Featured Projects

Water Charity is proud to have completed projects in 70 nations and has recently finished our 3,000th project! Here you can find a selection of our featured programs, noteworthy projects, disaster relief efforts and the like. If you would like to find specific projects, we encourage you to use our "Find-A-Project" page where you can sort through our work a number of ways. To see every project, article and conclusion page we have, go to our "Announcements" section.

Ethiopia Borehole Program

Ethiopia Borehole Program - Ethiopia

 

Water Charity is proud to announce our Ethiopia Borehole Program.  This is a major initiative to drill new boreholes in the Sidama region of Ethiopia. The program is underway.  Click the links near the bottom of this page to read about the projects that are started.NPCA & WC LOGOS

This program is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

The drilling will be done by Selam Awassa Water Drilling works & Sanitation PLC, a local company that was donated drilling equipment by our friends Wine 2 Water, who have been gracious enough to make this connection for us.  In order to achieve maximum effect, and a high return on the dollar, this program is being done in partnership with these groups with an existing presence in the region, and a strong record of success in the field of well creation, management and repair. These will be our first projects in Ethiopia in quite some time, and we are thrilled to be working with people who have been actively engaged in doing water and sanitation projects in the area.

The woredas (counties) to be served by this program are Wondo Genet and Dalle to begin with, and as we can compound upon initial successes, we will expand the program to include other needy areas.  Click on the map to the right to expand it.  Each well will have its own project (and conclusion) page, which will be linked below.  This page will be updated as new projects are started and news from the field comes in.

Map of the regionThe regions in question are mountainous with an average elevation of 6,000ft.  60% of the people in the area do not currently have access to clean water.  According to the 2011 UNDP Human Development Report, Ethiopia is ranked as one of the least developed countries at 174 out of 187 in the United Nations Human Development Index.  It is estimated that one in four Ethiopians live on less than one dollar per day. Access to safe drinking water is particularly lacking in Ethiopia’s rural areas.  During the dry season more traditional sources of water are placed under pressure as hand dug wells and other perennial sources dry up.  Although Ethiopia is said to have one of the greatest water reserves in Africa, most of this lies untapped below the surface of the earth with water tables ranging from 50 to over 500 feet down.

Given this variety in depth, the difficulty and cost of doing wells in various areas varies tremendously.  A 180m deep well is going to cost more per person than a 90m... or 30m well.  The areas we have chosen to start this program are neither the hardest nor the easiest regions where this is concerned, but rather represent an area where the need is great, and the infrastructure to get projects done is present and running well.

Ethiopia’s main health problems are said to be communicable diseases caused by poor sanitation and malnutrition.  Water and sanitation-related diseases, particularly diarrhea, are among the top causes of death in the country, especially for children under 5.  In the woredas where our new wells will be drilled, there are frequent cases of dysentery, giardia, typhoid and other dangerous waterborne illnesses.

The majority of the population consists of subsistence farmers, growing crops such as sugar cane, false banana, coffee, and avocado.  The women and children in the communities are responsible for collecting water for their households from unprotected hand dug wells and contaminated ponds. Wells of the kind we will be installing (deep boreholes) provide year-round safe access to water, and will free up many hours of labor. 

The focus is to empower women who carry the burden of hauling water and making a living in a paternalistic society and who offer so much promise to transform communities. Communities and trusted partners are invited to participate in each stage of the work in order to create a sense of ownership, responsibility and stewardship. In this way, a framework and support system is established that can provide long-term benefits for individuals and communities.

A Water Use Committee (WUC) has been established for each water point so money can be collected for repairs.  This will ensure village participation, sense of ownership, and long term sustainability.

Cement pouredAs the wells are drilled, a health and hygiene training program will be organized. Hand washing, diseases transmission, pump care, and other key lessons will be taught. One of the community members is chosen by the WUC to be caretaker of the pump and will be responsible for small maintenance issues and security.  The new boreholes will dovetail with local community based organizations to build upon a community outreach program (Sustainable Living Groups) for the longevity and sustainability of the project. This, combined with WC's traditionally minimal overhead costs, creates a very comprehensive package that doesn't stop at simply drilling a well and installing a pump, but continues to engage with the community, and make sure these water points will continue to provide for the people for many, many years to come.

While this ambitious effort to create wells in a very needy region of a very needy country has a major donor already, we encourage everyone interested in helping out to do so.  The more money we collect for this program, the more people we can help.  This is an opportunity for people to contribute meaningfully to these communities without the massive overhead often associated with such projects.

You can view the individual borehole projects via links at the bottom of this page.

This program falls under our larger, comprehensive East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

 Village Mother

Conclusion of Kors Ream Primary School Well and Water System Project - Cambodia

Conclusion of Kors Ream Primary School Well and Water System Project - Cambodia

This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Evalynn Romano.
To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

 

Water Tank TowersA summary of the completion report for the KORS REAM PRIMARY SCHOOL WELL AND WATER SYSTEM PROJECT - CAMBODIA:
Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project: Evalynn Romano

SCOPE OF PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

The aim of the water project for the Kors Ream Primary School was to implement a strategy for water supply, sanitation and hygiene by means of a well, a hand washing station, water storage containers, a steel stand, and ceramic water filters. The goal was to help the teachers and students of the primary school gain access to water and sanitation in order to achieve safe, clean latrines and water for hand washing, drinking and irrigating the school vegetable garden, in hopes of creating a safe learning environment that supports the health of the primary school students, increasing the amount of time students attend school.

SPECIFIC WORK COMPLETED:

With the help of the funds provided by Water Charity, a well, a hand washing station and a steel stand to support water storage containers were constructed. In addition, two 2,000-liter water storage containers and nine ceramic water filters (one for each classroom) were purchased. The school contributed about 55% of the funds for the second water storage container. Additionally, the teachers planned and organized a school-wide hand washing education day.

PROGRESSION OF PROJECT THROUGH EACH STAGE:

The construction of the well was the first stage of the project. The community was hopeful, however not entirely confident, that water would be found beneath school grounds. The primary school director invited respected men in the village to pray to the gods for water and arranged an offering. After four days of digging, and digging 10 meters deeper than planned, water was found, and the community was overjoyed. The local workers involved in the construction of the well were interested in helping the needs of the primary school, and gave a 20% discount for their services.

Faucets and sinksThe next step was the construction of a 3-meter steel stand to support two 2,000-liter water storage tanks, and the hand washing station. Although the local construction workers have a vast background in their work, they had never constructed a hand washing station before. After just 10 days, a well-constructed hand washing station was situated just outside the latrines.

The station includes a roof to protect it from the rain and a fence that allows the school director and teachers to lock the station during summer vacation. These small but important additions were vital in preserving the hand washing station and allowing long-lasting usage. The local construction workers were happy to be involved with this project as they have children attending the primary school, and gave a discount for their services as well.

The hand washing station was nice, but needed some color. The Peace Corps Volunteer organized a mural to be painted on the hand washing station walls with the help of primary school students. The mural involved visuals and instructions in Khmer on the steps of hand washing as a reminder for the students. The students really enjoyed watching the daily progression of the mural. Several primary school students were able to contribute to the mural by painting their handprints, which became an entertaining activity and memory for them. The students are very happy and excited about their new, colorful hand washing station.

The ceramic water filters were implemented in each classroom. The only source of drinking water on school grounds had been the bottles of water sold in shops and stands around the school that the students would have to purchase. The water filters provides students with easy access to free drinking water.

Finally, a school-wide day of hand washing education was organized. The interactive sessions included asking questions to test the current knowledge of the students, games that helped students to visualize the spreading of germs, a play put on by primary school students of a family at mealtime, a song and dance on hand washing, and then encouraging students to utilize the newly constructed hand washing station to demonstrate what they had just learned. The students were excited to learn about hand washing in the interactive and entertaining methods the teachers used.

The primary school held a celebration for the completion of the project. The school invited monks and members of the community to gather in honor of the donations received. Everyone was in bright spirits and happy to come together for the festivities.

Certificate Of AppreciationFURTHER UPDATE:

This week, I attended a ceremony held by the primary school for the retirement of the current school director and the beginning of a new director. I was presented with a certificate in your organization's name for the donations that you have given. The school and the community are still very grateful for your support and wanted to make sure that you saw your certificate. They wanted me to send it to you, but I'm not sure that it would make it in one piece.  (WC Note: We don't need the Certificate, but thanks for sending the pic.)

END RESULT:

The Kors Ream Primary School now has the resources needed for a water supply, sanitation and hygiene. The community is proud to finally secure these resources on school grounds after many years of unfilled promises from different organizations.

REACTIONS AND QUOTES:

“I am very happy for the generous donation. Thank you very much from the school director, teachers and members of the Kors Ream village community. This is the first time any school from the commune is able to secure a well from an organization. It will help students have good health and study well. I wish you a lot of success and happiness.” – Mr. Hem Sophat, primary school director

“Cool!” – primary school students, in regards to the hand washing station and mural


We would like to thank Evalynn once again for executing such a fine project.  We are honored to have been involved in helping this wonderful community.

Though completed, this project still needs donations to recoup the funds pre-funded at the outset.  Consider adopting this very worthy project, and enjoy the great pictures below.
Buddhist Monks at CelebrationBuddhist Monks
StudentsKids dancing
Handprint mural insideKids making handprint leaves
the heavy machinerywater found
Using the handwashing station
 

Conclusion of Well Handpump Repair and Workshop Program - Uganda

Conclusion of Well Handpump Repair and Workshop Program - Uganda

This project has been completed under the partnership of Water Charity, the National Peace Corps Association, Wine To Water, and Connect Africa, and involved the participation of Peace Corps Volunteer Katherine Marshall.  It is a part of our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.
To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Project Highlights:

  • Threading a new pump rod.Reached 3,642 Ugandans with access to clean water 
  • Successfully repaired 10 well handpumps
  • Held 10-day workshop training, 13 technicians, on handpump repair
  • Held 2-day workshop training, 48 water committee members, on borehole maintenance
  • 4 additional well handpumps were repaired with local Uganda Water Project Funds helping an additional 1,200+ people access clean water

Project Summary:  

In May of 2015, Water Charity funded a well handpump repair workshop in Wakiso District of Uganda.  This unique project aimed to train/retrain handpump technicians, educate water committee members, and repair 10 broken handpumps/wells.  Robert Acaye, handpump repair program manager for Connect Africa, conducted site assessments with District representatives and led the workshop.  There were 13 total participants from Connect Africa, Uganda Water Project, Drink Local Drink Tap, EMI, and the Peace Corps.

Participants pulling pipe and preparing a new cylinder.The first three days were devoted to handpump repair classroom training, held at the Connect Africa “HUB” in Migadde, Wakiso District.  Lessons included handpump parts/functions, proper tools/procedures, troubleshooting, and well maintenance.  The teachings were fun and interactive, with meals provided for the participants.  There was a mixture of new and returning participants, all receiving certifications on the third day.

The next two days were perhaps the most important, addressing the “software”.  They focused on Borehole Management, covering topics such as community ownership, source protection, and managing finances.  This included each borehole’s own water committee, usually consisting of four members each.  The first session was held at the HUB, with members from Gombe and Centema sub-counties. The second session was held at Masulita sub-county headquarters, with member from that area.  All water committee members made their own by-laws and set household water user fees, usually about $0.30 (1,000 UGX) per month.  A total of 48 committee members attended; each receiving lunch and a small transportation reimbursement.

Borehole maintenance class with water committee members in Masulita.The remaining five days were all spent in the field, repairing the handpumps and promoting proper hygiene.  The participants were very eager to get real experience to develop skills that complement their new knowledge.  The group of 14 was divided into two, each with a separate task that rotated back each day.  While one group repaired the handpump, the other group taught community members on disease transmission, washing hands, and clean water storage.  All of this activity created quite a buzz, with decent sized crowds watching the technicians work, listening to the hygiene promotion, and preforming tasks needed for the well (like slashing grass, picking up trash, and fence building). 

The most common mechanical problems were worn out cylinders (rubbers and foot valve), pipes, and rods.  Other problems included broken handles, chains, pump heads, and concrete pad repair.  A wide variety of repair techniques were practiced during the workshop.

The whole workshop ended with successfully repairing 14 handpumps and equipping their water committees with the knowledge to maintain them.  The government funds which enabled the addition of 4 "extra wells" was a welcome matching/ community contribution.  As a result, an estimated 4,842 Ugandans now have access to clean water thanks to Water Charity, Connect Africa, and this program!  Also, 13 handpump repair technicians have built both hardware and software skills to make a huge difference. 

Peace Corp Volunteer, Katherine Marshall, stated how impressed she was at the workshop and how it has given her new community training skills to use in the future.

 

Well Details:

Well #

Community Name

Parish

Sub County

People Served

Static/Well Depth

GPS Location

1

Sinabulya

Masulita

Masulita

420

20/40 feet

N 0°30'44.66"  

E 32°21'13.33"

2

Centema

Centema

Centema

210

10/30 feet

N 0°21'56.02"  

E 32°24'13.78"

3

Kisaga

Kisaga

Masulita

210

20/70 feet

N 0°31'04.17"  

E 32°21'26.05"

4

Kiziba

Kiziba

Masulita

350

15/40 feet

N 0°27'59.31"  

E 32°19'56.55"

5

Kigogwa

Migade

Gombe

400

10/35 feet

N 0°29'59.25"  

E 32°39'22.34"

6

Bubale Central

Bubale

Gombe

420

85/240 feet

N 0°28'53.63"  

E 32°28'07.89"

7

Abasi

Kaaso

Gombe

322

25/65 feet

N 0°32'37.19"  

E 32°29'59.85"

8

Kigogwa S/School

Migade

Gombe

500 students

50/75 feet

N 0°30'28.70"  

E 32°31'22.10"

9

Bugulube

Bugulube

Gombe

210

10/25 feet

N 0°30'44.66"  

E 32°21'13.33"

10

City Land College

Kigogwa

Gombe

600 students

40/70 feet

N 0°29'09.21"  

E 32°30'40.25"

 

 

 

 

3,642

 

 

 

Way forward:  

Routine follow-ups will be done to keep community relations and ensure the well is maintained (92% previous results).  This will be much easier because the all the communities are within Wakiso District, where the HUB is located.

We would like to thank everyone involved for executing such a fine project, and we would also like to thank Kyle Lomax and David Cuthbert of Wine To Water for another successful partnership and their quality field reporting on this. We again express our gratitude to the donor who provided the funding for the project.

This was an extraordinary project for Water Charity, not only because of the tremendous results, but also because it pioneered a new model in our relationship with the Peace Corps.  A serving Peace Corps Volunteer was able to participate in an important extended learning and work experience.  The knowledge gained is being transmitted to her fellow Volunteers, staff, and the NGO where she works, thereby multiplying the benefits.

Contaminated water source, used before the well was repaired.
^ Contaminated water source, used before the well was repaired. ^

Community members ready for their well to be repaired.Participants pulling pipe and preparing a new cylinder.
Newly repaired well being used.Children watching the water flow.

Newly repaired well being used.                                                                                     Children watching the water flow.


 

Conclusion of Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program - Phase 3 - The Gambia

Conclusion of Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program - Phase 3 - The Gambia
This project has been successfully completed under the direction of RPCV Jeremy Mak, with the support of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association. All proposed well rehabilitations were completely quickly and smoothly

To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.
 
Jeremy Reports:
 

Conclusion Sare Sambel

In summary, 5 Bluepumps were installed and 2 Mark II pumps successfully rehabilitated, improving clean water access for a communal health center and 2 villages, and completely RESTORING clean water access for 2 additional villages. All 7 water points are now producing clean water for beneficiary communities.
 
In total, an estimated 2,800 women, children, and men have directly benefited from these pump works and will enjoy drastically better health outcomes. Indirectly, the more than 26 villages that rely on the District Health Center (patients from outside Dankunku District are often referred to this health center) also benefit.
 
In particular, we invite you to look at the videos of the works from Kalikajara village, where we chlorinated and sealed a once-open well and installed two new Bluepumps. 
 
A short synopsis of the work done in each village is listed below, with links to videos. 
 
SWE-GAM, a company based in Banjul, deployed to the Niaminas on two trips to install the handpumps. Water Charity paid for 4 Bluepumps, along with all installation costs and per diems for local Gambian support staff. SWE-GAM was generous enough to donate a 5th Bluepump. Leftover Mark II spare parts were available from the Gambia Lifewater Project’s 2013 and 2014 campaigns, leaving the handpump repair costs in Fula Kunda negligible. 
 
Sare Sambel
150 people / 6 compounds
GPS: N 13 degrees 33.206' W 015 degrees 15.706'
Date: April 8, 2015
Deliverable: Old German Mark II replaced by Bluepump
10 meters to water, 5.20 meters water column
Bluepump installation depth: 14 meters
Conclusion FK
 
Videos:
 
Sare Bakary
200 people / 7 compounds
GPS: N 13 degrees 33.964', W 015 degrees 19.835'
Date: April 8, 2015
Deliverable: Malfunctioning German Mark II replaced with Bluepump
8.3 meters to water, 5.9 meters water column
Bluepump installation depth: 12.55 meters
 
Videos:
 
Kalikajara
117 people / 12 compounds
GPS: N 13 degrees 37.150' W 015 degrees 18.986'
Date: April 21, 2015
Deliverable: Open well with two broken Mark II pumps chlorinated and sealed, 2 new Bluepumps installed
9.4 meters to water, 8.3 meters of water column
Bluepump 15 meters of pipe x 2
 
Sare BakaryTwo Bluepumps went to Kalikajara as planned. We also shock chlorinated the well with Aquaprove (chlorine dioxide). Before we closed the slab, the imam was lowered in and scooped out all the floating debris, including some frogs! We're expecting the water quality to improve over time. 
 
**Both pumps work fine now. However, one of the pumps has a very small pinhole leak on the water tank portion, so the water level drops a few centimeters--not a serious problem. We didn't have an extra tank pipe piece to use, but hope to rectify this on another trip to make it right. 


Videos:
Kalikajara Open Well 1

 

Dankunku Health Center
1,500-2,000 people (150-200 compounds) in Dankunku, plus 26+ total beneficiary villages
GPS: N 13 degrees 34.357 W 015 degrees 19.468'
Date: April 21, 2015
Deliverable: 1 broken Indian Mark II pump replaced with Bluepump to provide district health center with 24 hour clean water access
14.5 meters to water, 5 meters of water column
Bluepump 18 meters of pipe
 
The last Bluepump went to Dankunku District Health Center. It serves 26 villages for primary care. Its solar water system broke long ago and now depends on a tapstand hooked up to Dankunku's larger water system, as well as a well in front of it. The larger water system sometimes shuts down and is closed at night, leaving the health center with just one working hand pump, which we fixed a couple years back. The well had another pump, which stopped working. We installed a Bluepump on this pedestal, improving clean water access for all district residents and for patients and their families who have to stay overnight. We went back the following morning to see that water was falling back into the well from a small hole that was accidentally made in the slab when we set the mold. We went back and patched it as well as another hole on the side of the slab that wasn’t seen the day before.
 

Videos:

Dankunku District Health Center 1

 

Fula Kunda
14 compounds / 350 people
GPS N 13 degrees  33.736' W 015 degrees 19.427'
Date: April 23, 2015
Deliverable: 2 broken Mark II handpumps fixed to provide village with sole source of clean water
 
Conclusion DKKBoth Mark II pumps stopped working last year after we fixed them. Each has 7 x 3 meter pipes and 1 x 1 meter pipe, for 22 meters each. One pump was severely damaged through suspected misuse and abuse. The kingpin for the cylinder's end piece was knocked out, with broken centralizers also falling and clogging the cylinder spring. Even with the replacement kingpin we put in, the cylinder leaked on testing, so we switched it out for the cylinder we harvested from Sare Sambel after installing a Bluepump there. This Sare Sambel cylinder is a newer, higher quality version--it didn't leak. However, the threading configuration is different, so we also had to change the water tank to one with male threads. We were lucky we had one on hand, which was from either Sare Bakary or Sare Sambel pre-Bluepump--the one previously there had female threads and the bolts were rusted on and impossible to change, even though we had a spare thread plate.
 
Just as we suspected, the second pump was clogged due to sand. We believe the well may be caving in on one of the lower concrete rings within the water column. We lifted the slab, but did not see any breaks above the water column. 2 pipes were fully clogged with sand. The force caused one rod to bend. The plunger bolt also snapped right above the checknut connection point. We replaced the plunger with the one from the first pump and changed the plug gasket and spring. On testing, there were no leaks. 
 
To avoid future sand clogs, we removed one section of 3 meter pipe, still leaving approximately 4 meters of pipe inside the water column.   
 
Videos:

Fula Kunda Mark II Handpump Repairs 1 Possible Diagnosis?

Fula Kunda Mark II Handpump Repairs 2 Counting the Pipes Inside

Fula Kunda Mark II Handpump Repairs 3 Switching the Cylinders

Fula Kunda Mark II Handpump Repairs 4 Priming Pump #1, Testing

Fula Kunda Mark II Handpump Repairs 5 Water is Flowing!

Fula Kunda Mark II Handpump Repairs 6 Sand Clogs!

Fula Kunda Mark II Handpump Repairs 7 Cleaning the Pipes

Fula Kunda Mark II Handpump Repairs 8 Clogged Pipes

Fula Kunda Mark II Handpump Repairs 9 Cylinder Testing

Fula Kunda Mark II Handpump Repairs 10 Priming Pump #2

Fula Kunda Mark II Handpump Repairs 11 Success!

Fula Kunda Mark II Handpump Repairs 12 Celebration

 
Monitoring and Maintenance
Beneficiary villages will be responsible for caring for their handpumps and preventing misuse and abuse. Additionally, local GLP workers will be outfitted with basic tools to perform routine Bluepump checkups and maintenance.  
 
Thanks again to Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association for making waterborne diseases a thing of the past for these communities!
 
Thanks to Jeremy for his always stellar work.  Not just on this considerable achievement of a project, but also for the filter project he was doing simultaneously... and the many, many great projects he has done with us before!
Conclusion KalikajaraConclusion DKKBeginning Fula KundaConclusion KalikajaraConclusion Sare SambelConclusion Kalikajara
 

 

Malawi Borehole Program

Malawi Borehole Program

Clean Water For Rural Malawi!

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis Malawi Program is a component of the East Africa Water and Sanitation Program, and is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the National Peace Corps Association.
 

Malawi Borehole Program

Malawi has suffered through a terrible and unprecedented drought that has made life very hard for the people there. Many rural villages were forced to trek long distance to gather meager water supplies from sources unfit for human consumption. This program has been enacted to cobat this tragic situation, and has been emminently successful.

In concert with our friends at Village X, Water Charity embarked on a program to provide wells to 7 villages in Malawi. At this point, we have done 10 projects so far, and intend to keep doing more! You can use the donate widgets below to allocate funds specifically for this program.

Each well project has its own project page, links to which can be found at the bottom of the page.  The conclusion pages to each project are linked to their project pages.

Check out this video to get a better idea of the situation in Malawi, and what Water Charity & Village X are doing about it:

Water Charity Malawi filmed by Gareth Burghes

Village X is a Malawi aid organization run by RPCV Michael Buckler, with whom Water Charity has worked on projects in the past. Malawi Country Rep, Myson Jambo, went out to visit villages within the Village X network that had identified a serious water/sanitation problem. Many of these communities are in dire need of clean water. Like Mlenga Village used to (the first  well/ pilot of this program, already completed) prior to March 2015, they fetch water from streams and shallow holes in the ground. Community members suffer from inordinate rates of waterborne illness and women (the primary water fetchers) have been subjected to domestic abuse, rape and, in one case, even death from drowning in a flooded river, because of commutes to and from polluted water sources.Finishing up a new well

Myson has found a number of communities in need of a new borehole installation, spanning three districts and 225 square miles in the Upper Shire Highlands of Southern Malawi (see map) -- Siyabu, Nachuma, Likoswe, Kazembe, Bakili and Mwanga. We have been making boreholes in them one by one. Now, in all, the boreholes have benefited nearly 10,000 people, mostly sustenance farmers and their families living in areas far from government services and significant NGO assistance. All of the original projects have been completed, and many villages have access to clean drinking water for the first time!

Not only have we finished the original 7 village wells successfully and continue to do new wells in new villages, we have enacted a Training Program to increase the number of trained borehole drillers in the region. Many of the wells being done in the region now are made possible by this effort, even if they are not specifically Water Charity projects.  You can find an updated list of projects at the bottom of this page, below you can see the original outline of the program when we started it. Please take the time to click through to the individual projects and their conclusions to see the true scope of this important work!

Original Program Outline:

Locations and Community Descriptions 

See above. Click on the map to expand it, or click here. Each village is marked on the map, and main roads (dirt and asphalt) are shown in yellow. 

Siyabu Village, Zomba District, Malawi. Siyabu is a typical rural Malawian village without running water or electricity, located along a dirt road, about a two-hour walk from the city of Zomba. Linesi Masala, a mother of two and resident of Siyabu, was abused by her husband for taking too long to retrieve water from a shallow well, where wait times were very long. He accused her of using that time to sleep with other men. Her husband subsequently died of dysentery. Approximately five couples in Siyabu have divorced over this issue.

Nachuma Village, Zomba District, Malawi. Nachuma is a typical rural Malawian village without running water or electricity, located along a dirt road, about a two-hour walk from the city of Zomba. Nachuma, an usually large village (two to three times larger than other Village X partner villages), has one operational borehole, built in 1993, that frequently has maintenance problems. Most of the village doesn't use this borehole due to long walking distances. Frola Nachuma, a mother of three and Nachuma resident, was stripped naked by her husband and tied to a pole in the village market. He was angry that she fetched water from a shallow well near their home instead of walking long distances to and from the village's sole borehole. Her husband has since fled the village.

Likoswe Village, Chiradzulu District, Malawi. Likoswe is a typical rural Malawian village without running water or electricity, located about a twenty-minute walk from a rural stretch of paved road, connecting Blantyre and Mulanje. A 13-year-old girl in Likoswe, Mphatso, was recently raped by a man from an adjacent village, while fetching water from a stream. She now has HIV.

Kazembe Village, Mulanje District, Malawi. Kazembe is a typical rural Malawian village without running water or electricity, located along a dirt road, a great distance from any paved road or urban area. Kazembe residents fetch water from the Nalada River. Consequently, infant morality rates are high and, on average, 4 cases of cholera are diagnosed in Kazembe each month.

Bakili Village, Mulanje District, Malawi. Bakili is a typical rural Malawian village without running water or electricity, located along a dirt road, a great distance from any paved road or urban area. Bakili lost a 14-year-old girl who went to fetch water from the local river and presumably drowned. Her body has not been recovered. 

Mwanga Village, Phalombe District, Malawi. Located along a rural stretch of paved road that connects the cities of Zomba and Phalombe, the commercial center of Mwanga has electricity, but many households lack it. In Mwanga, women often ask their husbands to fetch water using their bicycles, from a borehole located far from the village. The men usually resist, leaving wives with no choice except fetching water from nearby, unsanitary sources. 

Problems Addressed

There is no clean water accessible for residents of the villages (except Nachuma, a huge village with one borehole for 1487 people, located far from where most of them live). This leads to illness and, in some cases, death, particularly among children under the age of 5. Residents currently fetch water for drinking and cooking from dirty shallow wells or waterways like streams or rivers. Women, in particular, are vulnerable in the absence of clean, nearby water sources. As described above, in our partner villages, women fetching water from sometimes distant, unsanitary sources have experienced domestic abuse for taking too long (husbands suspect infidelity), rape (when women venture into remote areas), and death from drowning in flooded rivers during the rainy season.Water drum transported by bike.

Project Descriptions

These projects involve building boreholes. Borehole locations were chosen by village project committees, acting on behalf of entire villages. All sites are in publicly accessible places. Construction of all boreholes will be done by EZ Borehole Drillers, a company located in Blantyre, with substantial experience in the area, including the Mlenga borehole funded by Water Charity in February 2015. The installations will take three days to complete. It is expected that water will be reached at about 45 meters, but the wells will be drilled to depths of about 60 meters. Before drilling, a hydro-geographical assessment using electrical measurements will be conducted to find the depth of the underlying aquifer. The boreholes will be guaranteed for one year by EZ Borehole Drillers. The Mlenga borehole is functioning well, with no reported breakdowns or complaints. Above ground, the boreholes will include a standard metal pump mechanism, a cement foundation to protect the pump mechanism, a cement spillway to direct water into a nearby vegetable garden, and a clothes washing station. Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the skilled labor as well as for the materials that cannot be found locally, such as piping, fixtures and fittings, and concrete. Communities will contribute volunteer labor, materials, including bricks and sand, and about $400 in cash.

Project Impacts

Siyabu Village, Zomba District, Malawi. 104 households; 512 people.

Nachuma Village, Zomba District, Malawi. 302 households (258 of whom don't use old borehole due to distance); 1487 people (1270 of whom don't use old borehole due to distance).

Likoswe Village, Chiradzulu District, Malawi. 187 households; 738 people.

Kazembe Village, Mulanje District, Malawi. 179 households; 704 people.

Bakili Village, Mulanje District, Malawi. 97 households; 474 people. 

Mwanga Village, Phalombe District, Malawi. 112 households; 671 people.

Totals: 937 households; 4,369 people.
 

Project Administration

These projects will be administered by Michael Buckler, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Malawi from 2006 to 2008. He is the founder and CEO of Village X, a social enterprise located in Washington, D.C. dedicated to improving community development work in sub-Saharan Africa.  He is a member of the National Peace Corps Association, Friends of Malawi, and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington, D.C.

Monitoring and Maintenance

EZ Borehole Drillers will conduct 2 days of community-based management training per borehole. Trainees will include village chiefs and members of two borehole management committees, a technical committee (responsible for upkeep and maintenance) and a sanitation committee (charged with keeping the borehole tidy and planting a vegetable garden that utilizes excess water from the well). The technical committees will collect a maintenance fee of 100 MK (about 20 cents) per month per household to ensure that there are sufficient funds to adequately maintain the facility and repair it when needed. These are important infrastructure projects that will improve the health and wellbeing of the communities. They are well planned, with strong management and fiscal safeguards in place. They incorporate elements of oversight and buy-in by the residents to make them sustainable into the future.

Fundraising Target

$8,000 per project ($56,000 for all seven)  Although these wells have been funded by an anonymous donor, further donations will go for additional wells. We are currently raising funds for wells 11 - 20, so donate generously!

Comments

EZ Borehole Drillers has already completed half of these wells, with plans to complete these projects in the Southern Region before traveling with their equipment for an extended trip to the Northern Region.  We have also now started our Malawi Borehole Training Program as a subprogram of this one, with the goal of having this team train 2 other teams to operate in other regions of Malawi... The end result will be that we will have 3 teams operating all over Malawi soon, and, thus, be able to do 3 wells at a time!

MALAWI BOREHOLE UPDATE:

2015 in Review: All 7 of the original borehole projects were successfully completed!  Water Charity & Village X validated and improved the model for this program in 2015. We demonstrated donor demand for direct giving and the capacity (time, intellect, know how) of local people to accomplish development faster, better, cheaper, and more transparently.  Communities contributed cash, labor and materials, and project costs were based on local prices. Consequently, this program had up to 8 times more charitable impact per dollar than status quo NGOs.

2015 Village X Infographic

2016 and Beyond:  Water Charity & Village X continue to assess water conditions in rural areas and have continued to create new boreholes for villages in need. The campaign has been very successful, and we even started a Borehole Training Program to increase the number of people trained in making boreholes there. The "ripple effect" from this (more villages getting wells and less time waiting) is just one of the happy side effects of this work. We are happy to say that improved health, and substantially less time spent collecting water from unimproved (often dangerous) sources, has led to increased productivity and improved well being. We hope to continue replicating this success until all villages in need are served. 

Please consider supporting this work by using the donate widget below:

Or via PayPal if you prefer:

 

 

Water For Zambia Program - Zambia

Water For Zambia Program - Zambia

NPCA - WC Logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location: 
Mansa District School, ZambiMansa District, Luapula Province, Zambia
 
Community Description: 
The primary schools where this project will take place are located in and around Mansa District in the Luapula Provnice of Zambia. These communities and schools are often without electricity and running water. The villages surrounding the schools consist of mud huts with grass thatch roofs. The main source of income in these communities is subsistence farming. 
 
Problem Addressed: 
The lack of safe drinking water at the middle schools of the district is the main problem to be addressed.  
 
Another community need is for food security, as schools are not currently able to create gardens and orchards due to the long distance to reach a water source.  A new water source will allow easy watering of plants and provide improved knowledge of gardening for students, as well as a convenient food supply.
 

Project Description:

This project is to restore water to 13 schools through the installation of a new water pump and associated improvements at each school. 

During Emily’s time as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia, she recognized the problem of inadequate access to safe drinking water sources throughout her 20-km catchment area. She was shocked to discover that all of the three schools in the area lacked an on-site, working water source.

Borehole and Pump - ZambiaThere was an existing play pump structure at all three schools, but the pumps had not worked since 2009. With the help of Water Charity, she was able to work with a local government group (similar to a Public Works Department) to renovate the water systems at all three primary schools. Each borehole now functional, and is expected to provide access to clean, safe drinking water for 300 people daily for a lifetime of 50 years.

Emily was informed of 13 other schools in Mansa District, with the identical play pump structures, currently facing water crises. She determined that the problem could easily and affordably be solved with the demolition of the existing structures and installation of new Afridev borehole pumps.

 
When she returned home after her Peace Corps service, she vowed to find a way to return to Zambia and renew her efforts to bring safe water to schools in the country.  She reached out to Water Charity to assist her in this endeavor, and a plan was developed for her to go back to Zambia and do this series of projects as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.  Water Charity decided to send her back with enough funding to accomplish this ambitious goal. 
 
This is one of the rare cases where WC paid to send someone to a location, and foot their living expenses while there.  The fact that she is doing 13 schools, and will also be sharing her experience with currently serving PCVs to develop their own WASH development work, makes this cost effective.
 
The work will be supervised by Emily and done by skilled technicians.  At each school, on the first day, there will be some demolition and installation of the pedestals. Then, after one week, allowing the pedestals to cure, the pumps and PVC piping will be installed
 

Each installation will include a runoff area, drain, soak pit, and other improvements as necessary.Mansa School Borehole Project - Zambia

 
Each community will provide the sand and perform the unskilled labor.
 
Each community will create an action plan regarding borehole maintenance, budgeting for spare parts, security, and sensitization of students, teachers, and surrounding communities.
 
Each school will host an orchard and garden.  The project will allow schools to complete other projects which may have been delayed due to a lack of water.
 
During Emily's stay in Zambia, as mentioned above, she will work with serving Peace Corps Volunteers to assist them in developing additional water and sanitation projects.  She will help them with all phases, including conceptualizing with the community, planning and budgeting, implementation, and maintenance and evaluation.  Her efforts in training and support on behalf of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association will result in a continuing flow of needed development projects. 

Project Impact: 
3.900 people will benefit from the project.  
 
Mbaso SchoolEach borehole will provide access to clean, safe drinking water for 300 people daily, for an expected lifetime of 50 years. As a result of this clean drinking water source, communities will experience improved health and sanitation. School absences for teachers and pupils (especially girls) will decrease, improving education for all.  There will be an increased knowledge of gardening and agriculture, food security, and community development.
 
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project: 
Emily McKeone, RPCV
 
Monitoring and Maintenance:
Local Community Maintenance Committees, School Administration, and Mansa District Municipal Council will play roles in the monitoring and maintenance
 
Comments:
In 2014, during Emily McKeone’s Peace Corps service, new boreholes were installed at an initial three primary schools within Mansa District in conjunction with Water Charity, as mentioned above. To read about that project CLICK HERE.  Not only did the communities report improved health and sanitation, but schools were also able to complete construction projects and further develop their infrastructure. This project and its 3 schools/ boreholes served can be considered the pilot project, or 1st project of this program.  Thus, when finished, a total of 16 schools and their defunct boreholes will have been served.
 
Dollar Amount of Project: 
13 additional schools at a cost of $28,000
 

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.

 
Any additional donations will be utilized to fund additional projects in Zambia.
 
Emily at her first borehole project for WC
Water For Zambia

 

East Africa Water & Sanitation Program

Water Charity and National Peace Corps Association East Africa Water and Sanitation Program

NPCA & WC LOGOSWater Charity and the National Peace Corps Association (NPCA) have begun a program to implement dozens of water, sanitation, and public health projects in East Africa.

This program is set for $2 million.  The first phase, in the amount of $215,000, resulting in at least 25 new projects was funded by an anonymous donor, and we are into the second phase.

The countries included in the program are Ethiopia, Uganda, Rwanda, Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Kenya, South Sudan and Madagascar.

Project planning is well underway, and work on the ground has begun on several projects. Individual projects will be phased in for implementation as planning for each is completed.

All projects are scheduled to be completed within a year, and it is anticipated that further funding will be available as the first phase is completed.

UPDATE:  The program has been extremely successful, spawned 6 sub-programs thusfar, and expanded into 2 new countries.  Many of the projects have been completed, and a host of new projects are on the way.  Look at the list at the bottom of the page for links to the various projects.

East Africa Water and Sanitation ProgramThe Partnership 
Water Charity is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, established in 2008 and headquartered in California, that does water, sanitation, and public health projects around the world. It has implemented over 2,500 projects in 67 countries to date, about 95% of them under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs).

The National Peace Corps Association (NPCA) was founded in 1979 and is headquartered in Washington, D.C. with a mission to championing lifelong commitment to Peace Corps values. The goals of NPCA are to help the Peace Corps be the best that it can be and help Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs) and RPCV groups thrive.

Averill Strasser, Co-Founder and COO of Water Charity, and Glen Blumhorst, President of National Peace Corps Association initiated a partnership in early 2015, that has led to this program and others like it.  The projects themselves continue to be done one at a time under our traditional, super-efficient model, managed by our volunteers on the ground.  While the scope has been expanded, these projects are the same great, high "bang for the buck" projects you have come to know and love from us.

Methodology
The program follows a unique methodology of utilizing the services of PCVs and RPCVs for project management. This imparts a level of cost-effectiveness that is many times that achieved by other organizations doing similar work.  Some of the projects in this program are done in concert with partner NGOs at work in-country.

Within the 8-country program area (now 10), individual projects will be planned and implemented one-by-one, rather than following an imposed and fully-developed plan. The model is based on the premise that there is great need in the entire program area, and the most cost-effective way to save lives and prevent and cure illness is to quickly address those needs in the order in which they arise organically from the communities.

Incorporation of Peace Corps Volunteers
The major portion of the on-the-ground administration of projects will be carried out under the direction of serving PCVs. These are all college graduates who have been trained in country, and possess language, technical, social, and community development skills.

East Africa Water and Sanitation ProgramThere are about 7,200 PCVs serving in 64 developing nations at any point in time. They live and work with members of the community and are involved in all stages of community organization, project conceptualization, planning, implementation, completion, and evaluation.

PCV's often work together in specific areas of the country, and there will be opportunities to aggregate projects that are being done in close geographic and temporal proximity. PCVs working together offer assistance to each other in planning and execution, economies of scale, camaraderie, continuity, sustainability, and ease of evaluation.

All projects will be funded using the normal channels through the Peace Corps Partnership Program after proper review.  This serves to ensure that each project meets a set of stringent requirements, and brings needed resources to assist the Peace Corps in its mission. 

The Role of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers
Approximately 215,000 people have served as PCVs since the Peace Corps was started about 54 years ago. They represent an important and valuable resource to assist in the role of community development in the world.

NPCA is a partner of Peace Corps, and is the designated organization to represent all RPCVs, and engage to amplify the power of the Peace Corps.

In the past 7 years, many RPCVs have worked with Water Charity to directly implement projects. RPCVs return to their country of service because of a lifelong commitment, and bring with them their prior skills, education, and training.

RPCVs will continue to directly implement projects, but will also be utilized to provide training and support to serving PCVS to assist them in all phases of their projects.

A good example is the Malawi Borehole Program with RPCV Michael Buckler.  In this program we are doing a slew of wells in concert with the NGO he founded when he decided to go back to Malawi (his country of service as a PCV), with the help of Water Charity.

East Africa Water and Sanitation ProgramTypes of Projects
All projects will fall under the categories of water, sanitation, and public health.

Typical projects will be water systems, wells, pumps, tanks, small reservoirs, rainwater catchment systems, irrigation systems, water purification installations, latrines, and handwashing stations.

All projects will require the community participation of labor, materials, and/or money to the extent of about 25% of the project cost.

Where feasible, small costs will be imposed on the villagers for use of newly-created water facilities, such that there will be funds available for maintenance, repair, and replacement when the need arises.

All projects will have community training and education components to teach villagers the technologies employed in the project, the use, maintenance, and repairs of the improvements, and necessary hygiene and public health concepts.

All projects will include a job training component whereby technical skills are imparted on villages such that they will be able to utilize the acquired knowledge and apply it in other communities. The formation of small businesses to proliferate the technology in nearby areas while creating employment and economic incentives will be encouraged. Where feasible, tools will be left behind to serve in this effort.

Sustainability will be ensured by serving PCVs and their replacements, who will visit the project sites at intervals after completion and facilitate needed repairs and improvements.

Implementation

This program is up and running, with 6 major sub-progams and a large number of single projects already.  These subprograms are collections of individual projects in a given country, utilizing a specific technique (i.e. borehole drilling or well rehabilitation) to help the people in need.  We are set to surpass all our goals with this umbrella program.  At the bottom of the page you can find links to everything we're doing.  Directly below, are links to the subprogram pages which showcase all the various projects being done under the auspices of each.

Summary
The program offers unmatched cost effectiveness to implement vital projects using appropriate technology for people across this entire region of Africa. It benefits from our unique model and past knowledge of and experience in the chosen countries. It eliminates the expenses of travel, in-country headquarters and administrative costs, and allows for most project dollars to be directed to materials and skilled labor.

The implementation is already well underway, with most of the original projects already completed, and the phase-in of new projects rapid.  There is a constant flow of new projects in areas of need, and new regions and countries are being added to the program as we are able to create worthy new projects and expand on the successes we have already achieved. A sister program is underway in West Africa which was able to receive funding due to the success of this initiative.

The Gambia Lifewater Pump Repair Projects

Jeremy Mak with the kids

It started as an ambitious project to repair pumps in villages along the great river in The Gambia, back when Jeremy Mak was a PCV (Peace Corps Volunteer) stationed there. One project followed another, and Jeremy has unceasingly gone back to install, fix, replace and repair wells and handpumps across that nation.  At this point, 57 well handpumps have been repaired, newly installed, or otherwise brought to working condition...with the majority of these projects beeing done by Jeremy Mak as an RPCV (Returned Peace Corps Volunteer), on his own time.

Successful Project!After the success of the first four projects (each with multiple sub-projects), this effort became known as the Central River Handpump Repair and WASH Improvement Program - The Gambia.  As a program, each of its Phases included a number of smaller projects, and allowed Jeremy to tackle more problems at a time, increasing the economy of scale. All of these projects improved water, sanitation, and hygiene conditions in the region, and specifically focused on the repair and installation of handpumps.  It was eminently successful, and really shows off how efficient and effective projects like this can be.  This is a model program we hope to replicate many times. In between and coinciding with these well and handpump projects, Jeremy also managed to plan and execute an additional WASH project and a water filter installation project as well.

In total, 57 water projects were done in 30 villages at an average cost of $375 each.

Eventually, we settled on the Gambia Lifewater name for this effort.  The overview of all of this is a bit complicated, as it spans many arbitrarily defined WC projects going back to 2011 (see below).  Many villages were served with more than one pump or project, and some of the later projects included components to do maintenance on pumps we had previously installed or repaired.  It is without a doubt, though, that the 43 locations are better off for all of Jeremy's hard work over these past few years.

Sometimes Jeremy had to make calls in the field, and repair a different pump than originally planned.  His quick thinking, and knowledge of the conditions allowed him to focus efforts on places with the most need... and in the end, all proposed wells were done successfuly. It is an amazing body of work, and Water Charity is proud to have been able to make this possible... just being able to get to know Jeremy has been an honor for us.

WASHThe Gambia is a small English speaking West African nation bordered on all sides by French speaking Senegal. To see a map of 2013 pump repair locations, CLICK HERE.

For a complete list of Gambia Lifewater Project Summer 2013 Beneficiary Communities, with GPS coordinates, pictures, and videos, CLICK HERE.
This summer’s work included rehabilitating ten pumps that previously broke down and were completely abandoned.

By our calculations, this work, with all its various projects has increased clean water access and restored water points for as many as 50,000 women, children, and men so far (directly & indirectly)!  Many of the direct beneficiaries were served by more than one project.  The indirect beneficiaries, in the 10's of thousands as a few of the projects were done at regional Health Centers, and places where people from all over the region pass through, or come to for help, may also have benefitted from more than one of these projects. These factors make it difficult to square the individual project totals with the overall totals.  It is possible that some people got counted twice, but this is an impressive achievement any way you slice it.

The best way to grasp the enormity of this work is to read all of the various projects and their conclusions directly.  Let Jeremy himself explain what he actually did, and why in his own words in the various conclusion reports.

All previous and current projects can be found below, and the list at the bottom of this page includes all the pump repair projects.


We at Water Charity commend Jeremy for his outstanding work. We, again, extend our thanks to Child Relief International for providing some of the funding for this work early on, and to Beverly Rouse and Brian Lee for their additional contributions. Patagonia also donated rainproof clothing to Jeremy and his crew for the endeavor, and we salute their interest in clean water.  We would also like to thank BluePump and Swe-Gam for aiding Jeremy and the Lifewater effort.  Jeremy also enlisted some of his friends and family through a successful Global Giving Campaign to pay for the entirety of the Phase 3 projects.  Kudos, and hats off to Jeremy Mak.

Some of the Phases of this wonderful program as well as the earlier projects below still need donations to recoup the funds Water Charity used to pre-fund them, so please consider helping us do more projects like this.

Iwo Jima of Water... in the Gambia

Water Charity in Senegal

Water Charity in Senegal

Water Charity has a special relationship with Senegal, in that we have done about 300 projects there. This arose naturally through the good relationship we developed with Peace Corps Senegal.  From the motivated PCVs to the enthusiastic staff, this proved fertile ground for our water projects.  From wells to filters to rainwater catchments and more, our projects there run the gamut. There is even a COFFEE TABLE BOOK about our work in Sengal, with pictures from Marc Champagne that was a result of our collaboration with Photographers Without Borders!

Feel free to look through the amazing work we've done, and continue to do there, by searching our site, using the dropdown menu at the top of this page, or by clicking on this link:

SENEGAL PROJECTS  (many of our projects here still need funding!)

An impressive list, which include such ambitious programs as:

the 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program - Senegal or the Foundiougne Water Filters Project - Senegal

Senegal Map

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Western Africa Water & Sanitation Program

Clean water or Dirty water

NPCA & WC LOGOSWater Charity and the National Peace Corps Association (NPCA) have begun a new program to replicate the ongoing success of our East Africa Water & Sanitation Program in Western Africa.  It involves the implementation of dozens of water, sanitation, public health, and environmental projects in a number of West African nations.

The initial countries included in the program were:
Senegal, The Gambia, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Togo, Benin, Morocco, Cameroon, Sierra Leone and Liberia.  Guinea was later added.

Si Kunda, The GambiaIt is likely that we will add other countries in the region to the program as it expands, and as security can be ensured..

This program is open ended, and will consist of individual projects both large and small.  These will include our "normal" projects in the region, as well as even larger, more comprehensive efforts.

Project planning is well underway, and work on the ground has begun on several projects. Individual projects will be phased in for implementation as planning for each is completed. 

The Partnership
Water Charity is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, established in 2008 and headquartered in California, that does water, sanitation, public health, and environmental projects around the world. It has implemented around 2,000 projects in 65 countries to date, about 95% of them under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs).

The National Peace Corps Association (NPCA) was founded in 1979 and is headquartered in Washington, D.C. with a mission to championing lifelong commitment to Peace Corps values. The goals of NPCA are to help the Peace Corps be the best that it can be and help Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs) and RPCV groups thrive.

Averill Strasser, RPCV, Co-Founder and COO of Water Charity, and Glen Blumhorst, President of National Peace Corps Association, are working together in the implementation of this program.

open wellMethodology
The program, along with much of the work done by Water Charity, follows a unique methodology of utilizing the services of PCVs and RPCVs for project management. This imparts a level of cost-effectiveness that is many times that achieved by other organizations doing similar work. In this way, travel and administrative expense are eliminated, as there are capable, local-language-speaking, highly-motivated PCVs already living in the villages where the projects are taking place.

Most often, these projects arise out of the relationship between the PCVs and their host communities, and an effort to bring these villages together on their water & sanitation issues.  This generally involves the formation of a local water committee, the use of entirely local labor, local materials sourcing, and a real commitment on the part of the people who benefit from the projects to monitor & maintain them. 

This is a sustainable and successful model in which the community is invested in the outcome and members are motivated to preserve the improvements.  With the community contributing materials, labor, and money, villagers have a sense of pride and ownership, leading to long-term success.

Within the 10-country program area, individual projects will be planned and implemented one-by-one, rather than following an imposed and fully-developed plan. The model is based on the premise that there is great need in the entire program area, and the most cost-effective way to save lives and prevent and cure illness is to quickly address those needs in the order in which they arise organically from the communities.

 Making soap    Incorporation of Peace Corps Volunteers
The major portion of the on-the-ground administration of projects will be carried out under the direction of serving PCVs. These are all college graduates who have been trained in country, and possess language, technical, social, and community development skills.

There are about 7,000 PCVs at any given time worldwide, with about 1,200 in the designated program area. These PCVs live and work with members of the community, and, in the implementation of our WATSAN projects, they are involved in all stages of community organization, project conceptualization, planning, implementation, completion, and evaluation.

Where there are opportunities to aggregate projects that are being done in close geographic and temporal proximity, we aim to get PCVs working together and offering assistance to each other in planning and execution. This has benefits of economy of scale, camaraderie, continuity, sustainability, and ease of evaluation.

All in all, Water Charity projects serve to strengthen the Peace Corps, and allow PCVs to contribute meaningfully to the health and wellbeing of their host villages.  Projects are often secondary to the primary program assignment of a PCV.  However, such projects always add to the value of the Peace Corps service by bringing needed resources to the village, and creating tangible community development results. 

     The Role of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers
Approximately 215,000 people have served as PCVs since the Peace Corps was started about 54 years ago. They represent an important and valuable resource to assist in the role of community development in the world.

Senegal woman in project groupNPCA is a partner of Peace Corps, and is the designated organization to represent all RPCVs, as well as to amplify the power of the Peace Corps.

In the past 7 years, many RPCVs have worked with Water Charity to directly implement projects. RPCVs return to their country of service because of a lifelong commitment, and bring with them their prior skills, education, and training.

RPCVs will continue to directly implement projects, but will also be utilized to provide training and support to serving PCVs to assist them in all phases of their projects.

Types of Projects
All projects fall under the categories of water, sanitation, public health,and environment, and many of these serve double duty, in that they also cover multiple areas like education, disaster relief, drought & famine aid, as well as the new Let Girls Learn designation. Running water to a school that never had access to water, and building a number of bathrooms, water fountains, and handwashing stations, for instance, is a water, sanitation, education and women's empowerment project all in one!

Typical projects will be community water systems, wells, pumps, tanks, small reservoirs, rainwater catchment systems, irrigation systems, water purification installations, latrines, and handwashing stations.

All projects will require the community participation of labor, materials, and/or money, to the extent that the community is able to contribute, often as much as 25% of the project cost.

The local water committee, in some cases, may decide to impose small fees on the villagers for use of newly-created water facilities, such that there will be funds available for maintenance, repair, and replacement when the need arises. These fees will always be affordable for all residents,

Water Charity is prepared to return to a community and aid the residents in repairs or expansion when local resources do not permit such work without assistance.

All projects have community training and education components to teach villagers the technologies employed, the use, maintenance, and repairs of the improvements, as well as any hygiene and public health concepts that might aid them.

Mass transit in Senegal Where the skilled labor needed to complete a job doesn't exist, Water Charity is pleased to engage in job training, whereby technical skills are imparted to locals looking for work, and thus enabling them to form small businesses which allows them to utilize the acquired knowledge, and apply it in other communities. This creates a rather profound "ripple effect" to our projects, whereby the new (or even pre-existing) businesses of the skilled laborers can proliferate the technology in nearby areas while creating employment and economic incentives.

Where feasible, tools are left behind after completion of our projects to serve in this effort.  In this way, many Water Charity projects have spawned dozens of other similar projects in a given area, without us having to be directly involved... and while boosting the local economy to boot.

Sustainability is ensured by serving PCVs and their replacements, who visit the project sites at intervals after completion and facilitate needed repairs and improvements.  Local water committees and skilled laborer businesses also contribute to the overall sustainability. Water Charity projects have an outstanding success rate because of these elements, and considerably greater longevity than comparable projects, while being an order of magnitude cheaper to implement in most cases.

Implementation
At the bottom of the page is a listing of projects that have recently been started under the program. The list will be updated as new projects come on line. A little triangle next to the project name indicates that it is already completed and a conclusion page has been posted and nested underneath the original project page.

Summary
The program offers unmatched cost effectiveness to implement vital projects using appropriate technology. It benefits from our unique model and past knowledge of and experience in the chosen countries. It eliminates the expenses of travel, in-country headquarters, and administrative costs, and allows for most project dollars to be directed to materials and skilled labor.

Donation to this program is a sure-fire way to aid and assist a large number of people with great water and sanitation needs, speedily and efficiently.

This program is targeted for funding of $2,200,000 over 3 years, rolled out as follows:

  • $440,000 for Year 1
  • $660,000 for Year 2
  • $1,100,000 for Year 3
 


Women carrying water, Senegal

Pages

Follow Us

Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google+ icon
YouTube icon
RSS icon


Donate $25 or more for Water Charity projects.

SiteLock

GlobalGiving vetted Organization 2016

***  Copyright 2017 ©  -  Water Charity is a 501(c)(3) non-profit (DLN 17053217312048) based in California & operating Worldwide  ***

 
 
Support Us