Tanzania

Village of Hope - Rotary Biosand Filter Training - Tanzania

Village of Hope, Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION, working with Friendly Water for the World.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

BSF in process of being built

Location
Village of Hope - Nyegezi, Mwanza, Tanzania

Community Description
Village of hope is a care center for children located at Nyegezi ward in Mwanza region. Mwanza is a mid-sized port city on the southern shores of Lake Victoria in northwestern Tanzania. With a population of over 700,000, it is Tanzania's second largest city, following Dar es Salaam. Mwanza is the capital of the surrounding Mwanza Region.

Problem Addressed
The Village of Hope care center provides all the basic needs of children and youth, such as housing, food, education, health care and so on.  Children are brought to the center at different age stages, but once they reach 18 years old, they get sent back to their family or community. Some of the kids have no family to be sent to, but they have a good chance to start a new life independently because of the skills they learned at the center.

The center has no reliable source of drinking water, which makes it extremely hard to keep the kids healthy. A big chunk of the center’s income has been spent on charcoal for boiling water. Nonetheless, waterborne diseases such as typhoid, amoeba and dysentery are common at the center.

Project Description
The idea of a BioSand water filter training project was introduced to the community for the purpose of providing safe and clean water to people in order to reduce water-related diseases. They were enthusiastic :-)

This project is a WASH and Bio Sand Water Filter Fabrication Training. Projects like this have proven very valuable and deliver high performance and profound effects in many areas of lesser developed countries like Tanzania, where access to safe water is still a problem. Improvement of people’s health is the major outcome, and there is a rise in living standards of people who are engaged in these projects. New employment opportunities is another impact in Tanzania. Approximately 200 group members who have been trained so far, are now employed under this project through fabrication, selling water and selling filters to earn income.

This project to provide training on the making and maintaining of BioSand Water Filters to 28 members of the center will have similar benefit. The operation will not only provide a continuous and reliable access to clean drinking water but it will also provide a source of income to the center through the sale of drinking water and filters in the community.
Training in progress, VOH Tanzania
Community Organizations
​This training is a collaboration of Water Charity, Friendly Water, CLAO and Village of Hope.

Community Life Amelioration Organization (CLAO) is the local organization (initiated by Tanzanian) registered under nongovernmental Organization act, 2002 (registration no 00NGO/0008807) with the aim to implement bio sand water filter projects in Tanzania with Friendly Water For The World. CLAO will be working with community at grassroots level in different projects initiated to raise community wellbeing economically, socially and in terms of health. Under this project, CLAO will organize the training, do preparation for all other requirements of Testing the BSFthe training, and conduct the training, monitor and evaluate the project’s progress.

Our vision is “to see a sustainable community where everyone has a decent and contented life”

Mission
“Fostering rational utilization of skills and manpower for sustainable development in both social and economic spheres as well as creating friendly environment in order to ensure diversity sources of income and improve livelihoods of communities.

Village of Hope (VOH) is a nonprofit organization that exists for the sole purpose of bringing hope to vulnerable children in Mwanza. They try to accomplish this by providing vulnerable children with shelter, education, healthcare and nutrition. They are currently serving over 300 children through their children’s home and school.

Vision
The vision of Village of Hope-Mwanza is that all children are loved and care for.

Mission
Village of Hope-Mwanza exists to bring lasting hope to the children at risk so they can embrace adulthood as independent and contributing members of the society.

Village of Hope-Mwanza came to exist due to stories of children, including abandonment and death of one or both parents. Many of the children were found abandoned in a certain area and brought to police and then to social welfare, which brought them to VOH. A few stories involve the death of both parents and family being unable to care for the child. In some cases the mother died at birth and no family was available.

Children are raised at the center until the age of 18 years, then released back to society to start independent life. It becomes a challenge for them to cope with community life, as some of them do not even know their relatives. They often have no life skills, apart from home-based education that they have received during years spent in VOH. 

New BSF!Each year, numbers of youth complete their secondary education with no hope for further studies, hence becoming a burden to society or engaging in adverse psychosocial behaviors.

Project Impact
More than 300 children living at Village of Hope-Mwanza and more than 30 workers employed with VOH will gain access ro safe and clean water. Trained youth will become employed, enabling them to earn income and  benefit the community.

Volunteer Directing Project
Julius Kenyamanyara

Monitoring and Maintenance 
Community Life Amelioration Organization (CLAO) in collaboration with Village of Hope-Mwanza (VOH) will monitor the progress of the project, whereby selected leaders from the group will collaborate on providing progress report and share groups information. 

Sustainability;

-Entrepreneurship and marketing skills will be taught as part of the training to provide members with techniques on selling of filters.

-VOH will be responsible to advertise, and find other donors to support the group.

-VOH should contact their partners to introduce them to the project hence more training is expected in the future in partnership with FWFW and CLAO.

Expected Outcomes:
Short-term

  • Equip group members with the knowledge and skills on fabrication and installation of bio sand water filter
  • Capacity building on water, hygiene and sanitation education to group members
  • Provision of safe and clean water to VOH community
  • Employment opportunity                                                                  

Long-term

  • Improve living standard of the group members and families in general
  • Reduction of water borne diseases as more people will be using bio sand water filters
  • Health improvement

Certificates Awarded
Village of Hope, Tanzania - Training Concluded!

The training was conducted and was a tremendous success.  Many filters were constructed and the knowledge that the certified trainees gained has already been passed along throughout the area.  The additional income generated for Village Of Hope is allowing them to expand their reach and aid even more children there.

A group of 28 people were trained: 24 youths, 2 teachers and, and 2 house women.
 

At the end of the training all the participants received a certificate, that prove their capability in making and maintaining the BioSand Water Filter as well as the basics of hygiene and sanitation.

 

Certificate awardedOutcomes:

- More than 300 beneficiaries in the Village of Hope center now have safe and clean drinking water, and the surrounding community also benefits from the project.  Members of the village of hope are designated to educate people on the importance of using safe clean water. This will also increase the sale of filters.

- Improvement of living standard of the group. The operation is making filters for the center and for the community. The BioSand filter is in high demand, and people buy them from the center.

- In a long run the center is projecting to be trained on the making of rainwater catchment system to have readily available source of water.

Up to date the group made and installed 139 filters. The center management has purchased 31 filters for all the workers at the center to be installed  in their households.  The center is proceeding to make filters for the surrounding community. The group has also recently received an order of 7 filters from the neighboring village of Bugarika.

The Village of Hope has a goal of making 200 filters by the end of the year, which will serve about 1,400 people.

​UPDATE:  They have already surpassed their goal, and continue to expand this very successful operation.  Who can say how many people will drink water free of microbes due to this project in the long run...

This project has been paid for through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

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Secondary School Water Tank Project - Tanzania

Secondary School Water Tank Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Secondary School Water Tank Project - TanzaniaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx Secondary School, Same District, Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania

Community Description
Xxxxxx Secondary School is located on a winding road that snakes through a number of mountains that sit to the north of Same Town. The area surrounding the school itself is sparsely populated. The school is located approximately halfway up a small mountain and at its elevation the climate is quite arid, though some of the surrounding mountains are capped by dense forests.

The school's population of 545 students consists of those who come from both the villages nestled in the nearby mountains as well as from villages which sit along the highway that passes along the border of the mountain range. Given that it is the only secondary school available in the ward, students will often walk up to 12 kilometers to school every day. This means that a typical day for a student will start well before sunrise, as they prepare for school, do their morning chores and walk.

The school itself has very basic facilities, though the school community, especially the headmaster and some dedicated teachers and board members, have been working diligently to improve it. The students in the school face many challenges in their daily lives. Predominantly they come from very poor backgrounds. Their families mostly engage in small-scale farming and herding activities. They often struggle to contribute money for their children to eat at school, meaning that many go throughout the school day with no food. Outside of school, students are often expected to help significantly with household chores.

Despite these challenges, the children are often eager to learn and are happy. They especially enjoy games of soccer and net ball along with socializing after school has ended. Their academic performance is generally very low, with very few students (less than 10%) passing on to advanced level studies every year. The school has been improving year after year in this regard, however.

Problem Addressed
The biggest and most basic problem facing the school is the availability of water, especially during the dry season. The school currently relies very heavily on the system of public water taps which run along the road through the nearby village to supply its drinking water, cooking water, water for cleaning and for the toilets.

As it stands, students are expected to carry all of the water for the school in buckets from these taps. The typical requirement is that each student brings 5 liters of water to school every day. However, because the taps are located at some distance from the school and they flow sporadically, the water that is brought is often insufficient. In this case students will be taken from class and sent to fetch water. This means that depending on the day the students may need to walk up to 3 km to find a flowing tap. This problem becomes dramatically exaggerated during the dry season because the taps flow even less regularly and with less volume.

As recently as two years ago the school actually needed to pay to have water brought to it by car from Same Town located 12 km away. This issue presents a huge burden on the school in its mission to educate students.

Project Description
This project is to build a water storage tank at the school with a capacity of 80,000 L, along with an associated set of water harvesting gutters on the school grounds.

The tank will sit between two class buildings, both of which will be equipped with gutters. The tank will also be connected with the local water system so that when water is flowing it can be stored directly in the tank.

The school has found a contractor who was born and raised in Vumari Village and specializes in water tank construction. The tank will be constructed of cement, reinforced with steel bars. He has a team of skilled workers who he will bring to help him complete the project. Because the contractor is also a community member, he has offered considerable discount on his labor for the project.

Secondary School Water Tank Project - TanzaniaThe school has also committed to collecting some of the required building materials, including the gravel, water, and sand. The school has also committed to contribute money necessary to reach a 25% contribution.

Water Charity funds will be used to buy the building materials and transport them to the school, and to pay the contractor and his team.

The steps to be taken will be clearing the construction site at the school, collecting the building materials, and finally the construction of the tank. The contractor has estimated that, after collection of the materials, he can complete the construction within a month.

Project Impact
575 students and staff will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
V. Franz

Monitoring and Maintenance
Three members of the project committee, two teachers and the headmaster, will be responsible for the monitoring and maintenance of the project in a very hands-on way. Along with supervising and assisting in the collection of the necessary building materials, they will be educated by the contractor about the construction of the tank and any potential problems that can arise as the tank ages.

The school will then be able to use its funds to make any small repairs that might be needed in the future. Furthermore, the teachers will be responsible for closely monitoring the amount of water in the tank and ensuring that its usage can be maintained throughout the dry season without calling on students to leave class to collect water.

Let Girls Learn
Since girls bear a major burden in collecting water, and are inordinately affected by the lack of clean and safe sanitary facilities, and this project will impact on those issues, we are designating this as a Let Girls Learn + project.

Project Funding
$4,990

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,990

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Simanjiro Maasai Training Initiative - Tanzania

Boy filling container in Simanjiro

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Girl Filling Water - SimanjiroLocation:
Simanjiro district, Manyara region, north-central Tanzania

Problem Addressed:
Simanjiro is a semi-arid district of some 185,000 people south of Mount Kilimanjaro and the Arusha region. Most of its inhabitants – 85% Masasi, plus some Bantu groups – are pastoralists. There are constant water shortages, and it is not uncommon for women to get up in the middle of the night and walk for as long as nine hours to fetch water from ponds or shallow wells, where the water is shared with cattle. The water is unclean, with constant outbreaks of waterborne illnesses, particularly typhoid, bacterial dysentery, and, before the rainy season, cholera.

Project Description:
Community Life Amelioration Organization (CLAO – Mwanza, Tanzania), with the enthusiastic support of local government authorities, plans to train six groups of 10 people, mostly Maasai, from six different wards in Simanjiro. Three groups will be mixed (male/female) and three groups all-women, with the Girl Pouring Water - Simanjiro, Tanzaniaidea of comparing their effectiveness in fabricating and distributing BioSand filters. 

The six groups with ten beneficiaries from each of six wards will be trained and provided with starting materials. Participants will be trained on fabrication, installation, distribution and maintenance of BioSand water filters. Also, education on water, hygiene and sanitation will be provided, as well as basic skills on keeping records, financial management, and basic business planning.

Project Impact:
This project will be beneficial to 60 community members from 6 wards (each ward, 10 participants) of Simanjiro District; 30 of them will be women who will form 3 groups among 6 groups.  The actual number of beneficiaries will grow exponentially as the filters, clean water and knowledge of how to build them are spread.  It is possible the reach of this project could extend to 10's of thousands of people eventually.

Among the expected results, in addition to reducing waterborne illnesses, is increasing school attendance (many children miss school because of waterborne illnesses), and the community’s capacity to engage in other economic activities. Once better health is achieved, CLAO hopes to move forward by training groups to build rainwater catchment/ferro-cement tank systems, reducing ‘the long walk to water’. This will become increasingly viable once local authorities have experienced a successful partnership to improve the lives and health of their constituents.

There will be an increase in knowledge regarding hygiene and sanitation, as well as the importance of clean drinking water. Enhanced job creation and self-employment will reduce burden on family members and government in general through improved living standard. Waterhole - SimanjiroEnough income will be generated to start other small projects. Disease burden will be reduced. The district will experience economic growth.

Person Directing: 
Robert Kennedy Mahili and Obed Gidion, leaders of CLAO, will direct the training. They both have extensive experience in the field. They will be joined by Friendly Water for the World’s treasurer Ginny Stern, who is currently in Tanzania with the Tanzanian Teaching Fund.

Monitoring:
In collaboration with local authorities, group leaders, and the CLAO team, a communications plan will be established to ensure flow of information among groups trained and trainers for technical support, challenges, and progress of the project. Each group will have a trained monitor. CLAO representatives will meet with each group after 90 days, to evaluate progress, and make necessary modifications to the business plans.


Budget Details:

No

Item description

Quantity

Unit price $

Total price $

Funder

1

Steel molds

12

550$

6600$

 WC

2

Set of toolkit

6

450$

2700$

 WC

3

Mold Transport

1

250$

$250

 WC

4

Set of Starter material

6

250$

1500$

 WC

5

Certificates 

60

3$

180$

 WC

6

Printing manual

60

4$

240$

 WC

7

 Trainers honorarium

4

300$

1200$

Participants contributions

8

Trainer Transport

1

300$

300$

 WC

9

Trainees transport fees

60

@5$×60×5 day

1500$

Local authority

10

Trainer accomm, food, communication

4

@30$×4×6 days

720$

 WC

11

Participants lunch and tea

60

@6$×60×5days

1800$

Local authority

12

Venue

1

50$×5 days

250$

Local authority

13

Training materials (flip sheet, pens, note books)

FF

350$

350$

 WC

14

Monitoring and evaluation

FF

400$

400$

 WC

Simanjiro, Tanzania

Expected Results

Short-term

-          This will increase the knowledge of the trained members and the community in general on hygiene and sanitation

-           Knowledge on treatment of water before drinking will help to reduce water related diseases

-          Education on Consequences from using unsafe water and benefits from using clean water will lead to health improvement

-          Knowledge on job creation and self employment to participants will reduce burden to the family members and government in general hence improve living standard

Long-term

-          Start of small projects in order to increase their incomes.

-          Reduction of unemployed people in Simanjiro district and Tanzania in general.

-          Reduction of diseases from unsafe water by distribution Bio Sand water filters.

-          Contribution to community’s economy and the whole country in general.

-          Increased number of people with access to clean water.

-          Economic growth of the District since people will be healthy.

Sustainability 

From the profits of this project, trained groups will invest in other different businesses and they will keep providing clean water to community via BioSand water filters distribution. On the contrary, the idea will be sold to other NGOs working in and out of Simanjiro district to adopt and distribute the idea to those who have no access with water.

UPDATE: Simanjiro, Tanzania Filter Training
 


Footage of dancing and jubilation concluding our training.  Full conclusion report to be posted soon!

 

Project Funding: 
This project has been funded through the generosity of a donor who chooses to remain anonymous.

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Secondary School Bathroom and Water Project - Tanzania

Secondary School Bathroom and Water Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Girls ToiletXxxxxxxxx Secondary School, Lushoto, Tanga, Tanzania

Community Description
Xxxxxxxxx Secondary School was one of the first government schools in the Lushoto district, established in 1988 in the village of Dochi/Vuri, Tanzania. The school began with just over 600 students and currently there are more than 1,000 students.

The school has Forms I through Form IV, which are equivalent to high school in the United States. Student ages range from 12 to 19 years. Form I through Form IV are day students who arrive at 7:00 am and return home at 3:30 pm. The curriculum is very similar to the high school curriculum in the United States. The average time for a student walking to school is 35 minutes. However, some students walk an hour to school.

In addition to the Forms I through IV, there are Forms V and VI, which consists of male residential students. The ages range from 19 to 22 and they take advanced studies in Kiswahili, history, geography, and English to prepare for continued studies at the university.

The main source of income for the community is through small businesses and agriculture; many small farms are terraced along the mountain sides. The people in the area are friendly and always willing to help. "Karibu," meaning "welcome," is the common greeting and is regularly heard.

Problem Addressed
Due to age and condition of the current facilities, and the ever-increasing class sizes the toilets no longer adequately serve students. The lack of a water supply and physical deterioration of the facilities are major concerns. The nearest source of water is 1/4 mile from the toilet. A large incoming class of 247 Form I students, and the projected trend of large incoming class sizes has placed additional strain on the current facility.

Computer LabSome of the issues that students mention during discussions are: urinary tract infections, odor, privacy, safety and lack of hand washing stations. In one small discussion group of 4 Form III girls, 16 to 17 years old, all had at least urinary tract infection in the past and one had three occurrences of a such a problem. Health, sanitation and privacy for the girls are a major concerns.

Project Description
New toilet facilities will be constructed on the school grounds, near the classrooms. A tank, piping, and hand wahing facilities wil be added.

The project is divided into 3 phases:

Phase 1: Demolition of the boys toilet and delivery of materials (7 days)

Phase 2: Building construction, plumbing and installation of 1.000 liter water tank and plumbing (14 days)

Phase 3: Finish interior, install hand washing stations, demolition of the girls toilet (12 days)

The water tank will be placed on a raised platform. The water tank will be filled using gravity since the source of the water is higher in the mountains. During construction, the boys will have access to the toilet used by male residential students and the girls will continue to use the current lavatory. Upon completion of the project, the girl's lavatory will be removed.Boys Toilets

During the construction, skilled labor will be used for brickwork, tiling, plumbing, and cement work. The bricks will be made on school grounds using community labor and carried to the construction site by community members. Lumber for roofing and door framing will be done by the school carpenter and the community will contribute to the construction of the of the doors for the toilet and stalls.

Water Charity funds will be used for the roofing material, skilled labor, the water tank, foundation stone, sand, cement, plumbing, paint, hand washing stations and transportation of material from the demolition of the old facility.

The completed toilet will have 20 stalls, each with doors, 10 for each gender, an entry door to toilet and 5 hand washing stations for each gender. A water tap will be in both facilities that will be used to fill buckets for flushing the toilets and cleaning the facility.

Mr. Wetundwa, Shambalai Secondary School Head Master, will be at the site on a daily basis overseeing the project. He will report to the Project Committee composed of school board members, the school headmaster and the PCV, regarding the progress of the construction.

Project ImpactComputer Lab
1,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
J. Krakowiak

Monitoring and Maintenance
The new toilet will be monitored daily by school staff and irregularities will be reported to the Head Master. Normal maintenance will be performed by school staff. Funding that is provided to each government school by the government of Tanzania will be used for maintenance beyond normal cleaning of the new facility.

Fundraising Target
$3,600

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in Tanzania.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT IN TANZANIA BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,600

 

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Mhezi Village and School Water Project - Tanzania

Mhezi Village and School Water Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Mhezi, Same District, Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania

Community Description
Mhezi Village is in the Same District of the Kilimanjaro Region. The village has a population around 2,000 people and borders four other villages with about the same population.

Mhezi is a farmland community in the forested part of the Pare Mountains. The major crops that are grown include sugarcane, corn, beans, cabbage, tomatoes, bell peppers, and avocados. All of the produce is sold to the local market and to the district market, which is 4 hours away by public transportation. Mhezi has two rainy seasons, which the farmers depend on for watering their crops.

As for the school system in Mhezi, there is one primary school (Kweresha) and one secondary school (Chanjagaa). Both the primary (built in 1976) and secondary school (built in 1998) were built with no handwashing stations. Each school has about 300 students attending and 10 teachers.

Problem Addressed
The Kweresha Primary School and Chanjagaa Secondary School both have water and sanitation problems. The village built irrigation and spring systems which allowed access to water closer to the schools. However, this system often turns off at inconvenient times because they rotate the irrigation flow to other parts of the village.

In addition, students have to leave in the middle of school to get water for the kitchen staff or to water the plants around the school. The other spring is a half hour walking distance round trip. Students get just enough water for the task at hand, and not enough for handwashing for 300 students.

This situation brings two problems: (1) Leaving during class results in less time for students to study, and (2) minimal access to water results in sanitation problems and students becoming sick more frequently. This results in absence from school.

Project Description
This project is to build a rainwater catchment system, a storage tank, and a handwashing station at each of 2 schools.

At each school, a 4,500-liter tank will be built near the kitchen using a ferro-cement design. A wire mesh frame will be constructed in the shape of the tank, then waterproofing cement will surround both the inside and outside of the frame.

At each school, the handwashing station will be near the Tank, and use gravity to provide water from the tank to the two spigots. In addition, there will be a third spigot that is close to the bottom of the tank to easily fill buckets for the kitchen staff to use to wash dishes or boil water for cooking. The tank can be filled by either rain water or the nearest well to the school.

This type of tank has been constructed in another village, and so there are experienced construction worker to come out with two other staff members to build the tanks and handwashing stations.

The funds from Water Charity will provide the supplies and the payment to the construction worker. The village will provide food and housing to the construction workers, along with some of the supplies like sand and wood. The WEO, teachers, students and Peace Corps Volunteer will provide any assistance to the construction worker as needed.

Project Impact
630 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Meredith Emery

Monitoring and Maintenance
The kitchen staff will monitor the tank every day. At least once a year, around the end of dry season before the rainy season, a member of the village or school will clean inside the tank. This will help keep the water clean. At this time the person will also inspect the spigots and the tank for leaks, and fix any leaks that they come across.

This project has been funded through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

 

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Iramba District School Water Project - Tanzania

Iramba District School Water Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Iramba District School Water Project - TanzaniaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxxxx, Iramba District, Singida, Tanzania

Community Description
Most members of the community are subsistence farmers.

Xxxxxxxxxx Secondary School is in the Iramba District of the Singida Region.

Xxxxxxxxxx is also home to 4 schools – 2 secondary schools, 1 primary school, and a primary school teacher’s college. Xxxxxxxxxx Secondary School serves all secondary students in the Xxxxxxxxxx ward.

Problem Addressed
There is no source of water on campus. The school currently gets water from the community pump which is a 20-minute walk from the school. These trips to retrieve water take time away from other school activities, especially class time. Fetching water is often a disciplinary action, which causes students to miss more than a period of instruction.

Iramba District School Water Project - TanzaniaProject Description
This project is to build a rainwater catchment system at the school.

Rainwater collection gutters will be installed on 3 buildings. A concrete base will be built near each building, upon which a plastic tank will be placed. Piping will connect the gutters to the tanks, resulting in a total capacity to store 18,000 liters of water.

The project committee consist of Gunda Gunda, the head of school, the chair of the school board, the Peace Corps Volunteer, Liberia Kawishe, the second master Mr. Ngagilo, and the academic master Everst Mponzi.

The community will contribute 25% of the total project cost, in cash from parents and the community and in labor.

Project Impact
575 people will benefit from the project.

Iramba District School Water Project - TanzaniaPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
J. Juran

Monitoring and Maintenance
The school maintenance committee will be responsible for the proper use, maintenance, and repairs of gutters and tanks after installation, and will cover all costs.

This project is sustainable because gutters and tanks require low maintenance, and no additional training is necessary for the school to take on these responsibilities.

Comments
This is an excellent, cost-effective project, which will provide water on campus, and significantly reduce loss of instruction time due to fetching water.

Fundraising Target
$2,350

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$260

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,090

 

Iramba District School Water Project - TanzaniaIramba District School Water Project - Tanzania

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Mbeya Clinic and School Water Project - Tanzania

Mbeya Clinic and School Water Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Mbeya Clinic and School Water Project - TanzaniaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxx, Mbeya district, Mbeya, Tanzania

Community Description
The community of Xxxxxxxx is located in the region of Mbeya. The population is 1,500 people, 740 females and 760 males. A high percentage of this population is composed of children; HIV and other illnesses have had devastating effects, leaving 200 orphans to be cared for by other family. A staggering 25% of the population is under 18.

The Xxxxxxxx clinic is responsible for the care of the 1,500 community members as well as surrounding communities. In total, the Xxxxxxxx clinic serves over 4,000 people, and the school’s 250 students.

The community members, despite their issues, are always kind and welcoming to all people, and it is a very peaceful environment. There is little to no crime in the community. The community consists of hard workers: farmers and pastoralist who sell their goods in a nearby town. They always love to talk to people about where they are from, teach them tribal greetings, and overall just sit down and have a good laugh.

Problem Addressed
Xxxxxxxx is a poor community where easy access to clean water is a serious problem. It is also a particular issue for the health clinic and school as the closest water source, a river, is about a 5-km walk. This hurts the already vulnerable young and sick community members.

During dry Season, these already small rivers become more scarce and farther away. Many villagers having to walk an hour or more to the river in the village over. The path conditions to the water are also dangerous and dirty, often on a road with speeding buses, cars and motorcycles that cover the people they pass in dirt or mud. This dirt has been getting into the lounges of the children causing high respiratory infections in the village.

Besides the issue of distance, this water is highly contaminated as it has run through the mountains, farm land with manure and pesticides, as well as living quarters, adding human contamination.

Community members suffer from various illnesses, caused or worsened by the lack of sanitary water, making it a struggle to recover and stay healthy. For example, one community member recently died due to dehydration while working his field. Approximately 100 children a year are treated for dehydration due to diarrhea; half of those are school-age children who miss school, hurting their education and health. Cases of typhoid and cholera have also been reported in the village due to unsanitary conditions of the water.Mbeya Clinic and School Water Project - Tanzania

Due to scarcity of water, washing hands is rarely practiced, leading to increased illness in the village. The village health clinic and school also do not have access to clean drinking water or cleaning water.

Young students are often tasked with the chore of fetching water, distracting them from school work and hurting their ability to succeed. The only investment in a water system has been private, for use as farmland irrigation.

Project Description
This project is to build a piping system to provide safe water for the clinic, the school, and the community at large.

Uncontaminated water will be piped from a spring at the top of the mountain (750 meters above the community) to the health clinic, school, and community office. The PVC piping will be 2 ½ inches in diameter, and will run 2,011 meters down rugged terrain of the mountainside. The piping will be buried in some tougher areas by the community members, but in most areas it will be weighed down using buried cement blocks created by a local carpenter.

It will take an estimated two weeks to complete all the installation of the pipes. Some committee members will be present while the work is being done in order to ensure quality and to answer any questions by the contractor. The project committee will be responsible for purchasing of the pipes, stands, faucets, cement, and connectors, and delivery to the contractor.

Once the installation is complete, the project committee will hold a community meeting with the nurse to teach people about sanitation of the water, and good hygiene practices now that water is more accessible.

Water Charity funding will be used for materials and skilled labor. The community will pay for transport of materials, local materials, and unskilled labor.

The work will be coordinated by the project committee, which includes town leader Paulo JoJo, Peirs Masalamwez, Anastazia Daniel, Yassin Ibilahim, Teacher Issa Hassan, Jerimiah Francis, Suzani Shanbo, Jane Julius, Lidia Edson and the PCV.

Mbeya Clinic and School Water Project - TanzaniaProject Impact
4,000 people will benefit from the project

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
E. Anthony

Monitoring and Maintenance
The contractor lives in the village, and will inspect the installation monthly. If anything unexpected happens, he will be able to help without having to wait for an outside contractor. This contractor has past experience with installing piping systems from the top of the mountain, and knows how to fix issues with the PCV piping, such as holes, connection problems, or animal interference.

The clinic’s records from the previous years will be used to measure changes in water-related health issues; these records show age, gender, issue, and time of visit. School records will be used to compare student absences and performance in previous years with those after the completion of the project.

Comments
This project will decrease the incidence of illness due to lack of clean water. This will decrease the amount time missed from school due to diarrhea, improve daily hydration, and decrease the amount time missed from school due to fetching water.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor. Please donate to our East Africa Water & Sanitation Program

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Shule ya Tanga Borehole and Water System Project - Tanzania

Shule ya Tanga Borehole and Water System Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Shule ya Tanga Borehole and Water System Project - TanzaniaLocation
Shule ya Tanga, Songea district, Ruvuma Region, Tanzania

Community Description
Shule ya Tanga is located in Songea district, Ruvuma region on the Njombe road (B4 road). Its entirety is composed of a little more than 9,000 people and has multiple sub-villages to give a total of 15,000 people in the ward. Shule ya Tanga is comprised of a primary and secondary school along with a clinic that has one primary doctor, and four nurses.

Problem Addressed
The 9,000+ inhabitants of Shule ya Tanga consistently struggle with acquiring enough water for daily household use. There are only a few wells in the village, along with a small river, that often lack water.

During the months of June to December, families endure great strain of trying to obtain clean water. During these months, Shule ya Tanga experiences an extreme heat wave that causes all wells to dry up completely, except for possibly one or two wells still containing water. Even then, the water is brown, dirty and unusable. The small river that is located by the secondary school also begins to slowly evaporate, and can no longer support both schools and the village.

Due to the lack of access to clean water, women will begin washing their clothes in the river, and children will try to escape the heat by playing and swimming in it, causing the small remainder of the river water to dirty, and become unusable.

The existing water structures do not supply enough water for each individual to get at least one 20 L bucket a day. Women and children have to walk close to a mile or more to fetch water from the existing well or climb a very steep hill to get water from the river.

The Water Committee, with previous community funding, has tried digging more wells throughout the village, with the idea that there will be more access to water, but unfortunately, these wells have also been susceptible to the hot sun, and dry up during the dry months of June-December. They have tried doing a water catchment system, but since it only rains for 4-5 months a year, the water does not last for the rest of the year.

Shule ya Tanga Borehole and Water System Project - TanzaniaProject Description
This project is to dig a borehole at the spring, add a 10,000L storage tank, and install a piping system, supported by a solar pump, to provide water for the village.

The Spring Water Development Project Committee has recruited community members to assist in digging trenches throughout the north part of the village. With hired engineers, an intricate piping system will be installed and powered by a solar generator. This will bring water to 10 separate stations placed throughout the north side of the village.

Due to much of the construction being done by hand, the project will take three months to complete. The community will contribute 29% of the project amount.

2,000 TZS will be collected from every person over the age of 18, and about 35 men have been chosen to help dig trenches, and lay pipes in the ground. This project will reach the north side of Shule ya Tanga, which consists of a population number of 4,500 people, and contains both the primary and secondary schools as well as the health clinic.

Once the project successfully brings the north side of Shule ya Tanga 10,000 L of water per day, a future project will be undertaken to bring water to the south side of the village.

Through talking to a variety of engineers, the Water Committee and the community leaders have compared and conducted price checks to receive the best possible prices for all the necessary materials. This village is very motivated and would like to see this project finished.

The Water Committee along with hired workers has started cleaning the spring (clearing away large grasses, shortening tree branches, and adding a fence around the location of the spring), and has set a schedule for once a month, to continue maintenance of the spring.

Kristen Hansen - TanzaniaA bore hole will be drilled no more than five feet away from the spring and a 10,000 L storage tank will be added. The spring water will be redirected through the bore hole to continuously fill the storage tank and to ensure the quantity of water being passed.

Trenches will be excavated with a depth of 100 cm and 60 cm wide and pipes will be carefully laid and fitted throughout these trenches for about 2.5 miles.

A solar-powered generator will be installed near the water storage tank to help the consistency and pressure of the water while it is passed through the pipes.

Engineers will install one tap every hundred yards, for about 2.5 miles, including both school grounds and the health clinic, making a total of 10 taps.

The water from the spring will be made safe for drinking with the help of chlorinated tables called Water Guard. Water Guard will be added every few months/year, to maintain the purity.

Project Impact
4,500 people will benefit from safe water as a result of the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Kristen Hansen

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Water Committee has set an effective timeline for the project, to keep the project on track. The village has formed a sub-committee that is designated for this project alone, and each member has a designated role, that he or she will be responsible for. This includes a project leader (Mr. Patrick Mkanula), a secretary (Mr. James Lipala), an accountant/bookkeeper (Ms. Gelewada Mbawala), an elder adviser (Mr. Benedicto Liloka), and multiple people who are in charge of collecting the community contribution, as well as advising the project leader (Ms. Isabela Tindwa, Mr. Emanuel Milinga, Mr. Inocent Kapinga, and Mr. Jafethi Jumapili).

This committee will remain intact until this project is finished, and will continue the maintenance, as well as fix any problems that may occur in the future. They have agreed to meet the last Wednesday of every month to talk about the project’s effectiveness, continuance and any problems that are being faced.

The committee will also hold “town meetings” every 6 months to inform community members of the continuation of the water project and to hear any problems the community members are having with the new water system. By establishing this project, the Water Committee, and the new sub-Water Committee have learned the proper ways of budgeting and implementing a sustainable project. They have acquired the knowledge that is needed to successfully run a water project and to continue to expand in the future.

The engineers, who have developed the project, will advise and work closely with local engineers and hired workers of the village to excavate trenches, and will help/teach them how to fix any problems, should they occur. The workers and local engineers, along with the Water Committee, will continue to evaluate and monitor the project, after it is finished.

Comments
The increased accessibility to water will give 4,500 villagers more free time to develop private economic endeavors, to study, and/or to improve agricultural production. Access to better quality water, will lower the cases of diarrhea, and other waterborne illnesses.

Let Girls Learn Plus
This is a project that we have categorized as Let Girls Learn Plus.  While not a formal part of the Peace Corps Let Girls Learn program, it has the same goals, objectives, and methodologies, so we have included it under our Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide. Due to the fact that it takes many hours to fetch water, women and children do not have the time to finish homework, study, or start economic activities. This project will allow women and children to have more time doing beneficial activities and to work more on their school work.

With the improved access to clean water, children will have the much-needed time that is required to finish school work and to study. Women will have the opportunity to start economic projects and have more time on their farms creating larger agricultural output.

Fundraising Target
$5,300

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$5,300

Dollar Amount Needed

$0 - This project has been funded through the generosity of the G3 Foundation, of Costa Mesa, CA, USA with help from an anonymous donor.

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Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - Tanzania

Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - TanzaniaLocation
Likarangilo Village, Songea DC, Ruvuma Region, Tanzania

Community Description
Likarangilo is located in the southwest region of Ruvuma in Tanzania. It is situated on a main road, just 45 minutes from the regional capital of Songea. There are a total of 2,984 villagers who live throughout Likarangilo, and identify with various tribes throughout Tanzania. Overall, it is a very diverse village with many religions, customs, and even a variety of food and weather patterns.

Likarangilo experiences four seasons throughout the year; heavy rains from January to March, light rains from April to May, winter from June until September, and hot dry weather from October until December. With each season brings different crops, foods, and living conditions.

For example, during the heavy rainy season Likarangilo has many mangoes and many people find it difficult to do work due to the rain. During the light rainy season there are many pumpkins and potatoes, and people are starting to harvest foods from their gardens and farms. With the hot summer, there is a lot of sugar cane, a lack of water, and people spend much of their time fetching water at nearby rivers and small lakes.

Overall, the diversity in people, seasons, food and resources make Likarangilo an exciting and wonderful place to live.

Problem Addressed
Likarangilo faces many issues throughout the year surrounding health, sanitation, and food security. During the short rainy season, water is more abundant as villagers can catch rainwater at their homes, but food becomes scarcer, people wait for the upcoming harvesting season, and heavy flooding hinders productivity and work. The burden of gastrointestinal diseases and skin infection also increases during this short rainy season.

During the long dry season, many of the on-site wells and water pumps are depleted and villagers are left to fetch water at rivers and lakes located outside of village, which are heavily polluted and not a safe source for potable water, leading to an increased risk for waterborne diseases and gastrointestinal illnesses.

Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - TanzaniaAs the village is situated on the busy highway, women and children who live in the sub-villages without functioning water pumps are required to cross this busy highway throughout the day and into the night, placing them at a high risk for accidents. Small children and their mothers often wait for traffic to pass while carrying large buckets of water back to their homes.

Project Description
This project is to rehabilitate four water pumps located throughout the village.

These four pumps have different issues and vary in detail, and will be fixed by mechanics employed by Handei Tanzania, a company located in Songea town. They will be taking private transportation to the village with all equipment and parts that will be needed to repair all of the water pumps.

The village will provide 25% of the budget in the form of Tanzanian Shilling (TSH) currency through community contribution, and the water committee will collect this contribution from house-to-house visits. Each household is expected to provide 1,000 TSH.

The following work will be done on the four water pumps:

  • Pump # 1: A deep cleaning will be done to remove dirt and increase the depth by two meters, from 27 to 29 meters. Then, 10 tubes, through which water is pumped up from the water table will be replaced.
  • Pump #2: The well will be cleaned completely since there is sludge blocking the water path. The depth will be increased by five meters, from 27 to 32 meters.
  • Pump #3: The existing water pump handle will be repaired by soldering the pieces of metal that have been damaged and replacing a rubber band which helps to make the pump functional. This well will also be cleaned to remove sludge blocking the path of water flow.
  • Pump #4: The well will be cleaned to remove sludge and the depth increased by two meters, from 27 to 29 meters. Nine tubes through which water is pumped up from the water table will be replaced.

Once these water pumps are renovated, the water committee and the PCV will hold educational meetings and trainings with the community. They will teach how to responsibly use and maintain the water pumps, and determine a plan for how to maintain and repair the pumps in the future.

The villagers will make a monthly contribution of 500 shillings after the completion of the project to help with maintenance when issues arise in the future.

Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - TanzaniaProject Impact
2,400 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Alyssa Sajady

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Likarangilo Water Committee will be in charge of monitoring and maintenance.

Comments
While this project has not been undertaken as an official Peace Corps Let Girls Learn project, it accomplishes the same objective of creating conditions that will enable girls to go to and remain in school.

In the village, it is typically the job of women and children to fetch water for the household. They wake up early in the morning and stay up late into the nighttime hours, and depending on the season, stand in line for up to two hours waiting for their turn to pump water. Many need to make multiple trips as they fill up to eight to ten 20-liter buckets of water per day to meet the needs of their large families.

The time spent fetching water could be much better spent for other things, such as doing domestic chores, socializing, and studying. For school-age girls, the time- savings resulting from the project will give them the opportunity to go to and remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$2,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$2,900

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

Additional donations will go toward other projects in Tanzania.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - TanzaniaLikarangilo Pump Rehab Project - Tanzania

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Mtambula Well Repair Project - Tanzania

Mtambula Well Repair Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Mtambula Village in Iringa Region, TanzaniaLocation
Mtambula Village in Iringa Region, Tanzania

Community Description
Mtambula is a farming community located in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania in the Iringa region. With roughly 4,000 community members, there are always events happening at one of the schools, community centers or shopping locations. Half of the year is in the "rainy season," from January to May. The other half is the "dry season," making it difficult to continue agriculture programs.

Living in Mtambula is different every day. There is a maternal health clinic that is short-staffed, many schools, and over half the population is school-aged youth! Mtambula is a large community with a large youth population, and will continue to grow in the coming years.

Problem Addressed
Currently, many community members are required to walk several kilometers to retrieve water, taking up time that could otherwise be spent elsewhere. The lack of available water leads to issues of sustainability, taking away precious time from income generation, learning, and food growth.

The only sources of water other than the two working wells are two rivers. During the rainy season, it is possible to retrieve water from these locations. However, the water is unsanitary.

Mtambula Village in Iringa Region, TanzaniaVillage law states that people must use a water source within one hundred meters of their home. With the amount of wells in need of repair, that is impossible for a large amount of the community.

The village of Mtambula, found in the Southern Highlands of Iringa, Tanzania, has had difficulty in fulfilling the community water needs. There are two highly trafficked wells, a few scattered private wells, and many non-functioning water sources.

The strain of access to water makes it difficult to keep students in class, for community members to provide basic food and sanitation needs at home, and for the two already busy nurses at the local maternal health clinic to keep up with the many women the clinic serves daily.

79% (3,284) of the population is under the age of eighteen, many of which are students at the primary and secondary school. Lack of water availability forces students out of class to fetch water daily. 2,194 women live in Mtambula, many of which frequent the farms and maternal health clinic.

Previously, the Water Committee of Mtambula has constructed additional wells to fight the water issue. The correct training was not used after construction, leading to more broken wells. A village of 4,167 people cannot sustain on two public wells which risk being broken from over-use if other community water sources are not repaired.

Project Description
This project is to repair twelve non-functional wells in the village of Mtambula, both reducing the strain of two working wells and to provide access to water closer to homes.

Mtambula Village in Iringa Region, TanzaniaThe work will be done by members of the Water Committee, with some responsible for purchasing the materials and others performing the repairs.

Standard pumps will be purchased and used at the existing wells. All broken piping will be replaced.

Water Charity funds will pay for the materials.

The community will contribute over 25% of the project costs in the form of local materials, labor, and cash.

Each member of the Well Committee, Water Committee and Village Committee will go door to door in their designated sub-villages, explaining the well repairs and that education will be provided at upcoming meetings that are required to use the repaired structures. To ensure people attend one of the meetings to learn about the new wells, fliers will also be handed out to all local businesses, including local shops, the clinic and the schools.

Project Impact
4,167 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Dennis Smith

Monitoring and Maintenance
Wells will be checked at June 30th, 2016. By July 15th, 2016, community members will be educated and given a test on proper well use.

Mtambula Well Repair Project - TanzaniaSmall amounts will be collected from users to ensure that future repairs can be made as needed.

Long-term, fixing the wells will give members of the community the knowledge of how to use them efficiently, know the signs of when to stop using a well, and prevent wells from breaking in the future. If a well does happen to break, members of the community will also have the knowledge to fix them.

Comments
By repairing twelve wells around the village and educating on proper use, access to water will be closer and more reliable to community members. The nurses will have access to water at the maternal health clinic, shop owners will not have to walk over one hundred meters to fetch water to cook, and homes will have access for many domestic needs.

Fundraising Target
$3,200

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$3,200

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project was fully funded through the generosity of the G3 Foundation, of Costa Mesa, CA, USA.  However, the project was cancelled due to the PCV leaving the country for medical reasons.  There was no loss of funds, and the money from G3 was re-allocated.

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