$1,001 to $2,000

Middle School Latrine Project - Senegal

Middle School Latrine Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Txxxxxxx, Department of Linguere, Region of Louga, Senegal

Community Description
Txxxxxxx is a small, rural village located 35 kilometers southwest of the departmental capital, Linguere, in the region of Louga. Of its 1,500 inhabitants, 90% are Pulaar and 10% are Wolof. Though the village is predominantly Pulaar, the Wolof are the region's majority ethnic group.

Txxxxxxx is the center of the rural commune, boasting a Health Post as well as one of only two middle schools in the commune. Students whose homes are distant from the village center walk and drive horse- or donkey-drawn carts several kilometers to attend school in the village each morning.

Individuals within the community of Txxxxxxx typically generate income through animal husbandry, herding cows, sheep, and goats.

Problem Addressed
The middle school has been borrowing a private space from the mayor's office since its inception. This year, the mayor is evicting the middle school so that the preschool, which has been located in the mayor’s office in the meantime, may utilize the space.

Two new classrooms have been constructed, but at a distance quite far (over 1 kilometer) from the village center, posing a challenge to all students but especially those that live outside of the village proper and commute many kilometers each day.

There is no electricity, running water, or latrine access at this new site. Students therefore have reported that they wait until school gets out to relieve themselves. This relocation to a more remote schoolhouse puts attendance of all students, but especially female students, at risk.

Maintaining proper menstrual health and hygiene is not possible without access to running water, toilets, or privacy. This population of rural, Pulaar girls is already vulnerable to social and cultural forces that keep female students from participating as fully in academic life.

Both school faculty members as well as parents of students have shown concern about the lack of amenities at the distant new school location and the potentially harmful effects on students’ ability to learn.

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalProject Description
This project is to build three toilets at the new school: one for the teachers, one for the girls, and one for the boys.

The mayor's office has financed a water line out to the school in order to make toilet construction possible, demonstrating the community’s commitment to the project, financial and otherwise. The new pipeline is complete and functional.

For this project, materials will first need to be purchased in Dahra Djoloff, the road town 35km northwest, and transported by pick-up truck to Txxxxxxx.

First, the brick maker will blend sand, cement, and gravel to form bricks. The laborer will then dig two 2m x 2m pits (the students’ blocs will share a pit) for the masons to line the pits with the finished bricks along with supporting rebar.

PVC piping will provide an evacuation route from the toilet to the pit as well as ventilation by way of T connector. Stalls will be fashioned with remaining bricks and doors, including the installation of a water spigot (robinet) by the community in each stall, a layer of cement will then be placed above the latrine pit, along with the placement of the Turkish toilets, connecting all relevant piping.

Hand washing stations will also be built by a local metalworker out of rebar and placed strategically so as to encourage proper hand washing behavior.

Additionally, materials necessary for maintenance and longevity of the toilets, such as buckets for flushing waste, plastic kettles for personal hygiene, and cleaning supplies like scrubbing brushes, will be purchased.

Construction of the toilets themselves will begin in December 2017, once the area is solidly out of the rainy season. The initial phase of the construction aspect has already been completed, as the school now has water access.

Messaging on topics such as water, sanitation, hygiene, and toilet maintenance will be delivered.

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalThe PCV will continue her work on the topic of menstrual health and hygiene with female students both attending the elementary school in the village as well as the middle school. More students progress from the village’s elementary school to its middle school each year, so outreach to future generations of middle schoolers is also important.

Project Impact
105 students and staff will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
A. Johnston

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school will monitor the use of the improvements and maintain the facilities.

Attendance is assiduously kept by the teachers at the middle school, so trends in female attendance may be isolated from before and after project implementation.

Furthermore, absences of the entire student body due to illness may also be tracked in relation to the WASH component of the project. With better WASH practice adherence, all students may enjoy fewer days out of school due to illness.

Let Girls Learn
This project accrues to the benefit of girls, in that it allows them to remain in school, by providing access to resources and privacy so that they may hygienically and discreetly manage their periods while attending classes.

Fundraising Target
$1,600

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,600

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalMiddle School Latrine Project - Senegal

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School Well Project - Senegal

School Well Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

School Well Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxxx, Kolda Region, Senegal

Community Description
The rural village of Xxxxxxxxx, population approximately 500, lies about 15 kilometers north of the regional capital city of Kolda. There is no electricity and no running water. The village consists mainly of farmers and their families.

The primary school serves students from 4 villages: Soussotou, Saare Samba, Saare Dombel, and Saare Banje. The school currently has 129 students enrolled, 81 males and 48 females.

The community has an organization of parents of students (The Parents d' Eleves de Ecole Primere Xxxxxxxxx (PdE)) who upkeep and try to improve the school.

Problem Addressed
The school currently has no well, and the nearest water source is from a neighboring compound, about 600 meters away. With no close water supply, the school grounds have no trees or garden crops growing (excluding the young mangoes planted by the PCV and the head of the PdE August, 2016.) The PdE and teachers of the school have long wanted the school to be thriving with trees and a student-centered garden, but have not been able to realistically sustain any attempts because of the distance of the water supply.

When water is needed, students are pulled out of class to fetch water – usually girls. Additionally, there is no shade in the school grounds – as trees have no reliable source of water.

Project Description
This project is to build a well on the eastern perimeter of the school.

School Well Project - SenegalThe well will be located between the two teaching buildings. It will be 1 ½ meters in diameter, hand dug by laborers to a depth of 20 meters. The sides will be reinforced by rebar (locally sold as Fehr #10) arranged in a grid, and will be lined in with cement.

The sand and gravel for the cement will be sourced locally and brought by the community.

Upon completion of the well, an above-ground structure will be made. It will be approximately 1 meter tall and surround the well in a circle. On top of the structure will be a suspended metal pole (held up by two other pieces) to which a pulley and rope will be attached.

The project includes the purchase of buckets and watering cans.

Immediately upon completion of the well, a tree nursery will be set up with the students and teachers. Additionally, the well will be used to water 9 mango trees that were planted during the rainy season of 2016.

Long-term, the well will be used to continually sustain trees planted in the school. As the school nursery trees mature, they will be planted in the school yard and watered with water from the well. Moringa, pigeon pea, mango, and ornamental china pride trees are among the species that will be planted.

Additionally, when school resumes in Fall of 2017, the well will be used to support garden beds created and seeded by teachers and students. The students will grow bissap, okra, onions, and other assorted vegetables common to the village.

Another intended use of the school space is as a seed and grafted scion source for the community. The well will support grafted mango trees, as well as moringa and pigeon peas. Community members will be able to harvest seeds to plant in their own households as well as use the mangoes as sources for scions. The school can then also be a location for grafting trainings, moringa nutrition and transformation trainings.

School Well Project - SenegalProject Impact
200 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Holly Henriksen will manage the project. She previously implemented the Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - Senegal.

Monitoring and Maintenance
This project will be monitored by the serving PCV, and volunteers who follow in the village. The Peace Corps indicators that will be measured are tree nursery creation, tree planting, tree survival, and gardens created. Additionally, any trainings associated with trees planted at the school (mango grafting, moringa transformation and nutrition, etc.) will be recorded – number of participants and other relevant information.

Maintenance of the actual structure of the well should be unnecessary in the coming years as it will be built to a high standard. The external structures (pulley, metal overhanging bar, buckets, and watering cans) can be maintained with funds from the school and PdE.

Maintenance and care of the trees and garden beds will be sustained by the students and overseen by the teachers, headed by the principal.

Let Girls Learn
This project supports Let Girls Learn. Currently, the school needs water to wash chalkboards, water the 9 mango trees planted, and wash hands. The water is retrieved exclusively by female students, who are pulled out of class to fetch water. Often, they are pulled out of class while class is in session. The addition of a well to the school will save the time that these female students are out of class getting water and increase their amount of time spent in the classroom learning.

Fundraising Target
$1,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,500

 

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Middle School Latrine Project - Senegal

Middle School Latrine Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, District of Medina Yoro Foulah, Kolda Region, Senegal

Community Description
Xxxxxx, a southern Senegalese village of 500 people, is a vibrant community made up of mostly people of the Pular ethnicity. This small, but historically significant locale is the seat of the communal government and is constantly welcoming visitors and officials for meetings and events.

The local sources of income are animal husbandry and field crops such as peanuts, millet, corn, and rice. The government structures include two schools, a health post, the mayor's office, and the office of the prefecture. There are also a number of small restaurants, a tailor, and shops that sell basic cooking materials and household items.

Additionally, with a new road being built between the village and the regional capital, Kolda, business and commerce between cities is becoming easier and easier. This village has a lot of potential for growth and can become a point of service for many of the surrounding villages.

There are a number of working groups within the community, such as a women's savings group, a youth association, and a health committee. Families value solidarity, hospitality, and unity of thought and action. The people say that they hold tradition in one hand, and modernization in the other. They want a brighter future for their children, but also to hold on to what makes them uniquely Pular.

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalProblem Addressed
The village of Xxxxxx is the site of one of only two middle schools in the commune. This means that since its inauguration in 2005, the middle school has hosted students from any number of the surrounding 99 villages. Some students live as far as 30 kilometers away, and have to temporarily move to a closer village just to go to school. Others live in villages between 6-8 kilometers away, and make the trek by foot, bike, or donkey cart every day, twice a day. For these students, going to school is no easy task.

The school was constructed without toilets. This means that if students need to use a bathroom, they would have to take the time to walk some distance into the village and ask permission to use somebody’s home toilet. However, the students are now in the habit of relieving themselves behind the school buildings. In both situations, students are disrupting the learning environment by requiring more time out of the classroom to find a bathroom or by defecating in the open on school property.

The health risks of open defecation are serious, and the diarrheal disease it engenders is one of the top killers of children under five in the region.

Project Description
This project is to create a sanitary place for students and teachers to use the bathroom by building a total of four toilets on campus, complete with two handwashing stations. and to use this opportunity to talk to the community about the importance of latrine usage.

Specifically, a head mason will lead a team that will be charged with the construction of two sanitary blocks, one for males and one for females.

Each sanitary block will be constructed with cement bricks and iron supports. Each will have a superstructure with dimensions 2 x 2 x 2 meters, and will be roofless (this is what the community asked for, because otherwise the odors will be trapped inside), and fixed with one metal, locking door per toilet.

The latrines will be Turkish style seats, connected to an offset pit via PVC pipes. The pits will also be 2 x 2 x 2 meters in dimension and lined with cement bricks. The pits will be covered, and contain removable windows, for emptying, and an aeration pipe, to allow odors to escape.

The handwashing stations are "tippy-tap" style (pressing a foot pedal will incline a water-filled jug to dispense a small stream of water), but will be made out of metal, which is meant to be durable enough for public use over a long period of time.

Working alongside the mason, members of the local youth association will contribute by bringing sand and gravel to the work site via horse or donkey charet, and will dig both of the pits.

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalThe metal components (doors, pit windows, handwashing stations) will be built in the regional capital and transported to the site along with the cement, iron bars, and other supplies. Water Charity funding will be used to pay for the majority of materials, supplies, equipment, and labor.

The community will contribute 10% of the total cost in cash and 15% in labor.

Project Impact
400 students will directly benefit from the project, with 13,000 people in the commune receiving indirect benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
R. Bannister

Monitoring and Maintenance
The vice principal of the middle school will assist with the formation of a sanitation committee, which is in charge of the cleaning schedule and maintenance of the latrines. Students will pull water for the toilets every morning before school, as there is a well only 130 meters away from the construction sites.

The toilets will be constructed in a way that will allow the school to empty the pits when they are full. They will be offset from the superstructure, lined with cement, and built with two removable “windows” which will allow it to be cleaned.

Money for repairs and cleaning supplies will be managed by the vice principal and come from the school’s funds. The health workers in the area will continue health talks on school campus and reinforce the importance of latrine usage and handwashing.

Fundraising Target
$1,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,500

 

Middle School Latrine Project - SenegalMiddle School Latrine Project - Senegal

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Kedougou Community Well Project - Senegal

Kedougou Community Well Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kedougou Community Well Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxx, Kedougou, Senegal

Community Description
Xxxxxxxx is a community of 220-250 people, depending on the season. It is located on the Fongolimbi road on the way to Dimboli. Farming is the main source of income for everyone in the village.

The village is 3.5 - 4 kilometers from one side to the other, with a hill in the middle. It is made up of two halves, Xxxxxxxx Labor and Xxxxxxxx Mawni.

Problem Addressed
The issue that the village is facing is water security in the dry season. When the rains come, the water table around the village is raised very high so there is no problem with wells or the forage drying up, or not having enough water, but during the dry season the water table lowers to a point where some of the wells dry up and are no longer a reliable source of clean water.

Kedougou Community Well Project - SenegalThe other issue that presents itself in the dry season is that the forage, while deep enough, requires a motor pump to bring the water into the basin. The system is effective, but expensive because it is a gas powered system. During the dry season, when it would be needed, a lot of the villagers do not have the funds to maintain constant use of it. So, they end up walking to the other side of the village to use the wells that are deep enough to have water through the dry season.

There is also the issue that the forage system is great, but it is twenty years old and there are days that it is "tired" and has to take a rest, so even if they have the funds there are days were the forage is just not available.

This presents a problem when the next closest source of clean water is a kilometer or more away in either direction. This also eliminates all possibility of dry season vegetable farming, so, in order to have proper nutrition, they have to go to the closest market which is about 20 kilometers away up the mountain.

Project Description
This project is to build a well in an area where water access is cut off in the dry season.

There will be one main well digger and two assistants chosen by the village chief, one from each side of the village.

The dimensions of the well are roughly:

-20 meters deep
-1.25 meters across

The mouth of the well and cover will be constructed by a mason from the village as well. The dimensions will be:

-1.25 meters tall
-1.25 meters across

The PCV will be responsible for purchase and transport of most of the materials, with the village responsible for providing sand and gravel with transportation of all materials once inside the village. Water will also be provided by the village from a nearby water source.

Kedougou Community Well Project - SenegalThe PCV and the village chief will be responsible for overseeing the construction of the well and mouth of the well by the well digger and mason on a daily basis.

The women's group will be responsible for the construction of the fence surrounding the well. The dimensions will be 7 meters x 7 meters

The education component will be overseen by the PCV and president of the Women's Association. The training will be held every other Sunday afternoon for the duration of the well construction. This training will encompass:

-Water treatment and storage
- Hand Washing
- Proper hygiene around and using water
- Water conservation techniques in dry season gardening.

At the end of the training there will be a demonstration of skills learned and a graduation of the course. There will also be a follow-up demonstration about three months later to judge the retention and implementation rate of what was learned.

Project Impact
150 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Ashley Prettyman

Monitoring and Maintenance
The well will be the responsibility of the women's group to maintain.

Let Girls Learn
Water collecting is primarily a women's and girl's responsibility. Having a closer source of water will enable the girls to be on time to school in the morning and have more time in the afternoon to dedicate to their school work. It might also help motivate men and boys to help with the water because it is not as far and it is not as hard to do, which would give the girls more time.

While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it carries with it the same attributes, providing for the sanitation and hygiene needs of girls. Therefore, we designate it a Let Girls Learn + project.

This project is part of our ongoing Western Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

Fundraising Target
$1,850

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,850

 

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Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - Senegal

Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - Senegal

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - SenegalLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Kolda, Kolda Region, Senegal

Community Description
The region of Kolda is Senegal's poorest and among the most malnourished. This project will be done in a neighborhood called Xxxxxxx in the capital city of the Kolda Region, Kolda. It will be done at a demonstration space run by a "Master Farmer" named Cherif Diallo. A Master Farmer is an individual identified by the Peace Corps who shows exemplary farming and teaching skills who uses their garden space for trainings and demonstrations.

This demonstration space is a place where innovative and sustainable agricultural practices are displayed and taught. During its 2-year life span, the Kolda Master Farm has had demonstrations and trainings on attaining higher yield on field crops without the use of chemicals, cold season gardening, live fences, and tree grafting. Cherif's demonstration space has a very wide audience, as it is in the capital city of the region and is very close to the city center, only about 1 kilometer outside of the main market.

Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - SenegalEvery person who is trained, tours, or visits the Master Farm will benefit. Annually, the Master Farm has around 250 visitors, who will benefit from the improved capability, innovation, and convenience.

Problem Addressed
The main well at this demonstration space caved in in July, 2016, due to heavy rains. This is the main source of water for the farm during the dry season. Until the well is re-dug, no gardening or advancement can be made at the garden, and no trainings or demonstrations can be held.

Since this farm is primarily a demonstration space, there are many visitors for the various trainings, tours, and demonstrations. In order to ensure sanitary visits while supporting a large number of people, a proper toilet is needed within the farm.

Project Description
This project is to build a well and a latrine at the Master Farm.

A 10-meter-deep well will be constructed about 10 meters North of the prior well location. A specialist will be hired to dig, as the soil is extremely sandy. When water is reached a reinforcement buttress of cement will be installed.

Kolda Master Farm Water and Sanitation Project - SenegalMaster Farmer Cherif Diallo and a hired mason will construct the reinforcement out of rebar, fencing, and cement. After the well has been sufficiently reinforced, an above-ground structure will be built for ease of access to the well. It will consist of approximately 150 bricks, made by a locally-hired mason.

A latrine will be constructed in the Eastern corner of the farm. The pit will be dug to a depth of 2 meters. A specialist will be hired to dig, as the soil is extremely sandy. When a depth of 2 meters is achieved, the walls of the pit will be reinforced by bricks and rebar. Approximately 30 bricks will be used.

A brick structure, 1 meter by 2 meters in size, will then be built by the mason using about 300 bricks. It will contain a concrete platform and a turkish toilet seat, and will be topped by a zinc sheet roof.

Project Impact
100 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
H. Henriksen

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Master Farm keeps records of how many people visit, tour, or attend a training at the farm. This attendance shows the number of people who will benefit from the installation of these features. Additionally, the master farmer keeps a record of all the produce, trees, and products he grows at the farm.

The Master Farmer has been farming for nearly 40 years, and is a very skilled mason. He will perform all repairs.

Comments
Improved farming techniques taught at the Master Farm will increase crop yields, leading to improved food security, enhanced nutrition and health, and increased economic opportunities.

Fundraising Target
$1,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,900

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Velingara Women's Group Garden Project - Senegal

Velingara Women's Group Garden Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Department of Velingara, Kolda Region, Senegal

Velingara Women's Group Garden Project - Senegal Community Description
The project will be implemented in a rural village of 450 people, located in the eastern part of the Kolda region. It is 5 km from the paved road, 30 km from a major city, and there is no running water or electricity.

All families are subsistence farmers, with peanuts, sorghum and corn as the primary crops. Due to the village’s remote location and resource constraints, economic activities are limited to cotton and charcoal production.

Ethnically, the village is Pulaar, with two main sub-groups: Fulakunda and Pula Futa. The Pulaar ethnic groups are traditionally pastoralists, and their living situations continue to reflect these traditional nomadic values. Villagers live in short-lived domed mud brick houses with straw roofs, women cook with fuel wood collected from the forest, and livestock roam the village. There are 20 family compounds, with approximately 20-25 people living in each compound. Men and older women are usually found working in the woods or fields, and younger women take care of the children, cooking and cleaning.

The population is very young; almost 50% of the population is under the age of 18. There is a primary school in the village, and the middle school is located in a roadside village 5 km away. Though the middle school is relatively close, many families do not have the expendable income necessary to pay for school fees and supplies.

Indeed, this village is located in the poorest region of the country, with the majority of the population living below the poverty line of $1.90 per day according to the World Bank. Because of this and the community’s remote location, many villagers suffer from malnutrition. This, in turn, affects the well being of the entire family as each member of the family shares responsibilities of the fields and/or the home. There is a strong workforce of motivated women eager to capitalize on income-generating activities and provide adequate nutrition for their families.

Problem Addressed
The primary barrier to adequate nutrition in this village is access to fresh fruits and vegetables. The diet is severely lacking in proteins and essential nutrients, comprised primarily of carbohydrates from grains such as sorghum, corn, or white rice. Due to very large family sizes and little income, members of the community do not have the expendable income necessary to buy healthy food. In addition, the nearest market is 10 km away, and without electricity, there is no preservation method to store fresh produce. As such, when possible, women construct personal vegetable gardens. This is easy during rainy season while livestock are tied up and water is abundant, and each household maintains its own vegetable garden. However, during the remaining eight months of dry season, water limitation and lack of a collective garden space prevents the production of fresh vegetables. As such, the majority of the year, vegetables are severely lacking from the diet and community nutrition is very poor.

Velingara Women's Group Garden Project - Senegal Project Description
This project is to create a protected one-hectare gardening space with water access. A center well will be built with three feeder basins.

The women are well versed in gardening practices, and ultimately want to create a long-lasting garden that the entire gardening cooperative can utilize year round.

The village men worked with a contractor to install a chain-link fence to enclose the gardening space and protect it from livestock. The women created a tree nursery, and planted thorny tree species around the perimeter to begin establishment of a live fence to ensure sustainable protection. Fruit trees (guava and mango) were also planted within the garden to increase the village’s fruit production.

A well contractor from a nearby city has visited the site and agreed to build the well and accompanying basins. A thirty meter, cement-lined well will be constructed in the center of the garden space, structurally reinforced with rebar for use with pulley systems.

Three 80 cm x 80 cm feeder basins will be built adjacent to the well and water poured into these basins will be gravity fed twenty meters through underground piping to the accompanying 2 m x 2 m storage basins.

The Peace Corps Volunteer will hold primary responsibility for purchasing materials, and the village men will be responsible for transportation of the materials from the city to the village.

The contractor has a team of three well diggers and one mason that will live in the village and work daily until the well and accompanying basins are complete. The village will provide room and board for the workers.

Since there is no water available at the work site, the women will pull and transport water to the work site each morning. Construction is expected to be finished in time for the women to begin dry season gardening.

Upon completion of this project, the women’s group of Sare Meta will have a long-lasting garden space equipped with all the necessary resources to produce vegetables year round. Additionally, due to the large garden size, women have the opportunity to grow vegetables in excess and sell them to surrounding villages, thus supplementing the family income.

Velingara Women's Group Garden Project - Senegal Further, the Peace Corps Volunteer will conduct a series of trainings to promote fruit tree propagation, grafting, and orchard management. The success of this project will result in the establishment of a community orchard, income-generating opportunities for women, and increased community nutrition.

The Women's Group will be responsible for the cash and in-kind contribution for the project, 25% of project cost

Project Impact
84 women will directly benefit, and the remaining 366 older women, men, and children will indirectly benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jenna Dodson

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Peace Corps Volunteer will be responsible for the following:

-Purchasing construction materials, creating inventory list, and monitoring material use
-Supervising/monitoring construction of well and accompanying basins
-Overseeing tree nursery construction, maintenance and planting
-Conducting an orchard management training

The community (men and women’s group) will be responsible for the following:

-Paying the cash contribution
-Transportation of materials to the work site
-Ensuring proper room and board for the on-site construction workers
-Construction, maintenance and planting of 1,000-tree nursery to complete the live fence
-Maintaining the garden after construction, including tree pruning and fence repair

The well contractor and his team will be responsible for the following:

-Purchasing construction materials
-Digging and reinforcing the well with cement
-Masonry for the feeder basins and wellhead
-Implementation of underground pipe system

Let Girls Learn
Although not designated as an official Let Girls Learn project, this project will indirectly benefit young girls in three ways. First, they will have improved nutrition due to increased consumption of essential vitamins and minerals. This will decrease their susceptibility to disease, thus reducing the likelihood of school absences due to illness. Second, there is potential for income generation when women sell excess produce. These funds may be used to offset the cost of their children’s education. Lastly, women involved in business transactions will act as role models for young girls eager to continue their education in order to find better work opportunities.

Fundraising Target
$1,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$100

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$ 1,400

 

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Keur Bakary Master Farm Water Project - Senegal

Keur Bakary Master Farm Water Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Keur Bakary Master Farm Water Project - Senegal

Location
Keur Bakary Master Farm, Nguekhokh, Department of Mbour, Thies Region, Senegal

Community Description
Keur Bakary is a small farming village 15 km north of Mbour. The Keur Bakary Master Farm is located outside of the village, serving not only the people of Keur Bakary but several surrounding villages. The Master Farmer, Cheikh Dieng, does extensive work in rainy season field crops as well as dry season market gardening.

In the rainy season, Cheikh works with Peace Corps to extend improved varieties of field crops as well as improved varieties of trees. The Keur Bakery Master Farm serves as a demonstration field for the area, providing people with a space to come and see improved gardening techniques put to use. This is Cheikh's fourth year in the Master Farm program and he has held numerous trainings both in and outside of the Master Farm. The Master Farm had over 120 attendees at various trainings in 2015 and has become a space in which community members come for guidance in agricultural techniques.

Keur Bakary Master Farm Water Project - SenegalProblem Addressed
The Master Farm is currently functioning on one well and one water basin. Peace Corps has started extending Pisciculture (fish farming) in the Master Farms and only having one basin has proven to be an issue. Currently, they are using the one basin for hand watering, a pisciculture demonstration and a drip irrigation system. Watering an entire field with one basin is labor-intensive and has kept Cheikh from producing at the full capacity of the space.

During the dry season, everything is dependent on the water source so currently only a small area of the field is being used due to lack of water. Another well was dug in 2011 but had gone dry and another basin was built but it needs repaired.

Project Description
The goal of this project is to repair one existing water basin, to repair one existing well, to purchase a pump, to construct two additional water basins and to connect the basins with underground piping to increase efficiency and reduce water loss.

The Master Farm program is working on expanding its work in pisciculture and this project will help with that expansion, as well as greatly increase the farmer’s capacity to grow food in the area, increasing food security.

The basin will be repaired and the new basins constructed by a local mason and the well will be deepened. The piping system will be installed by Cheikh and some of the workers at the field.

Water Charity funds will pay for the materials as well as some of the labor for the project.

Keur Bakary Master Farm Water Project - SenegalProject Impact
150 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Mallory Ross

Monitoring and Maintenance
Currently, the lack of water is limiting the amount the farm is producing. The success of the project will be monitored, and demonstrated by an increase in the production from the farm. Monitoring will be done by Mallory, and continued by subsequent PCVs who serve in the community. The Master Farm program's annual survey will help in the collection of this data.

Comments
Cheikh is an extremely reliable work partner and spends his time helping those in his community and surrounding communities. The Master Farm program has helped him gain confidence in his teaching ability and he truly serves as a resource to the area. He is always looking for teaching opportunities and is passionate about being sustainable in the work. This project will help him continue to teach others in improved gardening techniques as well as provide more food security for the area during the dry season.

Fundraising Target
$1,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,500

Keur Bakary Master Farm Water Project - SenegalKeur Bakary Master Farm Water Project - Senegal 

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Hamdalaye Well Rehab Project - Senegal

Hamdalaye Well Rehab Project - Senegal

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Hamdalaye Well Rehab Project - SenegalLocation
Hamdalaye, Salemata District, Kedougou Region, Senegal

Community Description
Hamdalaye, a beautiful village of approximately 300 people, is located among the hills about 12 kilometers west of Salemata in the Kedougou Region of Senegal. The village has two community buildings: one elementary school and one mosque.

The villagers are all Pulaar, which is the dominant ethnic group in the region of Kedougou, though many Bassari villages are located close by and they frequently interact with each other. The villagers' main source of income comes from farming corn, peanuts, and rice.

Though the land is very good for farming, malnutrition rates are high among children under 5 in the community and surrounding areas, which is of particular concern due to their isolated location and difficulty reaching distant health clinics.

Everyone in Hamdalaye is Muslim and are very strong in their faith and cultural values, with the family (very large ones at that!) being the core part of their social structure.

Problem Addressed
Hamdalaye has had serious problems with access to potable water. Despite the construction of two wells within the past ten years, one of which was poorly constructed and is beyond repair, the community’s lack of water has caused them to draw water from contaminated sources several kilometers away and has made it impossible for the women to participate in any gardening.

The inability to produce their own vegetables and fruits is of special concern, as the closest weekly market is in Salemata, which, if they make it there, has a generally poor selection of nutritious foods. This lack of potable water and nutritious foods has contributed to the high rates of malnutrition and diarrhea, especially in children under 5 in the village.

Hamdalaye Well Rehab Project - SenegalProject Description
This project is the repair of a well in the village.

This will restore the community’s access to potable water and ability to garden, as the shortage of water currently prevents them from doing so.

The old pump and piping will be removed and replaced as necessary to bring the well to full functionality. The work will be performed by an experience water pump technician, who has already identified the problem, and will complete the work over the course of three days.

The village, which will provide essential materials, has also already started to repair the garden fence that once stood next to the well.

The President of the Hamdalaye Women's Group has been organizing the villagers and conducting meetings, and will conduct trainings on pump use, maintenance, and repairs.

Project Impact
300 people will benefit from the project

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Lesa Young

Monitoring and Maintenance
The technician who is doing the renovation will return to provide maintenance and perform necessary repairs. The women’s group will supervise the use of the well.

Comments
After the work is completed, 40 women from the women’s group in will participate in training and rebuild the community garden.

As a result of this project, member of the community will have a safe and close water source, and will also be able to garden and provide much-needed nutritious foods for their families.

Fundraising Target
$1,450

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$55

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,395

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

 Hamdalaye Well Rehab Project - SenegalHamdalaye Well Rehab Project - Senegal

 

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Illimoko Well Rehab - South Sudan

Celani Opanni at the shallow, dirty well

NPCA & WC LOGOThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity, Water is Basic & the National Peace Corps Association.

This project is part of Phase 2 in our ongoing South Sudan Well Rehab Program. The program's Phase 1 began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These new projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.

Location
Illimoko Village, Yei River Region, South Sudan
The Community
Community Description

Illimoko is a small village, a conglomeration of 48 households and approximately 250 residents and counting. With an uneasy economy struggling from increased irregularity created by South Sudan’s current civil war, the amount of residents in Illimoko fluctuate daily as many families are forced to move around in search of work. The main source of Illimoko’s income is made from small-scale farming, supported by the temporary workers that wander in and out of the community.  

The village is right off the main road, on the way from Yei Town headed towards Koboko. Since the borehole was drilled in 2013, the neighboring church has been responsible for monitoring the water usage. 

The recent outbreak between government forces has increased the distress on local communities, such as Illimoko. Being a part of Yei River County is an extensive concern for locals. A central and exponentially diverse community of South Sudan, this major hub is a central location for trade from Uganda and Congo. The basic availability of clean water provides a much-needed relief to the stress and struggle this village has been through. 

The VillageProblem Addressed
While Illimoko is home to one of Water is Basic’s drilling specialists, the additional management of water usage and maintenance has not kept one of the borehole’s pipes from rusting out and requiring repair.

Having a drilling specialist live locally has benefited the community well, as he has provided attentive care and vital education on maintenance, to others within the community. This has helped empower the community, making them feel that they are able to provide sustainable solutions to their problems. 

Since its drilling, the residents have been diligent in collecting monthly funds for a healthy savings.  Most families provide a monthly 5SSP (approximately 25 cents) to the borehole’s committee, to ensure a healthy savings. A month before the pipe rusted out, the pastor of the church ran away with the community’s savings. Beyond losing their ability to provide clean water for their families, the community is struggling with the betrayal of someone whom they thought was a well-trusted individual. Celina Oppana

Celina Opanni is one of the many individuals whom is suffering from this physical and emotional loss. The 38-year-old is, practically, a single mother to six children as her husband is forced to work hours away in the Argo forest, the only steady and guaranteed work, for the government, around. This has left Celina lonely and distraught as she not only cares for her children on her own, but maintains the family’s farm. Time is of the essence, as anyone with one or two children knows. But with six kids and an entire farm to operate, it is nearly impossible for Celina to add an extra three hours to her daily routine to commute back and forth to the closest shallow well. Even then, water is not guaranteed during the dry season as many families from surrounding areas rely on this shallow well, typically drying out what little is available. Celina says she often buys water from the GIZ Company so her kids can have clean water to drink. But with the water costing 2 SSP per jerry can (half of what the monthly fee for full-time use of the borehole, before it broke), there is too much of a financial strain on her family for water from the GIZ Company to act as a long-term, sustainable solution.

Youth at the shallow wellProject Description
This project is to restore the well to full service.  In collaboration with Water is Basic, a locally owned and operated water drilling company, the project should only take 1-2 days to complete.

First, the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. The crew will go on to replace the parts needed. and the pump head will be re-attached and checked. If everything is working properly, the last step is to check the water flow rate to ensure the borehole is deep enough and the pressure is appropriate for the community’s needs. 

The next, major part of this project will be to help the community and committee make the necessary organizational and operational changes are made to prevent another mishap, like the one with the pastor.  These changes will include involving many people from the community into the committee to spread the feeling of empowerment. The treasury position will be separated between two committee members to ensure a check and balance system is set in place.

Project ImpactThe Well
This project will benefit more than 250 residents.

Project Manager
Steve Roese,President of Water is Basic U.S.will oversee the project

Monitoring and Maintenance
Once Water is Basic is finished repairing the borehole, the non-profit will oversee the expansion and increased education of the committee, currently run by the church. There will be two treasurers, one member of the community and one member of the church, who will be responsible for keeping track of the fees earned to ensure the savings stay safe. The other members will be responsible for teaching proper WASH techniques and making sure that people are using these techniques around the well.  

The well repair will give the community of Illimoko clean and healthy water, again. For a child, water is everything.  The repaired borehole will give new life to the community, helping them keep the funds normally used for medical bills that accumulate from treating water-borne illnessesYoung girl carrying water. The repair will also give time back to families for work, education, and spending time with each other. The shallow well that the Illimoko residents are currently gathering water from will be navigated to local crops, lessening the amount of physical labor the residents use to water their crops. 

More importantly, this clean water will help people like Celina Opanni use her hard earned money for food or sending her children back to school. The kids of Illimoko will see immediate health benefits from having a constant source of clean water, giving the community greater control of their future by having a better understanding of how to raise and use the money accumulated from borehole-usage fees. The community will take part in the committee and have a large part in decision-making, ensuring better management, and lessening the control of any one individual, to prevent the problem as previously experienced with the ex-pastor.  With great hope, the residents of Illimoko are looking ahead to begin investing in other community developments, such as building schools, diversifying income opportunities, and developing health facilities. 

Comments
Water is Basic’s strength come from the experienced local personnel. These individuals lead the non-profit’s mission with determination and skill, guiding the country to develop self-sustaining water systems, managed and operated by local villages. It is the mission of Water Is Basic, and these projects being done with Water Charity under our joint South Sudan Well Rehab Program, to build communities and empower the Sudanese to implement solutions for their water crisis on their own.

Part of the program involves an internship program where local, promising secondary school graduates manage our projects for one year. Two recent graduates from Nehemiah Gateway University, in Albania, oversaw interns and the projects the interns were directing. In exchange for their work, the interns are given access to distance learning courses and are then assisted in applying for, and attending, their university of choice.
 

Phase II, which includes this project, is being supported by an anonymous donor, who will match your donations. Please click the Donate button below to keep this great program going.

 

fieldsWellGathering waterVillage

Water used for cropsCommunity around the dirty well

The Village

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
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Loggo II Well Renewal - South Sudan

Ladies carrying water

NPCA & WC LOGOThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association, in collaboration with Water is Basic.

This project is part of Phase 2 in our South Sudan Well Rehab Program. The program's Phase 1 began with the Tore region, which became the center of a new wave of violence.  These new projects are being done along the Yei River, of Yei State. We continue with multiple well rehabs in Yei County where many are displaced from the last two years of violence in the Unity and Jonglei States.
The Community
Location
Loggo II, Lomulule Sub-Boma, OwtogoPayam, Yei River County, Yei State, South Sudan

Community Description
Along the main road, headed towards the Western Equatorial State, there are over forty tukuls covered in grass-thatched roofs. The Loggo II village, 7 miles west of Yei Town, relies on the crops that are planted at the edge of town. Along with any necessary hunting and additional small businesses to encourage trade and economic expansion; maize, cassava, and sorghum are the only way the residents survive. 

Problem Addressed
For three years, the broken borehole has kept over 200 residents from having access to clean water, forcing many to find streams and shallow, dirty wells to source hydration. 

Suffering from the contaminated water himself, the technician died before being able to finish repairing the borehole. The local technician was already paid for his work, however, draining the community’s funds.

Doruka, a housewife married to Edward, barely survived the birth of her only living child. Edward blames Doruka for their lack of children, insisting it is because of the dirty water she drank since the borehole was broken. Threatened and fearful, Doruka is not only concerned about the health effects on her and her family, from the water, but she is concerned about the physical retaliation from her husband. 

DorukaProject Description
This project is to restore the well to full functionality.

First the Water is Basic crew will take the pump apart, removing all the pipes to examine and check for holes or signs of future problems. The crew will then replace the parts needed, and replace the pipe.. The pump head will then be attached and checked. If everything is working properly the last step is to check the water flow rate to make sure the borehole is deep enough and the pressure is appropriate for the community’s needs. 

Over the last 8 years Water is Basic has been a reliable company in South Sudan, drilling many boreholes since 2008. This project should only take 1-2 days to complete.

Project Impact
This project will impact over 200 people.

A Child Carrying Water

Project Manager 
Steve Roese is President of Water is Basic U.S. An entrepreneur and pastor, Steve has been involved in South Sudan since 2004 where he has fought alongside his brothers and sisters for peace and opportunity. His motto is “whatever it takes” and he means it when it comes to building the new nation of the Republic of South Sudan.

Monitoring and Maintenance
This borehole has a committee that consists of ten members:  a Chair-Person and Vice Chair-Person, a Secretary and Vice- Secretary, a Treasurer and Vice-Treasurer, a time keeper, and three advisors. Together, the members have introduced regular fees to build a savings for future well improvements.

Focused on longevity, the borehole will be cleaned every morning before it is opened to the rest of the village.  Controlling the usage of the borehole, with availability being a maximum of 8 hours per day, is essential for the borehole to prosper in Loggo II. 

Comments
Providing clean water for the residents of Loggo II will not only save the lives of young children, as 40% of new-borns die due to unclean water contaminating their mothers and thus them, but will help decrease the physical violence at home, driven by the misogynistic and paternalistic cultural norms of South Sudan. 

Phase II, which includes this project, is being supported by an anonymous donor, who will match your donations. Please click the Donate button below to keep this great program going.

 

Youth running
Getting water

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
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