Uganda

Kole Forest Garden Project - Uganda

Kole Forest Garden Project - Uganda

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Kole District, Northern Uganda

Community Description
The Kole District in Northern Uganda is home to rolling hills of farmland that is plowed by hand or oxen. The Langis and Acholis tribes make up the majority of people in this region, extending to the west and north toward South Sudan. Life in Kole was significantly disrupted in the mid-1990s when Joseph Kony and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) rose up against the government and attacked civilians in the northern half of the country. During this time, almost two million residents were affected and forced to flee their homes or lose their lives.

When the LRA insurgency ended, there was widespread international support for farmers and other displaced people returning to Kole, but since then large NGOs such as World Vision, Care International, Action Aid, and the United Nations have ended their programming in these regions. The majority of agricultural programming over the past 30 years by the international community has encouraged mono-cropping of one or few crops on farmers’ lands, ultimately contributing to the loss of agricultural and ecological biodiversity across the landscape.

Problem Addressed
Many Kole households continue to rely on open streams for domestic water collection. However, because of pollution and agricultural runoff from the villages along the streams, much of this water is unsafe for domestic use. Farmers need to improve water quality, build soil health, and conserve precious resources.

Despite the fact that the Lango culture prevalent in Kole is male-dominated, women are responsible for nearly all of the domestic and agricultural family activities. It is the women that grow food, collect water, build and maintain houses, educate children, and generate income for the home, and have the greatest need for improved techniques.

Formerly displaced persons are very much affected by the use of improper farming techniques in their effort to earn a living. Farmers who left their lands during the Lord’s Resistance Army insurgency have returned now and are practicing conventional, destructive farming techniques. As farmers continue to clear brush and trees to plant crops year-round, soil fertility is quickly depleting. Tree cover is disappearing in Kole , Uganda due to human encroachment on forests.

Project Description
The overall goal of the Kole Forest Garden Project is to increase food security and income of 282 families in Kole, Uganda, by transforming their degraded fields into sustainable Forest Gardens. This project will help farmers and their families break the cycle of poverty.

The Forest Garden system is a multi-tiered mixture of trees, shrubs, and crops that is grown on one to two acres of land. Trees have long been a vital resource for smallholder farmers since, once established, they require very little labor and resources to be productive. Centering farms around trees is not difficult, but most African farmers are resource- and technology-poor and are stuck in a losing battle growing short-term cropping to meet short-term needs.

Locally-based technicians will work on-the-ground with farmers to design Forest Gardens which will maximize yields and provide a consistent income, while also improving the quality of the land being farmed.

Key objectives over the next 12 months of this project include:

1) Provide support and training to 282 farmers in Kole, Uganda on Forest Garden design and nursery development and maintenance,

2) Plant approximately 600,000 trees on Forest Garden sites to protect and fertilize soils through establishment of green walls, contour lines, and planting of nitrogen-fixing, fertilizer trees; begin out-planting, and conduct training events on composting, integrated pest management strategies, and perma-garden growing techniques, and

3) Establish 282 garden beds—one for each farmer—with a diverse mix of nutritious vegetables and fruits surrounded by fodder and timber trees.

The activities will include:

● Out-planting trees
● Composting and Integrated Pest Management training
● Tree and vegetable nurseries
● Farmer sample survey and evaluations
● Gardening training
● Annual review and planning meeting
● Tree and vegetable out-planting
● Fruit tree nursery training
● Fruit tree nurseries
● Fruit tree out-planting training
● Out-planting fruit trees

The work is being carried out by Trees for the Future, founded in 1989 to combat unsustainable land use practices in the developing world. Its mission is to improve the livelihoods of impoverished farmers through revitalizing degraded lands.

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for agroforestry tree seeds, fruit tree seeds and cuttings, vegetable seeds, materials, tools, and transport.

Project Impact
1,700 people in 282 families, from 13 different small farmer groups, will benefit from the project. Combined, these families will transform 277 acres (112 hectares) of previously degraded land into prolific, diverse, and permanent Forest Gardens.

Kole Forest Garden Project - Uganda

Project Manager
Ashleigh Burgess, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, Sengal (2011-14), Trees for the Future

Monitoring and Maintenance

To measure the overall impact of the Kole Forest Garden program during the entire project term (estimated to be completed by March 2020), the measurable objectives are to:

1) Increase sustainability of rural landscapes for 282 Kole farmers by establishing environmentally responsible agricultural systems—indicated by the number of farmers who have established Forest Garden sites,

2) Increase household food security for Kole farmers through increased access to food over an annual period—indicated by USAID's Household Food Insecurity Access Score, and

3) Increase household resilience to economic instability for Kole farmers over an annual period—indicated by USAID's Household Resilience Capacity Score.

Comments
The Forest Garden approach is designed to help farmers improve water quality through conservation practices, decrease reliance on costly and environmentally harmful pesticides and fertilizers, build soil health, and conserve precious resources. In addition, the project will provide the entire community with the tools and resources to be successful in growing food and preserving the environment for years and generations to come.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

If you are moved by this model, that has lifelong impact on the wellbeing of the community while protecting the environment and improving the water supply, please Donate using the button below. Your contribution will be allocated to similar projects in nearby locations.

 

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Kazingo and Karangura Water Project - Uganda

Kazingo and Karangura Water Project - Uganda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kazingo and Karangura Water Project - UgandaLocation
Kazingo and Karangura parishes, Kabarole district, Bukuuku and Karangura sub-counties, Western region, Uganda

Community Description
Kazingo and Karangura are located about 16 km from Fort Portal town, 10 km off Bundibugyo road.

Twerwaneho Orphans Community Initiative (TOCI) works with over 220 vulnerable families in 26 villages of Bukuuku sub-county Kabarole district in areas of child protection, water, hygiene, health, sanitation, education and income generation.

TOCI has been supporting and empowering the community since May, 2006, and has been working with Peace Corps Volunteers and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers since 2010.

Problem Addressed
Bukuuku and Karangura sub-counties are remote areas bordering and in the middle of Rwenzori Mountains, where families commute long distances (2-3 km) in search of clean water.

During annual assessment and community visits, out of the 8 schools in and around Rwenzori Mountains, none has a nearby water source. Children in schools survive and drink dirty water from far rivers. This poses a risk of contracting waterborne diseases like diarrhea, typhoid and cholera for school-going children.

Kazingo and Karangura Water Project - Uganda		Lack of nearby water sources affects and lowers household incomes as people take time searching for clean water that could have been used for productive work, such as farming, business or any other family income generating project.

TOCI organized meetings with community members and local council leaders to gather information, ideas and solutions to address the long-time water shortage and associated problems.

Project Description
This project is to build 3 rainwater harvesting systems in 2 communities.

Two tanks will be constructed in mountainous Karangura sub-county and one in Bukuuku sub- county. The school water tanks will each have two locally-made handwashing facilities fitted on the tanks so children can access safe drinking water.

The work will be done by Water for Hard to Reach Areas (WAHARA), an organization with considerable experience in similar projects.

Each system will consist of a 5,000-liter storage tank, gutters attached to building roofs, and piping.

In addition, 200 water collection and storage containers will be distributed at 2 schools, and to 150 vulnerable children from families affected and infected by HIV/AIDS, and special needs children.

Tank Specifics
The tanks will be 10-12 mm thick plastic, with a capacity of 5,000 liters each. The tanks are guaranteed to last 30 years (when well protected).

Stand Construction
A base will be constructed of bricks, cement sand mortar of 1:3, concrete of 1:2:3 (cement sand and aggregates), constructed 2-3 feet above the ground.

Provision for Runoff
A soak pit will be constructed to capture runoff. A pit of 3 feet diameter will be dug and filled with hard stones, protected against breeding of mosquitoes by covering with taupline (polythene).

Gutters and Piping System
4 inch gutters will be installed on the face board to collect water from the roof surface. They will be connected to the down pipe and then to the tank.

Water Purification
Water will be collected in a clean container and mixed with water guard to make it safer for human consumption. Families will be encouraged to boil drinking water to kill germs when stored for long periods.

Kazingo and Karangura Water Project - UgandaProject Impact
2,700 people will benefit from the project.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Tiffany Tai, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Uganda, 2011-2013), Regional Recruiter for Peace Corps / West Coast Region, and active member of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Los Angeles, will lead the project.

Tiffany previously completed the Kazingo, Kiguma and Karangura Water Project - Uganda

Monitoring and Maintenance
The local council leaders and water user committees will be equipped with skills to safeguard the systems, raise funds for repairs and improve sanitation around the water source.

The completed projects will be officially launched with the support of a sub county community development officer and health assistant who will help in the ongoing monitoring and support.

Let Girls Learn
The project targets over 800 girls faced with water, hygiene, and sanitation challenges that make it difficult for them to remain in school. Since girls bear the major burden of retrieving water, they will most benefit from the improvements.

While this project, administered by an RPCV, is not a part of the Peace Corps Let Girls Learn initiative, it embraces the same values. Hence, it is given the Let Girls Learn Plus (LGL+) designation, and included as a part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

Fundraising Target
$4,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$4,900

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been fully funded by an anonymous donor.  Additional donations using the Donate button below will be used for other projects in Uganda.

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

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Kampala Lifewater Filter Distribution Project - Uganda

Clean water for the first time at C4C Children's Home

This project is made possible through the collaboration of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps AssociationNPC & WC Logos

Location

Central Kampala and surrounding areas, Uganda, East Africa

Community Description Boiling Water at Teresa Home Children's Home
Kampala District is a district in Uganda that is coterminous with the country's capital city, Kampala. The main language spoken is Luganda, although many other languages are spoken, including English, Swahili, Runyankole/Rukiga, Acholi, and Lusoga.  Kampala largest city of Uganda and is divided into five boroughs that oversee local planning: Kampala Central Division, Kawempe Division, Makindye Division, Nakawa Division, and Lubaga Division.  

This project focuses on children’s homes and individual households in this district burdened with the health and economic costs of boiling water for consumption.

Problem Addressed
Although the Central Kampala has a functioning piped water system, the water is not fit for immediate consumption. It must be first boiled. If it isn’t, the health consequences can be dire.  Through the years, Uganda’s capital city, as well as districts up-country, have been suffering recurrent outbreaks of waterborne diseases like, cholera, typhoid, and dysentery, which have sickened tens of thousands and claimed numerous lives.

While boiling water is seen as a necessity for cooking and drinking, it is costly. Many Ugandan homes use charcoal or wood stoves to boil water. (Gas and electricity are also used, but to a lesser degree). The daily task of boiling water is not only an economic burden (especially for households who earn only a few dollars a day), but it also contributes heavily to deforestation, hugely contributing to demand on imported charcoal and wood from rural areas outside Kampala. Boiling also means prolonged exposure to indoor air pollution and respiratory diseases from the burning fumes and smoke created by dirty cook stoves. 

Boiling Water at C4C Children's Moreover, even if water is boiled, this does not remove suspended particulate matter and other physical impurities in the water. The long-term health impacts of ingesting these particulates are uncertain and a reason for concern. Better-off Ugandans purchase bottled water rather than boiling water, but even they feel the economic squeeze. Moreover, without an effective recycling program in Kampala, the plastic bottles that this produces creates unnecessary demand on imported plastic products and generates mountains of trash.

Project Description
This project seeks to distribute 50 Sawyer Point One filters to 3-5 children’s homes and day care centers in the Greater Kampala area, as well as approximately 30 individual households. Each Sawyer filter has the ability to filter out impurities as small as 0.1 micron, and can effectively remove bacteria that causes typhoid, E. coli, dysentery, cholera, and other serious waterborne diseases, making it unnecessary to boil water. The filters are extremely long-lasting and capable of producing more than 792,500 gallons of clean water each.

All filter recipients will be taught how to install, operate, and clean these filters to ensure proper care and maintenance, as well as long user life. Teaching will borrow on lessons learned from THIS earlier filter distribution project conducted by Water Charity.
To foster community buy in, all households will be required to contribute funds towards purchasing buckets, onto which the filters will be installed. These filters cost approximately $50 each, and will be provided free of charge to children’s homes and day care centers, and to households of more modest means. For those households with more disposable income, they will be requested to contribute a nominal percentage of the filter costs on a sliding scale.

Beneficiaries will also receive details of a local distributor of Sawyer Filters, should they need future after sales service or wish to purchase additional filters at full cost.

Project ImpactFilter Demonstration
It is envisaged that this project will benefit about 400 Ugandan women, children, and men with a reliable source of clean water, eliminating the need to boil water and saving resources for other competing needs and productive investments, like contributing to savings, buying food for one’s family, or paying for school fees and medical expenses.

This is part of Water Charity's ongoing Filters For Life Program - Worldwide.
 
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jeremy Mak, a member of the National Peace Corps Association and the Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Los Angeles.

Comments
Jeremy has done a large number of projects with Water Charity.  Starting as a PCV in The Gambia, then as an RPCV, and including quite a few ambitious programs to repair or provide new handpumps in communities where their old pumps had ceased functioning, as well as distribute household filters to villages relying on open wells. Water Charity has funded these Gambia Lifewater Pump projects readily (benefitting more than 15,000 Gambians), and will continue to work with Jeremy through a new round of pump and filter projects.  

This filter project is Jeremy’s first in Uganda. To see a complete list of projects that Jeremy has worked on with Water Charity, CLICK HERE.

We at Water Charity commend Jeremy for his outstanding work.

Dollar Amount of Project

$2,500

Donations Received

$0

Donations Needed

$2,500

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. Donating the full amount will allow you to dedicate the project, if that is something you would like.

 


This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.
Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

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Kazingo, Kiguma and Karangura Water Project - Uganda

TOCI kids at our Early Childhood Development center

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC

Location
Kazingo and Karangura parishes in Bukuuku and Karangura sub-counties located in Kabarole district, western Uganda - East Africa.Micheal and some of the beneficiaries

Community Description
Kazingo and Karangura are located about 16 KM from Fort Portal town, 10 KM off Bundibugyo road.

Twerwaneho Orphans Community Initiative (TOCI) works with over 220 vulnerable families in 26 villages of Bukuuku sub-county Kabarole district in areas of child protection, water, hygiene, health, sanitation, education and income generation.

TOCI has been supporting and empowering the community since May 2006, and has worked with Peace Corps Volunteers and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers since 2010.

Problem Addressed
Bukuuku and Karangura sub-counties are far-flung areas bordering, and in the middle of, Rwenzori Mountains where families commute long distances (2-3 KM) in search of clean water.

studentsDuring annual assessment and community visits, out of the 8 schools in and around Rwenzori Mountains, it was found that none has a nearby water source; children in schools survive and drink dirty water from far-away rivers. This poses a risk of contracting waterborne diseases like diarrhea, typhoid and cholera by school-going children.

Also, the community around the Kazingo area has no clean water, and adults and children are at risk of contracting diarrhea, cholera and typhoid. As a result of the water shortage, children and women spend a lot of time looking for clean water.  This makes children tired, leaving them little time and energy for reading books and fulfilling other responsibilities.

The lack of nearby water sources lowers household incomes.  People spend a lot of time searching for clean water, limiting the time that could be used for productive work, such as farming, business or other family income-generating projects.

TOCI organized meetings with community members and local council leaders to gather information, ideas and solutions to address the long-time water shortage and associated problems. The community is in serious need of clean water, and therefore requested support from TOCI and Water Charity.  In doing so, they offered to contribute locally-available resources and help with project implementation.

Project Description
Water for Hard to Reach Areas (WAHARA) will construct 3 rain harvesting tanks with a capacity of 5,000 liters each for schools water tankin three villages of Kazingo, Kiguma and Karangura parishes.

The school water tanks will each have two water outlets.  On one side there will be a hand washing outlet with a liquid hand washing soap dispenser fitted, and on the opposite side will be a drinking water outlet with 2 ceramic water filters fitted on the tank. Thus, children will be able to access safe drinking water.

The project will also distribute 500 water collection and storage containers to 6 schools and 400 vulnerable children affected by HIV/AIDS and special needs children.

The project will also train and support 15 water user and monitoring committees with technical skills, tools and materials to ensure coordination and regular maintenance and repairs. The trained and empowered local committees will be among the beneficiaries and local leaders who will work voluntarily to ensure the projects are well cared for and last a long time.

schoolProject Impact
The project will benefit more than 8,500 people.  5,500 children and over 3,000 adult beneficiaries.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Tiffany Tai, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Uganda, 2011-2013), Regional Recruiter for Peace Corps / West Coast Region, and active member of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Los Angeles

Monitoring and Maintenance
The project will also train and support 15 water use and monitoring committees with technical skills, tools and materials to ensure coordination and regular maintenance and repairs. The trained and empowered local committees will be among the beneficiaries and local leaders that will work voluntarily to ensure the projects are well cared for and last a long time.

Comments
This project falls under our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.  If you like this project, please donate to the overall program so that we can continue to do similar projects.  It also comes under our Training & Support Initiative where we highlight projects that result in ongoing impact.

This project had been funded by an anonymous donor.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

polluted watercommunity current access to water

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Bikira Catholic Parish Community Water Projects - Uganda

Kitteredde Primary School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Bikira Catholic Parish, Masaka Diocese, Kasali Sub-County, Rakai District -- Uganda
Students carrying water
Community Description
The pump project will serve five communities, including three schools, one novitiate, and the Bannakaroli Brothers Community. The names of the schools are St. Joseph’s Secondary School (coed), Sacred Heart School (boys), and Kiteredde Vocational Institute (coed).  Students in the three schools range in age from 12 to 20 years old.  Girls form the majority of the population in the two coed schools.

More than half of the students are boarders at the schools, and the others walk to school from surrounding areas.  Most of the students come from poor farm families.  In addition to the students who live in the schools, the community is also made up of teaching and support staff, half of whom are women.
 
Problem Addressed
The current surface-type water pump was installed ten years ago.  Since then, the population of the institutions has doubled while the capacity of the pump has remained constant. Presently, the pump can’t produce enough water for the total population in the area. As a result of this situation, the only alternative water source where the Brothers and students draw water is highly congested with poor sanitation.  To make matters worse, during the dry spell these water sources dry up.  There is a major need for installing a submersible pump which will reach down to the water table and provide a clean and adequate water supply for the Brothers’ Community and the schools in the area.
Man using manual pump
Project Description
Water system: There are five institutions, which will share in using the system: a secondary school, a secondary technical school, a vocational school, a novitiate, and the Brothers’ residence.  The system will consist of the following components:

1.  Water Source:  The water will be pumped by submersible pump from underground through a borehole to an existing well, which has a reliable water table, which will meet the needs of the project.

2.  Characteristics of the well:  The present well will not change.  The engineer will only remove the galvanized pipes and the manual pump and replace them with plastic pipes and the submersible pump.  The present borehole was constructed in such a way that it can be used either manually or using a motor pump.  Therefore, there is no need to enlarge the existing bore hole.

3.  Main Tank:  Water from the underground will be pumped through the transmission pipes into the main tank.  From the main tank, water will be distributed to different institutions by gravity flow through the pipe network, which is already in existence.

4.  Submersible Pump: The engineer will install a Grundfos submersible pump with an output of 5,000 liters per hour, which is both reliable and powerful enough to pump water for the whole community.Students collecting water

5.  Network:  This is composed of pipes, which distribute water from the main tanks to various areas of the community.  The network includes one reserve tank for each of five communities.  The tanks now in place are old and need to be replaced.  These will be replaced later when the Brothers obtain enough money to do so—probably through fundraisers organized by the Brothers of St. Charles Lwanga Foundation in Chicago.

 6.  Power Source:  Electricity from the national power line will be used to run the pump.
 
Storehouse:  There is a need for a small storehouse where spare parts can be kept. This house is also necessary to protect part of the pump system including the switch, electric wires, and water meter from bugs, weather, and children.  The funds necessary to construct the house will be paid by the schools.

Elder in a wheelchairProject Impact
This project will benefit 2,200 people.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
James Salvatore

Monitoring and Maintenance
The maintenance and sustainability of the project will be the responsibility of Kiteredde St. Joseph’s Secondary and Technical school management committee and administration. According to the engineer, the average cost of maintaining the pump is around $55 per month. This expense will be included in the overall annual budget of the school, which will be paid for through school fees charged to the parents. Since the Bannakaroli Brothers administer the schools and their own community and novitiate, they will bear practically all of the responsibility for the implementation and the administration of the project.

 Comments
The Bannakaroli Brothers Community with the help of the engineer will oversee the implementation and administration of the project.

James is a Returned Peace Corp Volunteer who was posted in Piura, Peru from 1966-68.
This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.  If you like this project, please donate to our East Africa Water and Sanitation Program, of which this project is a component. 

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

Elders housed in the communityExisting well

Collecting waterStudents carrying waterStudents collecting waterSchool and tanks

SchoolSchool

SchoolSchool

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Well Handpump Repair and Workshop Program - Uganda

Well Handpump Repair and Workshop Program - Uganda

NPCA - WC LogosThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.


Location
Connect Africa Borehole Repair CrewWakiso District, Uganda, East Africa

Community Description
Wakiso District is a district in Central Uganda that encircles Kampala, Uganda's capital city. The district is named after the town of Wakiso, where the district headquarters are located. Kira, the country's 2nd largest city and suburb of Kampala, lies in the district. 53% of the population are children below the age of 18 years and 17% of the total population are orphans. The district is rapidly becoming urbanized, with the main economic activities turning away from agriculture to trade and industry. 

Problem Addressed
Millions of people in rural Africa rely on water wells or “boreholes” for their daily water needs.  In sub-Saharan Africa, one in every three wells are in non-working order, most commonly due to broken handpumps, used to pump the ground water to the surface.  Many government and non-government organizations have simply come in with a drill team, drilled a well, and left.  There is rarely any training on well maintenance, the establishment of a water committee, or routine follow-ups.  When the handpump eventually needs repair, the communities are unable to do so because of the lack of resources, proper management, and sense of ownership.

Project Description
14 broken handpumps are targeted for repair, and a training workshop will be conducted to train workers in the maintenence, upkeep, and repair of the boreholes and their handpumps.

Borehole Repair Workshop - Uganda

The handpump repair program has been one the most successful and is in high demand.  It starts off with needs assessments within the communities and tasking them to establish or reestablish a water committee.  The committee is then trained on borehole management and in a highly participatory workshop facilitated by Connect Africa staff.  This takes 1-2 days with meals provided.  The topics include community ownership, managing finances, and sustainability planning.  

Then the handpump is repaired with help from other handpump repair trainees, in this case, staff from another local NGO called Uganda Water Project.  The mechanical repairs, for India Mark II handpumps, usually include replacing the pump cylinder, rods, pipes, and pump head repairs.  Some concrete pad repairs, fence building around the well, and general grounds cleaning are also done by the community members.  Proper hygiene is heavy emphasis throughout the whole project.  

The handpump repair workshop will start on May 8 where Connect Africa staff will begin training Uganda Water Project staff.

An extraordinary component of this program is the inclusion of Peace Corps Volunteer Katherine Marshall in the training process.   She works with a small NGO, ClearWater Initiative, that focuses on rural water supply in Northern Uganda. As her background is in geology and environmental engineering, her main efforts are to provide technical guidance.  This experience will help her proliferate the technology, to the Peace Corps and to the NGO with which she works.

The 14 boreholes will be repaired over the weeks to follow. This will not only use a sustainable method to provide 3,500 people clean water, but also greatly improve the quality of training with more community and field work.  The boreholes have already been assessed to complete this work, lasting about 2 weeks.  The well locations are at the community level, with an average of 50 households using each well.  

Routine follow-ups are done to keep community relations and ensure the well is maintained (92% previous results).  

Project Impact
More than 3,600 people will have a new working well, and dozens of workers and volunteers will have training to fix and repair these boreholes and their handpumps.

Monitoring and Maintenance
Repaired borehole and handpump - UgandaKyle Lomax, of Wine to Water worked to establish this project, and provided monitoring.The local water comittees will be responsible for maintenance and monitoring of the wells.  There will be complete follow-up, reporting, and evaluation of the efficacy of the training and installations. 

Comments
These 14  borehole repairs, as well as the training will be implemented by partner NGO on the ground Connect Africa.  This program is made possible through the collaboration of Water Charity and Wine To Water, a US nonprofit. 

Total Fundraising Target
$13,000

Donations Collected to Date
$13,000

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.

 
Any additional donations will be utilized to fund additional projects in Uganda.
 
UPDATE:
This project is well underway, and we will have more to report soon.  Meanwhile here are some pictures we have received from the field :-)

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.
 
Planning and studyingIn action
Hard at work
 

 

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Usuk Secondary School Pump Project - Uganda

Usuk Secondary School Pump Project - Uganda

Location
Usuk, Katakwi District, Uganda

Usuk Secondary School Pump Project - Uganda

Community Description
Usuk Secondary School is a government-run school located in rural northeast Uganda. Water is generally obtained from boreholes. There is currently no electricity in the area.

The school has approximately 700 mixed boarding and day students in 6 different grades. Science classes are mandatory for the first 4 grades (S1-S4) and optional dependent on which educational track the student follows in the upper level (S5-S6).

Problem Addressed
The science labs utilize a rainwater catchment system whereby water captured in gutters is pumped to a tower, and then gravity fed into the classrooms.

There are presently about 34 m of PVC gutters feeding into a 1,500 L plastic water tank. From there, there is a hand-operated pump that feeds into a 500 L tank on top of an approximately 10 ft tower. That tank feeds into the building, which is divided into three separate laboratory rooms, each with an attached storage/teachers room.

The physics and biology labs each have 13 sinks, 12 in the classroom and one in the storage/back room. The chemistry lab has an additional 4 sinks in the classroom for a total of 17. The sinks are in various states of disrepair.

Unfortunately, the hand pump broke many years ago, and since then, the rest of the system has fallen into disrepair. Therefore, the students, in order to conduct classes, must fetch water from the borehole, and are forced to wash lab equipment outside.

Usuk Secondary School Pump Project - UgandaProject Description
This project is to renovate the water system supplying the science laboratories at the school.

A new hand pump will be purchased and installed.

Sinks will be repaired where possible. The remaining sinks, numbering about 4 or 5 per classroom will be replaced. The connecting piping indoors will be repaired as needed.

Work on the gutters and outside piping will complete the renovation and make the system operable.

The major installation of the hand pump will be overseen by a contractor chosen by the school administration and supported by the school staff. Unskilled work will be done by school staff.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the pump as well as the fittings and piping.

Project Impact
700 students will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Kenneth Ivory

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school staff will monitor and maintain the system after completion.

Comments
This is an important project for the school. It will vastly improve the educational benefits of the laboratory experience by restoring running water to the classrooms.

Dollar Amount of Project
$740.00

Donations Collected to Date
$740.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Kenneth Ivory.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will Kenneth of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Kenneth and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Teso Honey Refinery Rainwater Catchment Project - Uganda

Teso Honey Refinery Rainwater Catchment Project - Uganda

Location
Soroti Town, Soroti District, Teso Sub-region, Eastern Uganda

Community Description
Soroti is the largest city in the Teso sub-region of Uganda. The population is about 50,000 people, and agriculture is the main economic activity.

Teso Honey Refinery Rainwater Catchment Project - Uganda

Some place Soroti in eastern Uganda, but the Teso culture has more in common with northern, Nilotic tribes than southern Bantu tribes. After President Museveni came to power in 1986, the Iteso failed to recognize his leadership and were attacked by the Ugandan government.

While it is peaceful in Teso now, the region still lacks adequate government funding for roads, schools and other infrastructure. In the late 1990's and early 2000's, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) came to Teso. The Iteso fought back, and the LRA did not stay long. Because they caused less damage in Teso than in neighboring Lango and Acholi regions, Teso has received little outside funding for rehabilitation. Many of the development projects in Teso are run by the Iteso, who are committed to helping "their people."

The Teso Honey Refinery is a community organization in Soroti Town that buys honey and wax from community members and processes it for sale. The refinery is centrally located and is staffed by community honey farmers. The grounds are also a demonstration farm, where new agriculture practices are shown.

The property currently does not have direct access to water. Water must be hauled to the site in jerry cans from a neighboring water source.

Project Description
This project is to install a rainwater collection system to assist in the operations of the refinery as well as for crop irrigation.

A 3,000 liter plastic water storage tank and valve will be purchased and installed. Gutters will be placed on two sides of the honey refinery building along the roof line. Rainwater will be directed into the tanks through plastic piping.

The refinery and farm staff will assist in the installation process and provide for the transportation of goods to the site.

Teso Honey Refinery Rainwater Catchment Project - UgandaWater Charity funds will be used to purchase the gutters, tank, and tap from local suppliers.

Project Impact
Over 1,800 people will benefit from the project including individual honey farmers who sell their honey and wax to the refinery, volunteer refinery staff, farm staff members who live on the premises, refinery staff, volunteers, and community development officers (CDOs). In addition 5,000+ community members who are trained by the CDOs will indirectly benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Joanna Groepper

Comments
The ability to collect rain water on the site will ease the daily operations at the refinery, allow the demonstration farm to demonstrate crop irrigation, and provide for the household water needs of the farm staff.

Dollar Amount of Project
$550.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Joanna Groepper of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Joanna and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.


This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Blessed Day Care Latrine Project – Uganda

Blessed Day Care Latrine Project – UgandaLocation
Kijura, Masindi District, Uganda

Community Description
Kijura is a suburb of Masindi town, located in western Uganda, and consists of a main trading centre and several rural villages.

Kijura has been plagued with turmoil for many years. It is a congested area, with many disadvantaged families which produce many children. Kijura is known around Masindi for its disproportionate number of pubs, residents' drug abuse, and crime rates. Under these stressful conditions, children are often ignored or even fully abandoned by their families and left to fend for themselves on the streets, too often turning to such demonstrated lifestyles that perpetuate poverty. Abandoned children are sometimes heard to be abducted and sacrificed by local witch doctors.

Blessed Day Care was founded in 2009 to take underprivileged, HIV-positive, disabled, and orphaned children into an environment that encourages learning and positive socializing. It is an early child development center designed to prepare them for higher education. Children who have left Blessed and have gone on to primary school have reportedly been doing very well in their studies.

Blessed Day Care Latrine Project – UgandaThe 60 children who are currently enrolled in the school are divided into three classes: Baby Class, for 2-3 year olds; Middle Class, for 3-4 year olds; and Top Class, for 5-6 year olds.

Those who live in the centre are seen after by willing caretakers in the area as well as the unpaid volunteers who serve as their teachers. These caring teachers educate the children on health issues including nutrition, sanitation, hygiene, and HIV status management, as well as basic English skills.

"By bringing these children together, with education and playing with friends, we are keeping them out of trouble and out of the street. Even when we don't have much to give them beyond 10:00 porridge, it is enough to keep them believing that there is a good future ahead," says Jimmy Angondia, director and founder of Blessed Day Care.

The centre currently shares the community latrine, which serves over six families in the area, in addition to the children and staff of Blessed; this is over 120 people.

Blessed Day Care Latrine Project – UgandaProject Description
The project is to dig and build a 3-stall latrine on the property of Blessed Day Care for the use of children and staff.

A pit 8 feet deep was dug before financial restraints halted progress. When finished, the pit itself will be 9' x 40' x 3'.

The surrounding structure is to be constructed with locally-sourced bricks, cement, iron, and other materials by experts in the area. It will consist of a stall each for boys, girls, and staff. The staff stall will include accommodations for disabled individuals.

A tippy tap and soap for handwashing will be located immediately near the latrine.

Educational lessons on latrine use, handwashing, and sanitation will be introduced and the teachers will incorporate these into all future curriculums.

Blessed Day Care Latrine Project – UgandaThe school plans a follow-up project that will include water pipe installation and a more permanent handwashing station.

Project Impact
This project will benefit the 60 children enrolled in the school, many of whom live in or near the centre. Also to be served will be the 3 caregivers, 2 staff members, and 4 teachers/caregivers.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily Clouse

Comments
This is a critically-needed project for this organization that serves an extremely vulnerable segment of the population.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the congregation of St. Paul Lutheran Church, Coldwater, Ohio.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Emily Clouse of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Emily and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Kanoni Water Tank Project - Uganda

Kanoni Water Tank Project - Uganda

This is the second project to be implemented under the Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program – Uganda, and the fifth project to be integrated into the more comprehensive Water Tank Program - Uganda.

Under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Jesse Coker, a large-capacity water tank will be built to serve the needs of the Kanoni Bible College, located in Kanoni Sub-County, Kiruhura District, Uganda.

The school is a small three- year-old college that trains individuals to become church leaders within the Christian faith. There are 96 students currently attending the college, most of whom are district residents. The college works in association with Kanoni Archdeaconry, just next door to the college.

Kanoni Bible College and Kanoni Archdeaconry are both part of the small trading center of Kanoni, which occupies a stretch of dirt road less than a kilometer in length in a very rural part of a generally rural district.

The project to be undertaken is the construction of a 25,000 liter rainwater harvesting tank. This tank will be built using Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks (ISSBs).

Kanoni Water Tank Project - UgandaThe business of tank construction was started both to provide communities with clean drinking water and also to support the operations of Engari Community Health Centre, PCV Jesse Coker’s host organization.

The project also provides some community members with employment opportunities, as seven local builders have been trained in the ways of using this methodology. So far, the project has constructed three water storage tanks, all of 20,000 liter capacities. Two were built at the Engari Community Health Centre, and one was built at Sya Bright Future Primary School.

It is believed that the proposed project will be the catalyst for the business to gain momentum, on its way to becoming self-sufficient. The location of the tank is ideal for marketing, as all of the bricks will be made on site, next to a road filled with passers-by throughout the day.

The tank will be built just on the downslope side of Kanoni Bible College. The now- experienced team of five masons, with two alternates, will be constructing the tank over a period of three weeks. This includes making all of the bricks needed (about 1,200), digging and setting the foundation, laying the bricks and supporting apparatus, roofing, plastering, and finishing processes.

The bulk of the project costs are being paid by donations from local community members, with Water Charity funds making up the necessary balance. The community will also be providing assistance throughout the project with labor, such as helping to carry bricks from the roadside down to the building site, or by sifting murram in preparation for making the bricks.

Ninety-six students of the college, in addition to twelve faculty members, will be the main beneficiaries.

During holidays, or in times of need, the tank will be available to other community groups, such as the adjoining primary or secondary schools.

This project has been concluded.

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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