$2,001 to $5,000

Ogiek Cultural Initiatives Program Training - Kenya

Ogiek Women

Ogiek TribeLocation: Narok, Mau Forest, Kenya

Problem Addressed:
The 30,000 members of the Ogiek tribe are the indigenous forest-dwelling beekeepers of Kenya. They have likely been there for a millennium, or more. In Kenya, they are considered the lowest of the low on the social totem pole, among other reasons because they do not trade in money, land, or cows, but only in honey. Simon Ndungwenkop, tribal chief and director of the Ogiek Cultural Initiatives Program, says that most members of his organization pay their membership dues in honey. Most of the honey is traded or sold to the Masai community, who use it in rituals.

The Ogiek people are under grave threat. Land speculators, government functionaries, and members of other tribes have been carving up the Mau forest where most of the Ogiek live, often claiming ownership of land that they haven’t even seen. Loggers are clearcutting whatever in the way of trees they can get their hands on. They are also setting fire to Ogiek settlements, burning them out of their homes and settlements.

The Ogiek people are attempting to fight back. They are barricading the “roads” (which can hardly be called that) against heavy equipment, and are replanting trees as fast as they can. They would also like to lodge a legal case to at least put a crimp in the cultural genocide that is taking place.

The Ogiek have no schools of their own, and there are neither schools nor teachers who teach in Ogiek, and there is no written language. As a human and indigenous rights defender, Simon says it is struggle to get his people to understand, no less defend, the rights they have under both Kenyan and international law.Burning an Ogiek Home

As a result of forest depletion, coupled with climate change, water sources dry up, and what remains is contaminated. The one remaining river Kalapichwa, the only close source of water, now looks more like a swamp than a river. Honey production is seriously affected. But, more critically, the Ogiek people are now seriously weakened by waterborne illnesses. Amebiases and bacterial dysentery are common, typhoid and cholera more than occasional.

Child mortality and morbidity are extremely high. There are now so many deaths of young children from waterborne diseases, people no longer count them. And it is difficult to fight for one’s rights when compromised by sickness, or in mourning.

Project Description:
A training program will be set up for 25 people on the edge of the Mau Forest in Narok. The group is located in Olokuseroi village. Besides BioSand Filter fabrication, distribution, installation, and maintenance, they will be instructed in how to teach community sanitation and hygiene, as well as basic business planning. The training will be in Swahili, and translated into Ogiek for those who need.

Filters will be sold to the Ogiek, mostly in exchange for honey (which is quite valuable, and the Ogiek Cultural Initiatives Program does this regularly). There will be a large market for Filters among the Maasai, the Ogiek’s traditional trading partners. If successful, the initiative will lead to more workshops.Terrible Water

Project Impact:
The immediate impact will be in providing employment for 25 participants, and resulting additional income to their families. This will also supplement the income of those who are living on the margins of the forest, whose income from sales of honey is intermittent.

Those with Filters will experience fewer waterborne illnesses, fewer deaths (especially among children), reduced medical expenses, improved school attendance, higher productivity, improved family and community life. The long-term objective of course is the elimination of waterborne illnesses among the Ogiek, and a higher living standard.


Person Directing:
Eric Lung’aho Lijodi, Friendly Water for the World’s Kenya and All-Africa representative, and leader of the Kambiri Group.

Community Group:
Kambiri Water and Sanitation Group is a fully registered group with the department of Social Services in Kenya. The overall mission of this team is provision of Sanitation and low cost clean water service to the community. This team has been in operation since the Year 2006 and has from time to time engaged in providing and selling filters to both individual persons and institutions. In the year 2009 the team participated in the Western Provincial Agricultural Society of Kenya Show, and received an award for their good work by the then Provincial Commissioner.

Kambiri Water and Sanitation Group’s overall mission is to provide of training in sanitation and hygiene and low-cost clean water approaches to the community. This group has been in operation since 2006 and has from time to time engaged in providing and selling BioSand Filters to both individuals and institutions.

Monitoring:
A group monitor will be appointed and trained to follow on Filter installations. A report will be prepared 90 days after the start of the project. Eric will visit with the group after 90 days to work with them on any adjustments needed to the business plan. A survey will be carried out on the health of recipients before and after Filter installation.

Budget Detail 

No.

Item Description

Unit Cost

Total $

1

 2 molds

430

860

2

1 sets of toolkit

450

450

3

 set of starter material

250

250

4

 25 Trainees material

5

125

5

1 Trainers Manual (We always make sure we leave the team we have trained with a trainer manual also)

20

  20

6

 25 Certificates

2

  50

7

25 Trainees meals for 5Days

5

625

8

2 Trainers transport costs from Kakamega

100

200

9

Certificates

     2

  50

10

Taxi (Narok to Olodung’oro for 6 days) There is no accommodation facility at the village)

  50

300

11

Trainers Honoraria

300

600

12

Molds Transport

 

200

13

Follow up

 

600

14

Meals and incidentals

 

700

Expected Outcomes:     

            Short-term:

1.       To train twenty five participants from the Ogiek on Sanitation and hygiene

2.       To train the participants how to make filters

3.       To train participants on how to maintain the filters

4.       To train the participants on setting up business

 

Long-term:

1.      Complete elimination of water borne diseases among the Ogiek

2.      Reduce the cases of absenteeism of school going children due to illness.

3.      Improve the living standard of the Ogiek from the sale of filters.

4.      Improved sanitation and hygiene among the Ogiek.

 

Project Funding: 
This project has been funded through the generosity of a donor who chooses to remain anonymous.

Imukoksei en toreret! - “Everything is Possible!” in Ogiek,
Simon and HeatherSimon

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Chheuteal Primary School Bathroom Project - Cambodia

Chheuteal Primary School Bathroom Project - Cambodia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Chheuteal Primary School Bathroom Project - CambodiaLocation
Chheuteal Village, Chheuteal Commune, Sandan District, Kampong Thom Province, Cambodia

Community Description
Chheuteal Primary School is located in Chheuteal Village, Chheuteal Commune, Sandan District, Kampong Thom Province. As the only primary school for Chheuteal Village and PreyKanline Village, the nine teachers, including the school director, teach 202 students total, 103 being female, ranging in ages from four to fifteen years old.

Chheuteal School currently consists of two 4-classroom buildings, two two-toilet bathroom structures at each end of the school buildings, one hand-pump well, an elevated water tower, and a large cement water storage tank. The bathrooms were constructed in 2005, and a cement water tower was built in the early 2000s.

Staff at Chheuteal Primary School pride themselves with the amount of support they receive from the surrounding community and pagoda, both monetarily and physically - community members often donate time to help repair structures around the school, and provide some money to let the students compete in the provincial football tournament.

A solar-powered pump well, along with a massive emergency shelter project, was constructed in 2017 at the Chheuteal Pagoda, which shares a fence with Chheuteal Primary School and is approximately 95 meters away. The school has received permission from local and international officials to use this electric pump well in order to bring water to the school year-round.

Chheuteal Primary School Bathroom Project - CambodiaProblem Addressed
Despite the hard work and successes achieved by Chheuteal Primary School staff and community members, it remains fraught with challenges that affect student wellbeing and success. Teachers identified that many of their students suffer from diarrheal-related illnesses and that current school bathroom facilities and lack of sanitary locations to wash one's hands are not meeting school needs.

Although two bathroom structures were built in 2005, due to faulty construction and lack of year-round water, the flooring and water basins for two toilets are broken - forcing over 200 students and staff to share the two remaining toilets. The lack of water stems from issues around the cement water storage tank. This tank was constructed by World Vision in the early 2000s, but quickly leaked and became unusable within a year. The bathroom structure that has access to the elevated water tower has experienced no problems and is consistently maintained, despite long-term usage by over 202 students and 9 teachers.

During the dry season, students bring water from the nearby well to fill this bathroom, whereas during the rainy season the tower fills up with rainwater. But because the currently broken bathroom facility is further from the well, it was not well maintained during the dry season, and leaked even during the rainy season - making the facility unusable year-round.

Furthermore, there are currently no separate, sanitary facilities for students to wash their hands with soap after using the toilet. Students often miss school as a result of diarrheal-related illnesses.

Additionally, current school curriculum has students learn about handwashing every year, but teachers have expressed a lack of guidance and exciting activities in these lessons as obstacles to student hygiene education.

Chheuteal Primary School Bathroom Project - CambodiaProject Description
This project is to build two enclosed handwashing facilities, and renovate two toilets, which are currently unusable. The community will contribute a water tower and piping to store water for these facilities.

As a result of the construction of an elevated water tower and piping from the Chheuteal Pagoda, the school will have access to year-round water. With this water, the school will be able to supply water to the enclosed handwashing facilities and bathrooms during all seasons.

Water Charity funds will be used for materials and skilled labor. The school will provide assistance with local materials and unskilled labor.

Ultimately, this project strives to provide the skills for teachers to continuously promote hygienic practices, sanitary and sustainable bathrooms and handwashing facilities for students and staff to use year-round, and the opportunity for students at Chheuteal Primary School to achieve an education without the risk of acquiring a diarrheal-related illness.

Project Impact
307 will benefit from the project, including 202 students, 9 staff, and 87 community members.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Nicholas Davies - Cambodia

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community plans to sustain this project by involving all teachers with the Training of Trainers workshop in order to learn the skills and activities necessary to teach proper hygienic practices in various ways, even after the PCV leaves the community.

The project will utilize materials found in the village or in the nearby district town. This is to ensure that if, and when, repairs need to be made, materials are easily accessible, and repairs can be done quickly. Along with that, locally sourced and known skilled laborers are being used to ensure the facilities are built with the long-term in mind, and if repairs need to be made, those knowledgeable in the facilities are nearby to assist.

The construction of fencing and roofing for the handwashing facilities will help ensure these facilities are protected from theft and inclement weather that might otherwise inhibit these facilities from functioning long-term.

Also, the project plans to utilize the mid-priced piping to bring water from Chheuteal Pagoda to the school. This decision was made in order to mitigate the risk of the pipes breaking in the near future, but if necessary, the school can afford to replace sections of piping.

Currently, classes take turns cleaning the currently functioning bathrooms, and such rotations will be used with the renovated bathrooms and handwashing stations to ensure these facilities are regularly maintained. A maintenance schedule will be drafted with the school director to solidify responsibilities each week.

Fundraising Target
$2,400

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,400

Chheuteal Primary School Bathroom Project - CambodiaChheuteal Primary School Bathroom Project - Cambodia

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Makhobalo High School Latrine Project - Lesotho

Makhobalo High School Latrine Project - Lesotho

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Makhobalo High School Latrine Project - LesothoLocation
Makhobalo High School, Ha Khabo, Leribe District, Lesotho

Community Description
Makhobalo High School is located in Ha Khabo, which is the center of the community of the Pela-Tsoeu constituency. Ha Khabo is the most densely populated community within Leribe district, consisting of about 2,500 people located on the road leading to Ts’ehlanyane National Park. It is one of the oldest communities that has been expanding every year in the past twenty years, because of the all of the services, like a postal office, military base, government office, large clinic, and a variety of schools all within walking distance. Within the area there are several schools, an Agricultural Vocational School, and a nearby Military base.

To live in Ha Khabo means there is never a dull moment. There are always events going on at Makhobalo’s School grounds, such as sporting events from the district to regional level, World Vision events that involve the Queen of Lesotho, political events with the prime minister, Agriculture events, and development studies and science fairs for the region. Most recently, the school hosted an event that included Help Lesotho, DREAM, Blue Cross, New Start, and Girl4ce to present to the students on various topics on everything from forced child marriage to HIV/AIDS.

Makhobalo High School Latrine Project - LesothoProblem Addressed
Ha Khabo is an active community and Makhobalo High School is at the center of that. The school hosts about 2-3 events a month with an average attendance of 1,500 per event. The highest record of attendance being this year with 3,500 people in attendance. Although the school grounds have the ability to host this many people, the facilities cannot.

They currently have one toilet for community events, and it is for women only. Although, this restricts the school’s ability to adequately host major events, the show must go on and Makhobalo must find a way to be allowed to continue to prosper and have adequate facilities.

Along with the increase in community events, Makhobalo has been rising in the ranks of top schools in the Leribe District, currently ranking in the top ten. This year they had 350 new applicants raising the total of students to 800. This leaves the school with only eight barely useable toilets for even more students (4 for the girls, and 4 for the boys) to share.

With this extreme lack of facilitates there are problems with the girl students, and the environment. Without a clean, and safe space for female students to relieve and clean themselves during their menstruation, there an increase in absences at school, as well as at community events.

Overall, the lack of facilities entices students and visitors to relive themselves in the nearby empty ravine. This is unsanitary, bad for the environment, and has the potential to contaminate the drinking water. Although the students see this empty ravine as an alternative, after a big rain storm, the ravine fills with water and eventually connects to the river.

Makhobalo High School Latrine Project - LesothoProject Description
This project is to build 18 toilets/pit latrines at the school. They will be used for community and school events, Makhobalo High School students and staff, and the families that board at the school.

A local contractor has identified accessible locations for the latrines and drawn up sketches. The latrines will provide a safe area for females to clean their reusable pads, and properly dispose of used pads.

The plans have also been reviewed by the local Ministry of Health and World Vision representative. Along with the contractor, a member of the community has brought his brick making machine to teach the students how to make bricks that will be used for the latrines.

The school has brought together the community members who are going to donate labor, supplies and some money.

The students, along with other members of the community, will help to make the bricks and build the latrines.

Water Charity funds will be used purchase materials for the latrines. These include cement, plywood, roofing and toilet seats.

Project Impact
3,500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Karina Guerrero

Makhobalo High School Latrine Project - LesothoMonitoring and Maintenance
After the completion of the project, the upkeep and management will be minimal. The school will be in charge of the keys that contain the locks for toilets; they will also manage the rotation of students who will clean the school latrines and repair any damages.

When it comes to community events, the person in charge of the event will receive the keys to the toilets and be in charge of the clean up after the event.

Since these are pit latrines that will become filled one day, they will be in a location with easy access by car so that a waste service can come and help dispose of the buildup.

The students, teachers and community who all contributed to this project will also have ownership in the project and participate in the sustainability of maintenance under the direction of Makhobalo High School.

Let Girls Learn
Although not an official Let Girls Learn project, it accrues largely to the benefit of girls, so we include it under our Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide.

This project will benefit the girls of Makhobalo High School immensely, and is sure to increase attendance to class and school events. These new latrines will provide the girls with a safe, clean, and reliable place to relieve themselves and take care of their personal hygiene needs while they are menstruating.

Fundraising Target
$3,400

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,400

 

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Menor Chijnaya Health Post Water Project - Peru

Menor Chijnaya Health Post Water Project - Peru

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Menor Chijnaya Health Post Water Project - PeruThis is the first project of the Altiplano Water Program - Peru.

Location
Menor Chijnaya, Pucara District, Lampa Province, Puno Region, Peru

Community Description
Menor Chijnaya is located in the rural district of Pucara, about 10 miles from its capital city of Pucara. It is situated at an altitude of almost 4,000 meters (over 13,000 feet). The population is about 250, with about 4.5 residents per household.

The community has a health post with consultation facilities and a small pharmacy, which is run by a nurse and a technician.

Problem Addressed
The health post does not have a regular supply of water. The equipment and infrastructure do not permit the staff to tend to serious emergencies, which must be referred to the health center in the capital of the district.

Menor Chijnaya Health Post Water System Project Project Description
This project is to guarantee an adequate supply of safe water to the health post by installing an automatic pump, additional storage tank, and a piping system.

A ½ horsepower electric pump will be installed to elevate the water to the roof of the bathroom, so that sufficient pressure is maintained 24 hours per day, and water is available from all the installed fixtures.

A 2,500-liter tank will be installed in a specially-constructed box below ground level. This will initially store the water from which the pump will draw when needed.

A piping system will be installed to bring the water from the municipal supply system, and to connect the pump, tank, sinks, toilets, and shower.

Project Impact
250 people will benefit from this project.

Project Administration
Ralph Bolton, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Peru,’62-’65), and founder and director of The Chijnaya Foundation.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The major components of the installation have an expected life of about 15 years with normal use. The community will collect fund sufficient to maintain the facilities, conduct repairs, and perform replacements when necessary.

Funding
Funds committed by a longtime Water Charity donor, the Paul Bechtner Foundation, have been made available for funding the Altiplano Water Program - Peru. All donations made using the Donate button on this page, will be applied toward that program, and will be matched, dollar for dollar, by the donor.

Menor Chijnaya Health Post Water Project - PeruMenor Chijnaya Health Post Water Project - Peru

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Sare Dembayel Latrine Project - Senegal

Sare Dembayel Latrine Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Sare Dembayel Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
Sare Dembayel, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Sare Dembayel is a village in the Kolda region, with an estimated population of 900. The main ethnic group is Fulakunda, with a few PulaFuta households. Sare Dembayel is located 13 kilometers from the National Road.

At their closest "Road Town," Mampatim, one can potentially access a wider range of food, education, and medical care. However, due to the long distance and difficult terrain, community members are often limited to the options presented within Sare Dembayel.

The Regional Capital, Kolda, is 67 kilometers from Mampatim. In Kolda, one can access the hospital to address more serious ailments and materials that the Road Town does not hold. To travel there, one must walk or bike 13 kilometers to Mampatim and wait for a small bus that has an irregular schedule. A few community members own scooters or older motorcycles, but paying for a ride is expensive and not an option most people can opt for.

Pertinent structures within the village include a primary school, a mosque, several small boutiques, and a health hut. Beyond these buildings, community members and youth must seek alternate and inconvenient options for education and health. Most times, children are not able to pursue higher education beyond the primary school level, and they typically start working at a young age in their family's fields.

Sare Dembayel Latrine Project - SenegalDepending on the season, the village may be vastly empty, with children and adults alike working in their fields. Upon returning from their work, community members relax by drinking and sharing tea with one another, while sitting on a large mat under a shady tree. Children play with one another with makeshift balls and homemade toys. Young girls must balance taking care of younger children and cooking and cleaning for their family. These chores usually take precedence over education and enjoying time with friends and family.

When community members are sick, they do not have the financial means nor the physical energy to travel to the "health post," which is like a local clinic. As a result, deaths occur annually from common and preventable health risks, mostly affecting the youth.

Because of the lack of jobs or financial incentives available in the village, men often seek seasonal or year-round work in more populated areas of Senegal, or in some cases, work abroad in surrounding countries. However, these jobs are difficult to obtain and sustain.

Throughout the year, community members plant, tend, and harvest their fields of rice, corn, millet, peanuts, and cotton.

Problem Addressed
A variety of factors play a significant role in the village’s poor health and the lack of infrastructure can lead to discouraging health outcomes. Due to the unavailability of sanitation infrastructure, open defecation is a dangerous practice rampant within the community and can exacerbate health and safety issues that are otherwise preventable, such as diarrhea and fecal contamination of water and food.

Sare Dembayel Latrine Project - SenegalOf the 70 compounds surveyed, 18 households reported having “non-functioning latrines”- meaning that efforts towards constructing latrines have been initiated, but due to the lack of materials and knowledge surrounding latrine construction, they are no longer in use. Therefore, 65 compounds of these 70 currently open defecate into the bush, roughly translating into 828 people out of 900 who must open defecate, as there are no other means.

Currently, the mosque does not have a latrine. Several community members frequent the mosque, especially on Fridays, and people from surrounding areas also visit the mosque, as they do not have a mosque in their villages. A nearby household has a latrine that they have opened for mosque Attendees. However, this latrine is becoming too dilapidated for use, as it is poorly constructed.

In survey responses, community members have emphasized the inconveniences and detrimental health effects of open defecation. Reoccurring and common responses include:

- the insufficient separation between feces and human contact
- children playing in the bush and bringing fecal matter back to the household and to family members
- the inconvenience of going to the bush during times of sickness (i.e. diarrhea), night time, and relentless rains
- water during the rainy season washing fecal matter into the compounds, subsequently affecting water and food sources
- inability to provide a place to defecate for guests and visitors

Project Description
This project is to build 25 single ventilated pit latrines, 24 at the household level and one at the mosque.

Beneficiaries will pay an 11,000 CFA (~20 USD) contribution. Each will Dig a pit that is 2 meters by 2 meters by 2 meters (depth x width x length), and gather and bring sand, gravel, and water for mason and brick-makers. They will attend a health talk concerning Water and Sanitation Hygiene behaviors and latrine maintenance.

The mason and brick-makers will:

- Create bricks from 6 bags of cement to surround the pit
- Mason will line bricks with cement
- Iron grid (4 bars) will create a structure for the pit cover, connected with iron wire, covered with gravel and cement
- Two meters of PVC Pipe and the PVC Coude will be used to connect the seat to the pit foot holdings will be constructed with remaining cement.
- Remaining PVC Pipe and a T connecting piece will be connected above the latrine and serve as a ventilation pipe
- With remaining iron, the mason will construct a makeshift “door handle” so that once the pit is full, latrine-owners will have the opportunity to empty the latrine.

An approximate timeline for brick-making is about two days, with a day break prior to the mason’s arrival so that the cement can successfully solidify, while masonry work will require about two days.

The committee members and the Peace Corps Volunteer will create and lead hand-washing demonstrations and periodically update one another on the progress of the project and if there are any concerns. The mason has had several trainings on WASH related topics and has received formal training on latrine construction. In addition, he has committed to attend these health talks for the households to teach members how to care for a latrine and what to do once it is full and ready to be emptied.

Health talks will be conducted at the household level, so that attendance can be assured and understanding of information presented reinforced. Community members will attend talks to build knowledge surrounding proper Water and Sanitation Hygiene (WASH) practices and understand proper care of latrines.

Upon distributing soap and hand-washing materials, household members will be asked to demonstrate proper hand-washing and relay the importance of hand-washing in relation to common illnesses. At the 3-month mark, surveys will be conducted to determine if hand-washing materials provided are still in use, specifically after using the latrine.

Project Impact
The project will benefit 400 people, comprised of people from 24 households and the mosque in the community.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Dorothy Nam

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Peace Corps Volunteer will conduct surveys 3 months afte completion to assess effectiveness of hand-washing materials, and follow-up on latrine maintenance and care.

The mason and brick-makers will present latrine care information at health talks.

The households will regularly maintain and repair their individual latrines upon completion.

Fundraising Target
$4,400

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$587

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,813

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Yagha Borehole Project II - Ghana

Yagha Borehole Project II - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Yagha Borehole Project - GhanaLocation
Yagha, Upper West Region, Ghana

Community Description
Yagha is a rural community within the Jirapa district in the Upper West region of Ghana. The community is located right off the Wa-Lawra paved road. The community consist of about 4,000 people, most of are from the Dagaaba tribe and speak the dialect of Dagaare, which is only spoken in the Upper West Region of Ghana.

The people in the community are mostly subsistence farmers. Their main crops are maize, millet, groundnuts and yam. All of these are used to prepare local food, but a large portion of millet is used to prepare a drink called pito. This is a semi-alcoholic drink is prepared by almost every woman in every house in the community.

Yagha, Upper West Region, GhanaThe community has a primary school and a JHS, where a large portion of the youth (mostly boys) attend regularly. The children are the ones who fetch water the most. They go before and after school to fetch for their compound, and sometimes even during school break, because of the overcrowding at the current boreholes.

Problem Addressed
Yagha is confronted with a number of infrastructural challenges, but one of the biggest is access to potable drinking water. While conducting a needs assessment, the Chief of Yagha expressed extreme worry about the access to clean water, the importance of stopping the fetching of dam water and the need for the construction of a new borehole closer to the town center.

The community has three boreholes in total, which is not enough to serve the entire community, therefore most people fetch water from the nearby dam. Yagha consists of over 4,000 people and the boreholes are only capable of serving 1,800 people at maximum. This means that not only is there a severe shortage of water, but also the boreholes that are in existence are being overworked and the resources are rapidly being exhausted.

As the community members are fetching water at the dam for drinking and preparing food, there is a high rate of bacterial infections and diarrhea, due to the fact that animals also bathe and drink from this same water source. The only other source of water collection is from rain water harvest. However, due to the short rainy season, this does not provide enough water to sustain a household, and most people find themselves in a running very low on water during the insufferable hot season.

Yagha Borehole Project - GhanaProject Description
This project is to build a borehole in a strategic location in the community.

The borehole will be drilled to a depth of 70 meters in an area which has a good discharge of ground water. The project will employ an Afridev manual water pump and constructed with NC pipes, which is economical and sustainable.

There will be a concrete platform that leads to a runoff area, with a concrete basin at the end for water collection. This excess water will be used to water the permagardens that are being constructed and the livestock that passes by.

Around the concrete basin, a soak-away pit will be built to manage water overflow. This will prevent breeding pools for mosquitoes.

There will be a fence built, and a chain provided to lock the borehole when not in use. This way, the WASTAN committee can guarantee that borehole users have to pay a small fee when they use the borehole. The funds accumulated can then be used for maintenance purposes should the borehole ever breakdown.

The work will be directed by Rural Empowerment for Accelerated Development (READ) Ghana, a locally-based NGO based in Wa, the capital of the Upper West Region.

Yagha Borehole Project - GhanaThe borehole will be built on land made available by the community. Volunteers will clear the project site and dig the animal water reservoir. They will also collect all locally available materials for the borehole development work, namely stones and sand. They will also provide much of the labor needed for construction.

The RASHBASH Company Limited will be hired for the construction (the digging down to the water table and the construction of the borehole structure itself). RASHBASH has considerable experience and expertise in the borehole industry in Ghana, having executed several borehole projects at competitive cost. They have successfully executed similar projects in all the 11 districts in the Upper West Region of Ghana.

In summary, the community will provide the land, labor, water, and resources needed, such as rocks and sand, while Water Charity funds will pay for the remainder (hiring of the RASBASH and the remaining resources).

Project Impact
600 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Taylor Bailey

Monitoring and Maintenance
A borehole management committee (an extension of the WATSAN committee) will be established to play a leadership and coordination role to ensure the sustainability of the project. As per the suggestion by community members, it will have 6 members (3 men and 3 women). Their roles will consist of making sure the borehole is being used and maintained properly. To enable this, READ Ghana will provide training for the committee and selected community members on the basis of strong leadership, management skills.

The borehole management committee, together with the whole community, will decide on reasonable fees to charge the users monthly. These fees will be collected and saved in an account with St. Joseph Credit Union-Jirapa. This will enable the community to maintain the borehole whenever it breaks down.

Fundraising Target
$4,375

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$785

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,590

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School Dignity Room Project - Ethiopia

School Dignity Room Project - Ethiopia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

School Dignity Room Project - EthiopiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Shola Gebeya, Hagare Mariam Kesem Woreda, North Shewa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia

Community Description
Shola Gebeya is a small-medium-sized town approximately 110 kilometers north Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa. The surrounding area mainly consists of rolling hills and farmland. Depending on who you ask, the town has about 3,500-8,000 people.

Town is the main town for the woreda, so all the government/municipalities and education offices are located there. This means that the town usually has a fairly busy feel to it.

Problem Addressed
Bxxxx General Secondary and Preparatory School currently has approximately 900 female students. The female students only have access to one latrine on campus. This facility is a great distance from the classrooms and there is no running water.

Menstrual hygiene management is a major issue, and many female students simply do not come to school while they are on their period because of many factors including: embarrassment, lack of sanitary facilities, lack of knowledge about menstrual hygiene, and the taboos that still surround it in their culture.

School Dignity Room Project - EthiopiaIf a female student is absent every month during their period they could possibly miss upwards of 36-40 total days of school. This is approximately 25-30% of the total school days. When missing this many days, the students are falling far behind in their studies, with little chance to make up the days or subject matter.

There is also significant need for education on these issues. Many of the problems with menstrual hygiene management are due to the lack of education. Some females simply do not know what is happening to them. They need proper training on menstrual hygiene management to understand that there is nothing wrong with having these issues, and they can still live normal lives and go to attend school at the same time.

Project Description
This project is to build a Dignity Room on campus for female students.

The building itself will be 6x4 meters, divided into two rooms. One will serve to take care of issues involving menstrual hygiene (changing/washing pads or changing clothes). The other is a room designated for gender club meetings, trainings and simply a room for female students to study/do homework.

The wash room will have sinks with running water. The meeting room will initially host menstrual hygiene management training such as making RUMPS (reusable menstrual pads), but then goal is to widen the spectrum to include all types of sanitation/wash trainings.

The construction will take approximately 2 months from start to finish. Once it is finished, the facility will be used immediately for menstrual hygiene practice, and over time the trainings will be scheduled and begin to be held on a regular basis.

Water Charity funds will be used for to purchase materials, and also to pay for the skilled labor.

The school will contribute 25% of the funds for the project.

Project Impact
The project will benefit 900 female students and teachers at the school.

School Dignity Room Project - EthiopiaPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
William Dickinson

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school will add the Dignity Room to their budget to provide maintenance and upkeep of the facility and ensure that menstrual pads are kept stocked. A program for disposing of the pads will also be put in place.

The members of the gender club have also agreed to clean the facility and contribute dues each month to help with some of the supply cost. This project was the idea of the staff gender club representative at the school, and she is already planning trainings to implement, and will oversee, all facets of the Dignity Room.

Let Girls Learn
This is a Let Girls Learn Initiative project.

Menstrual hygiene is a major problem that keeps girls from attending school in rural Ethiopia. By constructing a room for girls to practice MHM (menstrual hygiene management), they are given more of an opportunity to stay in school, and not simply miss approximately 25-30% of school because they have their period. The room will also function as a meeting place for the gender club, so the females will now have a designated place to discuss and educate themselves on gender issues involving education and empowerment.

Fundraising Target
$2,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,500

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Well and School Garden Project - Senegal

Well and School Garden Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Well and School Garden Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Lxxxxxxx, Tambacounda, Senegal

Community Description
The village of Lxxxxxxx is an ethnically Pulaar farming village with a population of about 600 in the heart of the Boundou Reserve. The economy consists of millet and peanut farmers that rely on rainy season water to grow their crops.

There is a 1-room school that is attended by over 80% girls. Most families send sons to school in nearby Goudiry. Since Goudiry is a larger town, parents perceive the school to be better equipped for teaching, with more opportunities, a higher chance for migration to a city center, increased access to college, and increased chances of emigration for better economic opportunities.

The village is in an ecologically valuable reserve, and some local men work for free, part-time, as ecoguards, teaching the local population about both the value and maintenance of the different ecosystems, flora, and fauna. They are partnered with the school, and take the students on field trips, as well as involve them in land reclamation projects and other conservation efforts.

The one teacher is a Wolof man from the tourist town Mbour, who has for 4 years worked to grow the opportunities, especially for the female students. He himself has a daughter and wife in Mbour who he sees on vacations and in the summer. He is also now fluent in Pulaar.

Well and School Garden Project - SenegalProblem Addressed
The people of the village of Lxxxxxxx are experiencing water supply problems. The population draws water mostly from one well, then from rainy season streams (3 months annually). Two wells are functional for the whole Village. The animals drink from troughs from one, and the other is far from the people, providing water for a crops field. This well also dries up every year, so is not accessible year-round.

In addition, the school in Lxxxxxxx is a difficult walking distance from the village well. The students therefore have no choice but to share the responsibility of carrying water to the school for their needs (erasing the chalkboard, washing their hands, and using the latrine). This labor detracts from schoolwork as it is time consuming, and tiring.

The trees planted by the students and ecoguards are also in need of more than rainy season water, especially the fruit trees. Finally, the students are poor. The idea of a garden and the benefits it would bring (economic and health related) is an impossibility without a water source.

Project Description
This project is to build a well and create a community garden in Lxxxxxxx.

The well will enable the school to have water self-sufficiency, so the students can have water have water for drinking, using the latrine, erasing the chalk board, washing their hands, and for starting a garden.

Well and School Garden Project - SenegalThe school garden will benefit the health and wellbeing of the student body.

The construction time will be 4-6 weeks. At 1.5 meters in diameter, 2 meters will be hand-dug per day, for 30 meters. Lining will be added daily, made of iron, cement brick, and mortar. Cement over steel lining is to be added after the digging is completed each day.

Once the water table is reached, the bottom of the well will be built by sinking 2 pre cast concrete rings. Factored into the cost of well construction is a preventative structure.

At the top of the well, there will be a 3-meter cement ring on top of a gravel barrier. This serves to prohibit standing water, so as to protect the integrity of the well, prevent water from seeping into the well, and allow people to access the water safely.

A series of courses are already being taught by the PCV, and the ecoguards in financial and land management. The fence is complete around the school, so all that remains is a water source.

The community will provide locally-available materials, and housing the workers.

The local teacher and volunteer ecoguards are facilitating the building, maintenance, and operations of the well, garden, and live fencing in order to build the agricultural capacity of 85+ local students.

Additional lessons include safe water supply usage taught by a volunteer representative from the Service Regionale de l'Hydralique, food transformation taught by a volunteer representative from local food agency, Experna, and Financial Planning and Business Planning taught by the PCV. Finally, this project is of an ongoing nature; locals will be trained in project management.

Project Impact
Over 600 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Moriah Lee. Moriah previously completed the Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The financial commitment, in tandem with business planning, by M. Sokhone has demonstrated the town's desire for a well. The community is purchasing all of the tools to be used for the garden and well not covered by Water Charity funds.

Certain activities, including live fencing, will lower maintenance costs and increase the sustainability of the project and the future projects started by the ecoguards and students.

The inclusion of local experts, including women's groups, water specialists, ecoguards, and the teacher-planned teaching events, will create a series of stakeholders who can maintain the momentum of gardening dissemination after the well is completed.

Comments
A water source will allow the maintenance of reforested trees around the school (planted by Boundou Reserve Ecoguards with the students in 2016), which will instill in the students a sense of responsibility for the ecologically significant park in which they live.

Let Girls Learn
This project will accrue to the benefit of girls, who bear the main responsibility for retrieving water, and make up most of the school population. Easier access to water will make it easier for them to attend and remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$2,800

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,800

 

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Secondary School Water Tank Project - Tanzania

Secondary School Water Tank Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Secondary School Water Tank Project - TanzaniaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx Secondary School, Same District, Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania

Community Description
Xxxxxx Secondary School is located on a winding road that snakes through a number of mountains that sit to the north of Same Town. The area surrounding the school itself is sparsely populated. The school is located approximately halfway up a small mountain and at its elevation the climate is quite arid, though some of the surrounding mountains are capped by dense forests.

The school's population of 545 students consists of those who come from both the villages nestled in the nearby mountains as well as from villages which sit along the highway that passes along the border of the mountain range. Given that it is the only secondary school available in the ward, students will often walk up to 12 kilometers to school every day. This means that a typical day for a student will start well before sunrise, as they prepare for school, do their morning chores and walk.

The school itself has very basic facilities, though the school community, especially the headmaster and some dedicated teachers and board members, have been working diligently to improve it. The students in the school face many challenges in their daily lives. Predominantly they come from very poor backgrounds. Their families mostly engage in small-scale farming and herding activities. They often struggle to contribute money for their children to eat at school, meaning that many go throughout the school day with no food. Outside of school, students are often expected to help significantly with household chores.

Despite these challenges, the children are often eager to learn and are happy. They especially enjoy games of soccer and net ball along with socializing after school has ended. Their academic performance is generally very low, with very few students (less than 10%) passing on to advanced level studies every year. The school has been improving year after year in this regard, however.

Problem Addressed
The biggest and most basic problem facing the school is the availability of water, especially during the dry season. The school currently relies very heavily on the system of public water taps which run along the road through the nearby village to supply its drinking water, cooking water, water for cleaning and for the toilets.

As it stands, students are expected to carry all of the water for the school in buckets from these taps. The typical requirement is that each student brings 5 liters of water to school every day. However, because the taps are located at some distance from the school and they flow sporadically, the water that is brought is often insufficient. In this case students will be taken from class and sent to fetch water. This means that depending on the day the students may need to walk up to 3 km to find a flowing tap. This problem becomes dramatically exaggerated during the dry season because the taps flow even less regularly and with less volume.

As recently as two years ago the school actually needed to pay to have water brought to it by car from Same Town located 12 km away. This issue presents a huge burden on the school in its mission to educate students.

Project Description
This project is to build a water storage tank at the school with a capacity of 80,000 L, along with an associated set of water harvesting gutters on the school grounds.

The tank will sit between two class buildings, both of which will be equipped with gutters. The tank will also be connected with the local water system so that when water is flowing it can be stored directly in the tank.

The school has found a contractor who was born and raised in Vumari Village and specializes in water tank construction. The tank will be constructed of cement, reinforced with steel bars. He has a team of skilled workers who he will bring to help him complete the project. Because the contractor is also a community member, he has offered considerable discount on his labor for the project.

Secondary School Water Tank Project - TanzaniaThe school has also committed to collecting some of the required building materials, including the gravel, water, and sand. The school has also committed to contribute money necessary to reach a 25% contribution.

Water Charity funds will be used to buy the building materials and transport them to the school, and to pay the contractor and his team.

The steps to be taken will be clearing the construction site at the school, collecting the building materials, and finally the construction of the tank. The contractor has estimated that, after collection of the materials, he can complete the construction within a month.

Project Impact
575 students and staff will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
V. Franz

Monitoring and Maintenance
Three members of the project committee, two teachers and the headmaster, will be responsible for the monitoring and maintenance of the project in a very hands-on way. Along with supervising and assisting in the collection of the necessary building materials, they will be educated by the contractor about the construction of the tank and any potential problems that can arise as the tank ages.

The school will then be able to use its funds to make any small repairs that might be needed in the future. Furthermore, the teachers will be responsible for closely monitoring the amount of water in the tank and ensuring that its usage can be maintained throughout the dry season without calling on students to leave class to collect water.

Let Girls Learn
Since girls bear a major burden in collecting water, and are inordinately affected by the lack of clean and safe sanitary facilities, and this project will impact on those issues, we are designating this as a Let Girls Learn + project.

Project Funding
$4,990

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,990

Country: 
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Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Secondary School Bathroom and Water Project - Tanzania

Secondary School Bathroom and Water Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Girls ToiletXxxxxxxxx Secondary School, Lushoto, Tanga, Tanzania

Community Description
Xxxxxxxxx Secondary School was one of the first government schools in the Lushoto district, established in 1988 in the village of Dochi/Vuri, Tanzania. The school began with just over 600 students and currently there are more than 1,000 students.

The school has Forms I through Form IV, which are equivalent to high school in the United States. Student ages range from 12 to 19 years. Form I through Form IV are day students who arrive at 7:00 am and return home at 3:30 pm. The curriculum is very similar to the high school curriculum in the United States. The average time for a student walking to school is 35 minutes. However, some students walk an hour to school.

In addition to the Forms I through IV, there are Forms V and VI, which consists of male residential students. The ages range from 19 to 22 and they take advanced studies in Kiswahili, history, geography, and English to prepare for continued studies at the university.

The main source of income for the community is through small businesses and agriculture; many small farms are terraced along the mountain sides. The people in the area are friendly and always willing to help. "Karibu," meaning "welcome," is the common greeting and is regularly heard.

Problem Addressed
Due to age and condition of the current facilities, and the ever-increasing class sizes the toilets no longer adequately serve students. The lack of a water supply and physical deterioration of the facilities are major concerns. The nearest source of water is 1/4 mile from the toilet. A large incoming class of 247 Form I students, and the projected trend of large incoming class sizes has placed additional strain on the current facility.

Computer LabSome of the issues that students mention during discussions are: urinary tract infections, odor, privacy, safety and lack of hand washing stations. In one small discussion group of 4 Form III girls, 16 to 17 years old, all had at least urinary tract infection in the past and one had three occurrences of a such a problem. Health, sanitation and privacy for the girls are a major concerns.

Project Description
New toilet facilities will be constructed on the school grounds, near the classrooms. A tank, piping, and hand wahing facilities wil be added.

The project is divided into 3 phases:

Phase 1: Demolition of the boys toilet and delivery of materials (7 days)

Phase 2: Building construction, plumbing and installation of 1.000 liter water tank and plumbing (14 days)

Phase 3: Finish interior, install hand washing stations, demolition of the girls toilet (12 days)

The water tank will be placed on a raised platform. The water tank will be filled using gravity since the source of the water is higher in the mountains. During construction, the boys will have access to the toilet used by male residential students and the girls will continue to use the current lavatory. Upon completion of the project, the girl's lavatory will be removed.Boys Toilets

During the construction, skilled labor will be used for brickwork, tiling, plumbing, and cement work. The bricks will be made on school grounds using community labor and carried to the construction site by community members. Lumber for roofing and door framing will be done by the school carpenter and the community will contribute to the construction of the of the doors for the toilet and stalls.

Water Charity funds will be used for the roofing material, skilled labor, the water tank, foundation stone, sand, cement, plumbing, paint, hand washing stations and transportation of material from the demolition of the old facility.

The completed toilet will have 20 stalls, each with doors, 10 for each gender, an entry door to toilet and 5 hand washing stations for each gender. A water tap will be in both facilities that will be used to fill buckets for flushing the toilets and cleaning the facility.

Mr. Wetundwa, Shambalai Secondary School Head Master, will be at the site on a daily basis overseeing the project. He will report to the Project Committee composed of school board members, the school headmaster and the PCV, regarding the progress of the construction.

Project ImpactComputer Lab
1,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
J. Krakowiak

Monitoring and Maintenance
The new toilet will be monitored daily by school staff and irregularities will be reported to the Head Master. Normal maintenance will be performed by school staff. Funding that is provided to each government school by the government of Tanzania will be used for maintenance beyond normal cleaning of the new facility.

Fundraising Target
$3,600

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in Tanzania.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT IN TANZANIA BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,600

 

Country: 
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Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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