Uganda

Bannakaroli Brothers - Kiteredde Water Project - Uganda

Bannakaroli Brothers - Kiteredde Water Project - Uganda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Bannakaroli Brothers - Kiteredde Water Project - UgandaLocation
Bikira Catholic Parish, Masaka Diocese, Kasali Sub-County, Rakai District, Uganda

Community Description
The project will serve five communities, including three schools, one novitiate, and the Bannakaroli Brothers community. The schools are St. Joseph’s Secondary School (co-ed), Sacred Heart School (boys), and Kiteredde Vocational Institute (co-ed). Students in the three schools range in age from 12 to 20 years old.

Girls form the majority of the population in the two co-ed schools. More than half of the students are boarders at the schools, and the others walk to school from surrounding areas. Most of the students come from poor farm families. In addition to the students who live in the schools, the community is also made up of teaching and support staff, half of whom are women.

Problem Addressed
In recent years (2014 and onward) the Rakai district of Uganda has experienced adverse climate changes with reduced rainfall. This has negatively affected agricultural production and lowered the quality of life of the people.

Bannakaroli Brothers - Kiteredde Water Project - UgandaProject Description
This project is to implement an irrigation system to improve the productivity of two square kilometer area of farmland run by the Bannakaroli Brothers Institute to enable them to produce enough food to feed the students at the nearby schools, the people in the community, as well as their own group of teachers and workers.

The project will be implemented by the Brothers. They will contribute to the project a 25,000-liter water tank, connecting piping extending 2.5 km, and 250 cubic meters of construction material for the water dam. The purchase of the water pump and the electrical components will be financed by the Brothers of Charles Lwanga Foundation fundraising activities.

Water Charity funding will go to the remaining expenses, including the pump house, plumbing, electrical accessories, and labor.

Project Impact
2,500 people will benefit from the project, including students and staff of the schools (which are open to everybody), Brothers and employees, and the local farmers around Kiteredde. The breakdown is as follows:

Bannakaroli Brothers - Kiteredde Water Project - Uganda500 Kiteredde Vocational School--Staff and Students
650 St. Joseph Technical School--Staff and Students
700 Kiteredde Senior Secondary School--Staff and Students
50 St. Teresa Novitiate--Kiteredde---Staff and Novices
350 Bannakaroli Brothers Community--Brothers and Novices
250 Local Farmers and Family members

Project Adiministrator
James Salvatore, Returned Peace Corp Volunteer, Peru ‘66-‘68

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Brothers will monitor the condition of the improvements, and maintain and repair the piping, facilities, and equipment as necessary to maintain regular and full functionality.

Comments
This is a follow-up to the Bikira Catholic Parish Community Water Projects - Uganda previously completed. That project has increased the available water supply for the Brothers, the four schools in the area, and the rest of the community.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.  If you like this project, please donate to our East Africa Water and Sanitation Program, of which this project is a component. 

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Kayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda

Kayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion CLICK HERE.

Kayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaLocation

Kayembe Primary School, Namwendwa Subcounty, Kamuli Region, Uganda

Community Description
Kayembe is a primary school in Kamuli region, Uganda with 545 pupils. It has been selected as part of the ‘One Village at a Time’ program by HYT Uganda. This means that 10 unemployed youths from the community have been selected to learn sustainable Interlocking Stabilized Soil Block (ISSB) masonry techniques through the building of various structures within the school. It currently has 2 classroom blocks, an office (used as a classroom), a dilapidated pit latrine and dilapidated kitchen, and a broken plastic water tank.

HYT trainees are currently working on a new classroom block, which will have sufficient roofing area to justify the construction and attachment of a water storage tank.

Problem Addressed
The current plastic tank’s guttering is broken, as well as its tap, and the walling is punctured. Pupils therefore miss lessons to travel to the borehole, which is shared by the school and community, resulting in long queues.

Kayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaProject Description
This project is to build a 20,000-liter tank, and install piping and guttering for a complete rainwater catchment system.

A new classroom block will provide the roofing area for rainwater harvesting upon its completion.

The tank will be constructed approximately 1 meter from the building and connected with guttering. It will be built using ISSB technology, which does not require firewood, unlike traditional burnt bricks, preserving vital tree cover.

Blocks are made by the trainees of the ‘One Village’ program using a manual press, and are curved. The subsoil required for their manufacture will be sourced onsite in Kayembe, mixed with sand, a little (5%) cement and waterproofing, compressed into blocks, and cured in the sun for 28 days. Masons will then utilize the blocks’ interlocking feature to build the tank, plastering and painting as well as roofing it.

This affords the masons the opportunity to learn universally-applicable construction skills, as well as unique ISSB techniques. This knowledge will contribute to their employment on further projects, either with HYT or other social enterprise organizations.

Funds will be used to purchase materials not freely available like the murram (e.g. cement, sand, roofing timber, iron roofing sheets, and paint), as well as to pay the masons’ wages and project management fees. The Kayembe Parent-Teacher Association and the entire community will provide food/water, onsite helpers, accommodation, site security, general support. This encourages the community to take ownership of the project and care for the new tank.

Kayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaProject Impact
552 people, consisting of 545 pupils and 7 staff, will directly benefit from the project.

Project Manager
This project will be managed by Charlie Tebbutt, Assistant Country Manager, HYT Uganda. Under Charlies direction the Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda https://watercharity.com/kagumba-primary-school-issb-tank-project-uganda was recently completed.

Monitoring and Maintenance
HYT employs locally-trained Ugandans to build its structures, creating a sense of local pride and ownership rather than an attitude of gift-receiving. The Trust signs a Memorandum of Understanding with the school and community, which includes clauses on the continued monitoring and maintenance of all structures, old and new.

When tanks are completed, communities are left with a manual and toolkit, to be used by a special committee for tank maintenance, stipulated in the M.O.U. HYT continues to visit project sites following their completion to check on the condition of structures and to encourage and advise the community regarding maintenance.

Let Girls Learn
Of 545 pupils, 270 are girls. The onsite water source that the tank provides will reduce pupils’ trips to the local borehole in order to collect water. Not only do these journeys take place during valuable lesson time, but they present risks to the children, particularly unaccompanied girls. A water tank will lower the occurrence of such trips.

Funding
This project has been paid for through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

Conclusion of Kayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda

Kayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaThis project has been completed under the direction of Charlie Tebbutt, Assistant Country Manager, HYT Uganda. To read about the start of the project, CLICK HERE.

Charlie reports:

Great news – the second tank project at Kayembe is complete! The school now has a safe, secure water source, and a new set of sustainable tank builders has been trained in the region!

Kayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaProject Summary
The new tank at Kayembe Primary School is unique. Not only does it provide 270 girls and 275 boys with life-giving water, but it has also equipped 10 young Ugandan men and women with employable skills in sustainable construction.

Selected from among local, unemployed youths on the basis of their enthusiasm, commitment and willingness to learn, Kayembe’s team of trainees had already learned to use Interlocking Stabilised Soil Blocks (ISSB) to build a classroom block. Using the curved version of the ISSB, trainees built the 20,000 L tank to store the vast amount of water collected by the classroom’s roof.

Kayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaIn the first few weeks, the team alternated between block-making, which involves compressing local soils rather than traditional brick-burning, and building the foundational slab. Once blocks had cured in the sun, trainees were taught to stack them using the interlock feature.

The team then had the opportunity to practice their plastering skills on the inside and outside of the tank, using wire mesh to strengthen the walls. After adding a roof and mesh netting to keep the water free of mosquitoes, trainees learned how to assemble and connect the guttering system to the tank.

Having protected the tank exterior with a layer of paint, trainees attached the tap to a plinth close to the school kitchen, where most of the water is used.

Before the tank’s construction, head teacher Mr Nkolowo Frances complained that “an hour is lost a day at the borehole”. That will now change, as the tank represents a secure, local water source, and reduces congestion around the community borehole.

Kayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaThanks to this project, the trainees now have the skills to build more such tanks across Uganda, obtaining employment and impacting the lives of schoolchildren all over the country.

Kayembe school has designated a tank management team, to ensure the long-term care of its new facilities.

HYT would like to thank Water Charity for their extremely generous support, as well as the community of Kayembe for their continued enthusiasm and assistance.

We wish you all the very best – it’s been great to work with such an efficient organisation!

We extend our thanks to Charlie for completing this important project, and look forward to future projects with HYT.

Kayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaKayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda

 

Kayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaKayembe Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda

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Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda

Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion CLICK HERE.

Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaLocation
Kagumba Primary School, Balawoli Subcounty, Kamuli Region, Uganda

Community Description
Kagumba Primary is a school in Uganda’s rural Kamuli region. The region is one of Uganda’s most neglected, a fact which is reflected in the school’s lack of decent infrastructure. There are 4 classroom blocks (1 new) catering for 549 pupils.

The school has two broken plastic water tanks. At least one classroom has a large- enough roofing area to support and justify the construction of a 20,000 L rainwater harvesting tank. The Haileybury Youth Trust (HYT), has recently completed the construction of a 5-stance pit latrine, and the school is building 2 more.

HYT was impressed by the responsiveness and involvement of the school’s administration, who are required to pay-in-kind, through services such as food/water provision, equipment storage and security for the masons. These criteria were consistently fulfilled to a high standard.

Problem Addressed
The two current plastic water tanks were sabotaged when the school insisted that they were for the use of pupils, rather than the community as a whole. The damage involved the insertion of nails into the plastic walling.

Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaProject Description
A 20,000 L water tank will be constructed approximately 1 meter from the sturdiest classroom block, and connected with gutters for harvesting rainwater. The tank will be built from Interlocking Stabilized Soil Block (ISSB) technology, which does not require firewood, unlike traditional burnt bricks, saving precious tree cover. The tank blocks are curved to suit their purpose, and made using a manual press. They will be made and used by ISSB masons, Ugandan youths trained by the Haileybury Youth Trust in this innovative technology.

All HYT masons are graduates of HYT’s ‘One Village’ at a time program, and were selected, as unemployed youths, to learn on projects in their local areas. They are now professional masons, some of whom have up to 10 years of experience building with ISSB. Water tank projects such as Kagumba contribute to their employment, as well as the spreading of environmentally-friendly ISSB technology.

Subsoil, a key component, will be sourced onsite in Kagumba, mixed with sand, a little (5%) cement and waterproofing, compressed into blocks, and cured in the sun for 28 days. Masons will then utilize the blocks’ interlocking feature to build the tank, plastering and painting as well as roofing it.

Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaWater Charity funds will be used to purchase materials not freely available, like the murram (a gravelly lateritic material), cement, sand, roofing timber, iron roofing sheets, and paint, as well as to pay the masons’ wages and project management fees.

The Kagumba Parent-Teacher Association and others in the community will feed the masons, as well as provide them with onsite helpers (e.g. water-carriers), accommodation, site security and general support. Not only does such participation increase a community’s sense of ownership of the project, but ISSB is also more resistant to the damages suffered by previous tanks.

HYT builds its taps in a separate outlet a few meters away from the tank, therefore disassociating them as a target of sabotage and facilitating easier repairs.

Project Impact
560 people (549 pupils + 11 teachers) will benefit from the project.

Project Manager
This project will be managed by Charlie Tebbutt, Assistant Country Manager, HYT Uganda

Monitoring and Maintenance
HYT employs locally-trained Ugandans to build its structures, creating a sense of local pride and ownership rather than an attitude of gift-receiving. The Trust signs a Memorandum of Understanding with the school and community, which includes clauses on the continued monitoring and maintenance of all structures, old and new.

When tanks are completed, communities are left with a manual and toolkit, to be used by a special committee for tank maintenance, stipulated in the M.O.U. HYT continues to visit project sites following their completion to check on the condition of structures and to encourage and advise the community regarding maintenance.

Let Girls Learn
Of the 549 pupils, 289 are girls. The onsite water source that the tank provides will reduce pupils’ trips to the local borehole in order to collect water. Not only do these journeys take place during valuable lesson time, but they present risks to the children, particularly unaccompanied girls. A water tank will lower the occurrence of such trips.

This project has been paid for through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaKagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda


Conclusion of Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda

Conclusion of Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaThis project has been completed under the direction of Charlie Tebbutt, Assistant Country Manager of Haileybury Youth Trust (HYT). To read about the start of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was designed to build a 20,000-liter water tank and rainwater catchment system using Interlocking Stabilized Soil Block (ISSB) technology.

Charlie reports:

Conclusion of Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaI'm very happy to update you on the successful completion of the 20,000L tank at Kagumba Primary School.

The block-making team, assembled from graduates of HYT’s training programme, arrived with the interlocking stabilised soil block (ISSB) press at Kagumba Primary School on July 13th 2017. Having selected and extracted local marram subsoil, they began to make curved blocks for the water tank. These blocks are cured in the sun, and do not require the firewood that is consumed by traditional brick-burning methods.

A foundational slab was laid down as the blocks dried and gathered strength. Once ready, they were stacked (a quick and simple process, thanks to the innovative interlock) to a height of 2.5 metres, enough to store up to 20,000L of rainwater! When the desired height had been achieved, the waterproofed blocks were plastered on the inside, with wire mesh to reinforce against the pressure of all that water. A roof was then added and the exterior was plastered, again with wire mesh to bolster integrity.

Conclusion of Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaThe tank’s final layer of protection was a coat of paint, after which the tap was mounted on a plinth a few meters away. HYT does this so that inevitable wear-and-tear is concentrated around the easily replaceable tap, rather than the more complex tank structure. Once guttering had been connected from the roof of the classroom next door, the tank was ready for business, producing cool, clean water thanks to an innovative “first flush” system. The transformative effects on both the school’s 289 girls and 260 boys, as well as the staff and community, are best described by the pupils and the deputy headteacher, Mr. Dathan.

“I move three kilometres to pick water from the borehole”, pupil Yoweria told us, yellow jerrycan in hand, following one of her regular trips to collect water.

Mr. Dathan explained that “Every day we send them during morning time, during lunch and in the evening”, in order to collect approximately 400 litres of water a day, for drinking, cooking and washing.

The tank’s 20,000L capacity will give the pupils and staff “ample time to focus on teaching”, according to Mr. Dathan.

The school has assembled a specific tank management team, and arranged for the community to have access to the water supply on weekends. This will ensure the long-term care of the facilities, and take pressure away from the local borehole.

HYT would like to thank Water Charity for their extremely generous support, as well as the community of Kagumba for their continued enthusiasm and assistance.

We extend our thanks to Charlie for completing this important project.

Conclusion of Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaConclusion of Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda

 

Conclusion of Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaConclusion of Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda

 

Conclusion of Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - UgandaConclusion of Kagumba Primary School ISSB Tank Project - Uganda

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Kampala Area Well Rehab Program - Uganda

Village Kids - Kampala Area, Uganda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.
​UPDATE: All 5 well repairs have been successfully completed. See the #conclusion report below for more details!

Water Charity is partnering with Wine To Water and the Ugandan Water Project to rehabilitate five non-functioning wells north of Kampala, Uganda (see map below). The program will benefit 5 communities and reach a total of 2,250 beneficiaries with clean water.

Bika Samba, UgandaThe Problem
The primary water source for the people of Uganda is a borehole well. Unfortunately, with so many moving parts, these wells endure a lot of stress, especially in areas where they are pumped around the clock. While the need for regular maintenance is clear, it is often neglected, resulting in over 30% of wells in Sub-Saharan Africa being broken at any one point in time.

Community Involvement


Working with the community leadership to develop a strong buy-in strategy helps create ownership. It also allows the community to recognize the need for regular well maintenance. This program employs a two-part process that not only fixes the broken water source, but builds the community’s capacity to maintain their well in the future.

Project Descriptions:

Bika Samba The connection was made with the Bika Samba LCI Masulita Town Council. This borehole was installed in May/ 2005 it has 14 pipes. Depth is 160ft water level is 90ft, and it has been not functioning properly since September/ 2016. It serves 700 people and was drilled by Jica. The primary problems with this well are the: Pipes, Rods, Chain and Cylinder.Carrying water

Mayanja We have been working with the Bika Mayanja LCI Masulita Town Council for this project. The borehole was Drilled in 2004, it has 18 pipes, and depth is 200ft. Water level is 120ft, and it has been broken since 2012. It was installed by Jica and it was serving 300 people. The primary problems with this well are the: Pipes, Rods, Cylinder Chain and Pump Head.

Kawesa David Lwemwede This well was installed in 2006. It has 12 pipes, depth is 120ft, water level is 90ft, and it was serving 350 people. It has been down since 2012. The primary problems with this well are the: Pipes, Rods and Cylinder. In addition, the elevated platform needs some repairs,

Lwemwedde Masulita This well was installed on 10/05/2015. It is composed of 10 pipes and it has been broken since September/ 2016 . The Cylinder and Rods have fallen in and are in need of repair. Once repaired, this well will serve 400 individuals.

Mulume This borehole was drilled in 2011 and is currently non-functional. This is a very deep borehole composed of 19 pipes and will serve 500 individuals once repaired.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor. If you wish to donate for our work, please choose a different project in the geographical area of your choice.

 


Village Happy
5 Villages Well Rehabilitation Project Completed! (Kampala Area, Uganda)

All 5 well repairs were effected and successful.  More than the 2,250 people we expected to help were impacted, and people now come to these wells from a wide radius.  People working

Naturally, there is more work that needs to be done, but this is a huge start.  Having access to clean water affects every level of the society and economy.  The health benefits, reduction in infant mortality and childhood diarrheal diseases have an incalculable effect on the potential of the region.

A major benefit of this initiative, is that it came from the village level and created a sense of ownership for these wells that wasn't there before.  There is a strong commitment in the villages to keep these wells functional, and minor upkeep and repairs will be handled in a timely manner going forward.

All in all a very successful series of repairs!  A folder full of pics from this work can be found HERE.  

Well Repair UgandaFixing a well

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Ndiraweeru BioSand Filter Training - Uganda

Ndiraweeru Training

This Uganda project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association, working with Friendly Water for the World.  

It has been successfully completed, and a short #conclusion report has been appended to the end of the page.
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training
Location
Ndiraweru-Banda Sub County, Uganda

Community Description
Ndiraweeru is an impoverished rural community in Uganda.  They have quite a few issues with water access and quality.

Problem Addressed
Lack of access to clean drinking water, and the subsequent reliance on substandard, contaminated water has created a high incidence of water-borne illnesses. Many of the residents are dealing with compromised immune systems due to HIV and other illnesses, so this is an even greater issue for them.

Project Description
The project will be a 5-day training in constructing and maintaining bio-sand water filters  for 25 of the group members These original members will pass on the knowledge to other group members with assistance from the Friendly Water area office. The group members are the first target beneficiaries for BioSand Filters. All will act as education and marketing agents to bring about change in the entire sub-district.

Community Organization
Ndiraweeru SMU group is a local initiative group founded as part of the Korean self-help development initiatives in rural Uganda. The group currently has 120 members, which is part of the Seamaul Undongo movement that also stretches to the National level. Water is a huge issue in the area and access to clean drinking water is a vital need. 68 out of the 120 members are HIV positive and access to clean water is even a greater need for them.

Project Impact
The original 25 Group members will be directly impacted; subsequently passing on knowledge to other group members. The group members are the first target beneficiaries for BioSand Filters; they will act as education and marketing agents to bring about change in the entire sub-district.  On a long-term, there will be more access to clean drinking water, thus resulting in fewer water borne illnesses.  The group members will be able to sell clean water and filters, as well as teaching other people to do the same.

Volunteer Directing Project
Kaweesi John Paschal

Training #2Monitoring and Maintenance 
The project manager will directly be responsible to coordinate the group activities, report to the Friendly Water office, which shall send an evaluation officer once a month for the first year. The trained group will be formed into a Rotary Community Corps under the direct supervision of the Rotary Club of Mityana. The club will also offer additional funding for capacity building.  The group already has ongoing Water Sanitation and Hygiene projects, which will all be integrated into one program.  

An effort will be undertaken to form a group of community health promoters from the trained group.  They will continuously do sanitation and hygiene talks in village meetings and other gatherings.

Expected Outcomes:

Short-term

-Environmentally conscious people that will foster environmental hygiene and sustainability

-25 Trained BioSand filter technicians

-Group that can take charge of its local water problems

-At least 120 filters to be built in less than 3 months

-A community with minimized waterborne diseases

Long-term

-Improved lives of families (healthier people )

-Regular school attendance due to the reduced incidences of water borne diseases

-An economically more productive population

- People with HIV will have regular access to clean water and will live longer.

-Community Health promoters to be formed from the trained group

Comments
​This project is part of Water Charity's ongoing Training & Support Initiative, and represents a forward thinking, efficient way to solve a problem. 
Rather than simply give the people filters, we are teaching them to make their own, and giving them the ability to pass on this knowledge.  As such, the final "ripple effects" of this work may never be truly known.  Considering how necessary clean water is, and how much the people want to be self-sufficient, we are sure this simple technology will spread broadly and quickly in the region.  It is quite likely that thousands of people will be touched by this effort.


Ndiraweeru, Uganda

​Conclusion Of The Project 

The project took place on August 14th and it was a great success among the group that 38 people ended up taking the training instead of the 25 people initially registered.

6 filters were made during the training, and 2 molds were delivered to the group.  They are already distributing filters as fast as they can make them, and are keen on purchasing more molds and tools. 

 

As with many of these trainings, despite our willingness to provide more molds and tools free of charge, the people prefer to use the funds they are now able to raise to expand their production themselves.  This speaks to the reason these trainings are so successful, as they empower the people to help themselves.

 

The group has great plans in training the rest of the members, and other groups in other districts.  We will update this page further as new information comes in from Uganda.

smiley

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor. If you are inspired by this what this project was able to accomplish, please Donate to support our future projects in Uganda.

 

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Kole Forest Garden Project - Uganda

Kole Forest Garden Project - Uganda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Kole District, Northern Uganda

Community Description
The Kole District in Northern Uganda is home to rolling hills of farmland that is plowed by hand or oxen. The Langis and Acholis tribes make up the majority of people in this region, extending to the west and north toward South Sudan. Life in Kole was significantly disrupted in the mid-1990s when Joseph Kony and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) rose up against the government and attacked civilians in the northern half of the country. During this time, almost two million residents were affected and forced to flee their homes or lose their lives.

When the LRA insurgency ended, there was widespread international support for farmers and other displaced people returning to Kole, but since then large NGOs such as World Vision, Care International, Action Aid, and the United Nations have ended their programming in these regions. The majority of agricultural programming over the past 30 years by the international community has encouraged mono-cropping of one or few crops on farmers’ lands, ultimately contributing to the loss of agricultural and ecological biodiversity across the landscape.

Problem Addressed
Many Kole households continue to rely on open streams for domestic water collection. However, because of pollution and agricultural runoff from the villages along the streams, much of this water is unsafe for domestic use. Farmers need to improve water quality, build soil health, and conserve precious resources.

Despite the fact that the Lango culture prevalent in Kole is male-dominated, women are responsible for nearly all of the domestic and agricultural family activities. It is the women that grow food, collect water, build and maintain houses, educate children, and generate income for the home, and have the greatest need for improved techniques.

Formerly displaced persons are very much affected by the use of improper farming techniques in their effort to earn a living. Farmers who left their lands during the Lord’s Resistance Army insurgency have returned now and are practicing conventional, destructive farming techniques. As farmers continue to clear brush and trees to plant crops year-round, soil fertility is quickly depleting. Tree cover is disappearing in Kole , Uganda due to human encroachment on forests.

Project Description
The overall goal of the Kole Forest Garden Project is to increase food security and income of 282 families in Kole, Uganda, by transforming their degraded fields into sustainable Forest Gardens. This project will help farmers and their families break the cycle of poverty.

The Forest Garden system is a multi-tiered mixture of trees, shrubs, and crops that is grown on one to two acres of land. Trees have long been a vital resource for smallholder farmers since, once established, they require very little labor and resources to be productive. Centering farms around trees is not difficult, but most African farmers are resource- and technology-poor and are stuck in a losing battle growing short-term cropping to meet short-term needs.

Locally-based technicians will work on-the-ground with farmers to design Forest Gardens which will maximize yields and provide a consistent income, while also improving the quality of the land being farmed.

Key objectives over the next 12 months of this project include:

1) Provide support and training to 282 farmers in Kole, Uganda on Forest Garden design and nursery development and maintenance,

2) Plant approximately 600,000 trees on Forest Garden sites to protect and fertilize soils through establishment of green walls, contour lines, and planting of nitrogen-fixing, fertilizer trees; begin out-planting, and conduct training events on composting, integrated pest management strategies, and perma-garden growing techniques, and

3) Establish 282 garden beds—one for each farmer—with a diverse mix of nutritious vegetables and fruits surrounded by fodder and timber trees.

The activities will include:

● Out-planting trees
● Composting and Integrated Pest Management training
● Tree and vegetable nurseries
● Farmer sample survey and evaluations
● Gardening training
● Annual review and planning meeting
● Tree and vegetable out-planting
● Fruit tree nursery training
● Fruit tree nurseries
● Fruit tree out-planting training
● Out-planting fruit trees

The work is being carried out by Trees for the Future, founded in 1989 to combat unsustainable land use practices in the developing world. Its mission is to improve the livelihoods of impoverished farmers through revitalizing degraded lands.

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for agroforestry tree seeds, fruit tree seeds and cuttings, vegetable seeds, materials, tools, and transport.

Project Impact
1,700 people in 282 families, from 13 different small farmer groups, will benefit from the project. Combined, these families will transform 277 acres (112 hectares) of previously degraded land into prolific, diverse, and permanent Forest Gardens.

Kole Forest Garden Project - Uganda

Project Manager
Ashleigh Burgess, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, Sengal (2011-14), Trees for the Future

Monitoring and Maintenance

To measure the overall impact of the Kole Forest Garden program during the entire project term (estimated to be completed by March 2020), the measurable objectives are to:

1) Increase sustainability of rural landscapes for 282 Kole farmers by establishing environmentally responsible agricultural systems—indicated by the number of farmers who have established Forest Garden sites,

2) Increase household food security for Kole farmers through increased access to food over an annual period—indicated by USAID's Household Food Insecurity Access Score, and

3) Increase household resilience to economic instability for Kole farmers over an annual period—indicated by USAID's Household Resilience Capacity Score.

Comments
The Forest Garden approach is designed to help farmers improve water quality through conservation practices, decrease reliance on costly and environmentally harmful pesticides and fertilizers, build soil health, and conserve precious resources. In addition, the project will provide the entire community with the tools and resources to be successful in growing food and preserving the environment for years and generations to come.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

If you are moved by this model, that has lifelong impact on the wellbeing of the community while protecting the environment and improving the water supply, please Donate using the button below. Your contribution will be allocated to similar projects in nearby locations.

 

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Kazingo and Karangura Water Project - Uganda

Kazingo and Karangura Water Project - Uganda

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kazingo and Karangura Water Project - UgandaLocation
Kazingo and Karangura parishes, Kabarole district, Bukuuku and Karangura sub-counties, Western region, Uganda

Community Description
Kazingo and Karangura are located about 16 km from Fort Portal town, 10 km off Bundibugyo road.

Twerwaneho Orphans Community Initiative (TOCI) works with over 220 vulnerable families in 26 villages of Bukuuku sub-county Kabarole district in areas of child protection, water, hygiene, health, sanitation, education and income generation.

TOCI has been supporting and empowering the community since May, 2006, and has been working with Peace Corps Volunteers and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers since 2010.

Problem Addressed
Bukuuku and Karangura sub-counties are remote areas bordering and in the middle of Rwenzori Mountains, where families commute long distances (2-3 km) in search of clean water.

During annual assessment and community visits, out of the 8 schools in and around Rwenzori Mountains, none has a nearby water source. Children in schools survive and drink dirty water from far rivers. This poses a risk of contracting waterborne diseases like diarrhea, typhoid and cholera for school-going children.

Kazingo and Karangura Water Project - Uganda		Lack of nearby water sources affects and lowers household incomes as people take time searching for clean water that could have been used for productive work, such as farming, business or any other family income generating project.

TOCI organized meetings with community members and local council leaders to gather information, ideas and solutions to address the long-time water shortage and associated problems.

Project Description
This project is to build 3 rainwater harvesting systems in 2 communities.

Two tanks will be constructed in mountainous Karangura sub-county and one in Bukuuku sub- county. The school water tanks will each have two locally-made handwashing facilities fitted on the tanks so children can access safe drinking water.

The work will be done by Water for Hard to Reach Areas (WAHARA), an organization with considerable experience in similar projects.

Each system will consist of a 5,000-liter storage tank, gutters attached to building roofs, and piping.

In addition, 200 water collection and storage containers will be distributed at 2 schools, and to 150 vulnerable children from families affected and infected by HIV/AIDS, and special needs children.

Tank Specifics
The tanks will be 10-12 mm thick plastic, with a capacity of 5,000 liters each. The tanks are guaranteed to last 30 years (when well protected).

Stand Construction
A base will be constructed of bricks, cement sand mortar of 1:3, concrete of 1:2:3 (cement sand and aggregates), constructed 2-3 feet above the ground.

Provision for Runoff
A soak pit will be constructed to capture runoff. A pit of 3 feet diameter will be dug and filled with hard stones, protected against breeding of mosquitoes by covering with taupline (polythene).

Gutters and Piping System
4 inch gutters will be installed on the face board to collect water from the roof surface. They will be connected to the down pipe and then to the tank.

Water Purification
Water will be collected in a clean container and mixed with water guard to make it safer for human consumption. Families will be encouraged to boil drinking water to kill germs when stored for long periods.

Kazingo and Karangura Water Project - UgandaProject Impact
2,700 people will benefit from the project.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Tiffany Tai, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Uganda, 2011-2013), Regional Recruiter for Peace Corps / West Coast Region, and active member of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Los Angeles, will lead the project.

Tiffany previously completed the Kazingo, Kiguma and Karangura Water Project - Uganda

Monitoring and Maintenance
The local council leaders and water user committees will be equipped with skills to safeguard the systems, raise funds for repairs and improve sanitation around the water source.

The completed projects will be officially launched with the support of a sub county community development officer and health assistant who will help in the ongoing monitoring and support.

Let Girls Learn
The project targets over 800 girls faced with water, hygiene, and sanitation challenges that make it difficult for them to remain in school. Since girls bear the major burden of retrieving water, they will most benefit from the improvements.

While this project, administered by an RPCV, is not a part of the Peace Corps Let Girls Learn initiative, it embraces the same values. Hence, it is given the Let Girls Learn Plus (LGL+) designation, and included as a part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

Fundraising Target
$4,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$4,900

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been fully funded by an anonymous donor.  Additional donations using the Donate button below will be used for other projects in Uganda.

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

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Kampala Lifewater Filter Distribution Project - Uganda

Clean water for the first time at C4C Children's Home

This project is made possible through the collaboration of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps AssociationNPC & WC Logos

Location

Central Kampala and surrounding areas, Uganda, East Africa

Community Description Boiling Water at Teresa Home Children's Home
Kampala District is a district in Uganda that is coterminous with the country's capital city, Kampala. The main language spoken is Luganda, although many other languages are spoken, including English, Swahili, Runyankole/Rukiga, Acholi, and Lusoga.  Kampala largest city of Uganda and is divided into five boroughs that oversee local planning: Kampala Central Division, Kawempe Division, Makindye Division, Nakawa Division, and Lubaga Division.  

This project focuses on children’s homes and individual households in this district burdened with the health and economic costs of boiling water for consumption.

Problem Addressed
Although the Central Kampala has a functioning piped water system, the water is not fit for immediate consumption. It must be first boiled. If it isn’t, the health consequences can be dire.  Through the years, Uganda’s capital city, as well as districts up-country, have been suffering recurrent outbreaks of waterborne diseases like, cholera, typhoid, and dysentery, which have sickened tens of thousands and claimed numerous lives.

While boiling water is seen as a necessity for cooking and drinking, it is costly. Many Ugandan homes use charcoal or wood stoves to boil water. (Gas and electricity are also used, but to a lesser degree). The daily task of boiling water is not only an economic burden (especially for households who earn only a few dollars a day), but it also contributes heavily to deforestation, hugely contributing to demand on imported charcoal and wood from rural areas outside Kampala. Boiling also means prolonged exposure to indoor air pollution and respiratory diseases from the burning fumes and smoke created by dirty cook stoves. 

Boiling Water at C4C Children's Moreover, even if water is boiled, this does not remove suspended particulate matter and other physical impurities in the water. The long-term health impacts of ingesting these particulates are uncertain and a reason for concern. Better-off Ugandans purchase bottled water rather than boiling water, but even they feel the economic squeeze. Moreover, without an effective recycling program in Kampala, the plastic bottles that this produces creates unnecessary demand on imported plastic products and generates mountains of trash.

Project Description
This project seeks to distribute 50 Sawyer Point One filters to 3-5 children’s homes and day care centers in the Greater Kampala area, as well as approximately 30 individual households. Each Sawyer filter has the ability to filter out impurities as small as 0.1 micron, and can effectively remove bacteria that causes typhoid, E. coli, dysentery, cholera, and other serious waterborne diseases, making it unnecessary to boil water. The filters are extremely long-lasting and capable of producing more than 792,500 gallons of clean water each.

All filter recipients will be taught how to install, operate, and clean these filters to ensure proper care and maintenance, as well as long user life. Teaching will borrow on lessons learned from THIS earlier filter distribution project conducted by Water Charity.
To foster community buy in, all households will be required to contribute funds towards purchasing buckets, onto which the filters will be installed. These filters cost approximately $50 each, and will be provided free of charge to children’s homes and day care centers, and to households of more modest means. For those households with more disposable income, they will be requested to contribute a nominal percentage of the filter costs on a sliding scale.

Beneficiaries will also receive details of a local distributor of Sawyer Filters, should they need future after sales service or wish to purchase additional filters at full cost.

Project ImpactFilter Demonstration
It is envisaged that this project will benefit about 400 Ugandan women, children, and men with a reliable source of clean water, eliminating the need to boil water and saving resources for other competing needs and productive investments, like contributing to savings, buying food for one’s family, or paying for school fees and medical expenses.

This is part of Water Charity's ongoing Filters For Life Program - Worldwide.
 
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jeremy Mak, a member of the National Peace Corps Association and the Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Los Angeles.

Comments
Jeremy has done a large number of projects with Water Charity.  Starting as a PCV in The Gambia, then as an RPCV, and including quite a few ambitious programs to repair or provide new handpumps in communities where their old pumps had ceased functioning, as well as distribute household filters to villages relying on open wells. Water Charity has funded these Gambia Lifewater Pump projects readily (benefitting more than 15,000 Gambians), and will continue to work with Jeremy through a new round of pump and filter projects.  

This filter project is Jeremy’s first in Uganda. To see a complete list of projects that Jeremy has worked on with Water Charity, CLICK HERE.

We at Water Charity commend Jeremy for his outstanding work.

Dollar Amount of Project

$2,500

Donations Received

$0

Donations Needed

$2,500

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. Donating the full amount will allow you to dedicate the project, if that is something you would like.

 


This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.
Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

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Kazingo, Kiguma and Karangura Water Project - Uganda

TOCI kids at our Early Childhood Development center

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC

Location
Kazingo and Karangura parishes in Bukuuku and Karangura sub-counties located in Kabarole district, western Uganda - East Africa.Micheal and some of the beneficiaries

Community Description
Kazingo and Karangura are located about 16 KM from Fort Portal town, 10 KM off Bundibugyo road.

Twerwaneho Orphans Community Initiative (TOCI) works with over 220 vulnerable families in 26 villages of Bukuuku sub-county Kabarole district in areas of child protection, water, hygiene, health, sanitation, education and income generation.

TOCI has been supporting and empowering the community since May 2006, and has worked with Peace Corps Volunteers and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers since 2010.

Problem Addressed
Bukuuku and Karangura sub-counties are far-flung areas bordering, and in the middle of, Rwenzori Mountains where families commute long distances (2-3 KM) in search of clean water.

studentsDuring annual assessment and community visits, out of the 8 schools in and around Rwenzori Mountains, it was found that none has a nearby water source; children in schools survive and drink dirty water from far-away rivers. This poses a risk of contracting waterborne diseases like diarrhea, typhoid and cholera by school-going children.

Also, the community around the Kazingo area has no clean water, and adults and children are at risk of contracting diarrhea, cholera and typhoid. As a result of the water shortage, children and women spend a lot of time looking for clean water.  This makes children tired, leaving them little time and energy for reading books and fulfilling other responsibilities.

The lack of nearby water sources lowers household incomes.  People spend a lot of time searching for clean water, limiting the time that could be used for productive work, such as farming, business or other family income-generating projects.

TOCI organized meetings with community members and local council leaders to gather information, ideas and solutions to address the long-time water shortage and associated problems. The community is in serious need of clean water, and therefore requested support from TOCI and Water Charity.  In doing so, they offered to contribute locally-available resources and help with project implementation.

Project Description
Water for Hard to Reach Areas (WAHARA) will construct 3 rain harvesting tanks with a capacity of 5,000 liters each for schools water tankin three villages of Kazingo, Kiguma and Karangura parishes.

The school water tanks will each have two water outlets.  On one side there will be a hand washing outlet with a liquid hand washing soap dispenser fitted, and on the opposite side will be a drinking water outlet with 2 ceramic water filters fitted on the tank. Thus, children will be able to access safe drinking water.

The project will also distribute 500 water collection and storage containers to 6 schools and 400 vulnerable children affected by HIV/AIDS and special needs children.

The project will also train and support 15 water user and monitoring committees with technical skills, tools and materials to ensure coordination and regular maintenance and repairs. The trained and empowered local committees will be among the beneficiaries and local leaders who will work voluntarily to ensure the projects are well cared for and last a long time.

schoolProject Impact
The project will benefit more than 8,500 people.  5,500 children and over 3,000 adult beneficiaries.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Tiffany Tai, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Uganda, 2011-2013), Regional Recruiter for Peace Corps / West Coast Region, and active member of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Los Angeles

Monitoring and Maintenance
The project will also train and support 15 water use and monitoring committees with technical skills, tools and materials to ensure coordination and regular maintenance and repairs. The trained and empowered local committees will be among the beneficiaries and local leaders that will work voluntarily to ensure the projects are well cared for and last a long time.

Comments
This project falls under our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.  If you like this project, please donate to the overall program so that we can continue to do similar projects.  It also comes under our Training & Support Initiative where we highlight projects that result in ongoing impact.

This project had been funded by an anonymous donor.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

polluted watercommunity current access to water

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Bikira Catholic Parish Community Water Projects - Uganda

Kitteredde Primary School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Bikira Catholic Parish, Masaka Diocese, Kasali Sub-County, Rakai District -- Uganda
Students carrying water
Community Description
The pump project will serve five communities, including three schools, one novitiate, and the Bannakaroli Brothers Community. The names of the schools are St. Joseph’s Secondary School (coed), Sacred Heart School (boys), and Kiteredde Vocational Institute (coed).  Students in the three schools range in age from 12 to 20 years old.  Girls form the majority of the population in the two coed schools.

More than half of the students are boarders at the schools, and the others walk to school from surrounding areas.  Most of the students come from poor farm families.  In addition to the students who live in the schools, the community is also made up of teaching and support staff, half of whom are women.
 
Problem Addressed
The current surface-type water pump was installed ten years ago.  Since then, the population of the institutions has doubled while the capacity of the pump has remained constant. Presently, the pump can’t produce enough water for the total population in the area. As a result of this situation, the only alternative water source where the Brothers and students draw water is highly congested with poor sanitation.  To make matters worse, during the dry spell these water sources dry up.  There is a major need for installing a submersible pump which will reach down to the water table and provide a clean and adequate water supply for the Brothers’ Community and the schools in the area.
Man using manual pump
Project Description
Water system: There are five institutions, which will share in using the system: a secondary school, a secondary technical school, a vocational school, a novitiate, and the Brothers’ residence.  The system will consist of the following components:

1.  Water Source:  The water will be pumped by submersible pump from underground through a borehole to an existing well, which has a reliable water table, which will meet the needs of the project.

2.  Characteristics of the well:  The present well will not change.  The engineer will only remove the galvanized pipes and the manual pump and replace them with plastic pipes and the submersible pump.  The present borehole was constructed in such a way that it can be used either manually or using a motor pump.  Therefore, there is no need to enlarge the existing bore hole.

3.  Main Tank:  Water from the underground will be pumped through the transmission pipes into the main tank.  From the main tank, water will be distributed to different institutions by gravity flow through the pipe network, which is already in existence.

4.  Submersible Pump: The engineer will install a Grundfos submersible pump with an output of 5,000 liters per hour, which is both reliable and powerful enough to pump water for the whole community.Students collecting water

5.  Network:  This is composed of pipes, which distribute water from the main tanks to various areas of the community.  The network includes one reserve tank for each of five communities.  The tanks now in place are old and need to be replaced.  These will be replaced later when the Brothers obtain enough money to do so—probably through fundraisers organized by the Brothers of St. Charles Lwanga Foundation in Chicago.

 6.  Power Source:  Electricity from the national power line will be used to run the pump.
 
Storehouse:  There is a need for a small storehouse where spare parts can be kept. This house is also necessary to protect part of the pump system including the switch, electric wires, and water meter from bugs, weather, and children.  The funds necessary to construct the house will be paid by the schools.

Elder in a wheelchairProject Impact
This project will benefit 2,200 people.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
James Salvatore

Monitoring and Maintenance
The maintenance and sustainability of the project will be the responsibility of Kiteredde St. Joseph’s Secondary and Technical school management committee and administration. According to the engineer, the average cost of maintaining the pump is around $55 per month. This expense will be included in the overall annual budget of the school, which will be paid for through school fees charged to the parents. Since the Bannakaroli Brothers administer the schools and their own community and novitiate, they will bear practically all of the responsibility for the implementation and the administration of the project.

 Comments
The Bannakaroli Brothers Community with the help of the engineer will oversee the implementation and administration of the project.

James is a Returned Peace Corp Volunteer who was posted in Piura, Peru from 1966-68.
This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.  If you like this project, please donate to our East Africa Water and Sanitation Program, of which this project is a component. 

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

Elders housed in the communityExisting well

Collecting waterStudents carrying waterStudents collecting waterSchool and tanks

SchoolSchool

SchoolSchool

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