Panama

Santa Rosa de Cucunati Latrine Project – Panama

Santa Rosa de Cucunati Latrine Project – Panama

Location
Santa Rosa de Cucunati, District of Chepigana, Province of Darien, Panama

Community Description
Santa Rosa de Cucunati is an Embera indigenous community outside the comarca located in the Darien province of Panama. The population has 129 men, women and children, and there are 25 houses. There is a school located in Santa Rosa that has 35 students and 2 teachers.

Santa Rosa de Cucunati Latrine Project – Panama

The people in the community make money as fishermen, traveling only thirty minutes by boat to the Pacific Ocean. Usually, families go to an island called Isla Peñal and stay for four nights. The families that do not fish work on a farm as a worker for weeks at a time. In addition to fishing, families plant yucca, plantain, banana and rice.

The community of Santa Rosa has an aqueduct that was built by the Ministry of Health in 1996. However, deforestation has caused the quantity of water to decrease significantly in recent years.

Problem Addressed
There are only 8 latrines in the community. The 6 pit latrines fill with water during the rainy season due to the high water table. There are 2 composting latrines from a pilot project.

People in the community who do not have latrines or a neighbor with a latrine use the river.

Project Description
This project is part of a larger effort to build 12 composting latrines in the community.

The composting latrine technology is effective in keeping contaminants from entering the water supply and from spreading disease-causing waste from during the rainy season. It also produces fertilizer as a byproduct.

Under the direction of the Sanitation Group, members of the community will provide labor and local materials as well as a small monetary contribution.

Each household will be required to have at least one worker to assist with not only their latrine but the others in the work group.

Santa Rosa de Cucunati Latrine Project – PanamaWater Charity funds will be used to pay for the materials for 3 composting latrines, including cement, rebar, nails, zinc sheets, and PVC piping, and also the labor of skilled craftsmen.

Community members will have to attend 4 meetings covering 3 topics including the expectations of the project, a two day health seminar covering hand washing and disease vector transmission, and a construction and maintenance meeting.

Project Impact
130 people will benefit from the entire project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Shayla Smith

Comments
The composting latrine project will prevent contamination of the river and improve the overall sanitation in the community, thus reducing disease.

Dollar Amount of Project
$1,500

Donations Collected to Date
$1,500

Dollar Amount Needed

$0 - This project has been funded through the generosity of Wilco Krul, of Einhoven, Netherlands.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Caimital Solar Well Pump Project - Panama

Caimital Solar Well Pump Project - Panama

Location
Caimital, Corregimiento de Tulu, Distrito de Penonome, Provincia de Cocle, Panama

Caimital Solar Well Pump Project - Panama

Community Description
Caimital is a rural community in the Penonome district of Cocle with a population of 175 people.

There is a primary school with one teacher for all six grade levels, one through six. Several committees exist within the community including Parent Teacher Association, Water Committee, Electrification Focus Group, Catholic Committee, and several sports teams.

The majority of residents work in Penonome, which is located just a 25-minute bus ride from Caimital. Many residents maintain small agricultural plots near their houses for family sustenance.

Problem Addressed
The community developed a clean well-water source that is sufficient to serve the entire population. A 150- foot-deep well was dug in 2007, and a diesel turbine was installed.

All houses in the lower part of the community are connected to the aqueduct system. However, due to lack of reliability of the old diesel turbine for pumping, and the high cost of fuel, the low-resource community currently has access to running water less than 2 hours per week.

Caimital Solar Well Pump Project - Panama

Residents are forced to seek out water from other sources, most of which are unprotected and of questionable quality.

Project Description
This project is to install an 850-watt solar panel array and electric pump to pump the water to the community storage tank, where it will then be fed by gravity to the homes below.

The project is being implemented as part of the Peace Corps Partnership Program by the Water Committee of Caimital. The committee will work with experienced technicians from Luz Buena on the installation.

The community contribution will include all unskilled labor, and some masonry work as needed to rebuild the pump housing and construct a protective fence around the solar panel array. The community will also provide concrete, sheets of zinc, and the majority of raw construction materials.

Food for work days will be provided and prepared by community members.

Water Charity funds will be used for the purchase of ten 85W panels, a Lorentz 1200 pump, associated parts, and skilled labor.

Caimital Solar Well Pump Project - Panama

In order to ensure project sustainability, a Water Committee Seminar will be held to train the water committee and all interested community members in the maintenance, management, and troubleshooting of rural aqueducts. There will also be a seminar introducing the community to solar power systems and explaining basic function and maintenance.

The community will collect small fees monthly to be saved for maintenance or replacement parts for the system. The community will independently operate and perform basic repairs on the system as needed.

Project Impact
131 people in 27 households will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Lindsay D’Amato

Comments
After the implementation of this project, all of the residents in Caimital 'abajo' will have running water in their homes 24 hours a day. The school and church will also have water available for the first time.

Sanitation practices will improve significantly with the arrival of daily running water in each house. It will no longer be necessary to bathe or wash dishes in the dirty River Marica, a development which will have a positive impact in overall health of the community. The monthly household expenditure for diesel fuel will drop, allowing those funds to go toward other pertinent family needs.

Dollar Amount of Water Charity Participation in Project
$2,173.84

Donations Collected to Date
$2,173.84

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has now been funded through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation.

This project has been finished.  To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Alto Limon Aqueduct Project - Panama

Alto Limon Aqueduct Project - Panama
Location
Alto Limon, Hato Juli, Comarca Ngäbe-Bugle, Panama

Community Description
Alto Limon is a community of 132 indigenous people located in Panama's Comarca Ngäbe-Bugle. Tucked away in the mountains, accessible only by footpath, it has beautiful panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean, but very little in the way of infrastructure.

In Alto Limon there is a church and there is an aqueduct. Unfortunately the aqueduct has never adequately served the needs of the people of Alto Limon and they continue to use stream water, which must be carried up steep hills back to the house, and exposes families to the risk of illness from contaminated water.

The problem is worst in the dry season when there is even less water available through the aqueduct and many local streams dry up, forcing people to search farther for water, and escalating a conflict with a neighboring community that uses a water source in Alto Limon for its aqueduct.

Alto Limon Aqueduct Project - PanamaThere is another spring not far from the current water source being used. Its water would help alleviate existing water problems.

Project Description
This project is to capture the water from the new aqueduct source for use by the community.

Under the direction of the Alto Limon Aqueduct Committee, the project will consist of building a second intake, laying pipe to connect it to the aqueduct and building a splitter box where pipelines from the two intakes meet in order to avoid the possibility of water flowing from the higher intake into the lower intake. At the same time, the flow of water between the rest of the community and the one house connected before the tank will be more equitably divided.

The splitter box is made of concrete blocks and is composed of three chambers. The first chamber is half the size of the box, and inlets from both intakes lead there. The other two chambers are proportioned according to how the water flow will be split and one pipe leads away from each.

The main part of the project is to capture the other water source and connect it to the aqueduct. This will be accomplished by digging back to the impermeable layer of rock where the water is coming out, building a wall to damn up the area and direct the water into the outlet tube. The entire intake area will then be covered with large rocks, on top of that gravel, and finally a cap of cement to seal it off and protect the source from contamination.

Alto Limon Aqueduct Project - PanamaThe community is committed to making this project happen. Locally available materials will be provided by the community; sand and gravel from the river have already been carried up to the community. The aqueduct committee has decided to pay a local constructor to lead the construction, and the community will provide unskilled labor. The Panamanian Ministry of Health (MINSA) has agreed to provide cement blocks and rebar for the project.

Water Charity funds will be used to buy cement, pipe, and fittings.

Project Impact
The 132 residents Alto Limon will benefit from the additional clean water available to them through this project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Laura Fishman

Comments
This is a necessary infrastructure project for the community. Capturing an additional source of water will drastically impact on the water problem in Alto Limon.

Dollar Amount of Project
$400.00

Donations Collected to Date
$400.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Laura Fishman.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Laura of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Laura and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Bahía Honda Bathroom Project - Panama

Bahía Honda Bathroom Project - Panama
Location
Bahía Honda, Bastimentos Island, Bocas del Toro, Panama

Community Description
The community of Bahia Honda is composed of approximately 250 indigenous Ngobe people, living in distinct homesteads. The Ngobe moved to the previously unoccupied bay on Bastimentos Island in 1972, when population pressures forced them to leave the mainland, which was rapidly growing into a tourist hotspot.

Bahía Honda Bathroom Project - Panama

The new residents of Bahia Honda built simple wooden homes on the edge of the mangroves, many on stilts d

irectly above the water. These families subsist mostly as fishermen, boat drivers, and construction workers, and live in extreme poverty.

Latrines cannot function in the wet mangrove environment and the residents cannot afford flushing toilet systems, so they go directly into the mangroves, polluting the ecosystem and harming the health of the residents. The community has agreed as a group that they want to work towards installing adequate bathrooms with flushing toilets and septic tanks – one for each homestead.

Project Description
This is a model project to install the first flushing toilet and septic tank system in Bahía Honda.

One homestead in particular has taken the initiative to raise money, make a budget and prepare a construction plan. The bathroom at this first homestead will serve as a model to instruct and motivate the others to follow suit.

The Castillos homestead consists of 19 people living in three houses, and they plan to build the bathroom in a central location, to be shared by everyone.

Water Charity funds will be used to buy a toilet, a septic tank, pipes, and a small rainwater tank for flushing.

Bahía Honda Bathroom Project - PanamaThe three households will pool their own contributions to buy the cement, blocks, wood, and tin roofing.

One resident is a skilled construction worker who has created a design for a basic 1 m by 1 m bathroom, with an underground septic tank and leach field. He has compared prices for materials and is ready to make purchases and start leading the construction once they acquire the needed funds.

All the labor will be conducted by community members, many of whom have construction experience. We anticipate that it will take about a week to buy the materials and about three weeks to complete the construction.

Project Impact
19 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jenny Boyd

Comments
This project uses the appropriate technology under the circumstances. It will protect the environment, have a significant health impact, and serve as a model for others to follow.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Andando Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Jenny Boyd of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Jenny and/or those of other PCVs in the country.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Pueblo Nuevo Aqueduct Project - Panama

Pueblo Nuevo Aqueduct Project - Panama

Location
Pueblo Nuevo, Comarca Ngobe Bugle, Panama

Community DescriptionPueblo Nuevo Aqueduct Project - PanamaPueblo Nuevo is a community of approximately 1,000 Ngobe Indigenous Panamanians.

Pueblo Nuevo has a large elementary and middle school. Children from communities as far as four hours away come to live there for school. There is also a vibrant artisans group that makes purses and shopping bags out of plants.

The community is downriver from other indigenous communities, so the water is not clean for drinking. For this reason, an aqueduct system was developed nearly 10 

years ago that leads from a creek of clean water to the community. However, the aqueduct has fallen into disrepair. The PVC pipes that bring water to the community are cracked and leaking in many places, so the water pressure is very low and dirt leaks into the pipes.

Project Description
The project will carry out repairs and improvements on the existing aqueduct system.

The broken PVC piping will be replaced. Additionally, a concrete base will be built where the water enters the aqueduct so that dirt and parasites cannot enter.

The work will be done by the members of the Pueblo Nuevo Water Committee over three days.

The PVC pipes that need replacing have been identified. The aqueduct will be shut off for these three days, while the pipes and joints are replaced.

The water at the beginning of the aqueduct will then be diverted, and a new concrete base will be built to raise the entry point of the water.

Pueblo Nuevo Aqueduct Project - PanamaProject funds will be used to buy 15 sacks of concrete, 16 PVC pipes, and 4 PVC joints. The remainder of the money will be used for transporting these materials to Pueblo Nuevo and buying food for the men doing the labor.

Project Impact
Over 1,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Alexander Blum

Comments
This is a necessary and important infrastructure project for the community. It has a tremendous amount of community support, and will make a significant difference in the lives of the villagers.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify the Peace Corps Volunteer of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Candela and Majagua Latrine Project - Panama

Candela and Majagua Latrine Project - PanamaLocation
Candela and Majagua, Corregimiento of Hato Jobo, Comarca Ngöbe-Bugle, Panama

Community Description
The communities of Candela and Majagua are located in the indigenous and mountainous region of the Comarca Ngöbe-Bugle. According to the World Bank, the Ngöbe-Bugle suffer from Panama’s highest rate of poverty and extreme poverty with over 95% of indigenous peoples falling below the poverty line and 86% living in extreme poverty. In addition, both communities lack basic infrastructure and are accessible only by hiking 1 -2 hours from the nearest road.

The majority of community members are subsistence farmers growing staple crops such as rice, corn and beans. Despite the continual economic challenges faced by these communities, community members are extremely optimistic, hard-working and generous.

Candela and Majagua Latrine Project - PanamaWith increased health education in the area, the communities recognize the importance and need for a safe place to dispose of bodily excrement. The community of Candela currently has a few poorly constructed and unsafe latrines, and Majagua has never had latrines.

Project Description
This project is to construct 5 new pit public latrines, 2 in the community of Candela and 3 in the community of Majagua.

The latrines will each be built in centrally-located areas, such as a medical center, a church and frequented community meeting places.

Candela and Majagua Latrine Project - PanamaThe funds from this project will go towards purchasing construction materials, including zinc for the roof, cement for the floor and toilet bowl, rebar and nails. The community will be providing materials for the walls, labor and transportation of materials to the community.

Each household will be required to attend 3 days of latrine construction and corresponding health trainings.

Project Impact
This project will benefit approximately 360 community members, including 210 in Majagua and 150 in Candela.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Lyndsey Bunting

Comments
The participation of the community in the construction and health trainings will lead to a change of attitude about sanitation, with a resultant improvement in public health.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed

$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative, with the help of Lyndsey's friends and family.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Lyndsey Bunting of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Lyndsey and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Mogué Composting Latrine Project - Panama

Mogué Composting Latrine Project - Panama
Location
Mogué, Corrigimiento de La Palma, Provincia de Darién, Panamá

Community Description
Mogué is a community of 500 indigenous people in rural Panamá. It is about 10 hours travel time from Panama City, in the country´s least developed and least populated province.

There is no road access to the community. The only access is by small boat down the Pacific Coast and up the Mogué River, or a 3-hour hike by trail from the provincial capital, with a population of about 3,000 people.

Community members base their lives around the river, bathing, washing clothes and dishes, and preparing food. The community currently uses pit latrines, some very close to the river. This poses a health hazard due to the runoff into the drinking water source.

Mogué Composting Latrine Project - Panama There is an increasing temptation for the villagers to start using chemical fertilizers for their crops. This also presents problems with runoff into the river and the streams which feed into the village aqueduct, its primary drinking water source.

Mogué has a 4-room schoolhouse that serves approximately 120 students. The schoolhouse has no adequate bathroom facilities, and has a very large school garden where the students plant a number of crops such as plantains, guandú, and corn.

Project Description
This project is to build a composting latrine at the school for use by the community and the school.

This will be a model project which incorporates training. The construction will be facilitated by Peace Corps Panamá´s latrine coordinator to serve as a training to 10-20 village men who have expressed a great deal of interest in learning how to build one.

The compost produced will be used in the school garden. This will serve as an instrument to teach the students the importance and utility of organic fertilizers.

Water Charity funds will be used exclusively for materials and gasoline to transport said materials. The labor and technical expertise will be provided by the community and the Peace Corps.

Those trained via the seminar and latrine construction will subsequently be capable of building dry composting latrines for personal use from either cem

Mogué Composting Latrine Project - Panama

ent and cinderblock or wooden boards, and teaching the technology to others.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from this project, including 120 students at the school.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Samuel Packard

Comments
Promoting the use of dry composting latrines is vital for riverine cultures like the Embera who populate this area. The technology serves to preserve the fresh water supply, and also to create a source of rich organic compost for agricultural activities.

Dollar Amount of Project$385.00

Donations Collected to Date
$385.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Samuel of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or other projects in the country of service.

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Caisan Centro Primary School Water Project - Panama

Caisan Centro Primary School Water Project - Panama Location
Caisan, Chiriqui, Panama

Community Description
Caisan Centro is a Latino farming community in the highlands of the province of Chiriqui, Panama. With about 200 houses, Centro is a small outlying suburb of the larger district of Renacimiento, and is often overlooked next to the bigger community when it comes to needed services. A specific case in point is the issue of water: Centro has a poorly maintained aqueduct, while surrounding communities have the resources to fund brand new aqueduct projects.

Centro’s aqueduct often breaks down because of poorly designed engineering and inferior materials. Even when fully functioning, there are parts of the community it cannot serve.

The most dire and immediate problem concerns the only elementary school in the community, Escuela Caisan Centro. It is a small two-classroom school, situated on top of a hill overlooking the province lowlands. Because of its elevation slightly higher than the aqueduct, the school cannot be served by the aqueduct and is without water.

The views from Escuela Caisan Centro are breathtaking, as is the trek up the hill carrying the buckets of water needed to mop, wash hands and dishes, and more importantly, to retrieve water for the children to drink.

Caisan Centro Primary School Water Project - Panama The school is run by one teacher who is also the school’s principal. She is responsible for the education of 30 students ranging from first to sixth grade, which she teaches in rotation. Due to an influx of children from a newly opened orphanage in the area, the student body recently rose to over 80 students.

The lack of accessible water in the school has meant that toilets are used like latrines, only flushed on specific days where area residents allow the school to use some of their scarce and precious well water. There is much less access during the summer when area wells start to dry up before the return of the rainy season.

The bathrooms and unwashed dishes tend to attract insects and animals, which bother the students in the nearby classrooms. In addition, there is the danger of the spread of disease. A second important health risk is the inadequacy of water available for the students and their teachers after recess or lunch, as the rationed water isn’t adequate to keep students or adults adequately hydrated in this hot climate.

The Ministry of Health closes the school down periodically when it comes by for inspection and finds that the school is without water. The teacher has asked students to bring their own water bottles to school, but being children, they often forget them at home.

Project Description
This project is to build a rainwater catchment system to provide water for the school, and to purchase a large cooler that will hold drinking water, donated by area neighbors.

Caisan Centro Primary School Water Project - Panama To build the rainwater catchment system, four-inch plastic PVC water tubes will be cut in half to make gutters for rainwater runoff from the school’s zinc roof. From the gutters, the water will be directed to a 200-gallon raised-tank through half inch PVC pipes.

In addition to the materials for constructing the gutters, project funds will go to purchase a sink for washing dishes and mopping, and for a 10-gallon cooler to hold drinking water in the classroom.

The community will provide labor and will transport the purchased materials.

Upon project completion, a Clean Water Day will be held to teach simple hygiene and sanitation to the students and their parents for proper hand washing, the risks of drinking untreated rain water, the dangers of dehydration, and the possible serious consequences from drinking water from old chemical containers.

Project Impact
This project will benefit about 85 people, including the students and staff at the school.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Annie O'Donnell

Comments
This project will help the school and the students make positive improvements in health and hygiene, reducing disease. It also will allow the students more time in the classroom, rather than carrying water.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Annie of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or other projects in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

La Honda Latrine Project – Panama

La Honda Latrine Project – PanamaLocation
La Honda, San Francisco District, Veraguas Province, Panama

Community Description
La Honda is an 800-person community nestled in a valley in the mountains of Panama. The people are almost entirely subsistence farmers who occasionally supplement their incomes doing odd construction jobs in other parts of the country. Jobs are extremely limited and what few jobs there are involve intense manual labor at larger farms that pay only a few dollars a day.

This is not a wealthy area and many houses consist of little more than a single room with corrugated tin walls and dirt floors. The center of town consists of one church, one very small general store and the elementary school.

Many do not have the basic waste disposal system they need for their families to live healthy lives.

La Honda Latrine Project – PanamaThe elementary school in La Honda is modest, consisting of three classrooms, each containing two grades 1st-2nd, 3rd-4th, 5th-6th with about 20 students per classroom.

Project Description
This project is to build five new latrines at homes that either have no existing latrines or have latrines so poor that they need to be replaced.

The holes will be 10 feet deep and four feet on a side. Because the soil in the community is so dense, lining the walls will not be necessary for the protection of the water table.

The cover plate will be made of concrete reinforced with rebar. Each latrine will have a molded concrete seat, and will be ventilated using plastic tubing.

La Honda Latrine Project – PanamaThe walls and door be constructed of 3 x 7 corrugated zinc sheets, and the posts holding up the structure will be made from small trees.

Project funds will be used to purchase materials, including cement, toilet bowls, nails, rebar and corrugated sheet metal.

All the work will be done by members of the community.

Project Impact
20 people will benefit from this project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
David Clarke

Comments
This is a project to help the neediest families in this community who possess few resources. It has great community support, with all of the labor provided by the recipient families and other villagers. The improved hygiene will have a significant impact on the reduction of illness and disease.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Diana Canale, of Indiana, PA, USA, with the help of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer David Clarke.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify David of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by David and/or those of other PCVs in the country.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Boca Del Monte Aqueduct Project - Panama

Boca Del Monte Aqueduct Project - PanamaLocation
Boca Del Monte, Ngöbe-Bugle, Panama

Community Description
Boca Del Monte is a community of about 500 people in the Comarca of Ngöbe-Bugle of Southwestern Panama. The community has a school that goes up to 8th grade, which had a 2010 enrollment of around 350 kids from Boca Del Monte and 5 other surrounding communities.

During the dry season in the community, which spans from January through May, the majority of the people and the students and teachers at the school do not receive water in their faucets. They are forced to grab buckets and fetch water from a contaminated stream located about 50 meters down and up some steep terrain.

The current aqueduct serves the community well between June and December. However, to improve the aqueduct to serve well also during the dry months, work on the aqueduct system is required.

Boca Del Monte Aqueduct Project - PanamaProject Description
This project is to improve Boca Del Monte´s aqueduct system by constructing 3 small cement tanks to serve as receptacles and depressurizing agents for the water flow.

Two of the tanks will cover 2 new ¨hojas de agua¨ the community members wish to add to the current aqueduct system. The third tank will serve as a place where 3 merging tubes, from 3 separate hojas de agua, will collect, depressurize, and send off in one solo tube that eventually connects up with the main aqueduct tank.

The project will be located in a place on the outskirts of Boca Del Monte that has one of the uppermost altitudes the community. It is an estimated 200 meters from the current aqueduct and at an altitude of about 30 meters higher than the current aqueduct, which lies about 180 meters higher than the lowest point in the community.

Project funds will be used to purchase materials, including 30 sacks of cement and 30 pieces of 1.5 inch tubing. Remaining funds will go toward transportation, with the community paying for the balance. The community will also provide other supplies, such as sand and gravel for the cement mix, and tube connectors.

Boca Del Monte Aqueduct Project - PanamaUnder the direction of the Community Aqueduct Committee, the villagers will provide all of the labor. Various participants in previous aqueduct construction possess the necessary skills to carry out all of the tasks.

Project Impact
This project will benefit about 850 people, consisting of the community population of 500 and the school population of 350 (including students, teachers, and out-of-community volunteers who work at the school).

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Timothy Vanden Boom

Comments
This is an important project for a large population that depends on the aqueduct system. The improvements build upon an infrastructure that currently only provides for seasonal needs, and create a reliable and safe water source during the entire year.

There is widespread community support, thus ensuring the sustainability of the aqueduct. Substantial health benefits will accrue through the reduction in the consumption of unsafe water from elsewhere during the dry season.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$500.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Timothy of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or other projects in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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