$2,001 to $5,000

Ogiek Cultural Initiatives Program Training - Kenya

Ogiek Women

Ogiek TribeLocation: Narok, Mau Forest, Kenya

Problem Addressed:
The 30,000 members of the Ogiek tribe are the indigenous forest-dwelling beekeepers of Kenya. They have likely been there for a millennium, or more. In Kenya, they are considered the lowest of the low on the social totem pole, among other reasons because they do not trade in money, land, or cows, but only in honey. Simon Ndungwenkop, tribal chief and director of the Ogiek Cultural Initiatives Program, says that most members of his organization pay their membership dues in honey. Most of the honey is traded or sold to the Masai community, who use it in rituals.

The Ogiek people are under grave threat. Land speculators, government functionaries, and members of other tribes have been carving up the Mau forest where most of the Ogiek live, often claiming ownership of land that they haven’t even seen. Loggers are clearcutting whatever in the way of trees they can get their hands on. They are also setting fire to Ogiek settlements, burning them out of their homes and settlements.

The Ogiek people are attempting to fight back. They are barricading the “roads” (which can hardly be called that) against heavy equipment, and are replanting trees as fast as they can. They would also like to lodge a legal case to at least put a crimp in the cultural genocide that is taking place.

The Ogiek have no schools of their own, and there are neither schools nor teachers who teach in Ogiek, and there is no written language. As a human and indigenous rights defender, Simon says it is struggle to get his people to understand, no less defend, the rights they have under both Kenyan and international law.Burning an Ogiek Home

As a result of forest depletion, coupled with climate change, water sources dry up, and what remains is contaminated. The one remaining river Kalapichwa, the only close source of water, now looks more like a swamp than a river. Honey production is seriously affected. But, more critically, the Ogiek people are now seriously weakened by waterborne illnesses. Amebiases and bacterial dysentery are common, typhoid and cholera more than occasional.

Child mortality and morbidity are extremely high. There are now so many deaths of young children from waterborne diseases, people no longer count them. And it is difficult to fight for one’s rights when compromised by sickness, or in mourning.

Project Description:
A training program will be set up for 25 people on the edge of the Mau Forest in Narok. The group is located in Olokuseroi village. Besides BioSand Filter fabrication, distribution, installation, and maintenance, they will be instructed in how to teach community sanitation and hygiene, as well as basic business planning. The training will be in Swahili, and translated into Ogiek for those who need.

Filters will be sold to the Ogiek, mostly in exchange for honey (which is quite valuable, and the Ogiek Cultural Initiatives Program does this regularly). There will be a large market for Filters among the Maasai, the Ogiek’s traditional trading partners. If successful, the initiative will lead to more workshops.Terrible Water

Project Impact:
The immediate impact will be in providing employment for 25 participants, and resulting additional income to their families. This will also supplement the income of those who are living on the margins of the forest, whose income from sales of honey is intermittent.

Those with Filters will experience fewer waterborne illnesses, fewer deaths (especially among children), reduced medical expenses, improved school attendance, higher productivity, improved family and community life. The long-term objective of course is the elimination of waterborne illnesses among the Ogiek, and a higher living standard.


Person Directing:
Eric Lung’aho Lijodi, Friendly Water for the World’s Kenya and All-Africa representative, and leader of the Kambiri Group.

Community Group:
Kambiri Water and Sanitation Group is a fully registered group with the department of Social Services in Kenya. The overall mission of this team is provision of Sanitation and low cost clean water service to the community. This team has been in operation since the Year 2006 and has from time to time engaged in providing and selling filters to both individual persons and institutions. In the year 2009 the team participated in the Western Provincial Agricultural Society of Kenya Show, and received an award for their good work by the then Provincial Commissioner.

Kambiri Water and Sanitation Group’s overall mission is to provide of training in sanitation and hygiene and low-cost clean water approaches to the community. This group has been in operation since 2006 and has from time to time engaged in providing and selling BioSand Filters to both individuals and institutions.

Monitoring:
A group monitor will be appointed and trained to follow on Filter installations. A report will be prepared 90 days after the start of the project. Eric will visit with the group after 90 days to work with them on any adjustments needed to the business plan. A survey will be carried out on the health of recipients before and after Filter installation.

Budget Detail 

No.

Item Description

Unit Cost

Total $

1

 2 molds

430

860

2

1 sets of toolkit

450

450

3

 set of starter material

250

250

4

 25 Trainees material

5

125

5

1 Trainers Manual (We always make sure we leave the team we have trained with a trainer manual also)

20

  20

6

 25 Certificates

2

  50

7

25 Trainees meals for 5Days

5

625

8

2 Trainers transport costs from Kakamega

100

200

9

Certificates

     2

  50

10

Taxi (Narok to Olodung’oro for 6 days) There is no accommodation facility at the village)

  50

300

11

Trainers Honoraria

300

600

12

Molds Transport

 

200

13

Follow up

 

600

14

Meals and incidentals

 

700

Expected Outcomes:     

            Short-term:

1.       To train twenty five participants from the Ogiek on Sanitation and hygiene

2.       To train the participants how to make filters

3.       To train participants on how to maintain the filters

4.       To train the participants on setting up business

 

Long-term:

1.      Complete elimination of water borne diseases among the Ogiek

2.      Reduce the cases of absenteeism of school going children due to illness.

3.      Improve the living standard of the Ogiek from the sale of filters.

4.      Improved sanitation and hygiene among the Ogiek.

 

Project Funding: 
This project has been funded through the generosity of a donor who chooses to remain anonymous.

Imukoksei en toreret! - “Everything is Possible!” in Ogiek,
Simon and HeatherSimon

Country: 
Tags: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Secondary School Water Tank Project - Tanzania

Secondary School Water Tank Project - Tanzania

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Secondary School Water Tank Project - TanzaniaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx Secondary School, Same District, Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania

Community Description
Xxxxxx Secondary School is located on a winding road that snakes through a number of mountains that sit to the north of Same Town. The area surrounding the school itself is sparsely populated. The school is located approximately halfway up a small mountain and at its elevation the climate is quite arid, though some of the surrounding mountains are capped by dense forests.

The school's population of 545 students consists of those who come from both the villages nestled in the nearby mountains as well as from villages which sit along the highway that passes along the border of the mountain range. Given that it is the only secondary school available in the ward, students will often walk up to 12 kilometers to school every day. This means that a typical day for a student will start well before sunrise, as they prepare for school, do their morning chores and walk.

The school itself has very basic facilities, though the school community, especially the headmaster and some dedicated teachers and board members, have been working diligently to improve it. The students in the school face many challenges in their daily lives. Predominantly they come from very poor backgrounds. Their families mostly engage in small-scale farming and herding activities. They often struggle to contribute money for their children to eat at school, meaning that many go throughout the school day with no food. Outside of school, students are often expected to help significantly with household chores.

Despite these challenges, the children are often eager to learn and are happy. They especially enjoy games of soccer and net ball along with socializing after school has ended. Their academic performance is generally very low, with very few students (less than 10%) passing on to advanced level studies every year. The school has been improving year after year in this regard, however.

Problem Addressed
The biggest and most basic problem facing the school is the availability of water, especially during the dry season. The school currently relies very heavily on the system of public water taps which run along the road through the nearby village to supply its drinking water, cooking water, water for cleaning and for the toilets.

As it stands, students are expected to carry all of the water for the school in buckets from these taps. The typical requirement is that each student brings 5 liters of water to school every day. However, because the taps are located at some distance from the school and they flow sporadically, the water that is brought is often insufficient. In this case students will be taken from class and sent to fetch water. This means that depending on the day the students may need to walk up to 3 km to find a flowing tap. This problem becomes dramatically exaggerated during the dry season because the taps flow even less regularly and with less volume.

As recently as two years ago the school actually needed to pay to have water brought to it by car from Same Town located 12 km away. This issue presents a huge burden on the school in its mission to educate students.

Project Description
This project is to build a water storage tank at the school with a capacity of 80,000 L, along with an associated set of water harvesting gutters on the school grounds.

The tank will sit between two class buildings, both of which will be equipped with gutters. The tank will also be connected with the local water system so that when water is flowing it can be stored directly in the tank.

The school has found a contractor who was born and raised in Vumari Village and specializes in water tank construction. The tank will be constructed of cement, reinforced with steel bars. He has a team of skilled workers who he will bring to help him complete the project. Because the contractor is also a community member, he has offered considerable discount on his labor for the project.

Secondary School Water Tank Project - TanzaniaThe school has also committed to collecting some of the required building materials, including the gravel, water, and sand. The school has also committed to contribute money necessary to reach a 25% contribution.

Water Charity funds will be used to buy the building materials and transport them to the school, and to pay the contractor and his team.

The steps to be taken will be clearing the construction site at the school, collecting the building materials, and finally the construction of the tank. The contractor has estimated that, after collection of the materials, he can complete the construction within a month.

Project Impact
575 students and staff will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
V. Franz

Monitoring and Maintenance
Three members of the project committee, two teachers and the headmaster, will be responsible for the monitoring and maintenance of the project in a very hands-on way. Along with supervising and assisting in the collection of the necessary building materials, they will be educated by the contractor about the construction of the tank and any potential problems that can arise as the tank ages.

The school will then be able to use its funds to make any small repairs that might be needed in the future. Furthermore, the teachers will be responsible for closely monitoring the amount of water in the tank and ensuring that its usage can be maintained throughout the dry season without calling on students to leave class to collect water.

Let Girls Learn
Since girls bear a major burden in collecting water, and are inordinately affected by the lack of clean and safe sanitary facilities, and this project will impact on those issues, we are designating this as a Let Girls Learn + project.

Project Funding
$4,990

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,990

Country: 
Tags: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Secondary School Bathroom and Water Project - Tanzania

Secondary School Bathroom and Water Project - Tanzania

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Girls ToiletXxxxxxxxx Secondary School, Lushoto, Tanga, Tanzania

Community Description
Xxxxxxxxx Secondary School was one of the first government schools in the Lushoto district, established in 1988 in the village of Dochi/Vuri, Tanzania. The school began with just over 600 students and currently there are more than 1,000 students.

The school has Forms I through Form IV, which are equivalent to high school in the United States. Student ages range from 12 to 19 years. Form I through Form IV are day students who arrive at 7:00 am and return home at 3:30 pm. The curriculum is very similar to the high school curriculum in the United States. The average time for a student walking to school is 35 minutes. However, some students walk an hour to school.

In addition to the Forms I through IV, there are Forms V and VI, which consists of male residential students. The ages range from 19 to 22 and they take advanced studies in Kiswahili, history, geography, and English to prepare for continued studies at the university.

The main source of income for the community is through small businesses and agriculture; many small farms are terraced along the mountain sides. The people in the area are friendly and always willing to help. "Karibu," meaning "welcome," is the common greeting and is regularly heard.

Problem Addressed
Due to age and condition of the current facilities, and the ever-increasing class sizes the toilets no longer adequately serve students. The lack of a water supply and physical deterioration of the facilities are major concerns. The nearest source of water is 1/4 mile from the toilet. A large incoming class of 247 Form I students, and the projected trend of large incoming class sizes has placed additional strain on the current facility.

Computer LabSome of the issues that students mention during discussions are: urinary tract infections, odor, privacy, safety and lack of hand washing stations. In one small discussion group of 4 Form III girls, 16 to 17 years old, all had at least urinary tract infection in the past and one had three occurrences of a such a problem. Health, sanitation and privacy for the girls are a major concerns.

Project Description
New toilet facilities will be constructed on the school grounds, near the classrooms. A tank, piping, and hand wahing facilities wil be added.

The project is divided into 3 phases:

Phase 1: Demolition of the boys toilet and delivery of materials (7 days)

Phase 2: Building construction, plumbing and installation of 1.000 liter water tank and plumbing (14 days)

Phase 3: Finish interior, install hand washing stations, demolition of the girls toilet (12 days)

The water tank will be placed on a raised platform. The water tank will be filled using gravity since the source of the water is higher in the mountains. During construction, the boys will have access to the toilet used by male residential students and the girls will continue to use the current lavatory. Upon completion of the project, the girl's lavatory will be removed.Boys Toilets

During the construction, skilled labor will be used for brickwork, tiling, plumbing, and cement work. The bricks will be made on school grounds using community labor and carried to the construction site by community members. Lumber for roofing and door framing will be done by the school carpenter and the community will contribute to the construction of the of the doors for the toilet and stalls.

Water Charity funds will be used for the roofing material, skilled labor, the water tank, foundation stone, sand, cement, plumbing, paint, hand washing stations and transportation of material from the demolition of the old facility.

The completed toilet will have 20 stalls, each with doors, 10 for each gender, an entry door to toilet and 5 hand washing stations for each gender. A water tap will be in both facilities that will be used to fill buckets for flushing the toilets and cleaning the facility.

Mr. Wetundwa, Shambalai Secondary School Head Master, will be at the site on a daily basis overseeing the project. He will report to the Project Committee composed of school board members, the school headmaster and the PCV, regarding the progress of the construction.

Project ImpactComputer Lab
1,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
J. Krakowiak

Monitoring and Maintenance
The new toilet will be monitored daily by school staff and irregularities will be reported to the Head Master. Normal maintenance will be performed by school staff. Funding that is provided to each government school by the government of Tanzania will be used for maintenance beyond normal cleaning of the new facility.

Fundraising Target
$3,600

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in Tanzania.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT IN TANZANIA BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,600

 

Country: 
Tags: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Dassa- Zoume Department Water Project - Benin

Dassa- Zoume Department Water Project - Benin

NPCA and WC logos

 

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.  ​Check out the #video below!

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Awaya, Dassa-Zoume Communé, Collines Department, Benin

Community Description
Dassa-Zoumé is a city in Benin, on the Cotonou to Parakou railway and the main north-south highway. The commune covers an area of 1711 square kilometers and as of 2013 had a population of 112,118

Dassa- Zoume Department Water Project - BeninGxxxxx and Axxxx are two neighboring villages located in the city, in the Collines department of south-central Benin. They lie two kilometers apart from each other and are connected by a dirt road. There are 5 schools in total: a kindergarten and primary school in each village, and a secondary school that serves both communities.

Recently, electricity was brought to Gxxxxx. However, the residents of Axxxx still live without this luxury. These two villages are comprised of approximately 2,200 inhabitants, the majority of whom are cultivators and vendors.

The primary language spoken is Mahi and about 20% of the population also speak French.

Problem Addressed
The inhabitants of Gxxxxx and Axxxx are in need of a reliable and safe water source. This need can be further defined on two levels: in the school community, and within the residential community.

Dassa- Zoume Department Water Project - BeninAt the moment, there is no access to water on or near the 5 school campuses located within Axxxx- Gxxxxx. This causes health concerns related to the inability to wash hands after using the restroom or before eating, and staying hydrated. Additionally, the lack of a nearby water source limits the school’s ability to develop a school garden. As a result, the students, and staff members at these schools are at compromising their health, which in turn impacts their attendance and performance at school.

Within the residential community, villagers rely on open wells dug throughout the community. This again results in a series of health risks including waterborne diseases and related illnesses. Furthermore, during the dry season of December through May, the water supply from these wells is exhausted. Villagers, primarily young girls, are forced to walk long distances to the nearest pump to retrieve water for their families to drink, prepare food, wash dishes, do laundry, and bathe. These pumps are often overcrowded as villagers must wait in line for their turn at the pump. During the dry season, which coincides with the school year, young girls spend around 12 hours each week fetching water instead of studying and doing homework.

Dassa- Zoume Department Water Project - BeninProject Description
This project will restore the existing water tower that serves the villages of Gxxxxx and Axxxx by connecting it to the nearby electrical system.

Until recently, the water tower was powered by a gas generator that frequently required maintenance. Two years ago, the generator broke, rendering the water tower unusable.

With access to this new, more reliable power source, water will be delivered to the existing water taps dispersed throughout the two villages and at each of the five schools. The water provided by these taps will be cleaner and more conveniently located than the current system of wells and pumps. This option is more cost-effective and sustainable than replacing the existing generator.

First, the community members will construct a shelter to house a 30-amp three phase transformer that will source electricity from the power line access point, located next to the primary school of Gxxxxx. Then, the community will clear a path, 1.5 km long and 5 meters wide, leading from the primary school of Gxxxxx to the water tower pump located in Axxxx. Then, 80 teak wood poles will be installed to support and elevate the 1,700 meters of SBEE electric cables. An electrician will be hired to connect the electric wires to the transformer in Gxxxxx and to the water tower pump in Axxxx.

The chiefs of villages are managing the overall project and mobilizing the efforts of the community, which is committed to the success of this project. The members are prepared to contribute the labor necessary to clear a path connecting the water tower and transformer, as well as provide the labor needed to install the 80 teak poles. This community contribution equates to 25% of the total project cost.

Funds from Water Charity will be used to purchase the materials, and pay for transportation costs and the skilled labor of the electrician

Project Impact
This project will serve all of the 2,200 inhabitants the two villages

Dassa- Zoume Department Water Project - BeninPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
L. Murray

Monitoring and Maintenance
The completion of this project will be a significant step in making the water tower more sustainable. By replacing the expensive gas generator, which required frequent maintenance, with a more cost effective and reliable energy source, less upkeep will be required to keep the water tower operating.

In order to cover electricity costs and necessary repairs, representatives from each village will regulate the water taps and charge a small nominal fee for their usage.

Additionally, each year community members will clear and maintain the path of the newly installed power lines to avoid trees and undergrowth interfering with the electrical connection.

Let Girls Learn
This project will have a large impact on empowering girls to stay in school. Due to the gender roles of Benin’s culture, household chores, including fetching water, are deemed as the responsibility of girls.

During the dry season, which coincides with the school year, the wells run dry and young girls are forced to walk further distances and wait in lines at overcrowded pumps to find water. On average, young girls spend 10 to 12 hours a week fetching water for their family instead of studying their school lessons.

By reducing the amount of time young girls spend fetching water, we can increase the amount of time they can devote to their school work, and further compete with their male classmates.

Fundraising Target
$4,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$800

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,100

Country: 
Tags: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Iramba District School Water Project - Tanzania

Iramba District School Water Project - Tanzania

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Iramba District School Water Project - TanzaniaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxxxx, Iramba District, Singida, Tanzania

Community Description
Most members of the community are subsistence farmers.

Xxxxxxxxxx Secondary School is in the Iramba District of the Singida Region.

Xxxxxxxxxx is also home to 4 schools – 2 secondary schools, 1 primary school, and a primary school teacher’s college. Xxxxxxxxxx Secondary School serves all secondary students in the Xxxxxxxxxx ward.

Problem Addressed
There is no source of water on campus. The school currently gets water from the community pump which is a 20-minute walk from the school. These trips to retrieve water take time away from other school activities, especially class time. Fetching water is often a disciplinary action, which causes students to miss more than a period of instruction.

Iramba District School Water Project - TanzaniaProject Description
This project is to build a rainwater catchment system at the school.

Rainwater collection gutters will be installed on 3 buildings. A concrete base will be built near each building, upon which a plastic tank will be placed. Piping will connect the gutters to the tanks, resulting in a total capacity to store 18,000 liters of water.

The project committee consist of Gunda Gunda, the head of school, the chair of the school board, the Peace Corps Volunteer, Liberia Kawishe, the second master Mr. Ngagilo, and the academic master Everst Mponzi.

The community will contribute 25% of the total project cost, in cash from parents and the community and in labor.

Project Impact
575 people will benefit from the project.

Iramba District School Water Project - TanzaniaPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
J. Juran

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school maintenance committee will be responsible for the proper use, maintenance, and repairs of gutters and tanks after installation, and will cover all costs.

This project is sustainable because gutters and tanks require low maintenance, and no additional training is necessary for the school to take on these responsibilities.

Comments
This is an excellent, cost-effective project, which will provide water on campus, and significantly reduce loss of instruction time due to fetching water.

Fundraising Target
$2,350

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$260

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,090

 

Iramba District School Water Project - TanzaniaIramba District School Water Project - Tanzania

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal

Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Well and Solar Pump Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, Tambacounda, Senegal

Community Description
The community is made of 8,200 people, most ethnically Pulaar, who are proud to live in what was pre-colonially the capital of the Boundou region (now Tambacounda). The community is composed mostly of women, children, and elderly, as many young men have migrated to find work.

More than 60% of the Xxxxxx population lives below the federal threshold of poverty, leading to food insecurity. The economic decline among the population is explained by:

1. the low post-colonial productivity of their primary economic activity, agriculture because of:

a. significant loss of soil fertility due to desertification,
b. lack of availability of agricultural training, therefore
c. an inaccessibility of many small operators to credit, and

Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal2. the lack of technical training in other sectors:

a. the only training for young people available is within the family, for that ever-shrinking percentage lucky enough to have been born in a family with prior skills (and this of course is rare for women, who start families early), and
b. stories of success from Dakar and abroad lure the men to pursue career options elsewhere, often after having started a family of his own. Thus, young men leave behind young wives with no employment skills, and young children, who are food insecure.

Problem Addressed
The problems to be addressed are water availability in the fields. There is a single well, which only provides water during the rainy season.

There are 8 gardens in Xxxxxx, which are not sufficient to meet the demand for vegetables of its 8,200 citizens.

Project Description
This project is to build a well, with a solar pump, to serve the water needs of the community.

A small community of volunteers in have given 2 hectares of registered land for the creation of a market garden, intercropped space for staple grains, and a fruit tree farm.

35 committed members have signed an agreement form to work for shared plots, attend ongoing trainings until August this year (with a break until November when cold season gardening begins).

Also, the agriculture club (15-19 students, which has helped the PCV plant and maintain trees) at the local high school will be attending all trainings.

1. From April 2017 - June 2017, a hand dug well will be constructed. At an excavation of about 1.5 meters in diameter, a local well company (head mason Mr. Sumare and 3-4 of his workers in tandem with one local metal worker) will dig two meters per day. The two meters dug will be supported by concrete poured from the top (between the sides of the excavation and temporary framework made of rebar) that becomes the permanent lining to the well, daily. This process will be repeated until the water table is reached at 30-35 feet.

The bricks will be made on site. The metal worker is scheduled to come every few days to make the new rebar rings and hooks for the next 4-6 meters until the water table is reached. Then, concrete rings, built by the head mason on site, will be sunk below the water line. Then, small gravel will be sunk to the bottom of the well as a sort of filter. The top of the well and below the ground for 3 meters will consist of a concrete and large gravel barrier for people to stand on while accessing water. This will channel draining water into a basin and keep rain or contaminated water from going into the well.

A tree nursery will be started in April, with a hands-on training and distributed maintenance calendar for members of the group.

Well and Solar Pump Project - Senegal2. In June 2017: After the completion of the well, a local volunteer from The hydraulics office will test the water for contamination, and conduct a safe irrigation training for 35 group members, high school students and any interested community members. This office will construct an “irrigation only” sign, to be installed on the day of training. The health PCV will train on dangers of unsafe drinking water, and importance of hand washing.

3. In June 2017: a solar pump will be transported and installed by a company in Dakar that specializes in solar pumps. Amadou Gakko, a solar pump technician will train 35 people, and additional high school students and interested community members on use, maintenance, and sustainability of the solar pump. Another PCV will give lesson on the dangers of uncontrolled slash and burn practices, so that local farming can scale up, as well as live fencing (with live fencing seed distribution).

4. In July 2017, pre-rainy-season staple crop lessons will be taught, cultivation of land will be carried out, and trees from the nursery will be planted. Post-rainy season (August 2017), 35 community members will harvest local crops and market garden, and distribute among 595 inhabitants.

Project Impact
Over 500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
M. Lee

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV, and group lead Sada Dieng will be present every day to oversee progress. The responsibility for maintenance of the project will go to the 7 volunteers, with whom the PCV is conducting project management training with her counterpart using PDM (Project Design and Management) Peace Corps curriculum in March. However, until August (year one of the project) the PCV will be working closely with the volunteers to launch the project successfully, teach record keeping, and teach financial and business management so that the project may sustainably continue for years to come.

In addition, business planning by Sada Dieng and youth member Dienaba Thiam has demonstrated the group's ability to cover any maintenance costs, be it the purchase of repairs or new tools that may arise after grant funds are exhausted. The community group will manage this fund, having been trained on project management by PCV.

Certain educational activities, like live fencing, will lower maintenance costs and increase the sustainability of this project and the future projects started by members of the group. The inclusion of local experts including technicians, health and water specialists, farmers, and business people in planned teaching events will create a series of stakeholders who can maintain the momentum of technology dissemination after the initial project is completed.

Comments
The arable space will be maximized by an accessible supply of water. The project will result in increased access to fresh local food, which will boost the economy and increase the nutrition of the local population.

Fundraising Target
$4,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$150

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,350

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Dahra Latrine Project - Senegal

Dahra Latrine Project - Senegal

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Dahra Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

District of Dahra, Region of Louga, Senegal

Community Description
The village is approximately 30 km from the nearest town and has a population of roughly 3,000. It is made up of two ethnic groups, Wolof and Pulaar, and, dependent on the time of the year, you can find a sizable Sereer population.

The community is made up of 6 neighborhoods, and each neighborhood has at least 2 members who are volunteer community health workers. This means that they spend time extending education to the community about things such as malnutrition, malaria, exclusive breastfeeding, and vaccinations.

Problem Addressed
Currently, there is not a restroom or a water source in the middle school. As a result, many students have stopped attending school, or their attendance has dramatically decreased.

The health post serves approximately 7,000 individuals, including people from neighboring smaller communities, health post staff and their families, and even nomadic herders. It has only two fully operational restrooms.

Project Description
This project will provide seven latrines and one water access point (robinet).

The seven latrines will all be VIP latrines, consisting of cement privacy structures, roofs, and locking doors. Five of the seven latrines will have Turkish basins, and the final two will have western toilets seats.

Dahra Latrine Project - SenegalFive of the latrines, and the one robinet will be constructed at the local middle school, while the last two latrines will be added onto the health structure.

Once these structures are completed, students at the middle school will complete WASH trainings during class with the village's community health workers and the volunteer. The students will also be exposed to further WASH behavior change activities through their participation in the Junior Health Committee Club.

In addition, community health workers will hold bi-monthly trainings on proper WASH practices at the health post to educate the citizens that will be benefitting from the new latrines at the health post.

The community will contribute in the form of cash contributions to the project.

Objectives of the project include providing students at the middle school, as well as the patients at the health post, with access to improved water and sanitation as well as providing education on the importance of good sanitation practices.

Project Impact
3,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Sydney Hurst

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school and health post will elect separate committees to handle the care and cleaning of the latrines, contributing to the sustainability of the project by maintaining the latrines in good working order.

Should there be a problem, the latrines and robinet are both being built by masons in the community, so they will be able to fix them in the future.

The community will sustain this project by consulting the Latrine and Robinet Addition Committee, which will see to the cleaning, maintenance, and all other tasks regarding the latrines and robinet.

Dahra Latrine Project - SenegalThe education of proper hygiene and sanitation practices will be enacted and sustained by continuing to discuss the topic and working as closely as possible with the youth. Most recently, the community has planned to begin a youth club that will focus on health issues, being a primary way to increase the sustainability of the material side of the project as well as the educational side of it.

Let Girls Learn
Five of the seven latrines that are being built will be located at the local middle school. This will provide female students with the proper environment needed to fully focus on their studies. The five latrines will be separated based on gender, two for male, two for female, and one for teachers. This separation will allow for maximum privacy and safety for the female students.

This project is part of the Let Girls Learn program started by FLOTUS Michelle Obama in partnership with Peace Corps. The goal of this project is to keep girls attending to school. It is a part of Water Charity’s Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

Fundraising Target
$ 2,750

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$305

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,445

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Touba Mouride Latrine Project - Senegal

Touba Mouride Latrine Project - Senegal

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Touba Mouride Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
Touba Mouride, Fatick Region, Senegal

Community Description
Touba Mouride has around 2,100 people, living in 217 households. A primarily ethnically Wolof town, it is largely devoted to agriculture practices, including raising peanuts, millet, and corn. In addition, it has a large women’s garden. A small subset of the village is Pulaar, living in a small community outside Touba Mouride, but still included in the village census.

Touba Mouride is filled with hard-working families who are committed to improving their health status. There is a highly functional health hut and committee, and the health hut serves 15 surrounding villages.

Problem Addressed
A baseline survey showed that of the 56 household sampled, 50% have a latrine that is only a simple unlined dug hole for a pit, 25% have a latrine with a pit lining, and 25% have no latrines.

Project Description
This project is to build 30 new family latrines in the community. The latrines will be simple slab pit-style, with each family providing the simple reed structure or room structure.

The latrines will be built away from major water sources, such as wells, as well as cooking areas, to avoid contamination. The work will be done by two experienced masons and their team of skilled workers.

Touba Mouride Latrine Project - SenegalEach latrine pit will be 2.5 meters deep, and 2 meters on each side. The pit walls will be lined with bricks made from cement and sand, along with mortar between the bricks. On all four corners there will be columns which will provide structural integrity.

The plate over the hole will be built with cement and lined with rebar so prevent collapsing. The bottom plate of the pit will be built in the same manner as the top due to the weight that must be supported.

The sand will be provided by the participating members of the community.

A series of health talks will be conducted with all beneficiaries. Topics will include hand washing at the five critical times, childhood illnesses related to WASH, disadvantages of open defecation, and latrine maintenance. The topics will be illustrated by a mural.

Project Impact
300 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Lauren Hall

Monitoring and Maintenance
Home visits will be conducted to be sure the families receiving latrines have adopted the behavior changes and are using the latrines properly.

Fundraising Target
$3,100

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$175

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,925

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Medina Yoro Foulah and Niaming Latrine Project - Senegal

Medina Yoro Foulah and Niaming Latrine Project - Senegal

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Medina Yoro Foulah and Niaming Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
Medina Yoro Foulah and Niaming, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Two communes in the Kolda region of Senegal are included in this project. The first consists of nine villages with an estimated total population of 3,100 inhabitants; the second consists of 45 villages with an estimated total population of 150,000 inhabitants.

These populations are very young: almost 50% of the population is under the age of 18. The main ethnic groups are Fulakunda, Pula-Foutah, Wolof, and Serrer.

It takes approximately 3 hours by car to travel from these communes to the regional capital, along an unpaved dirt road that can sometimes become impassible during the rainy season of July through October.

Agriculture and animal husbandry compose the bulk of economic activity in the two communes. Almost all adults, as well as many children and teenagers, are involved in some kind of agricultural or gardening activity, either for sale at the weekly Sunday market or for personal consumption. People primarily plant and harvest millet, corn, peanuts, mangoes, bananas, egg plants, okra, and chili-peppers. Other vegetables such as tomatoes and carrots are consumed within the community as well, but they are usually imported from other areas.

Both communes are located in the poorest region of the country, with the majority of the population living below the poverty line of $1.90 per day according to the World Bank. This is evident in every aspect of life: people cannot always afford food, clothing, medication or other basic necessities. Two examples can be found in education and health: a large number of students cannot afford tuition for middle or high school; and many people cannot pay the 200-300 CFA (roughly 35 US cents) to see the doctor when they suspect they (or their children) have malaria.

Medina Yoro Foulah and Niaming Latrine ProjectProblem Addressed
Between them, the communes support two pre-schools, 15 elementary schools, one middle school, and one high school. The extreme poverty of the two communes has meant that, as of now, only nine of these schools (all at the elementary level) have been able to afford to provide their students with functioning latrines. Two other schools have latrines, but they are in a state of such complete disrepair that they cannot be used by the students. The rest of the schools have no latrines at all.

The children in these communities relieve themselves in the bush and do not wash their hands, a hygiene problem that can negatively impact both the children and their communities. Diarrhea and other illnesses related to a lack of hygiene are common.

Beyond general hygiene problems, the lack of functional latrines exacerbates gender imbalances, particularly at the higher levels of schooling. Teen girls who have reached puberty often choose to stay home during their period for lack of adequate hygiene resources. For example, in one of the communes, the ratio of boys to girls in school drops from 50/50 in primary school to 70/30 in high school. Furthermore, some classes at the high school level have no female students at all.

Project Description
The project targets schools in a number of rural villages in the Medina Yoro Foulah district of the Kolda region of Senegal. The plan is to rehabilitate 13 latrines in the village of Medina Yoro Foulah (four at the pre-school and nine at the elementary school), and to construct 16 new latrines in the following locations: four each in Sare Demba and Sinthiang Yoro Douda, and three each in Touba Mboyene, Sinthiang Sadio, Demanoufa, and Kour Sally.

The Peace Corps Volunteers in the two communes plan to address these issues through the rehabilitation of the existing latrines, the construction of new latrines where none existed previously, the implementation of joint hand washing / soap making classes for students and their parents, and the introduction of additional activities aimed specifically at girls to encourage them to stay in school (i.e. Girls’ Club, sports/nutrition class, mentoring and tutoring).

Medina Yoro Foulah and Niaming Latrine Project - SenegalThe Peace Corps Volunteers will be responsible for purchasing and ensuring the delivery of most necessary project materials to the site of the repairs. The community will be responsible for quarrying and transporting the necessary quantities of sand and gravel. Water for construction is available on site (through faucets), it will also be provided by the community.

Over the course of the repairs the Peace Corps Volunteers and the Mayor will be responsible for overseeing the work on a daily basis and for dealing with any problems that arise.

More specifically, the rehabilitation of the 13 existing latrines, under the supervision of one mason and one plumber, will cover the following:

1. Elementary school (eight student latrines, one teacher latrine)

a. The pipes connecting the latrine cabins with the pit are broken. These need to be replaced.
b. The PCV pipes providing aeration have snapped off; these also need to be replaced.
c. The doors and their hinges are damaged beyond repair and need to be replaced.
d. There is currently no privacy wall in front of the latrines. This needs to be built to conform to cultural norms to allow female students to use the latrines.
e. The cement cover of the pit is cracked and needs to be re-done.
f. There is currently no running water available for students to wash their hands. A new line must be connected to the school water mainframe and faucets must be established next to the latrines.
g. The latrine holes and pipes (within the cabins) are broken. They will be replaced with Turkish seats for easier use by the students. The eight student cabins will also be tiled (as requested by the principal), to facilitate easier cleaning and maintenance through the students.
h. The teacher latrine has no roof and no door.
i. There are four latrines on the school premises that are beyond repair (the pits have caved in and the cabin bricks are disintegrating). They are a serious health hazard and need to be removed.

2. Pre-school (four toilets within one bathroom)

a. The cement cover of the latrine pit has fallen into the pit and must be re-done.
b. The toilets are all clogged and need to be un-clogged.
c. None of the four English toilets currently have seats. The students therefore cannot use the toilets, as they would fall in.
d. The toilet boxes for three of the toilets are broken and need to be replaced.
e. There is currently no running water available for students to wash their hands. The existing faucets in the bathroom will be connected to the pre-school’s water mainframe.

A second mason will be responsible for the construction of the 16 new latrines at the other schools. In each of the six villages, the village in question will appoint an assistant mason to ensure that the communities are fairly represented and involved. Two of the villages will receive four toilets each (one each for male and female students, and one each for male and female teachers and other staff). The other four villages will receive two toilets each (one each for male and female students).

Again, all materials necessary for construction (other than gravel and sand) will be bought and transported to a central drop-off location by the Peace Corps Volunteers. All of these materials, in addition to gravel and sand (which will be quarried and transported to individual villages by community members) will be transported by the villages, as will be water, in whatever quantities necessary.

The construction of the new latrines will cover the following: 1. Pit

a. The latrine pit will be 2m x 2m x 2m in size, and will be lined with cement bricks to maintain structural integrity. The pit will be dug by the community and will be lined by the mason.
b. The latrine cover will be made of cement and rebar, and will be constructed by the mason.
c. A PVC pipe extending from the pit will permit aeration.

2. Latrine Cabin

a. The latrine cabins, sized at 1m wide x 1.5m deep x 2m tall, will be built apart from the pit; waste will move from the latrine cabins to the pit via a PVC pipe. This construction ensures the longevity of the latrine: the mayors of the respective communes have agreed to incorporate money into their yearly budgets to have the pits emptied when they become full. The latrines will be built in pairs and will share one wall to reduce the materials needed for construction.
b. The latrines will be tiled to facilitate cleaning.
c. Each school will have either two or four latrines to separate for boys and girls.
d. For all new latrines, privacy walls will be built to ensure the latrines conform to cultural norms, allowing female students to use the latrines.
e. The doors of the new latrines, like those on the repaired latrines, will be made of iron. This is to ensure durability and longevity of the latrines.

Transportation of required materials from the central drop-off point to the final village location is also the responsibility of the community members. Donkey- and horse-drawn carts will be arranged to move the materials from the central drop-off point to the individual schools.

All involved parties (masons, plumber, school principals, school security guards, mayors, Peace Corps Volunteers) have agreed to share responsibility on monitoring construction materials, keeping an inventory, signing out materials, and storing it in one central and lockable location until such time as it will be used.

Rehabilitation of the existing latrines and construction of the new latrines will start at the same time, at the beginning of February 2017. The second mason and the Peace Corps Volunteers will determine the order of villages for the construction of the new latrines.

The project is backed and supported by the communities. The communities and the Peace Corps Volunteers collaborated to decide on the design, layout, and exact location of the latrines. The design was chosen in discussions between the mason, plumber, respective school principals, and Peace Corps Volunteers.

The general layout of the latrines is based on the wishes of the mayors, as they have agreed to be responsible for latrine upkeep: the latrines will be separated from the pits so trucks can periodically remove waste when the pits are full. This serves to increase the longevity of the latrines. On a day-to-day basis, general cleaning and maintenance of the latrines will be undertaken by the teachers and students at each benefiting school.

The location of the latrines on school grounds was determined during meetings with the village chiefs, principals, and presidents of the parent-teacher associations in each village.

Also, in each village, a meeting was held to decide on in-kind and labor contributions. All the communities have offered to quarry and transport the sand and gravel necessary for the construction and rehabilitation of the latrines. The remaining community contribution will be paid in cash by the mayors for their respective communes.

Project Impact
The project will immediately benefit 1,000 students (currently enrolled), 32 teachers, and 500 parents

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Laura d’Elsa and Abigail Pershing

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Peace Corps Volunteers will be responsible for the following:

- Supervising/monitoring construction/rehabilitation of 13 existing and 16 new latrines
- Conducting joint soap-making / handwashing classes at all eight schools with students and parents
- Purchasing construction materials, creating inventory list, and monitoring material use
- Tutoring / mentoring female students at all eight schools

The mayors of the two communes will be responsible for:

- Paying the 10% cash contribution
- Coordinating delivery of the 15% in-kind contribution
- Supervising/monitoring construction/rehabilitation of 13 existing and 16 new latrines
- Maintaining latrines after their rehabilitation/construction, including emptying pits and repairing them when they are broken

The masons and plumber will be responsible for building/repairing the latrines.

The eight schools (principals, teachers, students) will be responsible for:

- Inviting participants for the joint soap-making / handwashing classes
- Attending classes
- Cleaning new latrines on a regular basis

Let Girls Learn
This project is part of the Let Girls Learn program started by FLOTUS Michelle Obama in partnership with Peace Corps. The goal of this project is to keep girls attending to school. It is a part of Water Charity’s Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide.

The lack of functional latrines in these eight schools exacerbates gender imbalances. It is currently almost impossible for girls on their periods to engage in good hygiene practices while at school, especially given the total lack of functional latrines at the secondary level.

During the 2015/2016 school year, 531 students attended one of the primary schools, of whom 266 were boys and 265 were girls; that same year, 177 students attended the high school, of whom 125 were boys but only 52 were girls. This huge drop in the percentage of girls attending school is in part due to the inaccessibility of latrines. By repairing the latrines at the secondary education level, this barrier to girls’ education will be drastically reduced.

In addition, the Peace Corps Volunteers’ commitment to introduce additional activities aimed specifically at girls to encourage them to stay in school (including mentoring and the formation of Girls’ Clubs) will help address the gender imbalance issues in education.

Fundraising Target
$6,400

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$1,629

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,771

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Tags: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Sake Water System Project - Rwanda

Sake Water System Project - Rwanda

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Rukoma and Gafunzo, Sake Sector, Ngoma District, Eastern Province, Rwanda

Sake Water System Project - RwandaCommunity Description
Sake is located in the Eastern Province, District of Ngoma. Ngoma is a very large district which divides into sectors, which then divides into cells and then villages. Sake is one of twenty sectors in Ngoma, which has 4 cells, Rukoma, Gafunzo, Kibonde and Nkanga. These fours cells have a total of 34 villages, with a population of 25,700 community members.

There are two beautiful lakes which runs through Sake, Lake Sake and Lake Mugesera. Sake neighbors a sector call Bugesera which happens to be the hottest place in Rwanda, which means living in Sake can be extremely hot especially during the dry seasons. Because Sake is in the Eastern Province, even the rainy seasons are not as wet as other areas.

In Sake, Gafunzo is considered the main town as there are many shops, the bus park, and most importantly the market.

Rukoma is where the health center is located and it services 25,700 community members. It is also the home of the Catholic Church in Sake where the majority of the community attends services.

Sake has a wonderful community environment. The people in Sake are both friendly and welcoming. Children enjoy seeing foreigners come in and out the villages and often times try to use English when approaching them. The majority of the community members are cultivators.

A major landmark in Sake is the gas station located near the Catholic Church (non affiliated). Many times there are heavy traffic due to construction being done by the government and also because the road leads the District Hospital. Sake has one of the most beautiful sunsets that reflects off the water.

Problem Addressed
Living close to open water, community members use the lake as a water source. This is a major issue because lake water is a health hazard. Because of the lack of water stations in the villages, community members rely solely on the lakes to provide water for their families. There is a high incidence of water borne illness in Sake, as reported by the health center, with many mothers and children who use lake water as a water source.

Sake Water System Project - RwandaSake has 34 villages and limited number of water stations nearing these villages. To get to a water station, some community members travel far. A jerry can contains 20 liters, which is a heavy load for a mother caring a child on her back. Because mothers are the primary caretakers, they are responsible for the majority of the household chores including fetching water. Many children can be seen fetching water and carrying them home to their families.

Rukoma and Gafunzo cells are the cells closest to the lakes and have very few water stations, resulting in community members using the lake as a water source.

Project Description
This project is to build a water system comprised of a water line connected to a new water station in each of three villages in Sake: Kizanye, Nyabuhoro, and Nyakagezi.

All of the work done will be done manually, with the help of the people of the community and the engineers who will lay the pipes.

The funds provided by Water Charity will be used to buy the materials and pay the engineers. The Sector officials (appointed officials of the sector) will pay for the community labor.

The implementation plan for this project is roughly five months:

First the engineers will buy the materials- (3 days)
Second the community will dig the path for the pipes (8 weeks)
Third the engineers will lay the pipes for the water stations.
The water pipes will be connected to Gasetsa water plant in Sake. (4 weeks)
The last month will be used to clean up the site and cover the pipes and to make sure everything is in place.

Sake Water System Project - RwandaIn order to build the water station in Sake, a trench will be dug from Gafunzo where the water source is located to where the water stands will be built. The trenches to all three villages will be 0.9 meters deep and 0.5 meters wide. The trench from Gafunzo to Nyabuhoro is 1 km long continuing another 1.5 km from Nyabuhoro to Kizanye and extending right of Nyabuhoro to Nyakagezi for an additional 2 km.

Since the trench will lead to three villages they will be 2,400 laborers working to dig the trench manually using shovels. After the trench is dug, a foundation will be put in place for the pipes.

Stones will be placed in the trench, and then sand placed to protect the pipes from damages that may occur from earth movement.

Next, galvanized pipe will be laid in the trench once a stable foundation is achieved. The pipes will be one continuous pipe from Gafunzo (location of the water tanks) to Nyabuhoro, Nyabuhoro to Kizanye and Nyabuhoro to Nyakagezi.

After the pipes are laid the laborers will place the small sand on top and around the pipes and then add small stones to ensure stability.

Finally, the laborers will come back to back fill the trench using the soil that was dug up from the trench.

The water stand will then be built. First sand will be placed around the area. Plank wood will be placed in a 8” x 16'' rectangular shape, which will then be filled with cement surrounding an upright above-ground pipe. Finally, a cylinder-shaped cement block will be placed around the pipe for stabilization.

Project Impact
This project will benefit all 2,618 members of the three communities reached.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Shinae Meylor

Monitoring and Maintenance
Once the piping is completed the community and the Sector office will take responsibility for the maintenance of the water stands. Each person that comes to the stand for water will pay 20 francs a jerry-can. The money collected from the community members will be used to pay the water company and the person responsible for collecting the money (community health worker).

The Executive Secretary will be responsible for any repairs that might occur in the future. She is responsible for actively communicating with the community members to assure that they are receiving quality water and that the pipe stands are available and working in the community.

Fundraising Target
$4,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$65

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,835

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - $2,001 to $5,000

Follow Us

Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google+ icon
YouTube icon
RSS icon


Donate $25 or more for Water Charity projects.

SiteLock

GlobalGiving vetted Organization 2016

***  Copyright 2017 ©  -  Water Charity is a 501(c)(3) non-profit (DLN 17053217312048) based in California & operating Worldwide  ***

 
 
Support Us