and the introduction of additional activities aimed specifically at girls to encourage them to stay in school (i.e. Girls’ Club, sports/nutrition class, mentoring and tutoring).

Medina Yoro Foulah and Niaming Latrine Project - SenegalThe Peace Corps Volunteers will be responsible for purchasing and ensuring the delivery of most necessary project materials to the site of the repairs. The community will be responsible for quarrying and transporting the necessary quantities of sand and gravel. Water for construction is available on site (through faucets), it will also be provided by the community.

Over the course of the repairs the Peace Corps Volunteers and the Mayor will be responsible for overseeing the work on a daily basis and for dealing with any problems that arise.

More specifically, the rehabilitation of the 13 existing latrines, under the supervision of one mason and one plumber, will cover the following:

1. Elementary school (eight student latrines, one teacher latrine)

a. The pipes connecting the latrine cabins with the pit are broken. These need to be replaced.
b. The PCV pipes providing aeration have snapped off; these also need to be replaced.
c. The doors and their hinges are damaged beyond repair and need to be replaced.
d. There is currently no privacy wall in front of the latrines. This needs to be built to conform to cultural norms to allow female students to use the latrines.
e. The cement cover of the pit is cracked and needs to be re-done.
f. There is currently no running water available for students to wash their hands. A new line must be connected to the school water mainframe and faucets must be established next to the latrines.
g. The latrine holes and pipes (within the cabins) are broken. They will be replaced with Turkish seats for easier use by the students. The eight student cabins will also be tiled (as requested by the principal), to facilitate easier cleaning and maintenance through the students.
h. The teacher latrine has no roof and no door.
i. There are four latrines on the school premises that are beyond repair (the pits have caved in and the cabin bricks are disintegrating). They are a serious health hazard and need to be removed.

2. Pre-school (four toilets within one bathroom)

a. The cement cover of the latrine pit has fallen into the pit and must be re-done.
b. The toilets are all clogged and need to be un-clogged.
c. None of the four English toilets currently have seats. The students therefore cannot use the toilets, as they would fall in.
d. The toilet boxes for three of the toilets are broken and need to be replaced.
e. There is currently no running water available for students to wash their hands. The existing faucets in the bathroom will be connected to the pre-school’s water mainframe.

A second mason will be responsible for the construction of the 16 new latrines at the other schools. In each of the six villages, the village in question will appoint an assistant mason to ensure that the communities are fairly represented and involved. Two of the villages will receive four toilets each (one each for male and female students, and one each for male and female teachers and other staff). The other four villages will receive two toilets each (one each for male and female students).

Again, all materials necessary for construction (other than gravel and sand) will be bought and transported to a central drop-off location by the Peace Corps Volunteers. All of these materials, in addition to gravel and sand (which will be quarried and transported to individual villages by community members) will be transported by the villages, as will be water, in whatever quantities necessary.

The construction of the new latrines will cover the following: 1. Pit

a. The latrine pit will be 2m x 2m x 2m in size, and will be lined with cement bricks to maintain structural integrity. The pit will be dug by the community and will be lined by the mason.
b. The latrine cover will be made of cement and rebar, and will be constructed by the mason.
c. A PVC pipe extending from the pit will permit aeration.

2. Latrine Cabin

a. The latrine cabins, sized at 1m wide x 1.5m deep x 2m tall, will be built apart from the pit; waste will move from the latrine cabins to the pit via a PVC pipe. This construction ensures the longevity of the latrine: the mayors of the respective communes have agreed to incorporate money into their yearly budgets to have the pits emptied when they become full. The latrines will be built in pairs and will share one wall to reduce the materials needed for construction.
b. The latrines will be tiled to facilitate cleaning.
c. Each school will have either two or four latrines to separate for boys and girls.
d. For all new latrines, privacy walls will be built to ensure the latrines conform to cultural norms, allowing female students to use the latrines.
e. The doors of the new latrines, like those on the repaired latrines, will be made of iron. This is to ensure durability and longevity of the latrines.

Transportation of required materials from the central drop-off point to the final village location is also the responsibility of the community members. Donkey- and horse-drawn carts will be arranged to move the materials from the central drop-off point to the individual schools.

All involved parties (masons, plumber, school principals, school security guards, mayors, Peace Corps Volunteers) have agreed to share responsibility on monitoring construction materials, keeping an inventory, signing out materials, and storing it in one central and lockable location until such time as it will be used.

Rehabilitation of the existing latrines and construction of the new latrines will start at the same time, at the beginning of February 2017. The second mason and the Peace Corps Volunteers will determine the order of villages for the construction of the new latrines.

The project is backed and supported by the communities. The communities and the Peace Corps Volunteers collaborated to decide on the design, layout, and exact location of the latrines. The design was chosen in discussions between the mason, plumber, respective school principals, and Peace Corps Volunteers.

The general layout of the latrines is based on the wishes of the mayors, as they have agreed to be responsible for latrine upkeep: the latrines will be separated from the pits so trucks can periodically remove waste when the pits are full. This serves to increase the longevity of the latrines. On a day-to-day basis, general cleaning and maintenance of the latrines will be undertaken by the teachers and students at each benefiting school.

The location of the latrines on school grounds was determined during meetings with the village chiefs, principals, and presidents of the parent-teacher associations in each village.

Also, in each village, a meeting was held to decide on in-kind and labor contributions. All the communities have offered to quarry and transport the sand and gravel necessary for the construction and rehabilitation of the latrines. The remaining community contribution will be paid in cash by the mayors for their respective communes.

Project Impact
The project will immediately benefit 1,000 students (currently enrolled), 32 teachers, and 500 parents

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Laura d’Elsa and Abigail Pershing

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Peace Corps Volunteers will be responsible for the following:

- Supervising/monitoring construction/rehabilitation of 13 existing and 16 new latrines
- Conducting joint soap-making / handwashing classes at all eight schools with students and parents
- Purchasing construction materials, creating inventory list, and monitoring material use
- Tutoring / mentoring female students at all eight schools

The mayors of the two communes will be responsible for:

- Paying the 10% cash contribution
- Coordinating delivery of the 15% in-kind contribution
- Supervising/monitoring construction/rehabilitation of 13 existing and 16 new latrines
- Maintaining latrines after their rehabilitation/construction, including emptying pits and repairing them when they are broken

The masons and plumber will be responsible for building/repairing the latrines.

The eight schools (principals, teachers, students) will be responsible for:

- Inviting participants for the joint soap-making / handwashing classes
- Attending classes
- Cleaning new latrines on a regular basis

Let Girls Learn
This project is part of the Let Girls Learn program started by FLOTUS Michelle Obama in partnership with Peace Corps. The goal of this project is to keep girls attending to school. It is a part of Water Charity’s Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide.

The lack of functional latrines in these eight schools exacerbates gender imbalances. It is currently almost impossible for girls on their periods to engage in good hygiene practices while at school, especially given the total lack of functional latrines at the secondary level.

During the 2015/2016 school year, 531 students attended one of the primary schools, of whom 266 were boys and 265 were girls; that same year, 177 students attended the high school, of whom 125 were boys but only 52 were girls. This huge drop in the percentage of girls attending school is in part due to the inaccessibility of latrines. By repairing the latrines at the secondary education level, this barrier to girls’ education will be drastically reduced.

In addition, the Peace Corps Volunteers’ commitment to introduce additional activities aimed specifically at girls to encourage them to stay in school (including mentoring and the formation of Girls’ Clubs) will help address the gender imbalance issues in education.

Fundraising Target
$6,400

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$1,629

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,771

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Progress: 

Sake Water System Project - Rwanda

Sake Water System Project - Rwanda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Rukoma and Gafunzo, Sake Sector, Ngoma District, Eastern Province, Rwanda

Sake Water System Project - RwandaCommunity Description
Sake is located in the Eastern Province, District of Ngoma. Ngoma is a very large district which divides into sectors, which then divides into cells and then villages. Sake is one of twenty sectors in Ngoma, which has 4 cells, Rukoma, Gafunzo, Kibonde and Nkanga. These fours cells have a total of 34 villages, with a population of 25,700 community members.

There are two beautiful lakes which runs through Sake, Lake Sake and Lake Mugesera. Sake neighbors a sector call Bugesera which happens to be the hottest place in Rwanda, which means living in Sake can be extremely hot especially during the dry seasons. Because Sake is in the Eastern Province, even the rainy seasons are not as wet as other areas.

In Sake, Gafunzo is considered the main town as there are many shops, the bus park, and most importantly the market.

Rukoma is where the health center is located and it services 25,700 community members. It is also the home of the Catholic Church in Sake where the majority of the community attends services.

Sake has a wonderful community environment. The people in Sake are both friendly and welcoming. Children enjoy seeing foreigners come in and out the villages and often times try to use English when approaching them. The majority of the community members are cultivators.

A major landmark in Sake is the gas station located near the Catholic Church (non affiliated). Many times there are heavy traffic due to construction being done by the government and also because the road leads the District Hospital. Sake has one of the most beautiful sunsets that reflects off the water.

Problem Addressed
Living close to open water, community members use the lake as a water source. This is a major issue because lake water is a health hazard. Because of the lack of water stations in the villages, community members rely solely on the lakes to provide water for their families. There is a high incidence of water borne illness in Sake, as reported by the health center, with many mothers and children who use lake water as a water source.

Sake Water System Project - RwandaSake has 34 villages and limited number of water stations nearing these villages. To get to a water station, some community members travel far. A jerry can contains 20 liters, which is a heavy load for a mother caring a child on her back. Because mothers are the primary caretakers, they are responsible for the majority of the household chores including fetching water. Many children can be seen fetching water and carrying them home to their families.

Rukoma and Gafunzo cells are the cells closest to the lakes and have very few water stations, resulting in community members using the lake as a water source.

Project Description
This project is to build a water system comprised of a water line connected to a new water station in each of three villages in Sake: Kizanye, Nyabuhoro, and Nyakagezi.

All of the work done will be done manually, with the help of the people of the community and the engineers who will lay the pipes.

The funds provided by Water Charity will be used to buy the materials and pay the engineers. The Sector officials (appointed officials of the sector) will pay for the community labor.

The implementation plan for this project is roughly five months:

First the engineers will buy the materials- (3 days)
Second the community will dig the path for the pipes (8 weeks)
Third the engineers will lay the pipes for the water stations.
The water pipes will be connected to Gasetsa water plant in Sake. (4 weeks)
The last month will be used to clean up the site and cover the pipes and to make sure everything is in place.

Sake Water System Project - RwandaIn order to build the water station in Sake, a trench will be dug from Gafunzo where the water source is located to where the water stands will be built. The trenches to all three villages will be 0.9 meters deep and 0.5 meters wide. The trench from Gafunzo to Nyabuhoro is 1 km long continuing another 1.5 km from Nyabuhoro to Kizanye and extending right of Nyabuhoro to Nyakagezi for an additional 2 km.

Since the trench will lead to three villages they will be 2,400 laborers working to dig the trench manually using shovels. After the trench is dug, a foundation will be put in place for the pipes.

Stones will be placed in the trench, and then sand placed to protect the pipes from damages that may occur from earth movement.

Next, galvanized pipe will be laid in the trench once a stable foundation is achieved. The pipes will be one continuous pipe from Gafunzo (location of the water tanks) to Nyabuhoro, Nyabuhoro to Kizanye and Nyabuhoro to Nyakagezi.

After the pipes are laid the laborers will place the small sand on top and around the pipes and then add small stones to ensure stability.

Finally, the laborers will come back to back fill the trench using the soil that was dug up from the trench.

The water stand will then be built. First sand will be placed around the area. Plank wood will be placed in a 8” x 16'' rectangular shape, which will then be filled with cement surrounding an upright above-ground pipe. Finally, a cylinder-shaped cement block will be placed around the pipe for stabilization.

Project Impact
This project will benefit all 2,618 members of the three communities reached.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Shinae Meylor

Monitoring and Maintenance
Once the piping is completed the community and the Sector office will take responsibility for the maintenance of the water stands. Each person that comes to the stand for water will pay 20 francs a jerry-can. The money collected from the community members will be used to pay the water company and the person responsible for collecting the money (community health worker).

The Executive Secretary will be responsible for any repairs that might occur in the future. She is responsible for actively communicating with the community members to assure that they are receiving quality water and that the pipe stands are available and working in the community.

Fundraising Target
$4,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$65

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,835

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Bantunding Water System Project - The Gambia

Bantunding Water System Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Bantunding Water System Project - The GambiaLocation
Bantunding, Wuli East, Upper River Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Bantunding is a village located in the Wuli East District of the Upper River Region in The Gambia. The population is approximately 1,500, with currently 65 compounds. Its inhabitants are all from the ethnic group, Mandinka, and farming is the main source of livelihood.

The agricultural system is based on subsistence methods with limited use of modern technology and family farming major practices in this community. Groundnut is the main cash crop and coos, and rice are the major staple crops. The Gambia has a six-month farming season (the first three months include their rainy season) where the entire family assists in preparing the fields, planting, growing, and harvesting their crops. Every family in the village owns farms and participates in the process. Their farms are mainly sustenance, with the sparse surplus being sold for a profit.

Bantunding has a two-classroom lower basic school with Grades 1-3. This year they began an Early Childhood Development Class (ECD) in a straw hut with more than 50 kids coming per day.

Bantunding Water System Project - The GambiaThe neighboring village, Baja Kunda, has a full basic cycle school and senior secondary school (Grades 1-12). The school is about four kilometers away, and by the time the students reach Grade 9, it is approximately the ratio of three boys to one girl. The girls often drop out of school earlier to stay to help their mothers at home, and get married. Of the 22 compounds surveyed, there was an average of 18 children per compound and 4.3 women of child-bearing age.

Problem Addressed
Bantunding has only one clean source of water, a hand pump located in a corner of the town, with the farthest compound a quarter mile away.

Since there is only one source of clean water, and its location is inconvenient, this result in at least 1/3 of the compounds are drinking out of open wells or inconsistently using the hand pump. Since drawing water is mainly a girls’ chore, there is a lot of time spent waiting to draw water, when they could be using the time to be in school, studying, or completing other chores.

Another problem is the high frequency of diarrhea in village. In an initial study, 20 out 22 compounds stated that their children had diarrhea in the past three months. The information collected from the nearby Health Center l (4 km away) also confirmed that the top three health concerns among kids from Bantunding were: diarrhea, malnutrition and malaria.

Bantunding Water System Project - The GambiaProject Description
This project is to complete the work implemented by the community and already underway to drill a borehole, install a pump, powered by 6 solar panels, and build a piping system, with 15 taps.

The main components of the project activities include: digging a borehole using modern equipment, installing 6 solar panels that will run the pump to draw water up, adding two 2,000-liter water tanks for storage, and laying pipe to connect 15 taps at major junctions throughout the village.

Through subscriptions and donations from relatives working abroad and in other areas of the country, Bantunding has raised over $6,000 USD for the project. The funds were used to dig the borehole and lay 660 meters of pipe for the network, and install seven taps to be connected to the tanks.

The BajaKunda Ward Development Program gave $5,000.00 USD of the 2014 and 2015 tax revenue to aid this project. The village is providing all unskilled labor from their men.

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the following: (i) to complete 660-meter pipe network (ii) to purchase and fix seven additional taps, (iii) to set up the solar panels, (iv) to erect and install the water tanks, and (v) to complete the system by adding in the pump.

The PCV and her counterpart will conduct water hygiene and quality management training for the community members, and water committee members will be trained on institutional management, resource mobilization and management as well as basic maintenance of the water system by the Regional Water Resources team base in the Regional capital (Basse) to enhance sustainability of this project beyond the grant life cycle.

The PCV and her counterpart will be working with Village Development Committee (VDC). A village base Community Base Organization legally registered to facilitate and manage local development activities of Bantunding. This body has led the design of the project, will facilitate the implementation of the project activities as well as manage the operation and maintenance of the project.

The VDC, headed by the Chairman, will serve as the contracting authority for the contract to deliver the project. Similarly, the VDC will be responsible for mobilizing both local and external resources to successfully execute the project activities, as well ensuring the sustainability of the project after the grant funding.

Project Impact
1,500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Alicia Vander Wal

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV and counterpart will continually monitor the implementation of the project activities to ensure the design is being followed correctly. They will also use data provided by the school and the nearby hospital, as well as Peace Corps’ own collection tools, to monitor whether the project and planned interventions are meeting the short-term and long-term outcomes of this project.

The PCV, counterpart, and community health nurse (CHN), will conduct teachings at the school and different groups of the community, as well as going compound-to-compound as necessary, to provide education regarding safe water storage vessels, hand hygiene, and how to prevent diarrheal diseases.

The water committee will be trained, with the help of the contractor, as well as Regional Water Resources team, on maintaining the tap system, collecting monthly dues from the compound, and possibly extending the project as deemed necessary. The committee will also be trained by the PCV and counterpart on basic financial record keeping to ensure fees are being paid, funds are available, cost of repairs, and that the committee is being accountable with the money.

Comments
Project objectives include: i) improved health of children, especially school-aged and those under five, due to a decrease in diarrheal diseases, ii) decrease in rates of diarrheal diseases based on education provided regarding handwashing and proper water storage vessels.

Expected outcomes include but are not limited to: i) a decrease in time spent collecting water by women and girls ii) increase in time spent studying and attending school for the girls iii) improved school attendance rates due to less sick days taken.

Let Girls Learn
This project qualifies as an official Let Girls Learn project, as it provides resources that accrue to the benefit of adolescent girls. As they are largely relieved of the arduous and time-consuming responsibility of waiting at the single nearby location or retrieving water from distant locations each day, they are able to attend and remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$4,100

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$470

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,630

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Khula Village Borehole Project - South Africa

Khula Village Borehole Project - South Africa

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Khula Village Borehole Project - South AfricaLocation
Khula Village, Mtubatuba Municipality, Umkhanyakude District, Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa

Community Description
Khula is a semi-rural village that borders an indigenous forest in north eastern Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa. The village was originally established by the South African government in 1993 to formally house families that had been residing in the forest. Unsatisfied with land allocations, many families opted to remain in the forest while others from nearby townships and communities decided to inhabit the newfound village in their place. Named after the fertile landscape of the forestland, the isiZulu word ‘khula’ means ‘to grow’.

Today, Khula is home to about 9,000 people situated on nearly 2,000 plots of land. The government has made efforts to develop the village by constructing two schools and a 24-hour clinic, and by installing electricity lines. Village members have also built many of their own shops to sell snacks and miscellaneous household items to earn a living. Life in the village is mostly quiet with neighbors keen to spend time chatting and taking care of one another.

Senzokuhle Community and Development Organization conducts home based care services in the village and provides assistance to families in need in the form of food schemes, facilitation of government grant applications, and the delivery of medical supplies.

Problem Addressed
Khula Village faces two major problems: (1) Health and societal issues related to a very high prevalence of HIV/AIDS (around 25%), and (2) Lack of access to water.

Khula Village Borehole Project - South AfricaThough the South African government has made significant strides in providing people living with HIV (PLHIV) with access to anti-retroviral drugs, it was not before the virus left a devastating effect on most families in the village. The havoc wreaked by HIV/AIDS in the community has led to a generational gap in Khula and has left most children in an orphaned state and left in the care of elderly and/or extended relatives.

Khula’s second major problem is water. Water is irregularly pumped into taps throughout the village by the municipal government, but only about once a month, or every other month. This forces families to walk extended distances to gather water from potentially polluted sources, leading to ever-increasing incidences of waterborne disease according to the village clinic. At a time when Khula’s family structure has been torn apart by disease, the issue of water only works to further harm the people as it seeps its way into almost every aspect of daily life.

Project Description
This project is to install a borehole at the site of the Senzokuhle Community and Development Organization.

Senzokuhle is conveniently located in the center of Khula Village and is in close proximity to hundreds of households. Fencing surrounds the organization and the premises are monitored by a security guard during closed hours. The organization operates from Monday to Saturday from 9:00 am to 3:30 pm, during which the public will be free to collect the water as needed.

A manually-operated turn style drill will be used to dig the borehole by a local contractor who has guaranteed the quality of the work and that water will be found, as well as to provide future maintenance as needed,

Water is expected to be found at a depth of around 11 meters, after which digging will continue another 7-8 meters. The work is expected to take three days to complete.

The borehole pump will be electric, and above-ground improvements will include a tap at the location of the borehole and hose connections to two on-site 5,000-liter water tanks.

A series of four public workshops – in which everyone in the village will be invited to attend - will be held to generate awareness of proper water and sanitation & hygiene practices following the installation of the borehole. Topics covered at the workshops will include the importance of regular hand washing, proper bathing techniques, dental hygiene, and the different kinds of waterborne illnesses and how to avoid them. Local professionals, including a nurse from the local clinic and a dentist from the nearby township, have agreed to volunteer their time to make presentations at the workshops.

Khula Village Borehole Project - South AfricaCommunity care givers will be trained on the material at the workshop, after which they will forward the information to the families where they conduct home visits.

Project Impact
800 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jason Jones

Monitoring and Maintenance
The borehole will be monitored and maintained by the drilling contractor, who will provide maintenance as needed.

Fundraising Target
$2,200

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,200

Khula Village Borehole Project - South AfricaKhula Village Borehole Project - South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Country: 
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Kinihira Sector Water Project - Rwanda

Kinihira Sector Water Project - Rwanda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kinihira Sector Water Project - RwandaLocation
Bweramvura and Gitinda Cell, Kinihira Sector, Ruhango District, South Province, Rwanda

Community Description
Bweramvura and Gitinda cells are located within Kinihira sector, in the district of Ruhango, Southern province of Rwanda. Bweramvura cell contains six villages: Kabadende, Bugarura, Gihororo, Gahororo, Nyagisenyi, and Nyabivumu.

Gitinda cell contains nine villages: Muremure, Nyamagana, Rubona, Remera, Nyarugunga, Nyagatovu, Rugarama, Kabasanzu, and Nyarusange.

The Nyabarongo and Kiryango Rivers run through the West and East, creating a border between Karongi district and Mwendo sector respectively. Much of the landscape of the area is filled with rolling hills with fertile soil, ideal for farming. There are also many small forests where the trees are cut and used for charcoal and plywood. The hills also boast the shiny mineral mica, commonly called “corta” by the community.

The climate in the region ranges from mild to cool. The rainy season is from February to June and October to December. The dry season is from June to September and December to February.

The community is very rural and not easily accessible. The nearest "town" is one hour by motorcycle taxi, but many community members cannot afford the transport. In the cells there is one school (primary to senior level three), a health center, three small boutique stores, an agronomy/veterinary store, and three churches (Catholic, Adventist, and Protestant).

Kinihira Sector Water Project - RwandaMany of the villagers practice farming as their main trade, as a majority of the land is farmland. The community is tight knit, and it seems as though everyone knows everyone.

The Muremure Health Center provides for the health needs of the residents of the sector.

Problem Addressed
There is a great need to improve the water infrastructure in the community. Many people have to walk 30-60 minutes one way to fetch water from the local source, usually one water tap per village. Some families live closer to a river than the water tap, and, therefore, use the unclean river water as their source. This of course leads to some of the hygiene-related illness we see in the young children.

The improvement of water access and WASH education in the community was found to be a priority when the community needs assessment was conducted. A majority of the community members mentioned that they have to walk very far distances to reach their water source, and also that parasites and diarrhea are big health concerns, especially in young children.

At the health center and its near vicinity, there are disruptions in water flow because of numerous damaged and leaking pipes due to heavy rains in the area that have caused erosion and displaced the pipes above ground. Currently, there are no functioning sinks or hand washing stations at the health center for patients or other community members to use. The sinks in place do not work, are very rusty, which causes blockages, or are badly leaking.

Kinihira Sector Water Project - RwandaProject Description
This project addresses the water needs of the community through three components:

 (1) The first priority is to repair the damaged water pipes in the area.

 (2) Second will be to repair the sinks and build simple hand washing stations at the health center for staff and patients for regular use.

 (3) Thirdly, one new water tap will be constructed in each of 14 villages that have insufficient access for community members.

An important aspect of the project is behavior change, which will come from an education component throughout the project. Community health workers will be trained on water, sanitation, and hygiene topics and apply these to their work and share with the community during home visits and village meetings. This will teach and encourage households to practice safe water drinking and storage, maintain hygienic homes and kitchen areas, and prevent and care for hygiene-related illness.

The project was planned by the health center supervisor, the PCV, the nutritionist (counterpart to the PCV), the community health worker manager, and the technician. Together, they went to visit each site where the pipes were damaged, and prepared a detailed budget.

The health center technician will manage the construction of the water taps and repairs of the pipes and sinks. He has a detailed estimate of how many workers he will need, the materials, transport, and timeline of the project. First will be to do repairs at the health center and any damaged pipes in the community. Then will begin the analysis of water tap location with input from community members, followed by the construction.

Kinihira Sector Water Project - RwandaDuring this time, the PCV will monitor the progress and also hold a training for community health workers about WASH. Once the construction has reached the half way point, a committee will be assembled in each village to ensure community support.

A potential challenge will be adhering to the timeline during the rainy season. The heavy rains may halt work for some days, or may even cause mudslides in the areas of construction.

This project builds skills and capacity in the community in several ways. Training community health workers in WASH topics will broaden their expertise of health issues and care. Helping community members to build their own hand washing stations will develop all of their skills to keep good hygiene. As all of the workers will be from the community, it will give them a form of village ownership, and they will learn about proper maintenance of water facilities.

Project Impact
10,626 community members will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Shreya Desai

Monitoring and Maintenance
Within each village, there will be a committee that will do monthly checks to ensure proper running of the water taps and determine if there is a need for maintenance of the water taps or pipes. If so, the health center will provide a technician, and the funds will come from health center and/or local government budgets.

Comments
The impact of the project will be a reduction in the time it takes community members to fetch water, improved facilities of water access, a decrease in the number of preventable hygiene-related illness, and an increase in knowledge of WASH topics within the community. This will result in the reduction in the rates of diarrhea, malaria, intestinal parasites, pneumonia, and other illnesses.

Additionally, this project will support the First 1000 Days program by bringing extensive hygiene and sanitation training to pregnant women and mothers with children under two years of age.

Fundraising Target
$4,800

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$125

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,675

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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