South Africa

High School Latrine Project - South Africa

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High School Latrine Project- South AfricaThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxx Village, Mtubatuba Municipality, Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa

Community Description
Xxxxx is a semi-rural village that borders the Isimangaliso World Heritage Site near St. Lucia, Kwa-Zulu Natal. There are approximately 10,000 residents living in the (most of Zulu descent) according to the 2011 South African Government Census with an average household size of 4.3 members. Census data puts unemployment for the municipal area around 40%, while the rate is likely much higher within Xxxxx.

In spite of the abject poverty that is quite obvious in the community, Xxxxx is a peaceful village to live in. Many village members work in the nearby town of St. Lucia performing various duties to serve the incoming tourist population. Others find work in the town of Mtubatuba, or informally through manual labor projects in the village.

Like many rural areas in the country, the people in Xxxxx are personable, quick to befriend outsiders, and easy to get along with. In their free time most people meet up to chat with one another and spend time together. Maintaining social relationships is a very important quality within Zulu culture so it's quite common to see groups of 2 or more sitting under a shady tree talking and sharing a bottle of soda together as you walk through the village.

High School Latrine Project- South AfricaProblem Addressed
The high school in Xxxxx Village, called Silethukukhanya, has a student population of approximately 1,000 and 39 staff including teachers. The school's female restrooms, in particular, have fallen into severe disrepair.

The latrine block was built in 2005 and the toilets themselves, which are pit-style, have since become quite full, leading to foul smells perforating throughout the immediate area. In addition, the foundation of the latrine block has started forming large cracks, possibly on account of poor initial construction when the foundation was laid. There are also no hand basins for washing up, mirrors, or changing rooms in the building. Furthermore, there's no electricity to the building nor is it easily accessible for those with physical disabilities.

The result of all these issues is an undignified restroom and hygiene experience for the females at the school, which has further unintended ramifications on morale and academic performance.

Project Description
This project aims to construct a new and fully functional female latrine block at Silethukukhanya High School in Xxxxx Village.

The latrine block will consist of four pit toilets and one extra-spacious toilet with hand rails for the physically disabled, three changing rooms, three sinks for hand washing with mirrors, a ramp for easier handicap access, and a wall around the entrance of the latrine block for privacy. Electricity and overhead lighting will also be installed for night use since many of the learners have extra classes in the evenings.

Two highly-experienced builders in Xxxxx Village have been identified to perform the work, along with several bricklayers and an electrician. Construction of the latrine block will begin with clearing a large site adjacent to the current latrine block. The pits for the five toilets will then be dug and the building's foundation laid after that. All of the construction materials will be sourced from the nearby town of Mtubatuba, which has several hardware stores.

In addition to the construction of the latrine block, the PCV has been working with the school's principal and teachers to identify a group of female students who come from severely disadvantaged backgrounds within the village. An after-school club with the girls will be formed to teach them about topics related to the female body, including puberty and feminine hygiene practices while segueing into other pertinent topics, including teen pregnancy and STIs. Two Child and Youth Care

Workers from the village have volunteered to facilitate the club, while donations of sanitary pads have already been made by a separate organization.

Overall, the community has been very active in this project, with teachers encouraging learners to participate in the club, care workers and volunteer guest speakers offering to speak to the girls, and members of the community offering to help with the construction of the latrine block once it commences.

High School Latrine Project- South AfricaProject Impact
575 people will benefit from the project, including female learners and staff, with many more in the future as students continue to cycle through the school.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
J. Jones

Monitoring and Maintenance
The builders of the latrine block have estimated the life span of the pit toilets to be 10 years before they fill up, but this is able to be extended through use of chemicals that help decompose the waste.

The latrines themselves will be cleaned and looked after by the janitorial workers at the school while future repair and upkeep costs will be furnished by the school as needed (with the repair work to be carried out by the builders constructing the latrines).

The fact that the toilets are pit-style increases their sustainability drastically as plumbing costs are kept to a minimum and water is not needed to flush the waste. Furthermore, the latrine block is to be constructed in such a way that promotes a large amount of natural ventilation when wind is present in the air, with a large number of overhead wind ducts.

Regarding the girls club, the knowledge passed on from the lessons will ideally be self-sustaining in that the girls will be encouraged to share the information that they learn with their siblings and peers, while also carrying it with them as they grow and have families of their own, some possibly remaining in the village.

Let Girls Learn
This project is expected to greatly benefit female learners, both directly and indirectly. The girls at the high school will have a much more dignified experience as they use the restroom, which will likely have a positive effect on their overall morale, especially as it translates to their academics. The girls will also no longer have to go into the forest to change clothes for sports days, drama rehearsals, and other events.

Also, an increase in hygienic practices (through the installation of sinks for hand washing) is reasonably expected to reduce the spread of illness and thus decrease sick days for the girls. Furthermore, grade 11 and 12 students are required to attend night classes, but in the past it has been difficult for them to use the latrine at night because of a lack of lighting, which will no longer be an issue for them.

Project Funding
The funds for this project have been provided by an anonymous donor.

If you like this project, please donate to Water Charity, so that we will be able to continue to do great projects in South Africa.

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Khula Village Borehole Project - South Africa

Khula Village Borehole Project - South Africa

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Khula Village Borehole Project - South AfricaLocation
Khula Village, Mtubatuba Municipality, Umkhanyakude District, Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa

Community Description
Khula is a semi-rural village that borders an indigenous forest in north eastern Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa. The village was originally established by the South African government in 1993 to formally house families that had been residing in the forest. Unsatisfied with land allocations, many families opted to remain in the forest while others from nearby townships and communities decided to inhabit the newfound village in their place. Named after the fertile landscape of the forestland, the isiZulu word ‘khula’ means ‘to grow’.

Today, Khula is home to about 9,000 people situated on nearly 2,000 plots of land. The government has made efforts to develop the village by constructing two schools and a 24-hour clinic, and by installing electricity lines. Village members have also built many of their own shops to sell snacks and miscellaneous household items to earn a living. Life in the village is mostly quiet with neighbors keen to spend time chatting and taking care of one another.

Senzokuhle Community and Development Organization conducts home based care services in the village and provides assistance to families in need in the form of food schemes, facilitation of government grant applications, and the delivery of medical supplies.

Problem Addressed
Khula Village faces two major problems: (1) Health and societal issues related to a very high prevalence of HIV/AIDS (around 25%), and (2) Lack of access to water.

Khula Village Borehole Project - South AfricaThough the South African government has made significant strides in providing people living with HIV (PLHIV) with access to anti-retroviral drugs, it was not before the virus left a devastating effect on most families in the village. The havoc wreaked by HIV/AIDS in the community has led to a generational gap in Khula and has left most children in an orphaned state and left in the care of elderly and/or extended relatives.

Khula’s second major problem is water. Water is irregularly pumped into taps throughout the village by the municipal government, but only about once a month, or every other month. This forces families to walk extended distances to gather water from potentially polluted sources, leading to ever-increasing incidences of waterborne disease according to the village clinic. At a time when Khula’s family structure has been torn apart by disease, the issue of water only works to further harm the people as it seeps its way into almost every aspect of daily life.

Project Description
This project is to install a borehole at the site of the Senzokuhle Community and Development Organization.

Senzokuhle is conveniently located in the center of Khula Village and is in close proximity to hundreds of households. Fencing surrounds the organization and the premises are monitored by a security guard during closed hours. The organization operates from Monday to Saturday from 9:00 am to 3:30 pm, during which the public will be free to collect the water as needed.

A manually-operated turn style drill will be used to dig the borehole by a local contractor who has guaranteed the quality of the work and that water will be found, as well as to provide future maintenance as needed,

Water is expected to be found at a depth of around 11 meters, after which digging will continue another 7-8 meters. The work is expected to take three days to complete.

The borehole pump will be electric, and above-ground improvements will include a tap at the location of the borehole and hose connections to two on-site 5,000-liter water tanks.

A series of four public workshops – in which everyone in the village will be invited to attend - will be held to generate awareness of proper water and sanitation & hygiene practices following the installation of the borehole. Topics covered at the workshops will include the importance of regular hand washing, proper bathing techniques, dental hygiene, and the different kinds of waterborne illnesses and how to avoid them. Local professionals, including a nurse from the local clinic and a dentist from the nearby township, have agreed to volunteer their time to make presentations at the workshops.

Khula Village Borehole Project - South AfricaCommunity care givers will be trained on the material at the workshop, after which they will forward the information to the families where they conduct home visits.

Project Impact
800 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jason Jones

Monitoring and Maintenance
The borehole will be monitored and maintained by the drilling contractor, who will provide maintenance as needed.

Fundraising Target
$2,200

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,200

Khula Village Borehole Project - South AfricaKhula Village Borehole Project - South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mbazwana Primary School Sanitation Project – South Africa

Mbazwana Primary School Sanitation Project – South Africa

Location
Mbazwana, Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa

Community Description
Mbazwana is located very near Sodwana Bay, a diving destination and a developing tourist area. Tourism does not yet provide jobs and work security to those living there, and most people are forced to leave to get work elsewhere.

Mbazwana Primary School Sanitation Project – South Africa

Mbazwana Primary School has 1,200 primary learners at 2 locations, a main campus and a second that handles preschoolers. Many of the learners at the school are in extended families or with grandparents.

The school has a good reputation in the community. Its sports field is used for various sports league activities and its classrooms are rented to outside groups.

The school is well-organized, with the involvement of administration, the community school board, and parents. However, the classrooms are overcrowded, educators have inadequate teaching materials, and funds do not exist to initiate any changes.

Problem Addressed
Forty flushing toilets were installed in the school about 7 years ago. Because there have been no repairs and little maintenance, compounded by the fact that students were never trained in their use, they have fallen into disrepair, and must be replaced.

Project Description
This project is to install 20 toilets and 8 sinks in 4 toilet units at the school.

Bowls, seats, and new flushing components will be installed. Sewer pipes and supply lines will be installed and replaced as needed. New sinks will be installed for hand washing after using the toilets.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the fixtures and materials and to pay for the labor of skilled technicians.

This project is a part of a larger project, which includes hygiene and sanitation training for educators and students, and will serve as a model to be adopted by other schools in the area.

Mbazwana Primary School Sanitation Project – South Africa

Project Impact
The school community of 1,200 learners, 34 educators, 1 principal, 2 vice principals, and 5 community school board members, will benefit from the project. Parents and caregivers, as well as members of sports leagues and outside community groups, will also benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Susan Goodson Fatherree

Comments
Susan previously served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand, where she completed the Ban Nongkad School Kitchen Project - Thailand.

As a Peace Corps Volunteer in South Africa, Susan completed the Mbazwana Primary School Water Project – South Africa.

The new facilities and training will result in a change of attitude toward sanitation and hygiene, thereby improving the health and wellbeing of all who attend and visit the school.

Dollar Amount of Project
$700.00

Donations Collected to Date
$700.00

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Alan Pollard, of Tenafly, NJ, USA.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

 

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Mbazwana Primary School Water Project – South Africa

Mbazwana Primary School Water Project – South AfricaLocation
Mbazawana Ward, Umhlabuyalingana Municipality, Kwa Zulu Natal Province, South Africa

Community Description
Mbazwana is located in the northeastern corner of the country, near the Mozambique border, on the Indian Ocean, next to Sodawana Bay, and is a UNESCO site. A rural area, it has a population of about 22,000 people. It is predominately a Black community, and employment is dependent on an under-developed tourist season, government subsidy, and work outside of the community.

The Mbazwana Primary School serves over 1,000 children, grades 1 through 7. It is one of 36 schools in the area.

Problem Addressed
The school has a single spigot that must be used by all of the students for drinking and washing hands. This makes it difficult to accommodate the 1,200 students who lunch all at the same time.

In addition, the kitchen does not have adequate facilities for food preparation and washing the dishes and utensils. Food for the school is prepared in the open-aired ‘kitchen room’ by the 7 cooks. Sometimes they sit outside in front and prepare the ingredients for the porridge or beans or rice that is for the served for the day.

Mbazwana Primary School Water Project – South AfricaCurrently, there is no running water and no drainage system in the kitchen. Food preparers must carry water from the faucet to the kitchen area to cook and clean.

Project Description
This project is to build a handwashing station for the use of the children, and a sink in the kitchen for the staff.

The handwashing station will be used by the children to obtain drinking water and to wash their hands and brush their teeth.

The plan is for a metal trough to be purchased nearby. If that becomes infeasible, the station will be built of concrete.

The trough will have five faucets that are accessible from either side. A center pipe will feed the faucets that sit up in the sink.

For the installation of the faucets, a paid contractor will locate the hardware and supervise the project. Experienced volunteers will do the installation.

Mbazwana Primary School Water Project – South AfricaThe second part of the project is to install a water supply and sink for the kitchen, to be used by staff for cooking and cleaning.

A covered concrete area will be built on the outside of the structure and a sink installed. A jojo (water tank) will be purchased and installed to supply water for the sink.

Water will be collected from the roof to fill the jojo, and waste water will be drained to a surrounding area.

The project is being carried out under the direction of Mr. Linda, the school principal. He has recruited parents and other community people to volunteer the labor.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the materials, including the jojo, trough, piping, fixtures, fittings, sink, roofing, and concrete.

Matching funds from a donor and the school district have been pledged. These additional funds will be used toward building the covered and cemented floor eating area.

Project Impact
1,200 learners, 37 teachers, 6 cooks

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Susan Goodson Fatherree

Comments
Susan previously served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand, where she completed the Ban Nongkad School Kitchen Project – Thailand.

Sanitary conditions for the students will be greatly improved with this project. In addition, the staff will have the capacity to prepare food for the students and serve it in a safe and clean environment.

The project accomplishes a tremendous amount with limited funding through thorough planning, full participation, and the use of matching resources.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the Gabriella Ille, of Sugar Grove, IL, and her friends.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Susan Goodson Fatherree of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Susan and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.


This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Ndlhavheya Primary School Rainwater Catchment System Project – South Africa

Ndlhavheya Primary School Rainwater Catchment System Project – South AfricaLocation
Basani, Ka-Bungeni Village, Vhembe District, Limpopo Province, South Africa

Community Description
Ka-Bungeni is a large village in the northernmost part of Limpopo Province, South Africa, near the border to Zimbabwe. It is situated in a hilly area on the tail end of the Soutpansberg Mountains. The dominant language is Xitsonga.

Bungeni is split into many smaller villages. The project targets Basani, one of the most impoverished areas. Many families in Basani either live in traditional thatched-roof houses, or small homes constructed from concrete or corrugated metal.

Basani is in a sub-tropical area which becomes lush with daily rainfall during the spring and summer but is dry during the winter months. Agriculture is very important; most families grow maize to eat, and many sell fruits and vegetables to generate extra income. Nonetheless, much of the local soil is depleted from years of farming.

Ndlhavheya Primary School Rainwater Catchment System Project – South AfricaUnemployment is high and many families are otherwise dependent on government money to feed their families. Some families have very little nutritious food to feed their children, and a child's only meal might be a free school lunch.

Access to water is a major local concern, as there are no rivers nearby. Wealthy families install boreholes, and sometimes sell water to their neighbors. Other families depend on unreliable municipality deliveries and community taps that are often dry.

The Ndlhavheya Primary School educates roughly 400 children from the impoverished surrounding community. The school cannot afford a borehole and is thus dependent on the unreliable municipality deliveries.

The teachers and principal are very interested in beginning a school garden to teach the children about healthy eating and supplement their school lunches, but currently what little water the school has must be conserved for sanitation and drinking. On some hot summer days the school is forced to close early for lack of water.

Ndlhavheya Primary School Rainwater Catchment System Project – South AfricaProject Description
402 learners this year, 15 educators, 3 support staff members, and local community members who will attend the permagarden workshops will benefit from the project.

Project Impact
This project is to build a rainwater catchment and storage system at Ndlhavheya Primary School.

Gutters will be installed along the school's roof. Rainwater will flow into two large cisterns at the end of the school block. These cisterns are plastic water tanks, each holding 2,200 liters. They are of a type used throughout South Africa, and are commonly called jojos. They are available for purchase from several local hardware stores, which deliver.

The school has a supply of concrete bricks that will make up the platform. The jojos have a tap on the bottom which can be attached to a hose.

The water collected in this rainwater harvesting system will primarily be used to support the school garden. The school already has several hoses that will be used to bring the water to the garden.

The garden will be created using sustainable permaculture methods which conserve water while improving the soil.

The food from the garden will supplement the school feeding scheme. Any additional food will be sold, with the money used to buy seeds and supplies for the garden.

Stored water will also be used when the municipality water runs out, so that the school is not forced to close.

The Peace Corps volunteer and a counterpart from a local community development organization will hold a series of workshops throughout the garden's creation, to educate learners and community members and empower them to employ permagarden techniques in their own gardens.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the gutters and cisterns.

The school is contributing funding to hire qualified community members to help the school groundskeepers install the system.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Kelsey Griffiths

Comments
This is an important infrastructure for the school. It will save money, conserve municipal water for drinking, and maintain a reliable source of water during the dry season.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Anonymous, of Bozeman, MT, USA.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Kelsey Griffiths of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Kelsey and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

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Umbulwane Water Transport Project – South Africa

Umbulwane Water Transport Project – South AfricaLocation
Umbulwane, Emnambithi/Ladysmith, uThukela District, Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa

Community Description
Ladysmith is a relatively medium sized town in the uThukela district, inside the province of Kwa-Zulu Natal, in South Africa. It is considered the central commercial shipping hub between the port city of Durban and the capital city of Johannesburg.

Umbulwane, also known as Little Qwa-Qwa (Qwa-Qwa being a large Lesotho settlement in South Africa) is a settlement of Lesotho immigrants located between the large townships of Ezakheni and Steadville. It is home to around 1,000 people, although this figure is only a guess as the area is not officially recognized, and census reports in South Africa are very inaccurate in general.

HIV/AIDS prevalence is expected to be close to the nearest neighboring town, Steadville, which has a 42% prevalence rate. Due to the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS, there is a large orphan population with grandparents representing a large portion of the caretakers in the village. A local crèche has been built with government and private funds to house the orphans during the day.

Umbulwane Water Transport Project – South AfricaThe village is located on two sides of a prominent road. One side is flat and spread out while the other is more condensed but situated on the side of a steep hill running alongside a small river bed. The river water is not safe to drink as it is located near many factories, and sewage pipes empty into it upstream.

Fortunately, there are water taps supplying clean water to the village, but there are only about a dozen of them located along a straight line through the village. Water piped directly to the homes is not available.

After conducting a Participatory Analysis for Community Action (PACA) with roughly eighty of the village elders it was determined, using pair-wise ranking, that water distribution was the number one need of the community.

Umbulwane Water Transport Project – South AfricaThe water taps available in the village are too far apart for many families to comfortably carry water back to their homes. Traditionally, women and children are responsible for fetching water. Without access to wheelbarrows and water jugs, many of them balance buckets on their heads in order to transport the water from the tap to their homes, often over long distances or up steep inclines.

Project Description
This project is to provide water to an unserved segment of the population using a simple system of wheelbarrows and water containers.

Ten or more wheelbarrows and twenty 25-liter jugs will be purchased for the community members to share when fetching water. Each of the wheelbarrows and jugs will be numbered using spray paint and stencils in order to keep track of them individually. They will also be labeled with identification of the sponsoring organizations, which will make them easily identifiable.

All items will be stored inside an 8-foot high gated area that surrounds the community crèche located near the middle of the village. They will be further secured using a lock and chain linking them all together when not in use.

The lead caretaker at the crèche, with whom Izimbali Projects shares a close relationship, has volunteered to be responsible for the safekeeping of the items. The crèche is operated seven days a week allowing anyone to easily check them out by signing a check-out sheet. This will ensure that it is known who has a wheelbarrow and jugs at any given time, and that they are checked back in by the end of the day.

By utilizing wheelbarrows and water jugs the villagers will be able to haul more than twice their usual amount of water back to their residence for each trip, and it will obviously be much easier on their bodies.

A local hardware store will sell the wheelbarrows at 20% off. Another local distributor will provide the 25 liter jugs with caps at-cost.

Due to the extreme lack of funds in the community, the community involvement will be in the form of helping assemble the wheelbarrows, stenciling the numbers and names on the sides of each item, and maintaining their safekeeping.

Project Impact
It is estimated that 200 people, or 20% of the village, those responsible for gathering water, will benefit directly from the project. The whole village will benefit indirectly from the potential use of the wheelbarrows and containers other tasks, such as delivering water to the active community garden, hauling building supplies for constructing, or repairing homes (many of which are made of a hardened mud material).

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Josh Dickey

Comments
This project uses the most basic and appropriate technology to bring water for the community. Its simplicity does not detract from the impact the project will have on the lives of the people.

Dollar Amount of Project
$480.00

Donations Collected to Date
$480.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Josh of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or other projects in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Sinozwelo Resource Centre Water and Sanitation Project – South Africa

Sinozwelo Resource Centre Water and Sanitation Project – South AfricaLocation
Tugela Ferry, Msinga Sub-District, Umzinyathi District, Province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Community Description
The geographical region served by Sinozwelo Resource Centre is one of the poorest regions of all of South Africa The population of the region lives in deep, remote rural areas long distances from villages and medical services.

The estimated rate of HIV/AIDS infection is 35-40% with an average age of 24 years and a life expectancy of 43 years. The population is 99.9% black and approximately 99% live in traditional areas as opposed to formal towns.

Sinozwelo Resource Centre Water and Sanitation Project – South AfricaOnly 13% of the households have electricity, less than 10% having adequate sanitation or access to potable water and 98% have to travel on foot to the nearest health centre, which is an average 4.4 kilometers away.

In Msinga municipality, there is a growing number of destitute children due to the HIV/AIDS pandemic in this region with over 500 orphans and vulnerable children around Tugela Ferry. As parents die from HIV/AIDS or tuberculosis, the consequence is a growing number of child-headed households which struggle to make ends meet often with no basic needs such as food, clothing, or income.

Sinozwelo Resource Centre was founded in 2001 to meet the needs of orphans and vulnerable children and to provide resources to families affected and infected by HIV/AIDS. Sinozwelo's facilities in Tugela Ferry, built in 2002, consists of a DayCare and Resource/Office centre.

Sinozwelo Resource Centre Water and Sanitation Project – South AfricaSince its origin, Sinozwelo Resource Centre has been funded through contracts with the Department of Health and Department of Social Development. These contracts have provided funding for food, staff stipends, and minimal operational expenses such as phone and electricity costs.

Over the past 10 years, there has been no money for the maintenance of the facilities and in particular, plumbing. Consequently, three out of four toilets used by over 65 children attending the DayCare and over 95 orphans and vulnerable children who come to Sinozwelo each day for daily meals are non-functional due to plumbing leaks and needed repairs. Children often use the grounds around the toilets due to the lack of functioning toilets.

In addition, the facility's kitchen sink serving the facility food preparation and washing of dishware is in disrepair and leaking.

Project Description
This project is to restore the use of the three non-functioning toilets and to repair the sink used for the preparation of over 150 meals each day.

On a competitive bid basis, a plumber will be engaged to perform the work as soon as funding is available. Parts needed for the repair will be purchased. Discounts on plumbing parts will be solicited from local vendors. Volunteer help will come from the community to repair the cabinetry around the facility's kitchen sink after the repairs of the sink are made.

Project Impact
This project will benefit 160 children, including 65 children attending the DayCare daily and 95 orphans and vulnerable children receiving daily meals.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Charles Possin

Comments
This is an essential project that provides the minimal repairs needed for the health and wellbeing of those being served by the center.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Charles Possin of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund projects by other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Phumelele Primary School Water Project – South Africa

Phumelele Primary School Water Project – South Africa Location
Sincobile, Eastern Mpumalanga, South Africa

Community Description
Sincobile is a small South African village of about 1,000 people, located in eastern Mpumalanga near the border of Swaziland. The dominant language is Siswati. The village lies in the foothills of the mountains to the east, and is surrounded by commercial pine tree plantations.

Most families in Sincobile live in varying degrees of poverty. Traditional homes, those constructed of mud and thatched grass roofs, greatly outnumber homes constructed with more modern techniques. Very few families have televisions or radios, and even fewer have cars. It is very common to see people riding horses along the dirt road.

Phumelele Primary School Water Project – South Africa Most of the people of Sincobile who do have jobs work for the tree farming companies, and nearly all families practice farming to some extent.

Agriculture is very important to the community. Sincobile is in the Highveld region of South Africa. This is a blessing and a curse, in that precipitation is plentiful, but the soil is predominantly composed of clay, and therefore contains high quantities of acid. During the spring and summer months it rains nearly every day. Precipitation levels drop off steeply during fall and winter months, however, and because the municipal water supply is not dependable, farming can become very difficult during these seasons.

Phumelele Primary School has begun a permagardening program. The goal is to produce part of the food for the school meal plan, and also to teach students gardening methods that can save water and produce crops without the need for expensive fertilizers and pesticides. Constant access to water is needed to continue the program year round. Due to the undependable municipal water system, the school is often forced to buy water deliveries for the cisterns.

Phumelele Primary School Water Project – South Africa Project Description
This project is to build a rainwater catchment and storage system at the Phumelele Primary School.

Gutters will be installed along the roof of the school. The water will flow into two water cisterns at the end of the school near the garden.

The water collected in the cisterns will be used for hand washing and gardening. Municipal water for drinking will be collected in a separate cistern when it is running. Since it will not be needed for hygiene, sanitation, and gardening, the potable water will last much longer.

In addition, a water awareness program will be created at the school. Short classes in water conservation will be given for older students and a puppet show will teach younger students. Once the new system is in place, signs will be placed on all the cisterns with simple iconic images to remind students which cisterns are for what purpose.

The project is being carried out under the direction of the School Governing Body and Parents Committee.

Project funds will be used for the purchase of equipment and materials. The work of installing the gutters and cisterns will be completed by the Peace Corps Volunteer and the school general worker.

Project Impact
200 students will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Alan Toth

Comments
This project will provide a more consistent and reliable supply of water and eliminate the cost of purchasing water for the school.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Alan Toth of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Alan and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.
Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Umuzomuhle Old Aged Club Garden Water Project - South Africa

Umuzomuhle Old Aged Club Garden Water Project - South Africa

Location
Betty'sGoed, Albert Luthuli Municipality, Gert Sibande District, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa

Umuzomuhle Old Aged Club Garden Water Project - South Africa

Community Description
Betty'sGoed is a rural village in South Africa about 15 km away from the Oshoek border gate with Swaziland. During the Apartheid era, the area around Betty'sGoed was used as a homeland for the Swazi people. Many were moved from around South Africa and have lived there ever since.

The village is located off a dirt road, and because of its lack of infrastructure it is hard for many people in the village to find employment. Often young people leave the village for larger cities to find jobs or get an education. They do not return to the village, leaving older members of the family to look after the home and small children.

The Umuzomuhle Old Aged Club currently has 15 registered women members, the oldest being 92 years of age. Many of the elderly women are the heads of their household. They are responsible for taking care of their adult children, their grandchildren and general upkeep of the home. These women supplement their family income with their work at Umuzomuhle. There, they make Swati straw mats, mats from plastic bags and other handicrafts which they sell at local markets. The women also keep a garden around their center, where they grow vegetables and mealies. They harvest these vegetables and eat them at the center where they work. The excess produce they bring home to their families or sell.

But Umuzomuhle is more than just an income generator. The club provides a place where the women can go and report abuse and find help from a social worker. They also empower themselves by having basic education classes at the center from June through December. They learn basic maths and literacy to help them manage the group's finances.

However, the water in Betty'sGoed is unreliable. The water treatment facility is old and gets overloaded. The taps can be dry for up to a week. The village bore-hole and river are too far away for these older ladies to go and carry water back. So, when the taps are dry the women cannot irrigate their crops and work stops at the center. This threatens the food security of their families and the financial stability of the group.

Umuzomuhle Old Aged Club Garden Water Project - South Africa Project Description
This project is to install a 2,200 L Jojo (water collection tank) in the garden of the Umuzomuhle Old Aged Club's facility. The water collected will be used to irrigate the community garden.

Project funds will be used to purchase a Jojo and pipes to connect the water tap to the Jojo, as well as for transport of the equipment and materials.

Umuzomuhle will provide the labor to install the tap and set up the Jojo on the existing stand.

Project Impact
75 people, consisting of the 15 registered women in the club and their families, will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Briana O'Sullivan

Comments
This project will provide for much-needed irrigation of the community garden. It will allow the highly-effective gardening program to continue, and be of great benefit to the participants and their dependents.

 

Dollar Amount of Project
$320.00

Donations Collected to Date
$320.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Jean O'Sullivan,of Coral Springs FL, USA.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Briana O'Sullivan of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Briana and/or those of other PCVs in the country.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Mmatope Primary School Water Project – South Africa

Mmatope Primary School Water Project – South AfricaLocation
Jericho, North West Province, South Africa

Community Description
Jericho is a rural community of 13,000 people in the North West Province of South Africa. Jericho faces many challenges due to the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, unemployment, and poor service delivery.

Though located only 80 km northwest of Pretoria and 40 km north of the closest town of Brits, service delivery in Jericho is very unpredictable. The vast majority of residents and organizations within Jericho get their water from taps in their yards or houses. However, the municipality often cuts off water to part or all of the village for weeks or months at a time.

Mmatope Primary School Water Project – South AfricaCurrently, there are people in Jericho who have not had water at their homes since June and have had to walk to other parts of the large village with wheelbarrows to collect water.

Mmatope Primary School serves 387 children in grades R (kindergarten) through 6, 56 of whom a considered to be Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVCs). The principal and teachers are dedicated to educating and empowering the learners despite the challenges they face coming from a rural community.

Although the school is able to provide enough drinking water for the learners through storage tanks on the school grounds, there is not sufficient water available to irrigate the school garden. The Department of Education requires each school with a school lunch program to create a garden to provide fresh vegetables to the learners, but Mmatope Primary School has struggled to start their garden due to the lack of a consistent water source.

Mmatope Primary School Water Project – South AfricaProject Description
This project is to provide a rainwater collection and storage system for the school. Rainwater will be collected off the roof of the classroom block adjacent to the garden and piped into two tanks.

The tanks will be connected to the existing gutters on the building and a stand for the tanks will be constructed.

The rainwater will be used to irrigate the garden throughout the year as well as a backup source of water when the municipal water has been turned off and the other tanks are depleted.

The garden will also be designed using permagarden techniques learned by the PCV and her counterpart, the school gardener, at Peace Corps South Africa’s permagarden workshop.

The garden will benefit not only the learners and educators, but the greater community as the school will donate excess vegetables to the families of OVCs and elderly community members who are unable to garden at their own homes due to lack of water.

Project funds will be used to purchase the tanks as well as bricks and cement to build the stands for the tanks. Parent volunteers will contribute the labor needed to complete the project.

Project Impact
387 learners and 18 educators, support staff and volunteers at Mmatope Primary School will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Rebecca Cramer

Comments
This project uses the appropriate technology to attack the problems of lack of water for irrigation and shortage of water in general during the dry season. It utilizes existing improvements and resources to implement the project rapidly and effectively.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Rebecca of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or other projects in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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