Rwanda

Gisenyi Rainwater Catchment System & Ferro-Cement Tank Training Program - Rwanda

Gisenyi Rainwater Catchment System & Ferro-Cement Tank Training Program - Rwanda

Water Charity will be joining with Friendly Water for the World to put on a 9-day training program and conference in Gisenyi, Rwanda in January, 2017. The technology to be taught is the construction and maintenance of rainwater catchment systems, with a focus on ferro-cement tanks.

This program will proliferate the technology through 7 countries (Rwanda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Burundi, and Ethiopia), and will focus on “training the trainers”. Water Charity will provide additional funding for the new projects that are spawned by the process.

During the week, two teams, of six Rwandans each, will be trained. They have among them proficiency in English, Swahili, and French in addition to Kinyarwanda. They will set up cooperative businesses, and proceed to train others, while they build systems throughout the country. They will be available to train serving Peace Corps Volunteers in and around the communities where they live and work. They already have orders for 50 tanks.

Representatives of several local NGOs will be trained as well. All told, more than 80 people will attend the training, and most of them will go back to their agencies, villages, communities to build catchment systems, construct tanks, train others, and incorporate the technology into their operations.

The training will be led by Friendly Water’s Uganda Representative Richard Kyambadde, who is Africa Representative to the American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association, and a three-person team from Uganda with which he works.

Averill Strasser, Water Charity’s Co-Founder and COO, and Beverly Rouse, its Executive Director will be at the training, providing support, and lining up new projects in Rwanda, as well as the rest of East and Central Africa.

Participants will learn to make three types of systems:Gisenyi Rainwater Catchment System & Ferro-Cement Tank Training Program - Rwanda

(1) Larger 5,000-20,000-liter free-standing tanks,
(2) 2,000-3,000-liter tanks made with wooden molds, and
(3) 1,000 liter "waterhives", which are semi-prefabbed.

Aside from the hands-on work, there will be meetings to teach the determination of the optimal type and size of units under differing conditions. There will be a focus on the continuing training and production of systems in a way that it is self-supporting in the community, eliminating the need of further assistance.

This is the implementation of a bold new concept to provide needed improvements while also creating business and employment opportunities. It is a part of the Water Charity Training and Support Initiative.  In addition, since the benefits will accrue to displaced persons in 6 countries, it is included under our Refugee Aid Initiative - Worldwide.

Water Charity has contributed all the costs for this conference and training through the generosity of an Anonymous donor.  Any further donations to the effort will be used to fund the various projects that arise from this training.  As we anticipate this to be quite a few, we ask that give what you can.  We hope to expand our highly sucessful training efforts dramatically in the new year!

Catchment tank

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Sake Water System Project - Rwanda

Sake Water System Project - Rwanda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Rukoma and Gafunzo, Sake Sector, Ngoma District, Eastern Province, Rwanda

Sake Water System Project - RwandaCommunity Description
Sake is located in the Eastern Province, District of Ngoma. Ngoma is a very large district which divides into sectors, which then divides into cells and then villages. Sake is one of twenty sectors in Ngoma, which has 4 cells, Rukoma, Gafunzo, Kibonde and Nkanga. These fours cells have a total of 34 villages, with a population of 25,700 community members.

There are two beautiful lakes which runs through Sake, Lake Sake and Lake Mugesera. Sake neighbors a sector call Bugesera which happens to be the hottest place in Rwanda, which means living in Sake can be extremely hot especially during the dry seasons. Because Sake is in the Eastern Province, even the rainy seasons are not as wet as other areas.

In Sake, Gafunzo is considered the main town as there are many shops, the bus park, and most importantly the market.

Rukoma is where the health center is located and it services 25,700 community members. It is also the home of the Catholic Church in Sake where the majority of the community attends services.

Sake has a wonderful community environment. The people in Sake are both friendly and welcoming. Children enjoy seeing foreigners come in and out the villages and often times try to use English when approaching them. The majority of the community members are cultivators.

A major landmark in Sake is the gas station located near the Catholic Church (non affiliated). Many times there are heavy traffic due to construction being done by the government and also because the road leads the District Hospital. Sake has one of the most beautiful sunsets that reflects off the water.

Problem Addressed
Living close to open water, community members use the lake as a water source. This is a major issue because lake water is a health hazard. Because of the lack of water stations in the villages, community members rely solely on the lakes to provide water for their families. There is a high incidence of water borne illness in Sake, as reported by the health center, with many mothers and children who use lake water as a water source.

Sake Water System Project - RwandaSake has 34 villages and limited number of water stations nearing these villages. To get to a water station, some community members travel far. A jerry can contains 20 liters, which is a heavy load for a mother caring a child on her back. Because mothers are the primary caretakers, they are responsible for the majority of the household chores including fetching water. Many children can be seen fetching water and carrying them home to their families.

Rukoma and Gafunzo cells are the cells closest to the lakes and have very few water stations, resulting in community members using the lake as a water source.

Project Description
This project is to build a water system comprised of a water line connected to a new water station in each of three villages in Sake: Kizanye, Nyabuhoro, and Nyakagezi.

All of the work done will be done manually, with the help of the people of the community and the engineers who will lay the pipes.

The funds provided by Water Charity will be used to buy the materials and pay the engineers. The Sector officials (appointed officials of the sector) will pay for the community labor.

The implementation plan for this project is roughly five months:

First the engineers will buy the materials- (3 days)
Second the community will dig the path for the pipes (8 weeks)
Third the engineers will lay the pipes for the water stations.
The water pipes will be connected to Gasetsa water plant in Sake. (4 weeks)
The last month will be used to clean up the site and cover the pipes and to make sure everything is in place.

Sake Water System Project - RwandaIn order to build the water station in Sake, a trench will be dug from Gafunzo where the water source is located to where the water stands will be built. The trenches to all three villages will be 0.9 meters deep and 0.5 meters wide. The trench from Gafunzo to Nyabuhoro is 1 km long continuing another 1.5 km from Nyabuhoro to Kizanye and extending right of Nyabuhoro to Nyakagezi for an additional 2 km.

Since the trench will lead to three villages they will be 2,400 laborers working to dig the trench manually using shovels. After the trench is dug, a foundation will be put in place for the pipes.

Stones will be placed in the trench, and then sand placed to protect the pipes from damages that may occur from earth movement.

Next, galvanized pipe will be laid in the trench once a stable foundation is achieved. The pipes will be one continuous pipe from Gafunzo (location of the water tanks) to Nyabuhoro, Nyabuhoro to Kizanye and Nyabuhoro to Nyakagezi.

After the pipes are laid the laborers will place the small sand on top and around the pipes and then add small stones to ensure stability.

Finally, the laborers will come back to back fill the trench using the soil that was dug up from the trench.

The water stand will then be built. First sand will be placed around the area. Plank wood will be placed in a 8” x 16'' rectangular shape, which will then be filled with cement surrounding an upright above-ground pipe. Finally, a cylinder-shaped cement block will be placed around the pipe for stabilization.

Project Impact
This project will benefit all 2,618 members of the three communities reached.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Shinae Meylor

Monitoring and Maintenance
Once the piping is completed the community and the Sector office will take responsibility for the maintenance of the water stands. Each person that comes to the stand for water will pay 20 francs a jerry-can. The money collected from the community members will be used to pay the water company and the person responsible for collecting the money (community health worker).

The Executive Secretary will be responsible for any repairs that might occur in the future. She is responsible for actively communicating with the community members to assure that they are receiving quality water and that the pipe stands are available and working in the community.

Fundraising Target
$4,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$65

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,835

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Mara Cell Water System Project - Rwanda

Mara Cell Water System Project - Rwanda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Mara Cell Water System Project - RwandaLocation
Mara Cell, Ruhashya Sector, Huye District, Southern Province, Rwanda

Community Description
Mara cell is located in Ruhashya sector, in Huye district, in the Southern province of Rwanda. It is a hilly and mountainous area, with the cell surrounded by forested areas and valleys. It is home to approximately 3,200 people. There is one primary school, serving approximately 700 students.

Life in Mara cell is difficult. Many people live in poverty, as a majority of people do sustenance farming to make their living. Farmers cultivate plantains, beans, and corn, or herd livestock, especially cows and pigs. Mara cell is known for having the best plantains in the sector.

There is no electricity or access to a clean water source in the cell. When fetching water, it is typical to travel 2 to 3 kilometers, spending 30 minutes to an hour doing so. Often, families have to find water in neighboring cells, or they fetch unclean water from the valleys.

Every Tuesday, groups gather to save and lend money, as the cell leader explains, with the hope that all citizens may be able to buy health insurance, at a cost of 3,000 RWF ($3.85 US) per person for one year. This is one community-driven action they are doing to reduce poverty in the area.

Mara Cell Water System Project - RwandaProblem Addressed
Mara cell is the most impoverished in the sector. It is rife with malnutrition, poor hygiene, and malaria.

One of the largest problems in the cell is that there is no access to water. People living in the area must travel to neighboring cells in order to fetch water, often spending up to an hour to do so. Because fetching water takes so long and water in the community is scarce, the citizens tend to prioritize water conservation over proper sanitation and hygiene, leading to increased disease, such as worms, diarrhea, and malnutrition.

Project Description
This project is to build a water system in Mara cell.

The project has been approved by the Ruhashya Sector Office, and will be carried out under the direction of a local water engineer. It can be broken down into three parts: (1) Extending pipeline to the cell office, (2) building the water source, and (3) conducting WASH training.

1. Extending the pipeline
The water pipeline will be extended from the closest water source in the neighboring cell, Ruhashya. The pipeline will extend all the way to the cell office, a central location from which future water sources can be added.

Mara Cell Water System Project - RwandaThe Mara citizens, as part of their “umuganda,” a day of community volunteering, will use hoes, picks, and other tools they own to dig the trenches for the pipeline. The piping will then be connected and buried.

2. Building the water source
The water source will be built, under the direction of the water engineer, by Mara citizens, who will donate their time and labor. They have also committed to financing or obtaining sand and gravel on their own. Some of the funds will be used to pay for labor fees for the water engineer and his counterpart.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the pipes and the construction materials to build the water source.

At the completion of the water source, the water engineer will give a training on how to properly maintain the water source.

3. WASH Training
In order to address the issue of disease burden in the community, community health workers in Mara cell will attend a training on WASH so that they may be more knowledgeable in teaching this topic to their neighbors.

The training will address preventive hygiene measures that are the frequent cause of health issues in the community. It will be led by Community Health Worker supervisor and the Health Center Titulair.

Mara Cell Water System Project - RwandaMara citizens have already been sensitized to improving their health, and decreasing the disease burden is one of the benefits that can come with improved access to water. With the access to a nearby water source, they are eager to learn how they can change their behaviors.

Project Impact
3,800 people will benefit from improved access to a clean water source.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Susan Robins

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Sector Social Affairs Officer has created a plan where the citizens of Mara cell will be charged 10 RWF for a 20 L jerrycan of water. The money collected will be used for maintenance and repairs.

During the first few months, the charge will be waived in appreciation for the work and materials that they have provided.

Fundraising Target
$6,100

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$6,100

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Kinihira Sector Water Project - Rwanda

Kinihira Sector Water Project - Rwanda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kinihira Sector Water Project - RwandaLocation
Bweramvura and Gitinda Cell, Kinihira Sector, Ruhango District, South Province, Rwanda

Community Description
Bweramvura and Gitinda cells are located within Kinihira sector, in the district of Ruhango, Southern province of Rwanda. Bweramvura cell contains six villages: Kabadende, Bugarura, Gihororo, Gahororo, Nyagisenyi, and Nyabivumu.

Gitinda cell contains nine villages: Muremure, Nyamagana, Rubona, Remera, Nyarugunga, Nyagatovu, Rugarama, Kabasanzu, and Nyarusange.

The Nyabarongo and Kiryango Rivers run through the West and East, creating a border between Karongi district and Mwendo sector respectively. Much of the landscape of the area is filled with rolling hills with fertile soil, ideal for farming. There are also many small forests where the trees are cut and used for charcoal and plywood. The hills also boast the shiny mineral mica, commonly called “corta” by the community.

The climate in the region ranges from mild to cool. The rainy season is from February to June and October to December. The dry season is from June to September and December to February.

The community is very rural and not easily accessible. The nearest "town" is one hour by motorcycle taxi, but many community members cannot afford the transport. In the cells there is one school (primary to senior level three), a health center, three small boutique stores, an agronomy/veterinary store, and three churches (Catholic, Adventist, and Protestant).

Kinihira Sector Water Project - RwandaMany of the villagers practice farming as their main trade, as a majority of the land is farmland. The community is tight knit, and it seems as though everyone knows everyone.

The Muremure Health Center provides for the health needs of the residents of the sector.

Problem Addressed
There is a great need to improve the water infrastructure in the community. Many people have to walk 30-60 minutes one way to fetch water from the local source, usually one water tap per village. Some families live closer to a river than the water tap, and, therefore, use the unclean river water as their source. This of course leads to some of the hygiene-related illness we see in the young children.

The improvement of water access and WASH education in the community was found to be a priority when the community needs assessment was conducted. A majority of the community members mentioned that they have to walk very far distances to reach their water source, and also that parasites and diarrhea are big health concerns, especially in young children.

At the health center and its near vicinity, there are disruptions in water flow because of numerous damaged and leaking pipes due to heavy rains in the area that have caused erosion and displaced the pipes above ground. Currently, there are no functioning sinks or hand washing stations at the health center for patients or other community members to use. The sinks in place do not work, are very rusty, which causes blockages, or are badly leaking.

Kinihira Sector Water Project - RwandaProject Description
This project addresses the water needs of the community through three components:

 (1) The first priority is to repair the damaged water pipes in the area.

 (2) Second will be to repair the sinks and build simple hand washing stations at the health center for staff and patients for regular use.

 (3) Thirdly, one new water tap will be constructed in each of 14 villages that have insufficient access for community members.

An important aspect of the project is behavior change, which will come from an education component throughout the project. Community health workers will be trained on water, sanitation, and hygiene topics and apply these to their work and share with the community during home visits and village meetings. This will teach and encourage households to practice safe water drinking and storage, maintain hygienic homes and kitchen areas, and prevent and care for hygiene-related illness.

The project was planned by the health center supervisor, the PCV, the nutritionist (counterpart to the PCV), the community health worker manager, and the technician. Together, they went to visit each site where the pipes were damaged, and prepared a detailed budget.

The health center technician will manage the construction of the water taps and repairs of the pipes and sinks. He has a detailed estimate of how many workers he will need, the materials, transport, and timeline of the project. First will be to do repairs at the health center and any damaged pipes in the community. Then will begin the analysis of water tap location with input from community members, followed by the construction.

Kinihira Sector Water Project - RwandaDuring this time, the PCV will monitor the progress and also hold a training for community health workers about WASH. Once the construction has reached the half way point, a committee will be assembled in each village to ensure community support.

A potential challenge will be adhering to the timeline during the rainy season. The heavy rains may halt work for some days, or may even cause mudslides in the areas of construction.

This project builds skills and capacity in the community in several ways. Training community health workers in WASH topics will broaden their expertise of health issues and care. Helping community members to build their own hand washing stations will develop all of their skills to keep good hygiene. As all of the workers will be from the community, it will give them a form of village ownership, and they will learn about proper maintenance of water facilities.

Project Impact
10,626 community members will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Shreya Desai

Monitoring and Maintenance
Within each village, there will be a committee that will do monthly checks to ensure proper running of the water taps and determine if there is a need for maintenance of the water taps or pipes. If so, the health center will provide a technician, and the funds will come from health center and/or local government budgets.

Comments
The impact of the project will be a reduction in the time it takes community members to fetch water, improved facilities of water access, a decrease in the number of preventable hygiene-related illness, and an increase in knowledge of WASH topics within the community. This will result in the reduction in the rates of diarrhea, malaria, intestinal parasites, pneumonia, and other illnesses.

Additionally, this project will support the First 1000 Days program by bringing extensive hygiene and sanitation training to pregnant women and mothers with children under two years of age.

Fundraising Target
$4,800

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$125

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$4,675

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Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - Rwanda

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - Rwanda

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Bubazi Health CenterLocation
Bubazi Cell, Rubengera Sector, Karongi District, Western Province, Rwanda, Africa

Community Description
The Bubazi Health Center’s catchment area encompasses two cells (Bubazi and Gitwa Cell) and 15 villages, and has a population of approximately 8,700 people. This project will benefit Bubazi Cell, which has a population of approximately 3,436 people and 7 villages: Kavumu, Kigarama, Gakomeye, Nyagahinga, Makurungwe, Gitwa and Kabuga Village.

Bubazi Cell has two schools: one Primary School and one Secondary School, with over 1,100 students attending (about 800 primary students and about 300 secondary students). There is also one nursery school with approximately 20 children in attendance. Students come from a wide range of cells to attend these schools. These are day schools, where some of the children walk well over 1 hour to attend. The school system is not able to provide food to the children and at this time there is no water available to the children.

The Bubazi Cell is located in the Western Province of Rwanda where the weather is mild, the terrain is mountainous and lush. It rains often with the rivers and streams flowing strong, yet very brown. The majority of the people still fetch their water from the rivers and streams.

The people are hard workers. They love to cultivate! Every day, without fail you will see women (and in the more remote villages, men and children) cultivating and planting from early morning until early afternoon. There is an abundance of vegetables, fruits and grains grown in the area (eggplant, cabbage, tomatoes, green beans, onions, garlic, avocado, bananas, pineapple, papaya, mango, corn, rice, soy and beans). This is due to the abundant rain and people who love to cultivate.

Bubazi Health CenterIn the early 1970’s a Swiss NGO established an Agricultural Project in the area of Bubazi Cell. They helped establish plantain farms and formal agriculture. To this day the people of this community are extremely knowledgeable about farming. Between 1972 -1976 the Swiss constructed the buildings of the compound that is now the Bubazi Community Health Center.

In 1990 the Swiss built two extensive and efficient water distribution systems. Locally they are known as Gakoma Source and Gatunguguru Source. Both of these water sources are prolific in their water supply. However, Gatunguguru Source appears to be especially vast.

The Gakoma Water Source distribution system originates from an underground source of water located at Gakoma Springs in a remote area of Gitega Cell. This distribution system has been repaired, thanks to Water Charity, through the implementation of Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source and now provides clear water, suitable for drinking, to 3,116 people in six villages.

The Gatunguguru Water Distribution System originates from an underground source of water located at Gatunguguru Springs in Muvungu Village, Gitega Cell. This distribution system, when in good working order will provide clear water, suitable for drinking to a minimum of 3,436 people in 7 villages as well as providing an abundance of quality water to Bubazi Primary School and Bubazi Secondary School.

Problem Addressed
Through interviews with the Bubazi Health Center staff, with Community Health Workers and with the village people, as well as through observation it is very clear that quality water access, poor hygiene and waterborne illness is a high ranking problem in the area. The underlying problem which contributes to poor hygiene and illness is access to clean water.

There is an abundance of water in the Bubazi area. The problem is that it is brown and full of parasites. Yet the people drink this unclean water.

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - RwandaThere is a high need for hygiene education in Bubazi and Gitwa Cells in order to align the minds of the people with the concept of hygiene. The W.A.S.H. (Water, Sanitation, Hygiene) Program would be valuable for this purpose. However, many of the people in the Bubazi area must walk long distances to fetch water for their families and then afterwards they should boil it. When one village woman was asked why she did not boil the water she fetched from the river before drinking it she replied with a weary expression of resignation on her face, “Who has the time?” Also the charcoal required for boiling water is very expensive. The problem is lack of access to quality water. It is not possible to have good hygiene and health if there is not access to clean water.

At one time the people of the Bubazi area had access to an abundance of quality water within their villages and at their schools. However, due to circumstances, access to this water has been lost. Both the Gakoma and the Gatunguguru water distribution systems were built in 1990. Sometime in the early 1990’s the Swiss NGO left Rwanda. Since the construction of these systems, 25 year ago, there has been very little maintenance of these systems.

This system consists of large, main water lines coming directly from the sources, with feeder lines branching out from the main line. These feeder lines feed into tap systems where villagers can easily fetch clean water. Many of the feeder lines are broken and most of the taps systems have deteriorated and are unusable. At one time these distribution systems provided water to 31 villages, possibly more. Most of these 31 villages no longer have access to these abundant water sources due to the deterioration of the distribution system. With the implementation of Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source quality water has been made available to 3,116 village people and to the Bubazi Health Center through the repair of the Gakoma distribution system. However, the Gatugunguru Water source and the 26 water fetching stations (fountains) that provide water to the 7 villages of Bubazi as well as to two Bubazi schools is still in severe disrepair. This leaves over 3,000 village people as well as the 1,130 children who attend the Bubazi schools without access to quality water.

Project Description
The goal of Bubazi Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source is to repair the Gatugunguru water catchment system, the entire main distribution line and all secondary lines from Gatugunguru Source to Bubazi Cell, its 7 villages and 2 schools.

Through the implementation of this project the following repairs will be made:

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - Rwanda1.The Gatunguguru Source catchment system will be repaired and protected.

2.The main line and all secondary lines will be repaired.

3. All the water catchment tanks, and feeder lines to storage tanks that are supplied by the Gatugunguru Source will be repaired.

4. All water fountains directly on the entire main line will be repaired and made operable.

5. The 26 water fountains (water fetching stations) located in the 7 villages of Bubazi Cell, and all distribution lines supplying these fountains will be repaired, made in good working order, and made available for the all people of the community for water access.

6. All feeder lines to the Bubazi Primary and Bubazi Secondary Schools will be repaired and four holding tanks on school grounds will be repaired and made in good working order. All fountains (water fetching stations) on school grounds will be repaired.

7. To set up a program for monitoring and maintenance of the Gatunguguru Source distribution systems.

The holistic goal and desired outcome is to provide the people of the Bubazi community the means to create healthy, vital lives for themselves. This will support the objective of the First Thousand Days project of improving the health and life expectancy of pregnant mothers and children as well as significantly lightening their work load.

In the Bubazi Community quality water access is the foundation of good health, followed by education and behavior change. It is difficult to ask people to change behavior when they do not have the resources to do so. This is a set up for failure. By making quality water accessible to the community we are setting the community up for success in the areas of good hygiene and good health.

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - RwandaProject Impact
This project will provide quality water to 3,436 village people and 1,130 school children (many of these children travel from villages outside of Bubazi Cell).

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
April Zachary

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Bubazi Health Center will be taking responsibility for the maintenance of the Gatunguguru Source and the Gakoma Source water distribution systems.

The Bubazi Health Center’s maintenance plan for the Gatungurguru Source and the Gakoma Source distribution system is as follows:

1. Each March, when the Health Center’s budget is planned, the health center will request funds for the year’s maintenance/repair of the water distribution system.

2. The health center will create a contract with a local plumber who will work for them on an on-call-basis for any repairs or maintenance needed for the system

3. The Executive Secretary of Bubazi Cell and the Bubazi Health Center Titulier will require each Village to create a Village Water Security Committee (VWSC). The committee will have a minimum of 3 people (more if possible) who will be responsible for the Water Security in their villages. They will provide quarterly Water Security Awareness Training to the peoples of their village. The training will have the purpose of inspiring the community to take ownership of the water distribution system and to participate in keeping it secure and strong. Parents will be asked to talk with their children about the importance of keeping their water system functioning efficiently (this will help prevent the occasional vandalism that happens to the water lines by the children). Parents and children will be asked to report to the Water Security Committee any broken pipes, non-functioning tap systems or anything that could be related to water security.

Bubazi Health Center Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source - Rwanda4. The Water Security Committee will do a monthly inspection of all of the water catchment tanks and tap systems in their village areas. They will report any problems (or potential problems) to the health center.

5. Quarterly, the people will clean (de-weed, etc.) the exterior of all water catchment tanks and taps systems, and the grounds around them, in their village area. They will report to the VWSC anything that looks unusual or could become a problem to water security. 6. The plumber will do an annual inspection of all water catchment tanks and taps in the Bubazi Cell. 7. The Health Center Titulier will have an annual meeting with the Village Water Security Committees in order to discuss any potential problems to the water security, any improvements needed to the reporting systems and any changes that need to happen within the committee (member rotations, etc.)

Comments
This is a second stage of a two-part project for repairing the water distribution system in the Bubazi area. The first project, Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source, was successfully completed on March 10, 2016.

Upon the completion of this second project, Bubazi Water Project 2: Gatugunguru Source, the entire water distribution system supplying quality water to the Bubazi area will be in good working order, with a maintenance/protection plan in place.

Friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer April Zachary may contribute using the donate button below.  Funds in excess of the project amount will go to other projects in Rwanda.

If you would like to help us with similar projects, please donate to the East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

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Bubazi Health Center Water Project - Rwanda

Water Catchment Area

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Bubazi & Gitwa Cells, Rubengera, Karongi, Rwanda

Community Description
The project community is the Bubazi Health Center Catchment Area. The Bubazi Health Center’s catchment area encompasses two cells, 15 villages, and has a Water fetching stationpopulation of approximately 8,700 people. The two cells are: Bubazi Cell and Gitwa Cell.  Bubazi Cell has a population of approximately 3,436 people and 7 villages. Bubazi Cell Villages: Kavumu, Kigarama, Gakomeye, Nyagahinga, Makurungwe, Gitwa, and Kabuga.  Gitwa Cell has a population of approximately 5,271 people and 8 villages.  Gitwa Cell Villages include: Rubona, Bizu, Muremerea, Kibande, Gaseke, Rwakigarati, Gitega and Rusegeya.

History of Area Water Sources
In the early 1970’s, a Swiss NGO (the name is unknown) established an Agricultural Project in the area of Bubazi Cell. They helped establish plantain farms and formal agriculture. To this day the people of the community are extremely knowledgeable about farming. Vegetables are abundant. Between 1972 -1976 the Swiss (that is how the locals refer to them) constructed the buildings of the compound that is now the Bubazi Community Health Center.  In 1990 the Swiss built two extensive and efficient water distribution systems. Locally they are known as Gakoma Source and Gatunguguru Source. Both of these water sources seem to be prolific in their water supply. However, Gatunguguru Source appears to be especially vast.

The Gakoma Water Source distribution system originates from an underground source of water located at Gakoma Springs in a remote area of Gitega Cell. This distribution system, when in good working order, provides clear water, suitable for drinking, to four Cells (Gitega, Rohinga, Ruragwe and Bubazi) and thirteen villages.

The Gatunguguru Water Distribution System originates from an underground source of water located at Gatunguguru Springs in Muvungu Village, Gitega Cell. This distribution system, when in good working order, provides clear water, suitable for drinking, to four cells (Kayenzi, Ruragwe, Gitega and Bubazi) and eighteen villages.

The people of the Bubazi/Gitwa community are hard workers. They love to cultivate and dig. There is rain in the area nine months out of the year with a 3-month dry season. The climate is moderate and the terrain is lush. There is an abundance of underground, quality water at the Gakoma and Gatunguguru sources. The problem is access.

Problem Addressed
Both the Gakoma and the Gatunguguru water distribution systems were built in 1990. Sometime in the early 1990’s the Swiss NGO left Rwanda. Therefore, since the construction of these systems, 25 year ago, there has been very little maintenance of these systems. This system consists of large, main water lines coming directly from the sources, with feeder lines branching out from the main line. These feeder lines supply water tap systems where villagers can easily fetch clean water. Many of the feeder lines have broken and most of the taps systems have deteriorated and are unusable.

Broken line in the mainAt one time these distribution systems provided water to 31 villages, possibly more. Most of these 31 villages no longer have access to these abundant water sources due to the deterioration of the distribution system. Just recently the main water line from Gakoma Source broke due to a mudslide. In Bubazi Cell there are only three villages that now receive water from these sources. Another problem is that these water distribution systems never reached Gitwa Cell, which, is one of the two cells in Bubazi Health Center’s catchment area. The citizens of Gitwa Cell (population 5,271) are still fetching their water from the Cyimbiri River.

Project Description 
The Bubazi Water Project is divided into 2 projects, Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source and Bubazi Water Project 2: Gatunguguru Source.  This project will implement the larger of the two, Bubazi Water Project 1: Gakoma Source.

The work will be completed as follows:
1. The entire Gakoma Source main line will be repaired and protected.
2. All the water catchment tanks, and feeder lines to these tanks, that are supplied by the Gakoma Source will be repaired and put in good working order.
3. The water taps directly on the entire main line will be repaired and made operable.
4. All of the water taps (water fetching stations), and distribution lines supplying these taps in the 7 villages of Bubazi cell, that are fed by the Gakoma line, will be repaired, made in good working order, and made available for the all people of the community for water access.
5. All feeder lines to the Bubazi Health Center will be repaired and holding tanks on Health Center grounds will be repaired and made in good working order.

Above the ground pipe
The Project 1: Gakoma Source should take approximately 8 weeks to complete, progressing as follows: 
Week One: Site Installation – 5 days:
1. Engineer on site
2. Material storage and security arranged
3. Organization of the labor force
4. Materials ordered
Week One – Week Three – 12 days: Site Preparation
Week One – Week Three - 14 days:  Supply, installation and lying of pipes and fitting from the tank to terminals fountain
Week One - Week Five – 30 days:  Trench Excavation on the total length of GAKOMA Source system
Week Three – Week Five – 21 days:  Backfilling and compacting for the entire length of 500 m x 0.5 x 0.6 m
Week One – Week Seven – 40 days:  Rehabilitation of Tanks and Water Taps (15 single fountain (size 3 m x2 m, h=1.2 m, thickness = 0.20 m)
Week Six – Week Eight - 7 days:  Site cleaning

Claude Kaliza, the Engineer, will be the project manager.  He is reliable and efficien, and has already created an extensive report, at no cost, with pipeline maps, cost analysis and project timeline.

The community will be providing the labor for trench excavation of the total length of the Gakoma line, 500 m of excavation, and 40% of the backfilling and compacting of the entire length of 500 m.

Project Impact
This project will directly benefit 8,700 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
April Zachary

Water CatchmentMonitoring and Maintenance
The Bubazi Health Center will be taking responsibility for the maintenance of the Gakoma Source Water Distribution System. The Bubazi Health Center’s maintenance plan for the Gakoma Source distribution system is as follows:
1. Each March, when the Health Center’s budget is planned, the health center will request funds for the year’s maintenance/repair of the water distribution system.
2. The health center will create a contract with a local plumber who will work for them on an on-call-basis for any repairs or maintenance needed for the system.
3. The Executive Secretary of Bubazi Cell and the Bubazi Health Center Titulier will require each Village to create a Village Water Security Committee (VWSC). The committee will have a minimum of 3 people (more if possible) who will be responsible for the Water Security in their villages. They will provide quarterly Water Security Awareness Training to the peoples of their village. The training will have the purpose of inspiring the community to take ownership of the water distribution system and to participate in keeping it secure and strong. Parents will be asked to talk with their children about the importance of keeping their water system functioning efficiently (this will help prevent the occasional vandalism that happens to the water lines by the children). Parents and children will be asked to report to the Water Security Committee any broken pipes, non-functioning tap systems or anything that could be related to water security
4. The Water Security Committee will do a monthly inspection of all of the water catchment tanks and tap systems in their village areas. They will report any problems (or potential problems) to the health center.
5. Quarterly, the people will clean (de-weed, etc.) the exterior of all water catchment tanks and taps systems, and the grounds around them, in their village area. They will report to the VWSC anything that looks unusual or could become a problem to water security.
6. The plumber will do an annual inspection of all water catchment tanks and taps in the Bubazi Cell.
7. The Health Center Titulier will have an annual meeting with the Village Water Security Committees in order to discuss any potential problems to the water security, any improvements needed to the reporting systems and any changes that need to happen within the committee (member rotations, etc.)

Comments
Peace Corps Volunteer April Zachary reports: It is imperative that leadership be a driving forces behind a project this extensive and complex. Anastase Ntezimana has been the Titulier of the Bubazi Health Center for 10 years. He is passionate about bringing about positive behavior change within the lives of the people on the village level. He has made great progress within his community in the area of nutrition and pre-natal care. Waterborne illnesses and hygiene continue to be urgent problems within the community due to the lack of access to quality water. When Anastase was informed that in order for the water project to be a possibility he would be required to bring in a qualified engineer to do a study of the water distribution system he did not hesitate.

Within one week he had an engineer, Claude Kaliza, brought onto site to make the initial assessment. A day later we had his assistant, Emile, a Water Distribution Technician, brought in. Together, the water technician, a local plumber, and I walked the entire Gakoma Source distribution system (a five-hour round trip hike) The water technician had a special water system GPS system which identifies underground water lines. Three days later the water technician returned and we, along with the plumber, walked the entire line of the Gatunguguru Source distribution system (a four-hour round trip hike). During these exploratory hikes, local people familiar with each area and the locations of the water catchment tanks met us to show the way. This required coordination of the people through phone tagging. We had support every step of the way. 

During the months of August and September 2015 a Community Needs Assessment (CNA) was done in the Bubazi Health Center catchment area (Bubazi and Gitwa Cells) through interviews, surveys, conversations and observation. Through the CNA inquiry of the people of Bubazi and Gitwa Cell, water quality/ access and hygiene were consistently found to be the most urgent problems in the Bubazi area. The majority of the Bubazi Health Center staff (10 out of 13) rated water quality/access and hygiene as the most urgent issues in their community. Home visits were made during the CNA and at the end of each interview families were asked if there was anything they would like to add.

Here are some of their answers:  “Water is a big problem. If you could try to help us get materials, the people could work together to bring water.” “We need help in teaching the people good hygiene. Are you able to help and support us in teaching the people good hygiene? The water is a problem.” The toilets are a big problem. If you could try, if there is a way that materials could be provided the people would build the toilets.” 

During these visits it became very apparent that the people were willing to provide their labor in order to solve the problem of water quality/access and hygiene. They were offering their services before being asked. It was through these conversations with the people at the village level that we became conscious of this fact.

The holistic goal and desired outcome of the larger Bubazi Water Project (Project 1: Gakoma Source, Project 2: Gatunguguru Source and possibly Project 3: Gitwa Extension) is to provide the people of the Bubazi (and Gitwa) communities the means to create healthy, vital lives for themselves. In the Bubazi/Gitwa Communities, quality water is the foundation of good health, followed by education and behavior change. It is difficult to ask people to change behavior when they do not have the resources to do so – this is a set up for failure.

By making quality water accessible to the community we are setting the community up for success in the areas of good hygiene and good health. We will be following up this technical project with education projects:
1. Water Sanitation and Hygiene (W.A.S.H) program
2. Permagarden Training
3. Community Finance Initiative (CFI)
4. The First Thousand Days Program (working with education of pregnant mothers and mothers in prenatal care and infant/child nutrition, the first thousand days of a child’s life).

Friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer April Zachary may contribute using the donate button below.  Funds in excess of the project amount will go to other projects in Rwanda.

If you would like to help us with similar projects, please donate to the East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.


 

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Groupe Scolaire Kamabare Rainwater Capture and Storage Project - Rwanda

Groupe Scolaire Kamabare Rainwater Capture and Storage Project - Rwanda

Location
Kamabare Village, Ngenda Cell, Nyarugenge Sector, Bugesera District, Eastern Province, Rwanda

Community DescriptionGroupe Scolaire Kamabare Rainwater Capture and Storage Project - RwandaKamabare is located in Rwanda's Eastern Province. Although Rwanda is known as the Land of a Thousand Hills, the Eastern Province is much different than other provinces because it is flat and dry.

When you ride a bicycle on the dirt roads, you can see breathtaking views of valleys and mountains far away in Rwanda's Southern Province. You pass mud brick houses and see households- -men, women with babies strapped to their backs and able-bodied youth working hard to hoe their small plot of land.

Almost everyone in Kamabare village cultivates for a living. There is no electricity or running water in the village and the closest commercial center is about two hours away on foot. Beans and cassava are the two most commonly harvested crops. Yields are relatively small since the soil is not fertile and the region is prone to drought.

Groupe Scolaire Kamabare is the main school in the village. It provides nine years of basic education (P1-P6, S1-S3) and in line with the Government of Rwanda's plan to provide 12 years of basic education, the school is in the process of building a new classroom block to accommodate S4 students next year.

The head master and teaching staff work hard to sensitize parents on the importance of education. Most parents are illiterate and struggle to find enough money to buy clothes and school materials for their children.

Groupe Scolaire Kamabare Rainwater Capture and Storage Project - RwandaParent Teacher Association (PTA) attendance is low and the administration recognizes that educating parents must remain a high priority throughout every school year. The head master believes that creating and maintaining a healthy, positive atmosphere at the school will help convince parents that education is valuable.

The district is one of only two in Rwanda that receives food assistance from the World Food Program.

Most schools in the district have problems obtaining water for cleaning, cooking, and drinking. At Bugesera schools, where lunch is served three times a week, water is in high demand. The headmaster believes that an adequate water supply can improve hygiene at the school and would help supplement the feeding program.

Groupe Scolaire Kamabare received a 5,000 L tank from another NGO operating in the area. The tank sits empty in the middle of the school grounds because there is no money to buy installation parts, build a cement stand, and pay labor costs.

The school currently buys water. Using the tank would reduce the school's water burden and would save time and energy, as fetching water would be easier and closer, with the tank situated directly in the center of the school's grounds.

The school normally receives capitation money three times a year from the Ministry of Education but there have been several delays this year and most districts in Rwanda have only received one installment (in the first term, January-March). Schools in three sectors in Bugesera district received tanks but most schools lack money for installation.

Project Description
This project is to construct an adequate rainwater capture and storage system at the school. It will utilize the existing tank and the gutters that are already installed on one classroom block.

Project funds will be used to buy needed installation parts, build a support stand, pay for transport of materials, and pay labor costs.

Project Impact
1,186 people will benefit from this project, including 901 Primary students (P1-P6), 258 Secondary students (S1-S3), and 27 teachers and administrators.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Kelly Miller

Comments
Having a functional rainwater capture system and storage tank ready for use before the end of the rainy season will greatly help the school get off to a strong start with a full tank when the new school year begins in January.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of CannedWater4Kids.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Kelly Miller of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Kelly and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Rushashi Health Center Water Project - Rwanda

Rushashi Health Center Water Project - RwandaLocation
Muyongwe cell, in Rushashi sector, Gakenke District, Northern Province, Rwanda

Community Description
The Rushashi Health Center is located in the Northern Province of Rwanda (Gakenke District). The catchment population of the health center is 19,046 people.

The local population consists mostly of farmers (potatoes, sugar cane, pineapples, passion fruit, manioc and corn) and cow farmers. The primary health problems of the community are parasites, upper respiratory infections and diarrhea.

This rural health center has been open since 1946. It is a relatively large health center with six buildings, including HIV and maternity services as well as routine consultation services. The health center has 20 employees.

Rushashi Health Center Water Project - RwandaCurrently in the consultation rooms there are no sinks. The nurses wash their hands using a small metal container, which must be constantly refilled with water. This leads to problems washing hands after each patient.

Patients stay overnight in the hospitalization rooms, sometimes for extended periods of time and they have all of their meals in the room. Oftentimes these patients already have weak immune system and are at risk for contracting diseases from other patients and from the medical staff.

The family planning, hospitalization, consultation rooms, injection room, and pharmacy services do not currently have running water. One of the services has a sink but it is not connected to a water source.

Project Description
This project is to install sinks and running water into the following services of the health center: family planning, hospitalization, 3 consultation rooms, injection room, and the pharmacy.

The health center will pay over 35% of the total cost in order to complete the project. This contribution demonstrates the motivation of the health center.

The maintenance staff has already been trained in how to fix and clean the new sinks that they will install as a result of a previous Appropriate Projects project.

Project Impact
The entire catchment population of the health center of 19,046 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Kitty Hall

Rushashi Health Center Water Project - RwandaComments
This project will result in an improvement in the hygiene and sanitary conditions of the health center. It will allow the nursing staff to wash their hands and materials before and after consultation with patients and will reduce the rate of transmission of hygiene-related diseases within the health center.

Kitty previously completed the Coko Health Center Water Project – Rwanda, Gakenke District Health Centers Plumbing Training - Rwanda, Rusoro Health Center Water Project - Rwanda and Rutenderi Health Center Water Project - Rwanda.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify the Peace Corps Volunteer of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Groupe Scolaire Sainte Famille Handwashing Station Project - Rwanda

Groupe Scolaire Sainte Famille Handwashing Station Project - Rwanda

Location
Nyarugenge District, Kigali, Rwanda

Community Description
Groupe Scolaire Sainte Famille has a long history educating the children of Rwanda’s capital, Kigali. Established in 1913, it is Kigali city’s first school. Currently, the G. S.

Groupe Scolaire Sainte Famille Handwashing Station Project - Rwanda

 Sainte Famille is one of nine Basic Education Schools serving the Nyarugenge District of Kigali.

The school currently has nearly 3,000 pupils, roughly equally divided between boys and girls. Additionally, a caring, competent staff of seventy adults leads the school. This entire school population shares only thirty-four toilets.

Additionally, Sainte Famille graciously donates their space each Sunday for WE-ACTx’s (Women’s Equity in Access to Care and Treatment) Sunday Support Group for Youth Living with HIV. This group of approximately 175 youth, peer leaders and WE-ACTx staff meet for support groups and recreation.

Currently, there is only one tap on school grounds for hand washing. This tap is not located near any of the toilet blocks making it difficult to encourage proper sanitation among staff and students.

Project Description
This project is to purchase and erect twelve handwashing stations at locations near toilet blocks and throughout the school grounds.

The hand washing stations come fully assembled and include a metal stand. The 20-liter containers are made of plastic, and will be purchased from a local market in Kigali.

The containers will be filled regularly by the custodial staff. The school has access to the city water supply so the containers can be filled from that source.

Project funds will be used to purchase the containers and stands.

Groupe Scolaire Sainte Famille Handwashing Station Project - RwandaThe Peace Corps Volunteer will provide hygiene lessons on the importance of proper sanitation and demonstration of good handwashing techniques to both the school and support group communities.

Project Impact
2,924 students and teachers at Groupe Scolaire Sainte Famille and the 175 youth who participate in the weekly WE-ACTx Sunday Support Group will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Anna Cowell

Comments
Handwashing has been proven to be the single most important behavioral change in the reduction of diarrheal disease. This project will promote hygiene and sanitation for all students, staff and visitors at the Group Scolaire Sainte Famille.

Dollar Amount of Project
$300.00

Donations Collected to Date
$300.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Six Senses Resorts & Spas as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Anna Cowell of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Anna and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Rutenderi Health Center Water Project - Rwanda

Rutenderi Health Center Water Project - RwandaLocation
Murambo village, Rutenderi cell, Gahenyi sector, Gakenke District, Northern Province of Rwanda

Community Description
Rutenderi Health Center is located 3 km (or 20 minute drive on a dirt road) from the main paved road that leads to Kigali. Although it is close to the main road it is one of the least developed health centers in the District of Gakenke (Northern Province, Rwanda).

The catchment population of the health center is 17,152 people. For the most part these people are poor, mostly uneducated farmers who live off of their crops (potatoes, sugar cane, passion fruit, bananas, pineapples, manioc, corn and beans).

Rutenderi Health Center Water Project - RwandaRutenderi is small, has no electricity, and is the only health center in the district that has absolutely no source of running water.

Currently none of the services have running water, and the staff must walk 45 minutes to carry water to the health center in jerry cans. Water is put into buckets, affixed with faucets, which are used by the staff and patients to wash their hands and materials.

The consequence is that the rate of parasites and diarrhea seen at the health center is high and contamination within the health center is a large problem.

At Rutenderi, the leading causes of consultation are intestinal parasites (830 cases in 2009) and diarrhea (796 cases in 2009). Contagious dermatological diseases are another leading cause of consultation in the health center (648 cases in 2009). These diseases are highly contagious, and patients and staff are at risk of becoming infected.

Rutenderi Health Center Water Project - RwandaOne of the struggles of the health center is to convince women to give birth in the health center rather than at their houses, with unqualified assistance and unsanitary conditions.

Project Description
This project is to provide water to the Rutenderi Health Center and provide sinks for all 5 of the services.

The health center will be connected to a water source that is located over 100 meters away.

The broken pipes leading to the well and water tank will be repaired.

Sinks will be installed in the following services: primary and curative consultation, prenatal consultation, laboratory, pharmacy, and maternity.

Project funds will be used to purchase fixtures, piping, and materials.

The health center will provide the remaining funds needed to complete the project.

Project Impact
The project benefits all 17,152 people in the catchment area.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Kitty Hall

Comments
By installing running water, the health center will be able to reduce the spread of disease among patients and staff. This will create an incentive for pregnant women to give birth there, and not at home. This in turn will reduce infant and maternal mortality and morbidity rates in the community.

Kitty previously completed the Coko Health Center Water Project – Rwanda, Gakenke District Health Centers Plumbing Training - Rwanda, and Rusoro Health Center Water Project - Rwanda.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Kitty of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or other projects in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.
Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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