Tanzania

Conclusion of Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - Tanzania

Conclusion of Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - Tanzania

This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Alyssa Sajady. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to rehabilitate four water pumps located throughout the village.

A summary of Alyssa’s report is as follows:

Conclusion of Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - TanzaniaThe scope of the Likarangilo Water Pump Rehabilitation Project was to repair four out of the total six water pumps throughout the community that were no longer functioning properly. This had long been a priority project for the community, but they were lacking the direction and financial support up until the involvement of Peace Corps and Water Charity.

The village government, the water committee of Likarangilo, and the Peace Corps Volunteer worked together with water engineers from Handei Tanzania to identify the various repairs that each of the four water pumps needed, and the total cost to repair the four water pumps amounted to 7,648,000 Tanzanian Shillings (TZS).

Over the next 8 months of mobilization and planning, the community successfully raised their contribution of two million TZS, while Water Charity generously provided the remaining funds. Once the project was fully funded, arrangements were made for Handei Tanzania to repair the water pumps over a span of two days. The water committee members, the counterparts of the volunteer, dedicated community members, and the PCV herself supervised and assisted with the repairs, which consisted of the following:

Pump # 1: A deep cleaning was done to remove dirt and increase the depth by two meters, from 27 to 29 meters. Ten tubes, through which water is pumped up from the water table, were replaced.

Pump #2: The well was cleaned, completely removing all sludge blocking the water path. The depth was increased by five meters (from 27 to 32 meters), and three tubes were replaced.

Conclusion of Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - TanzaniaPump #3: The existing water pump handle was repaired by soldering the pieces of metal that were damaged and replaced rubber band parts within the pump. This well was also cleaned to completely remove sludge blocking the path of water flow.

Pump #4: The well was cleaned to remove sludge and the depth increased by two meters (from 27 to 29 meters), and six tubes were replaced.

After two days of repairs, all water pumps that were worked on successfully yielded clean and potable water. A meeting was held shortly after with the water committee and village government to discuss how the project went, sustainability of the project by collecting contributions of 2,000 TZS from each household monthly, as well as a lesson plans for conserving water and how to properly care for the water pumps. These short lessons will be presented to each sub-village over the upcoming months.

We are grateful to Alyssa for completing this important project.

Conclusion of Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - Tanzania

 
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Shule ya Tanga Borehole and Water System Project - Tanzania

Shule ya Tanga Borehole and Water System Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Shule ya Tanga Borehole and Water System Project - TanzaniaLocation
Shule ya Tanga, Songea district, Ruvuma Region, Tanzania

Community Description
Shule ya Tanga is located in Songea district, Ruvuma region on the Njombe road (B4 road). Its entirety is composed of a little more than 9,000 people and has multiple sub-villages to give a total of 15,000 people in the ward. Shule ya Tanga is comprised of a primary and secondary school along with a clinic that has one primary doctor, and four nurses.

Problem Addressed
The 9,000+ inhabitants of Shule ya Tanga consistently struggle with acquiring enough water for daily household use. There are only a few wells in the village, along with a small river, that often lack water.

During the months of June to December, families endure great strain of trying to obtain clean water. During these months, Shule ya Tanga experiences an extreme heat wave that causes all wells to dry up completely, except for possibly one or two wells still containing water. Even then, the water is brown, dirty and unusable. The small river that is located by the secondary school also begins to slowly evaporate, and can no longer support both schools and the village.

Due to the lack of access to clean water, women will begin washing their clothes in the river, and children will try to escape the heat by playing and swimming in it, causing the small remainder of the river water to dirty, and become unusable.

The existing water structures do not supply enough water for each individual to get at least one 20 L bucket a day. Women and children have to walk close to a mile or more to fetch water from the existing well or climb a very steep hill to get water from the river.

The Water Committee, with previous community funding, has tried digging more wells throughout the village, with the idea that there will be more access to water, but unfortunately, these wells have also been susceptible to the hot sun, and dry up during the dry months of June-December. They have tried doing a water catchment system, but since it only rains for 4-5 months a year, the water does not last for the rest of the year.

Shule ya Tanga Borehole and Water System Project - TanzaniaProject Description
This project is to dig a borehole at the spring, add a 10,000L storage tank, and install a piping system, supported by a solar pump, to provide water for the village.

The Spring Water Development Project Committee has recruited community members to assist in digging trenches throughout the north part of the village. With hired engineers, an intricate piping system will be installed and powered by a solar generator. This will bring water to 10 separate stations placed throughout the north side of the village.

Due to much of the construction being done by hand, the project will take three months to complete. The community will contribute 29% of the project amount.

2,000 TZS will be collected from every person over the age of 18, and about 35 men have been chosen to help dig trenches, and lay pipes in the ground. This project will reach the north side of Shule ya Tanga, which consists of a population number of 4,500 people, and contains both the primary and secondary schools as well as the health clinic.

Once the project successfully brings the north side of Shule ya Tanga 10,000 L of water per day, a future project will be undertaken to bring water to the south side of the village.

Through talking to a variety of engineers, the Water Committee and the community leaders have compared and conducted price checks to receive the best possible prices for all the necessary materials. This village is very motivated and would like to see this project finished.

The Water Committee along with hired workers has started cleaning the spring (clearing away large grasses, shortening tree branches, and adding a fence around the location of the spring), and has set a schedule for once a month, to continue maintenance of the spring.

Kristen Hansen - TanzaniaA bore hole will be drilled no more than five feet away from the spring and a 10,000 L storage tank will be added. The spring water will be redirected through the bore hole to continuously fill the storage tank and to ensure the quantity of water being passed.

Trenches will be excavated with a depth of 100 cm and 60 cm wide and pipes will be carefully laid and fitted throughout these trenches for about 2.5 miles.

A solar-powered generator will be installed near the water storage tank to help the consistency and pressure of the water while it is passed through the pipes.

Engineers will install one tap every hundred yards, for about 2.5 miles, including both school grounds and the health clinic, making a total of 10 taps.

The water from the spring will be made safe for drinking with the help of chlorinated tables called Water Guard. Water Guard will be added every few months/year, to maintain the purity.

Project Impact
4,500 people will benefit from safe water as a result of the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Kristen Hansen

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Water Committee has set an effective timeline for the project, to keep the project on track. The village has formed a sub-committee that is designated for this project alone, and each member has a designated role, that he or she will be responsible for. This includes a project leader (Mr. Patrick Mkanula), a secretary (Mr. James Lipala), an accountant/bookkeeper (Ms. Gelewada Mbawala), an elder adviser (Mr. Benedicto Liloka), and multiple people who are in charge of collecting the community contribution, as well as advising the project leader (Ms. Isabela Tindwa, Mr. Emanuel Milinga, Mr. Inocent Kapinga, and Mr. Jafethi Jumapili).

This committee will remain intact until this project is finished, and will continue the maintenance, as well as fix any problems that may occur in the future. They have agreed to meet the last Wednesday of every month to talk about the project’s effectiveness, continuance and any problems that are being faced.

The committee will also hold “town meetings” every 6 months to inform community members of the continuation of the water project and to hear any problems the community members are having with the new water system. By establishing this project, the Water Committee, and the new sub-Water Committee have learned the proper ways of budgeting and implementing a sustainable project. They have acquired the knowledge that is needed to successfully run a water project and to continue to expand in the future.

The engineers, who have developed the project, will advise and work closely with local engineers and hired workers of the village to excavate trenches, and will help/teach them how to fix any problems, should they occur. The workers and local engineers, along with the Water Committee, will continue to evaluate and monitor the project, after it is finished.

Comments
The increased accessibility to water will give 4,500 villagers more free time to develop private economic endeavors, to study, and/or to improve agricultural production. Access to better quality water, will lower the cases of diarrhea, and other waterborne illnesses.

Let Girls Learn Plus
This is a project that we have categorized as Let Girls Learn Plus.  While not a formal part of the Peace Corps Let Girls Learn program, it has the same goals, objectives, and methodologies, so we have included it under our Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide. Due to the fact that it takes many hours to fetch water, women and children do not have the time to finish homework, study, or start economic activities. This project will allow women and children to have more time doing beneficial activities and to work more on their school work.

With the improved access to clean water, children will have the much-needed time that is required to finish school work and to study. Women will have the opportunity to start economic projects and have more time on their farms creating larger agricultural output.

Fundraising Target
$5,300

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$5,300

Dollar Amount Needed

$0 - This project has been funded through the generosity of the G3 Foundation, of Costa Mesa, CA, USA with help from an anonymous donor.

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Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - Tanzania

Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - TanzaniaLocation
Likarangilo Village, Songea DC, Ruvuma Region, Tanzania

Community Description
Likarangilo is located in the southwest region of Ruvuma in Tanzania. It is situated on a main road, just 45 minutes from the regional capital of Songea. There are a total of 2,984 villagers who live throughout Likarangilo, and identify with various tribes throughout Tanzania. Overall, it is a very diverse village with many religions, customs, and even a variety of food and weather patterns.

Likarangilo experiences four seasons throughout the year; heavy rains from January to March, light rains from April to May, winter from June until September, and hot dry weather from October until December. With each season brings different crops, foods, and living conditions.

For example, during the heavy rainy season Likarangilo has many mangoes and many people find it difficult to do work due to the rain. During the light rainy season there are many pumpkins and potatoes, and people are starting to harvest foods from their gardens and farms. With the hot summer, there is a lot of sugar cane, a lack of water, and people spend much of their time fetching water at nearby rivers and small lakes.

Overall, the diversity in people, seasons, food and resources make Likarangilo an exciting and wonderful place to live.

Problem Addressed
Likarangilo faces many issues throughout the year surrounding health, sanitation, and food security. During the short rainy season, water is more abundant as villagers can catch rainwater at their homes, but food becomes scarcer, people wait for the upcoming harvesting season, and heavy flooding hinders productivity and work. The burden of gastrointestinal diseases and skin infection also increases during this short rainy season.

During the long dry season, many of the on-site wells and water pumps are depleted and villagers are left to fetch water at rivers and lakes located outside of village, which are heavily polluted and not a safe source for potable water, leading to an increased risk for waterborne diseases and gastrointestinal illnesses.

Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - TanzaniaAs the village is situated on the busy highway, women and children who live in the sub-villages without functioning water pumps are required to cross this busy highway throughout the day and into the night, placing them at a high risk for accidents. Small children and their mothers often wait for traffic to pass while carrying large buckets of water back to their homes.

Project Description
This project is to rehabilitate four water pumps located throughout the village.

These four pumps have different issues and vary in detail, and will be fixed by mechanics employed by Handei Tanzania, a company located in Songea town. They will be taking private transportation to the village with all equipment and parts that will be needed to repair all of the water pumps.

The village will provide 25% of the budget in the form of Tanzanian Shilling (TSH) currency through community contribution, and the water committee will collect this contribution from house-to-house visits. Each household is expected to provide 1,000 TSH.

The following work will be done on the four water pumps:

  • Pump # 1: A deep cleaning will be done to remove dirt and increase the depth by two meters, from 27 to 29 meters. Then, 10 tubes, through which water is pumped up from the water table will be replaced.
  • Pump #2: The well will be cleaned completely since there is sludge blocking the water path. The depth will be increased by five meters, from 27 to 32 meters.
  • Pump #3: The existing water pump handle will be repaired by soldering the pieces of metal that have been damaged and replacing a rubber band which helps to make the pump functional. This well will also be cleaned to remove sludge blocking the path of water flow.
  • Pump #4: The well will be cleaned to remove sludge and the depth increased by two meters, from 27 to 29 meters. Nine tubes through which water is pumped up from the water table will be replaced.

Once these water pumps are renovated, the water committee and the PCV will hold educational meetings and trainings with the community. They will teach how to responsibly use and maintain the water pumps, and determine a plan for how to maintain and repair the pumps in the future.

The villagers will make a monthly contribution of 500 shillings after the completion of the project to help with maintenance when issues arise in the future.

Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - TanzaniaProject Impact
2,400 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Alyssa Sajady

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Likarangilo Water Committee will be in charge of monitoring and maintenance.

Comments
While this project has not been undertaken as an official Peace Corps Let Girls Learn project, it accomplishes the same objective of creating conditions that will enable girls to go to and remain in school.

In the village, it is typically the job of women and children to fetch water for the household. They wake up early in the morning and stay up late into the nighttime hours, and depending on the season, stand in line for up to two hours waiting for their turn to pump water. Many need to make multiple trips as they fill up to eight to ten 20-liter buckets of water per day to meet the needs of their large families.

The time spent fetching water could be much better spent for other things, such as doing domestic chores, socializing, and studying. For school-age girls, the time- savings resulting from the project will give them the opportunity to go to and remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$2,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$2,900

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

Additional donations will go toward other projects in Tanzania.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Likarangilo Pump Rehab Project - TanzaniaLikarangilo Pump Rehab Project - Tanzania

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Mtambula Well Repair Project - Tanzania

Mtambula Well Repair Project - Tanzania

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Mtambula Village in Iringa Region, TanzaniaLocation
Mtambula Village in Iringa Region, Tanzania

Community Description
Mtambula is a farming community located in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania in the Iringa region. With roughly 4,000 community members, there are always events happening at one of the schools, community centers or shopping locations. Half of the year is in the "rainy season," from January to May. The other half is the "dry season," making it difficult to continue agriculture programs.

Living in Mtambula is different every day. There is a maternal health clinic that is short-staffed, many schools, and over half the population is school-aged youth! Mtambula is a large community with a large youth population, and will continue to grow in the coming years.

Problem Addressed
Currently, many community members are required to walk several kilometers to retrieve water, taking up time that could otherwise be spent elsewhere. The lack of available water leads to issues of sustainability, taking away precious time from income generation, learning, and food growth.

The only sources of water other than the two working wells are two rivers. During the rainy season, it is possible to retrieve water from these locations. However, the water is unsanitary.

Mtambula Village in Iringa Region, TanzaniaVillage law states that people must use a water source within one hundred meters of their home. With the amount of wells in need of repair, that is impossible for a large amount of the community.

The village of Mtambula, found in the Southern Highlands of Iringa, Tanzania, has had difficulty in fulfilling the community water needs. There are two highly trafficked wells, a few scattered private wells, and many non-functioning water sources.

The strain of access to water makes it difficult to keep students in class, for community members to provide basic food and sanitation needs at home, and for the two already busy nurses at the local maternal health clinic to keep up with the many women the clinic serves daily.

79% (3,284) of the population is under the age of eighteen, many of which are students at the primary and secondary school. Lack of water availability forces students out of class to fetch water daily. 2,194 women live in Mtambula, many of which frequent the farms and maternal health clinic.

Previously, the Water Committee of Mtambula has constructed additional wells to fight the water issue. The correct training was not used after construction, leading to more broken wells. A village of 4,167 people cannot sustain on two public wells which risk being broken from over-use if other community water sources are not repaired.

Project Description
This project is to repair twelve non-functional wells in the village of Mtambula, both reducing the strain of two working wells and to provide access to water closer to homes.

Mtambula Village in Iringa Region, TanzaniaThe work will be done by members of the Water Committee, with some responsible for purchasing the materials and others performing the repairs.

Standard pumps will be purchased and used at the existing wells. All broken piping will be replaced.

Water Charity funds will pay for the materials.

The community will contribute over 25% of the project costs in the form of local materials, labor, and cash.

Each member of the Well Committee, Water Committee and Village Committee will go door to door in their designated sub-villages, explaining the well repairs and that education will be provided at upcoming meetings that are required to use the repaired structures. To ensure people attend one of the meetings to learn about the new wells, fliers will also be handed out to all local businesses, including local shops, the clinic and the schools.

Project Impact
4,167 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Dennis Smith

Monitoring and Maintenance
Wells will be checked at June 30th, 2016. By July 15th, 2016, community members will be educated and given a test on proper well use.

Mtambula Well Repair Project - TanzaniaSmall amounts will be collected from users to ensure that future repairs can be made as needed.

Long-term, fixing the wells will give members of the community the knowledge of how to use them efficiently, know the signs of when to stop using a well, and prevent wells from breaking in the future. If a well does happen to break, members of the community will also have the knowledge to fix them.

Comments
By repairing twelve wells around the village and educating on proper use, access to water will be closer and more reliable to community members. The nurses will have access to water at the maternal health clinic, shop owners will not have to walk over one hundred meters to fetch water to cook, and homes will have access for many domestic needs.

Fundraising Target
$3,200

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,200

 

 
 
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Nkwini Rainwater Catchment Project - Tanzania

Nkwini Rainwater Catchment Project - Tanzania

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location
Students
Nkwini, Same District, Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania

Community Description
Nkwini, a tiny sub-village, sits 5 km away from the main village, Makanya, in the Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania.  It is located on the semi-arid flat lands traditionally used as land for Nomadic herders. People from the Pare tribe descended from the mountains to this area because of the rich soil and the promising farming prospects.

Unfortunately, over the years climate, change and deforestation have negatively impacted the area. The dry season has become drier and longer.  People who have depended for years on the fertile soil of Nkwini are consistently let down because of drought, and they are often unable to grow enough food to feed themselves, let alone make a profit off of their labors.

There are very few services in Nkwini: a primary school, a mill, a few small huts with basic commodities, and an incomplete clinic. Life is difficult for its people. Many have started to move, leaving in search of better opportunity. The main sources of income are day labor at the neighboring sisal plantation and the selling of crops, both paying very little. Despite its struggles, the people of Nkwini continue to work hard and are optimistic about the future of their village.

Problem Addressed
Due to deforestation and climate change, the once predictable rains have become uncertain. The average rainfall is 500 ml per year. The systems required to adapt to such unpredictability have yet to be cultivated. Nkwini’s small population relies on two sources of water. The first comes from the neighboring mountain village of Mw’gende. The water is transported through a gravity pipe, and stored in a 16,000 L tank.  

Village WomenDuring the dry season, it is common to go more than 4 weeks without water from Mw’gende. A United Nations report states that the minimum water needs per person is 25 L per day. Nkwini’s current water system cannot provide people with enough water for more than two days.

The second source of water comes from Makanya’s boreholes located 5 km away. Wealthier villagers, with private storage wells, hire trucks to transport the water from Makanya to Nkwini.  They then charge the villagers double the price of transport. The people of Nkwini have little control of their water situation, leaving them vulnerable to drought and price augmentation.
    
Project Description
In the sub-village of Nkwini there is a concerning lack of affordable, sanitary drinking and household water. The Rainwater Harvesting Committee proposes to build two circular, above-ground, ferro-cement rainwater catchment tanks of 30,000 liters each at the primary school and the clinic in town.

Each tank will have a corrugated iron roofs, and will be connected to a central water point.

Adding these tanks to the existing water structure will help the villagers in times of drought. It will also increase available sources of water in the community, discouraging dependence on and depletion of one. This will Villagersbenefit all residents. 

The masons of the community will be taught how to use the ferro-cement technology, a more efficient, more durable method, from an expert mason recommended by Empower Tanzania, a local NGO.

The tanks will be opened only after there has been no water available for one week. Each person in the village will be allowed 60 L per week. Each 20 L will cost 200 TZS. 152 of those 200 TZS will go towards replenishing the tank from a neighboring borehole 5 km away. The remaining 48 TZS will go towards maintenance and repair of the tank.

The actual dispersal of the water will follow the normal process in which households are called forth by neighborhood. This process will be monitored by the Nkwini Water Committee. Building will begin in the beginning of May 2016, and will be finished by the end of June.

The community will contribute water, sand, stones, food for the masons, and a cash contribution, totaling 25% of the total project cost.

Project Impact
This project will benefit 495 people.

Water - TanzaniaPeace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Katie Kirkwood
 
Monitoring and Maintenance  
The monitoring and maintenance of this project will be conducted by the Rainwater Harvesting Committee. The first phase will be the acquiring of all necessary materials. This should take no longer than one week. All of which will be done with the committee members and PCV to ensure proper procurement. The chief mason, Godrich Msangi, will partner with a committee member and the PCV for directing the purchases in Same Town.

After this, the second phase will begin immediately, the building of the first tank for the purpose of educating Nkwini’s local masons in ferro-cement building.  All 5 masons have signed a contract agreeing to participate and to donate a substantial amount of work and time in order to both expand their skill set and better the lives of the people of Nkwini. This phase should take no longer than 2 weeks.
 
The third phase: building tank two will come shortly after the first tank is done. Both tanks will be built with the expertise and supervision of Godrich Water containersMsangi. 
 
The maintenance of the project after completion depends on community funds from the water that will be purchased. Each 20 L will cost 200 TZS, with 48 TZS going toward repairs. If there is a repair needed that is not able to be covered by the repair fund, it is acceptable to pull from the refill fund. Charging for rainwater will also discourage the dependence on the tanks, as well as on Makanya’s boreholes.

The Water committee will be responsible for collecting whereas the Development Committee will store the money and decide when to use it. Having these two Committees working together ensures transparency and accountability with the funds collected from the tanks. They will act as a check and balance for each other.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.  Please donate to our other projects in our East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

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Ipillili School & Village Well Project - Tanzania

Students in Ipillili Village

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location
Village with his bike
Ipillili Village of Nzega District, Tabora region, Tanzania

Community Description
Nzega Secondary School is located in Ipilili village in Tabora, one of the very hot and dry regions in Tanzania. Life there revolves around water. Due to the lack of water in the community, students and the surrounding community struggle with sanitation, illnesses caused by drinking unclean water, and food insecurity.

Problem Addressed
Nzega Secondary School has one rainwater catchment system, which only provides enough water for the school and surrounding villagers for a few days until the next downpour. After rainy season, students are sent to fetch a few buckets of water from taps, which come on once every few weeks, or from shallow pools of water nearby. The lack of water is a major cause of poor sanitation, diarrhea and food insecurity in the surrounding community.

One of the biggest health issues among adults and children, aside from malaria, is diarrhea. People drink from unsanitary sources, such as the river or shallow hand-dug wells, without using any method of purification. This is especially common among school-aged children. Students often miss school due to illnesses, such as diarrhea and the common cold, which could be minimized by having water available for sanitary purposes.      

current water sourceProject Description
This project is to build a well at Nzega Secondary School.  The well will be drilled to a depth of about 120 meters. Piping will be inserted into the well, and a manual hand pump will be attached.  The water will be used mainly for drinking water and sanitation purposes. 

The headmaster has paid for a technician for a preliminary survey to determine the best location of the well.  A water committee has been established consisting of members of the school and the PCV. The members will rotate the tasks of overseeing the process and managing funds. 

The drilling company will guarantee that water will be reached and provide an adequate supply for some time into the future.  The school will provide a manual pump to ensure sustainability.  The pump is low-cost and can be easily repaired.      

Water Charity funds will be used for the purchase of specified equipment and materials as well as the cost of skilled labor.  The entire project is scheduled for completion 3 weeks after work is started.

Project Impact
1,280 students and villagers will benefit from the project.Female student  pouring water

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Wangui Mwaniki

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community has created a water committee of four members of the school, including the headmaster, to oversee the maintenance of the well, and pump to ensure sustainability.

Comments
The water available will also provide a source of drinking water for students and community members as well as for crops to improve food security for the community.

A tank and irrigation system for food security is envisioned as a future project for the school.

This project falls under our ongoing Let Girls Learn Initiative, an effort to help girls stay in school created by FLOTUS Michelle Obama. It is also part of our East Africa Water & Sanitation Program. Both of these programs can use support from donors to continue doing worthy projects like this one.

This project became infeasible, and was cancelled by the Peace Corps Volunteer.  There was no expenditure of funds.  

Female students filling water bucketsYouth with a bucket of water

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Mtii Health Clinic and Dispensary Construction and Well Project - Tanzania

Village children

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Mtii, Mtae Ward, Lushoto District, Tanga Region, Tanzania

Community DescriptionWoman villagers
The community of Mtii, located within Mtae ward close to the Lushoto area of Tanzania, is a beautiful sub-village with its own village officials. The population of Mtii is a little over 2,518, with 708 being women of childbearing age and 1,120 being children under the age of 15.

Problem Addressed
The biggest dilemmas that villagers face are those of health care and water. The closest dispensary is over an hour and a half walk through mountainous terrain, with no way for a car to pass.  Currently, the majority of pregnant women give birth at home without trained professionals, leading to a low birth survival rate, about 1 in 4 newborns do not survive.  Children and elderly have a difficult time attending to their health needs because they cannot make the long trek to the dispensary.

In the past, the village government has tried to build a dispensary, constructing a foundation and some walls, but was unable to finish due to lack of funding. 
 

clinic foundationProject Description
This project is to finish construction of the dispensary and clinic, and to build a well to provide for the water needs of the facility. The building construction will be completed.  A 20,000 liter well will be built for water storage, attached to the municipal water source, and piped to the building.
 
The anticipated outcome is that the dispensary will provide all health services and medicines for residents as well as a source of water for sanitation, hydration and hygiene. The beneficiaries will be all men, women and children in the village. This project will start in January, 2016, and be completed in April, 2016. 

The project committee includes the community change agent, a female village chairperson, the village official, a village delegate, and the ward chairperson. The project committee intends to oversee and monitor construction and implementation of the dispensary and well and cover any maintenance fees of the well with funds from the village government. They will ensure sustainability of the dispensary and well after the volunteer leaves by meeting monthly to discuss progress or issues.
 
The community is thoroughly involved in this project because the understand the importance of having accessible healthcare and water. The project committee has a complete plan for the dispensary and will begin construction on the foundation of the building.
    
The project committee is motivated to improve their community and increase birth survival rate, educate villagers about family planning, proper hand washing and sanitation and improve the overall health and wellbeing of their village.  The committee will oversee the buying of materials for this project, monitor the construction of both the dispensary and the well and will continue to evaluate both after completion to ensure the sustainability and success of the project. They have already met three times to discuss materials needed and update timelines. They will continue to meet bi-weekly throughout construction of the project and then monthly after completion to discuss fixing any issues and the general progress of the dispensary and well. The community contribution for this project is mostly in the form of volunteers to help transport materials and with construction. The money to buy certain items will come from the village and water office funds collected from the community.

To implement this project, the project committee has divided the tasks among themselves. All of the members of the project committee, except for one, live in Mtii and Mtii centerare able to easily monitor progress and oversee the construction of this project.  They will be responsible for getting and transporting supplies and for keeping the masons and carpenters on track. The first phase of implementation will take place in January, 2016, and will include buying all materials necessary from Lushoto town or Mtae village and transporting them to the project location.

The second phase beginning in late February, 2016, will include construction of both the dispensary and well simultaneously. The well is located nearby to the clinic with water pipes connecting the two.
     
Phase three includes monitoring and evaluation. This phase will include the completion of the construction process and the evaluation of the completed project addressing any issues that may have occurred. This will happen in April, 2016. In order to evaluate the projects’ success, the committee will record how many citizens are going to the clinic for treatments, medicine or clinic days each month because of its close location in the village and how many babies survive birth because women are choosing to deliver at the clinic with trained staff instead of at home. Also, they will determine if the water from the well is enough to sustain
the clinic on a daily basis.
 
All items were priced according to experts in their fields such as the carpenters, masons and plumbers. The experts contacted the stores where the items will be bought and then met with the project committee members to write down all specific items and prices. Community members will volunteer to transport all materials from the buses, trucks or stores in Mtae village to Mtii.

The main items covered by Water Charity funding are doors, windows, ceiling boards, paint, rods, wires and cement. The community has contributed the price of construction workers to build the dispensary, all volunteers who will help transport materials and with construction, bags of sand and piles of stones; some travel expenses, as well as pipes to connect to the well. Eventually the community will also contribute porcelain sinks and soap for the dispensary.

Project Impact
This project will impact 2,518 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Mia Young

Village leadersMonitoring and Maintenance
The project committee intends to oversee and monitor construction and implementation of the dispensary and well and cover any maintenance fees of the well with funds from the village government. They will ensure sustainability of the dispensary and well after the volunteer leaves by meeting monthly to discuss progress or issues.

The project committee has taken full responsibility for sustaining the project after completion and after the volunteer has left. Because the anticipated outcome of this project is a dispensary, after completion of the building, the committee members including village officials and a ward chairperson will contact their government to send the doctors and nurses. This process is separate from this project and will be the responsibility of the members of the project committee. To address any problems that may arise in the future, the project committee has agreed that all maintenance issues within the dispensary or the well will be paid for from the village government funds coming from community members.

Also, the plumber will volunteer to fix any piping issues related to this project with funds from the water office, also paid for by the community members. The project committee will meet once a month after the project is completed and more times if necessary to discuss the progress of the dispensary and the overall wellbeing of both the dispensary and well. Eventually, a dispensary committee will be created consisting of the doctor and/or nurses and village officials and will continue to oversee the welfare of the dispensary and water well.

Comments
This is Peace Corp Volunteer, Mia Young’s second project.  Click here to see her first Tanzania project. The community organization involved in this project is the Mtii Village Government.  The beneficiaries of this project will be all men, women and children in the village. This project will start in December 2015 and be completed in March 2016. The community contribution will be 25% of the cost.
 
Community contribution includes two masons, cement bags, stones, sand, pipes and volunteers to transport supplies and help with construction. The project committee includes Amina, the community change agent; Upendo, a female village chairperson; Athumani, the village official; Asha a village delegate and Richard, the ward chairperson.

In the short term, this project will provide a building that will serve as a dispensary and clinic for the people of Mtii village. Also, there will be a 20,000 liter well, which will be connected to a water pipeline already existing in the village. This well will store water so that the dispensary will have reliable running water year round for all sanitation and hydration needs.

The anticipated long-term outcomes will be increased birth survival rate due to women delivering in a medical facility with trained professionals, better health care for children due to ease of access to clinic days and medicines, an increase in the number of women using family planning techniques such as contraception, and a decrease in malaria deaths and the spread of HIV and serious illnesses because of the relative location of the health facility to get testing, treatment and education.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.  You can still donate to this project, and all further funds will go to helping start more projects in the region.

If you wish to help with more great projects such as this one, please donate to the East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

stones

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Kwizu Village Water Tank Project - Tanzania

Children playing

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Kwizu Village, Same District, Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzaniawomen farming

Community Description
The village of Kwizu is located high in the Southern Pare Mountains, approximately 1,710 m (5,605 ft) in elevation. Around 2,000 villagers make their home here within the steeply sloping, intensely wooded mountains. Their primary occupations are farming, with corn, beans, and sugarcane being the main crops, and animal husbandry of cows, chickens, and sheep.  Trees are varied and highly abundant, with an emphasis on deciduous species, and local farms are built within and around these forests.

There are two different forests within the village of Kwizu, one is a managed forest (msituwabiashara) and the other is a reserve forest (msituwaasili). The managed, or ‘business’ forest is used primarily for wood-cutting, farming, and homesteading, while the reserve forest has been set aside by the government to transition into Mkomazi National Park in the lowlands.

Water sources come from any one of three rain-fed upland springs. Because of this, water tends to be more available during the rainy season and a considerable problem during the dry season.

Problem Addressed
In Kwizu village, access to water is challenging for most villagers.   There are no tanks, local water sources are very far walks, and most water taps are in poor condition. Further, some areas in the village do not have any nearby water taps and women and children must walk long distances to collect water, usually up to one kilometer.

Of the areas where taps are present and in working condition, water only flows to them 6 months of the year or less, and because of distances from the source only about 40% of those actually receive any water during these times. Furthermore, water access issues discourage student attendance at schools since many youth are required to walk long distances to fetch water for the family in the mornings and then must travel 45 minutes to 2 hours to reach school. With this strain, students often arrive late, which is a provocation for corporal punishment, or they may choose not to go at all. In addition to students, older women also suffer from carrying water long distances, oftentimes carrying a baby on their backs or another burden in their hands, such as corn or leaves to feed cows, thus exacerbating existing health issues and/or creating new ones.

water pipeA lack of available water resources also influences nutrition and available food products. Currently there are only two vegetable gardens in existence and Kwizu village does not have its own market. This combination means that in order for villagers to acquire dietary variety beyond corn products and beans, they must travel by foot anywhere from one to five hours each way, every week or else pay 10,000 tsh (round trip) to go to town for food stuffs. Increasing water availability in the village will enable villagers to create more household gardens, and perhaps in time, fish ponds or even their own village market.

Project Description
To address the water challenges present in the community, we plan to build five water tanks dispersed throughout the village to improve access and availability.

The tanks will vary in size depending upon how many villagers they will serve. Of the six sub-villages within Kwizu, one tank will be placed within each of five of them. In Kionzogolo A, the central part of the village, we will place a 20,000 L tank, in Kionzogolo B we will place a 5,000 L tank, Kibengele will receive a 15,000 L tank, Nzoroko A, which also extends down the mountain to the secondary school and health clinic, will receive a 20,000 L tank, and in Nzoroko B we will build a 10,000 L tank.

In addition to building tanks, the main water source areas will be cleaned up. This will include maintenance around the water intake areas as well as cleaning the nearby environment and planting trees to encourage greater water storage for the future. A price estimate has been secured from an experienced tank builder who will oversee the hiring of multiple other builders within the village. The work will be spread out to many villagers to speed up the building process as well as to spread out the income generated from the project. The majority of needed supplies will be purchased in Same, the nearest banking town to Kwizu, and transported up the mountain by either villagers or rented trucks.      

water to carry Villagers will contribute both time and cash money to the project. Cash money will be approximately 1,818,000 tsh (~$910), and will be raised from within the community.  Each household has committed to contributing a small amount to raise the necessary funds; this process will be repeated again in the future for any maintenance or repairs.

Activity-based contribution will total approximately 3,809,000 tsh (~$1,905). Activities the villagers propose to contribute include digging up and preparing each site, breaking down rocks from the surrounding landscape and carrying them to each site (both large and small), and carrying other bought supplies up from town to decrease transportation costs. Villagers will begin by collecting rocks as well as bringing up supplies to the sites as much as they are able to.

Water Charity funding will be used to purchase remaining materials, and to pay the salary of the builders. At this point, the remainder of the supplies will be acquired from town, as well as some from stores within the village, and the builders will begin their work on the tanks simultaneously. Ideally the whole process will take approximately three months.

Project Impact
This project will benefit approximately 2,200 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Bethany Drahota

Monitoring and Maintenance
Project monitoring will be the responsibility of the water projects committee. This is a WUC-type group formed for the project.  The head of the committee and Bethany's village counterpart, will be responsible for overseeing project implementation and following up with progress, although all committee members will participate. The committee has also assigned record keepers from within each sub-village to record outcomes, as well as any problems that may require maintenance. They will measure impacts and will review and maintain all documentation from the entire village. There is also one accountant who will be in charge of collecting and monitoring funds from within the village.  The community has agreed to contribute a small amount from each household to ensure tank upkeep. The committee plans to meet 3-4 times per year to discuss impacts and any needed maintenance.

broken wellComments
The community organization involved in this project is Kwizu Water Projects Committee. They have been instrumental in evaluating community needs and determining ways to fill them.

Upon arrival in Kwizu, Bethany was extremely impressed with how motivated the community was for change. Hearing from other volunteers the struggles they were having generating interest for projects, Bethany was pleasantly surprised when she met no such resistance here.

The idea for a water project was first initiated by the villagers. She was met at each site by a large gathering of enthusiastic men and women, eager to show her how they lived and answer all her questions. When she told them that to obtain funding, the community would need to contribute, there was a resounding yes, and it took less than 10 minutes to come up with enough activities to meet 25% of the requested funds.. Every step of the way, there has been much support and excitement.  Bethany says she was blown away by the experience of setting this up, and is very pleased to be a part of this project.

This project has been funded by an Anonymous donor.  Additional donations will go toward other projects in Tanzania.

 

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

water intakerusted pipe

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Kisese-Dissa, Magereza, and Teiriani Water Project - Tanzania

Village women filling their water jugs

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC LOGOS

Location

Kisese-Dissa, Kondoa District, Dodoma Region, Tanzania

Community Description
The project community is comprised of three neighboring villages: Kisese-Dissa, Magereza, and Teiriani.  These three villages are located in central Tanzania in the region of Dodoma, notoriously one of the hottest and most dry areas in Tanzania. The majority of the 2,000 inhabitants in this area are people of the Warangi tribe that maintain their livelihood through tending large farms, where the primary crops are beans, peanuts, corn, and sunflowers, and managing small herds of livestock consisting of goats, cows, and a few sheep.  Because these farms and animals provide the only source Village Woman carrying many water jugsof income for most families here, they are constantly at the mercy of the rains and dependent on having access to sufficient water. "Water is life," states Mama Adamu, a grandmother living in the village of Kisese-Dissa. 

In the rainy season, lasting from December to early April, the area is full of vibrant colors: the luscious greens of corn stalks, bright fields of yellow sunflowers, and the rich brown of constantly wet soil.  However, by the time September rolls around, the last of these colors has faded and the landscape becomes a hazy blend of various shades of light brown and gray.   When the rainy season has passed, the only source of water in the area comes from a natural spring in the ridgeline that forms a backdrop on the western skyline of the village.  During these dry months, people spend their time fetching water, storing their harvested crops, and resting for the next round of planting.  A few households try to maintain small home gardens throughout the dry season but often give up due to the heavy labor of fetching water to nourish their plants. 

Life here revolves around water.  Whether it is talking about how scarce the rains were this past year, when the rains will return, or whether the closest tap actually has water on that particular day, water is a constant topic of conversation in this dry district.

Children attend the primary school in Kisese-Dissa from neighboring villages.  In total, nearly 500 students attend this school and are taught by 11 teachers in unfinished, crowded classrooms.  It is not unusual to walk into a classroom and find 80+ students; some sit on crowded benches while others line the wall or sit in the aisles.  These close quarters offer a haven for germs, especially since the children are currently unable to wash their hands while at school. 

The clinic located in Kisese-Dissa is also the primary health center for the ward, comprised of five villages.  People come here to be tested for HIV or malaria, to give birth, receive vaccinations or other shots, and be treated for various wounds.  One doctor and a rotation of three nurses staff the clinic.  Because both the primary school and clinic are located in this village, there are constantly people from other villages passing through.  However, these unfamiliar faces are often from another village in the ward.  Because Kisese-Dissa is located on a dirt road at least 3.5 hours from the nearest large town, it remains rural and unknown to many individuals outside the district of Kondoa.

Life in rural Tanzania is difficult.  Every day physical labor is required for survival.  Whether it is hauling water, preparing the farm, tilling fields, or harvesting crops, there is always something to be done. Every Saturday, people converge on the distant village of Madisa, a 90-minute walk one-way, to buy fresh produce for the week. However, despite this rigorous lifestyle, the people here remain optimistic and find moments to celebrate.  Relief from the cycle of labor comes in the form of weddings, political campaigns, local soccer games, and religious holidays.  On these occasions, people do not hold back.  Whatever they have, they share with friends and neighbors by preparing sumptuous feasts and recognizing their culture by playing traditional Kirangi music on handmade drums and cow horns as the older women sing songs from their memories.

Problem Addressed  
When surveying the inhabitants of Kisese-Dissa, it does not take long to gather a consensus as to what the biggest issue is: water.  While the increasingly unpredictable rains are not something that can be fixed, the ability of the village to harvest and store water is an issue that can be resolved.  In the 1980’s a 40,000 L cement water tank was constructed to harvest water from a natural spring in the nearby mountain, then distribute it to the residents of Kisese-Dissa through a pipe system. 

However, since the construction of this tank, the population has nearly tripled and additional pipelines have been laid to provide water for the neighboring villages that have no other source of water; therefore, this 40,000 L tank has become insufficient.  The tank is closed off at night, allowing it to be refilled by the spring.  Water from the spring is able to refill the tank within 8 hours, after which time the water continues to flow in but is directed to the overflow pipe, which simply dumps the water onto the ground outside the tank, wasted and unusable.
broken pipe repaired with plastic bags
Therefore, when the pipes are opened each morning, it is only matter of hours before the tank is emptied and unable to refill fast enough to maintain strong enough water pressure to push the water to the furthest destinations.  As a result, water often does not reach its furthest destinations, and even if it does, it is usually cut off by about 1:30 pm.  That gives people a period of four hours to haul all the water they need for the day, 50 to 70 liters per household.  During this time, they are competing with their neighbors for use of the tap; in some places, a single water tap serves up to 200 people!  When the water is cut off, people then walk upwards of two kilometers to obtain water from another tap; people will even fetch water from the nearby riverbed. 

In the dry season they have to dig down at least three feet in the riverbed to access water, and in the rainy season they are using water that is contaminated by livestock, since the river is a popular place to water the animals.  The local primary school is one of the locations that rarely receive water.  Although there is a tap installed at the school, water only reaches the school about once a week, and at a very slow trickle.  For the rest of the week, the students and teachers have no water to drink, no water to clean the bathrooms, and no water to wash their hands after using the bathrooms. 

When asked about how she deals with the water issues, 6th grade student Shialah says, “If it’s really hot I bring water from home, and I just don’t go to the bathroom at school.  Usually I can wait until I get home."  Other students are not so fortunate: those who can’t ‘hold it’ will sometimes go to the bathroom in the bushes to avoid the disgusting toilets.  And some students live far from the school and are unable to return home at lunch break to refill their water and eat lunch; they simply sit at the school and try not to think about how hungry they are.  Students often miss class due to minor illnesses, such as diarrhea and the common cold, which could be minimized if students had the means to wash their hands at school.

Another area that is in desperate need of a reliable water source is the clinic for the ward, located in Kisese-Dissa.  At a health center responsible for delivering babies, treating serious wounds, and treating HIV, where contact with bodily fluids is inevitable, the lack of water is an obvious health hazard.  The doctor and two nurses are forced to haul water from the closest tap and store it in buckets at the clinic.  The lack of running water greatly increases the risk of spreading disease through unsanitary practices.  The absence of water at the clinic is due to a faulty pipeline. 

The pipeline has a handful of leaks that are repaired in by simply wrapping plastic bags or rubber strips around the pipe to prevent water from squirting out.  Adding to the problem is dirt build-up or other debris that clogs the pipes and obstructs water flow.  The filtration screen that was installed at the spring source has slowly deteriorated, letting larger objects pass through and obstruct the flow of water, while also potentially contaminating the water.  Local government officials have attempted a variety of solutions to remedy the water issue, but have been thwarted in finding a permanent solution.  Last year, due to the scarce rains and limited water supply, numerous households not only lost the crops in their farms, but were also unable to maintain their home gardens, instead having to ration the water for day-to-day tasks such as bathing, washing clothes, and cooking.

Overall, the health of this community group is pretty good compared to other places, but there are still a variety of health issues.  One of the biggest health issues among both adults and children, following malaria, is diarrhea.  The doctor believes that people drinking from unsanitary sources such as the river or shallow, hand-dug wells without using any method of purification cause most cases of diarrhea.  Common illnesses such as diarrhea and the common cold are common, especially among school-age children. 

Project Description
To remedy this water issue and assure that water arrives not only to the clinic and school, but also increases the amount and duration of water availability at other sites, the people of Kisese-Dissa will construct a 50,000 L water tank adjacent and connected to the existing water tank.  The existing water tank is located about 300 yards behind the local clinic and is positioned at the base of a ridgeline.  The surrounding area consists of small farms and a gulley that originates in the mountain and continues throughout the village.
Young girl carrying water
Once the first tank is filled, the excess water will be directed into the new tank, instead of being dumped outside and absorbed back into the ground where it is unusable.  This new water tank will also help to increase the water pressure, thus pushing the water as far as the primary school and distant village of Teiriani throughout the entire day.  Via underground pipes, the new tank will be connected to the existing pipe system so that when the water from the first tank is drained, a valve can be opened to allow water from the second tank to enter the system.

To further increase water pressure, a new air valve will be installed at two key points in the pipe system, which will guarantee that the water reaches the furthest destinations.  A thorough cleaning of the existing tank and pipe system will also take place to remove any blockages that have built up and to conduct any necessary repairs.  To prevent future blockages, and to help reduce water contamination, the filter screen at the spring will be replaced and an additional screen will be installed where the pipe dumps the water into the tanks. 

Furthermore, the existing tank will be re-coated with another layer of plaster to prevent cracks from forming and strengthen the tank.  Additionally, once the lid of the tank is completed, the boards that were used to support it during construction will be resold and that money will be used to buy new pipes to replace those that could not be adequately repaired.  All of these efforts – the new water tank, filter screens, air valves, system cleaning, and pipe replacement will ensure that the people of Kisese-Dissa, Magereza, and Teiriani will have a constantly accessible source of water to care for their families, enact healthy hygiene habits, and maintain home gardens. The local primary school will further benefit by using their new water source to construct two hand washing stations, which will provide students and teachers the means to reduce the spread of illness by washing their hands after using the bathroom or returning from the farm. 

In coordination with this project, a one-day seminar will be held at the school to remind students and teachers of proper hand washing techniques and appropriate times to wash their hands.  Another seminar about hand washing, water purification, and water management will be held in the village of Kisese-Dissa to educate residents about healthy practices and ways to reuse gray water. This project will take place as soon as the funds are received, and the tank will be completed within 40 days.  This tank is a priority for the entire village and will be completed through a group effort.  The chairmen from Kisese-Dissa, Teiriani, and Magereza have assembled volunteer groups that will come each day to assist the lead workmen during construction. 

The first task is to dig the hole to make a level base for the tank; this will be completed in three days.  The next phase is to lay the foundation, a combination of cement, rocks, and crushed rock.  The architect has allotted four days for this process and another three to complete the floor of the tank.  After a day of drying, work will begin on the 1.8 m high walls and continue for 12 to 15 days.  Once the walls are finished, the workmen will spend three days building the concrete and rebar slab that is to act as a lid for the tank. For at least two weeks following completion of the lid, water will be poured daily over the cement surface to prevent cracking. 

As work on the tank is being done, the pipe foremen will oversee the digging of the ditch to lay the pipes.  This process, plus repairing the tap at the primary school, will take about a week.  To ensure completion within the specified time, the foremen will pre-order supplies and each evening will check to make sure that the supplies for the next day are already there. The goal is to have this tank completed and functional by the end of January 2016. Using Water Charity funds, supplies will be bought to build the tank, to buy the pipes and parts that will connect the two tanks, and to provide a small, reduced salary for the builders.  The most expensive items include bags of cement, crushed rocks, boards, and rebar, but there are many other smaller materials that will be used for this project, such as wire mesh, chicken wire, nails, steel wire, and the cost of transporting the materials. 

Showing their dedication to the project, the community is providing the equivalent of 26% of the total cost of the project.  Their contributions include labor, buckets, gathering large rocks and sand, support poles, expert consultations, food for the workers, land for the tank, and a night guard to sleep at the site throughout construction.  Beyond these physical contributions, the members of the water committee – the chairmen of the villages, the village executive officer, and the three lead workmen – are expending their own time and effort to prepare this proposal, oversee construction progress, and complete evaluations for at least a month after the completion of the tank.

Project Impact
Number of people affected by the project: 2,000

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Rochelle Latka

Monitoring and Maintenance
Monitoring the progress of the tank and the indirect projects following the tank’s completion will be a constant, ongoing process headed by the village chairmen and the headmaster at the primary school.  At least twice a week during the period of tank construction, the chairman of Kisese-Dissa and the Peace Corps Volunteer will visit the site to monitor progress and address any issues through an on-site survey and discussions with the lead workmen.  The same process will be used to monitor the laying and connection of the pipes. 

A week after the tank’s completion, each village chairman will visit all the taps in his/her village to assess the quantity and availability of water; this will continue for a month, with the results being reported back to Kisese-Dissa’s chairman, to be shared with the foremen, and the volunteer.  Monitoring of the hand washing stations at the primary school will be done by the headmaster and primary school teachers, with assistance from the volunteer.  Final evaluation will take place in March to assess the continuation of the hand washing stations.  Finally, using a before and after survey, the amount of absences from school and children coming to the clinic with common illnesses will be compared to see if the new water tap at the school has made a positive impact on student health.  This survey will be done from November 2015 to March 2016.

Even after the volunteer leaves, the local Water Committee will support this project.  These groups of individuals, including the village chairmen, village executive officer, and three head workmen, have pledged to care for this project and sustain it in the years to come.  The chairman of Kisese-Dissa and two of the workmen already volunteer their time and efforts to maintain the existing tank and pipe system and have vowed to do the same for this tank. Additionally, after completion of the tank, they will request a monetary contribution from each household, which will then be put in the bank to be used for tank or pipe repairs.  The Water Committee is organizing the community contributions and overseeing construction         

girls at the water pumpComments
This project qualifies as a part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative, but is not part of the official Peace Corps Let Girls Learn program.  We therefore class it as LGL+.  

While all students at the primary school will be direct beneficiaries of this project, the female students will benefit in ways other than just having water to wash their hands and refill their water bottles at school.  In this community, women and girls are responsible for matters relating to the home.  This includes fetching water for tasks such as cooking, washing clothes, and bathing.  Each morning, during every lunch break, and after school, girls who are able to carry a bucket of water are expected to help their mothers or older sisters to bring water to the house.  This is problematic for girls who live in the areas where many people are waiting at a single tap to get water or where water does not reach in the afternoons.  These girls are required to either wait or go in search of other water before returning to school. 

While this is a necessary task, it often causes girls to return late to school and miss out on their studies, not to mention receiving a punishment for being late. This also limits female students’ ability to participate in after school activities as they are requested to return home as soon as school ends to help fetch water for the evening and early morning activities.  By increasing the amount and accessibility of water in these areas, the amount of time that these girls will spend fetching water will decrease and allow them to return to school in time for the afternoon session. Having water readily available at the primary school will also help the older female students. 

The age range of female students that attend the school is 5 to 15 years old.  Many girls begin their menstruation around the age of 14 years old and it is a worrisome enough time without the added fear of how you will be able to clean yourself at school.  In fact, some girls choose to simply skip school when they are menstruating, thus missing out on their education.   In the past few months, the local Peace Corps Volunteer has worked with Huru International to assist these older girls by providing them with reusable pads and knowledge regarding matters of menstruation.  However, it is difficult to put these practices into action when no water is available at the school to wash your hands after changing pads.  Therefore, with the success of this project, these girls will gain the means to hygienically care for themselves without missing school.

The construction of this water tank will offer immediate benefits for the residents of Kisese-Dissa, Teiriani, and Magereza, but it also paves the way for potential future projects.  After obtaining water security, people will be more able to maintain home gardens and obtain nutritious foods, leading to better nutrition.  At the school, there are even more possibilities.  For months, the headmaster and village chairman have discussed creating a school lunch program to feed the children that live too far away to return home for lunch, but the lack of water was a major deterrent in this initiative.  However, with the completion of this project, creating a school lunch program is now a valid possibility.  The creation of a school garden is also now an obtainable goal.  The point of mentioning this is to show that not only will this water tank improve the lives of people in the short term, but it also increases the potential for future projects within the community.

Dollar Amount of Project
$5,100

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,100

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

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Hagati Secondary School Rainwater Catchment System Project - Tanzania

Hagati Secondary School Rainwater Catchment System Project - Tanzania

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Hagati Secondary School (Mbinga), Ruvuma Tanzania

Community Description
Hagati Secondary school is a small government school in rural Tanzania, about 2 hours south west of Mbinga. There are approximately 285 students and 30 teachers at the school, with about half of each group living on campus.

Hagati Secondary School (Mbinga), Ruvuma TanzaniaRuvuma is one of the more forgotten regions of Tanzania--with almost no outsiders (tourists, NGOs, or others) making their way into the very southern, westernmost corner of Tanzania. Hagati is in the last of the highland valleys before reaching the western side of Lake Malawi (called Lake Nyassa in Tanzania), and as a result provides an excellent climate for the main industry of the area--coffee farming. Most of the students at Hagati are the children of coffee growers, and many plan on working on their own farm when they complete their education.

The seasonal nature of cash crops, however, as well as the lack of infrastructure to transport their product to market, creates some hardship for the people around Hagati, but a decent climate and soil allows subsistence agriculture (mostly corn) to supplement their income. Unlike in many parts of Tanzania, such as Mbeya or the Kilimanjaro region, large-scale commercial agriculture is non-existent, and almost all produce is from small farms perched on the edges of steep hillsides.

Many of the students dream about leaving the valley behind, with its lack of paved roads and electricity, and going to big cities like Dar es Salaam or Mbeya. Even for those who remain, however, change is definitely coming---the government has proposed (and started constructing) new electric lines that will bring wired electricity from Mbinga all the way to Mbamba Bay on the shores of the lake.

Problem Addressed
Currently, the school relies on a tap for its water supply. The tap provides water from a mountain spring that is several kilometers away from Hagati, and during the rainy season provides a convenient and reliable source of relatively clean water. During the dry season (May through November), however, the spring and the tap often run dry. When this happens, the school must rely on a nearby river to provide its water. This creates two major problems. First, female students are often pulled from the classrooms and sent to fetch water for the school. One trip can take upwards of half an hour, and depending on how much water the school requires, the girls can miss quite a lot of class. Additionally, the community members do not purify the water in any way, which leads to an increase in sickness due to waterborne illness from drinking untreated river water. This leads to lost worker hours on the part of both students and teachers, negatively impacting the students' education.

Project Description
This project will be to create a water catchment and storage system. An analysis of the rainfall patterns at the school indicate that rainwater catchment could provide an excellent supplemental source of water for the school during the rainy season.

Gutters, made from cut tin roofing material, will be added to the roof of the large assembly hall, which is on the school campus. The gutters will collect rainwater and funnel it into an underground storage tank.

The underground storage tank itself will have a capacity of approximately 40,000 L. The construction will be reinforced masonry, with the bricks, sand and gravel being supplied locally. A local technician, who has experience installing similar systems in the area, will oversee the implementation of the project. Local community workers will provide much of the labor for digging the hole, and the technician and his workers will erect the gutters and construct the tank walls and roof. Water will be brought out of the tank using a simple pump of a type similar to that purchased by a nearby community. Using a local craftsman and technology that those in the area are already familiar with will help ensure the sustainability of the project.

The school will provide unskilled labor, a portion of the engineering fee, and many of the materials, including bricks, sand, gravel and rocks.

Project Impact
Approximately 315 people will benefit from this project immediately, as well as future students and staff.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Emily Van Dam

Monitoring and Maintenance
The implementation of the project will be monitored start to finish by the water committee. The water committee, comprised of several teachers, the second master (vice principal), the academic master, and the Peace Corps Volunteer, will be in charge of overseeing all material purchases, as well as regularly inspecting the work of the technician and organizing the unskilled labor. All work and materials will be obtained locally and be done by local technicians. This ensures that, should the need for repairs arise, the school will have access to all the necessary materials and skilled labor that it requires.

Purification treatment will mostly consist of avoiding contamination of relatively clean rainwater. The first heavy rain of the season each year will be used to flush the system. At that time the tank will be thoroughly cleaned, bleached, and then pumped dry, and only rains after the initial rainfall will be collected. The tank will be covered, and a pump will be used to further prevent contamination.

Comments
This is a project conceived and organized by the community. It will provide immediate benefits related to health and hygiene, and tresult in training and empowerment for the community.

Let Girls Learn
This project will be implemented under the Let Girls Learn Program, and included under our Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide..

In Tanzania, the responsibility for collecting water is considered to be the job of women and girls, and Hagati Secondary is no exception. During the dry season, when the community tap runs dry, female students are regularly pulled from their classes at random and sent to fetch water from the river. This has a very negative impact on their ability to receive an education, and it is something that their fellow male students do not have to deal with. As a result, many girls at the school are at a disadvantage during the dry season due to the lack of readily accessible water at the school.

This project will provide an alternative (and cleaner) drinking source right on school campus. As a result, girls will no longer need to be pulled from class for lengthy periods of time to fetch water as the school cook, and the other teachers, would have immediate access to water at the school, even when the tap runs dry.

This project is a part of our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

This project has been fully funded by a major WC donor who prefers to remain annonymous.

 

Further donations to this project will be applied to Emily's next project or to future Peace Corps projects in Tanzania.

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