Malawi

Saiti Village Borehole Project - Malawi

Saiti Village Borehole Project - Malawi

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Saiti Village Borehole Project - MalawiLocation
Saiti Village, Zomba District, Malawi

Community Description
Saiti is a typical rural Malawian village, without running water or electricity, located along a dirt road, about an hour away from the city of Zomba. Saiti has one broken borehole, built in the 1990s, that was hand-dug to a depth of only 6 meters. Saiti also has a shallow, hand-dug well capped with a cement silo. Residents currently walk 6-8 kilometers to fetch clean water.

Problem Addressed
There is no accessible clean water source for residents of Saiti Village. This leads to illness and, in some cases, death, particularly among children under the age of 5. Most residents currently fetch water for drinking and cooking from dirty wells or waterways like streams or rivers. Women, in particular, are vulnerable in the absence of clean, nearby water sources.

Project Description
This project is to construct a borehole in Saiti Village.

The borehole location was chosen by a village project committee, acting on behalf of the entire village. The site is publicly accessible.

Construction will be done by EZ Borehole Drillers, a company located in Blantyre, with substantial experience in the area, including other boreholes funded by Water Charity.

The installation will take three days to complete. It is expected that water will be reached at about 45 meters, but the well will be drilled to a depth of about 60 meters, if necessary. Before drilling, a hydro-geographical assessment using electrical measurements will be conducted to find the depth of the underlying aquifer. The borehole will be guaranteed for one year by EZ Borehole Drillers.

Above ground, the boreholes will include a standard metal pump mechanism, a cement foundation to protect the pump mechanism, and a cement spillway to channel excess water.

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the skilled labor as well as for the materials that cannot be found locally, such as piping, fixtures and fittings, and concrete.

The community will contribute volunteer labor, materials, including bricks and sand, and about $300 in cash.

The project will be administered by RPCV Michael Buckler, founder and CEO of Village X Org, a social enterprise located in Washington, D.C. dedicated to improving community development work in sub-Saharan Africa. He is a member of the National Peace Corps Association, Friends of Malawi, and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington, D.C.

Saiti Village Borehole Project - MalawiProject Impact
2,035 people, living in 402 households will benefit from the project.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Michael Buckler, RPCV Malawi (’06-’08)

Monitoring and Maintenance
EZ Borehole Drillers will conduct 2 days of community-based borehole management training. Trainees will include the village chief and members of two borehole management committees, a technical committee (responsible for upkeep and maintenance) and a sanitation committee (charged with keeping the borehole tidy).

The technical committees will collect a maintenance fee of 100 MK (about 20 cents) per month per household to ensure that there are sufficient funds to adequately maintain the facility and repair it when needed.

Village X will gather data from nearest health clinic to evaluate the impact of the borehole, comparing rates of waterborne illness before and after installation.

This is an important infrastructure project that will improve the health and wellbeing of Saiti. It is well planned, with strong management and fiscal safeguards in place. It incorporates elements of oversight and buy-in by the residents to make the project sustainable into the future.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

This project is the ninth to be implemented under our Malawi Borehole Program, which is a part of our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program. If you would like to help us with more projects such as this one, please click the Donate button below.

 

Saiti Village Borehole Project - MalawiSaiti Village Borehole Project - Malawi

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Salima District Water Project - Malawi

Salima District Water Project - Malawi

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Salima District Water Project - MalawiLocation
Salima District, Malawi

Community Description
Thirteen border communities around Kuti Wildlife Reserve look to the organization for assistance on issues of environmental awareness and wildlife conservation. Many of the communities have significant water needs that leave thousands without access to clean water.

Hundreds of local people are currently using Kuti's wetland as their primary water source and are thereby exposing themselves to harmful water and risking the safety of the wildlife within the park.

The border communities are actively engaged in community development projects that diminish people's reliance on park resources and put the power into the people's own hands. There is a thriving Village Natural Resource Management Committees in each of the communities and all are eager to take on new projects that promote the safety and development of their people.

Problem Addressed
Yonamu Community: There is a borehole in a remote village under the Yonamu community that has had parts stolen, rendering it useless. Because of its location, the only other water access comes from Kuti's wetland. This water is very unclean and there is a very high concentration of malaria. People are using the same water that animals use to drink and defecate in.

Salima District Water Project - MalawiThe next closest water source is a borehole at a primary school over 2 km away. Because hundreds of learners are using the borehole on a daily basis, the area around the borehole can become very congested and cause wait times of over on hour.

Kachenembwe Community: Six villages within Kachenembwe do not have boreholes and rely on the nearest primary school, walking distances over 2 km to access clean water. The school has expressed concern over how many people are using the school's water source and families often have to take many trips with small buckets to fulfill their water needs.

Mkhukhi Community: Over 1,000 people within Mkhukhi rely on water from a 2 km distance. The only other water access is from wells where people frequently find dead animals and trash within.

Danken Community: Of the five villages within Danken, there is only one borehole. 2,000 people are walking up to 4 km in order to access clean water. With such a distance, people can only manage to carry small buckets and therefore have to vastly limit their water intake or make multiple trips.

The only other water access comes from wells which offer very unsafe water. With the impending risk of cholera in the area, access to safe drinking water is imperative.

Chatayika Community: Four villages in Chatayika don’t have clean water and are sharing the two boreholes that exist within the six-village community.

Salima District Water Project - MalawiThe only other water source is Kuti's wetland where the water is not safe to consume. The nearest borehole is 2 km away, and people sometimes wait over an hour in order to get water.

Project Description
This project is to build 5 boreholes, one in each of 5 communities.

The boreholes will be built using the standard technology used in the area. They will each have an Afridev pump, and will be surrounded by a concrete slab, with a runoff channel, and soak pit.

Each committee will implement a Village Savings and Loan program to offset maintenance costs for the boreholes. One community has already started theirs and it has met with success.

The boreholes will provide water for permagardens in the communities where it is appropriate. For example, in Mkhukhi, the borehole will be placed next to a day care orphanage. By planting a self-sustaining permagarden, the children can gain access to nutritious foods as well as safe drinking water, all year round.

The project will be implemented by the Kuti Wildlife Reserve, working with the PCV. The project will be managed and completed 100% by local workers and Kuti's Community Outreach Officer, and Kuti will help with any extra costs by allocating funds from gate fees (30% of gate fees are put towards community outreach and development).

Project Impact
4,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Anya Russom

Salima District Water Project - MalawiMonitoring and Maintenance
Kuti Wildlife Reserve will oversee operations and maintenance in the villages, which are all reachable by bike or car, and also attend committee meetings to make sure Village Savings and Loan programs are being properly implemented and managed. They will then begin the permagarden programs.

Let Girls Learn
This project is a Peace Corps Let Girls Learn Project.

Countless young women wait hours for their chance to draw water. Since women predominately secure water for the household, they are the ones who are being forced to sacrifice their time and energy. This project makes water readily available, increasing the ability of young and adolescent girls to go to and remain in school.

This project became infeasible before there was an expenditure of funds. Donations that were made prior to that determination were re-allocated to other projects in Malawi.

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Chitimbe Borehole Project - Malawi

Chitimbe Borehole Project - Malawi

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Chitimbe Borehole Project - MalawiLocation
Chitimbe Village, Mulanje District, Malawi.

Community Description
Chitimbe is a typical rural Malawian village without running water or electricity, located along a dirt road, about an hour away from the city of Blantyre. Chitimbe has one broken borehole, built 30 years ago, that is not operational. The depth of that well is only 6 meters.

Problem Addressed
There is no accessible clean water source for rural residents of Chitimbe Village. This leads to illness and, in some cases, death, particularly among children under the age of 5. Most residents currently fetch water for drinking and cooking from dirty wells or waterways like streams or rivers. Women, in particular, are vulnerable in the absence of clean, nearby water sources.

Project Description
This project entails constructing a borehole in Chitimbe Village.

The borehole location was chosen by a village project committee, acting on behalf of the entire village. The site is publicly accessible.

Construction will be done by EZ Borehole Drillers, a company located in Blantyre, with substantial experience in the area, including other boreholes funded by Water Charity. The installation will take three days to complete.

Chitimbe Borehole Project - MalawiIt is expected that water will be reached at about 45 meters, but the well will be drilled to a depth of about 60 meters, if necessary. Before drilling, a hydro-geographical assessment using electrical measurements will be conducted to find the depth of the underlying aquifer.

Above ground, the boreholes will include a standard metal pump mechanism, a cement foundation to protect the pump mechanism, and a cement spillway to channel excess water.

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the skilled labor as well as for the materials that cannot be found locally, such as piping, fixtures and fittings, and concrete.

Communities will contribute volunteer labor, materials, including bricks and sand, and about $300 in cash.

Project Impact
2,721 people in 623 households will benefit from the project.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
The project will be administered by Michael Buckler, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Malawi from 2006 to 2008. He is the founder and CEO of Village X, a social enterprise located in Washington, D.C. dedicated to improving community development work in sub-Saharan Africa. He is a member of the National Peace Corps Association, Friends of Malawi, and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington, D.C.

Chitimbe Borehole Project - MalawiMonitoring and Maintenance
EZ Borehole Drillers will guarantee the borehole for one year, and be available to respond to any problems that arise.

Villagers will be charged a nominal amount for water usage to have funds available for maintenance and repairs.

Village X will gather data from nearest health clinic to evaluate the impact of the borehole, comparing rates of waterborne illness before and after installation.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

This project is the eighth to be implemented under our Malawi Borehole Program, which is a part of our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program. If you would like to help us with more projects such as this one, please click the Donate button below.

 

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE

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Siyabu Village Water Project - Malawi

Mama and youth carrying water

NPC & WC LOGOThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location

Siyabu Village, Zomba District, Malawi
map
Community Description
Siyabu is a typical rural Malawian village without running water or electricity, located along a dirt road, about a two-hour walk from the city of Zomba.

Problem Addressed
There is no accessible clean water source for rural residents of Siyabu Village. This leads to illness and, in some cases, death, particularly among children under the age of 5. Most residents currently fetch water for drinking and cooking from dirty wells or waterways like streams or rivers. Women, in particular, are vulnerable in the absence of clean, nearby water sources. In our partner villages, women fetching water from sometimes distant, unsanitary sources have experienced domestic abuse for taking too long and husbands suspect infidelity or rape when women venture into remote areas, and death from drowning in flooded rivers during the rainy season.

Linesi Masala, a mother of two and resident of Siyabu, was abused by her husband for taking too long to retrieve water from a shallow well, where wait times were very long. He accused her of using that time to sleep with other men. Her husband subsequently died of dysentery. Approximately five couples in Siyabu have divorced over this issue.

Mother and youth at the water holeProject Description
This project entails constructing a borehole in Siyabu Village. A village project committee, acting on behalf of the entire village, chose the borehole location. The site is publicly accessible. 

EZ Borehole Drillers, a company located in Blantyre, with substantial experience in the area, including other boreholes funded by Water Charity, will do the construction. The installation will take about 2 weeks to complete. It is expected that water will be reached at about 45 meters, but the well will be drilled to depths of about 60 meters, if necessary. Before drilling, a hydro-geographical assessment using electrical measurements will be conducted to find the depth of the underlying aquifer. EZ Borehole Drillers will guarantee the borehole for one year.

Above ground, the boreholes will include a standard metal pump mechanism, a cement foundation to protect the pump mechanism, a cement spillway to channel excess water, and a clothes-washing station. Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the skilled labor as well as for the materials that cannot be found locally, such as piping, fixtures and fittings, and concrete. Communities will contribute volunteer labor, materials, including bricks and sand, and about $400 in cash.

Project Impact
There are 104 households, or 512 people, who will directly benefit from the project.  Village X will gather data from nearest health clinic to evaluate the impact of the borehole, comparing rates of waterborne illness before and after installation.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
VillagersThe project will be administered by Michael Buckler, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Malawi from 2006 to 2008. He is the founder and CEO of Village X, a social enterprise located in Washington, D.C. dedicated to improving community development work in sub-Saharan Africa.  He is a member of the National Peace Corps Association, Friends of Malawi, and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington, D.C.

Monitoring and Maintenance
EZ Borehole Drillers will conduct 2 days of community-based borehole management training. Trainees will include the village chief and members of two borehole management committees, a technical committee responsible for upkeep and maintenance, and a sanitation committee charged with keeping the borehole tidy. The technical committees will collect a maintenance fee of 100 MK (about 20 cents) per month per household to ensure that there are sufficient funds to adequately maintain the facility and repair it when needed. 

Comments
This is an important infrastructure project that will improve the health and wellbeing of Siyabu. It is well planned, with strong management and fiscal safeguards in place. It incorporates elements of oversight and buy-in by the residents to make it sustainable into the future.

This project is part of our ongoing Malawi Borehole Program, in concert with Michael Buckler and Village X.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.
If you like this project, and want to help with future projects of this type, please Donate for the East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

This project has been COMPLETED.  To view the results, CLICK HERE.

at the waterholewoman and baby walking through the fields

Villagers thanking Water Charityvillagers

 

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Nachuma Village Water Project - Malawi

Woman getting water

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC LOGOS

Location

Nachuma Village, Zomba District, Malawimap of Nachuma Village, Malawi

Community Description
Nachuma is a typical rural Malawian village without running water or electricity, located along a dirt road, about a two-hour walk from the city of Zomba. Nachuma, an unusually large village (two to three times larger than other Village X partner villages), has one operational borehole, built in 1993, that frequently has maintenance problems. Most of the village doesn't use this borehole due to long walking distances.

Problem Addressed
There is no accessible clean water source for rural residents of Nachuma Village. This leads to illness and, in some cases, death, particularly among children under the age of 5. Most residents currently fetch water for drinking and cooking from dirty wells or waterways like streams or rivers. Women, in particular, are vulnerable in the absence of clean, nearby water sources.

Project Description
This project entails constructing a borehole in Nachuma Village. A village project committee, acting on behalf of the entire village, chose the borehole location. The site is publicly accessible. EZ Borehole Drillers, a company located in Blantyre, with substantial experience in the area, including a number of other boreholes funded by Water Charity, will do the construction.

Polluted water sourceThe installation will take three days to complete. It is expected that water will be reached at about 45 meters, but the wells will be drilled to depths of about 60 meters, if necessary. Before drilling, a hydro-geographical assessment using electrical measurements will be conducted to find the depth of the underlying aquifer. EZ Borehole Drillers will guarantee the borehole for one year.

Above ground, the boreholes will include a standard metal pump mechanism, a cement foundation to protect the pump mechanism, a cement spillway to channel excess water, and a clothes-washing station. Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the skilled labor as well as for the materials that cannot be found locally, such as piping, fixtures and fittings, and concrete. Communities will contribute volunteer labor, materials, including bricks and sand, and about $400 in cash.

Project Impact
There are 1,487 people in 302 households who will directly benefit from the project. Village X will gather data from nearest health clinic to evaluate the impact of the borehole, comparing rates of waterborne illness before and after installation.

Return Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Michael Buckler

Monitoring and Maintenance
EZ Borehole Drillers will conduct 2 days of community-based borehole management training. Trainees will include the village chief and members of two borehole management committees, a technical committee responsible for upkeep and maintenance and a sanitation committee charged with keeping the borehole tidy. woman carrying water

The technical committees will collect a maintenance fee of 100 MK (about 20 cents) per month per household to ensure that there are sufficient funds to adequately maintain the facility and repair it when needed. 

This is an important infrastructure project that will improve the health and wellbeing of Nachuma. It is well planned, with strong management and fiscal safeguards in place. It incorporates elements of oversight and buy-in by the residents to make them sustainable into the future.

Comments
EZ Borehole Drillers can conduct a survey and complete the borehole within two weeks. This project is URGENT, as the rainy season will arrive in mid to late November.

Michael Buckler, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Malawi from 2006 to 2008, will administer the project. He is the founder and CEO of Village X, a social enterprise located in Washington, D.C. dedicated to improving community development work in sub-Saharan Africa.  He is a member of the National Peace Corps Association, Friends of Malawi, and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington, D.C.

Mike expressed, “Once again, thanks so much for the partnership. Please help us finish the last two boreholes before the rains come!”

Due to the devaluation of the currency in Malawi, and great program management by Village X, Water Charity is able to build an extra borehole this year in our Malawi Borehole Program.  This program falls under our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Initiative.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.
 

Villagers thank Water Charityvillagers thank Water Charity

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Kamsonga Region Rainwater Harvesting and Well Project - Malawi

Kamsonga Region Rainwater Harvesting and Well Project - Malawi

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location
Kamsonga TC, Ntchisi District, Malawi

KamsongaCommunity Description
Ntichisi is a district in the Central Region of Malawi with a population of 212,000 and a land area of 1,655 sq km which gives a density of 128 persons per square kilometer. The district receives an annual rainfall from 900 mm to 1,500 mm.

Agriculture forms around 80% of the district economy where 14% of cultivable land are estates producing mostly tobacco with the remainder of small holder farms producing a range of crops such as maize, beans, groundnuts, potatoes, and cassava. Livestock, forestry, and irrigation are also important activities in the district. There is little private industry in the District and Government is by far the largest employer. The poverty rate in the district, according to Profile of Poverty in Malawi, 1998, was 76.3%

This project is being initiated, planned, and implemented by a community development group called SOLID in coordination with a local Peace Corps Volunteer.

Problem Addressed
The problems being addressed by this project is lack of water, community development, computer and writing skills, as well as malnutrition.

Project Description
This project involves the building of three new wells, the installation of 13 rainwater harvesting systems, and irrigation of a number of community gardens.

Three village wells will be dug and lined with bricks, using local labor, with the intention of securing year-round access to a reliable and clean source of water.

The rainwater harvesting portion of the project will supply SOLID Members' households with rainwater catchment system in 6 villages in the area of Kamsonga. Each system will consist of gutters around the house to collect water, attached to a piping system that runs to a 1,000 liter plastic tank.

The water that is collected during the rainy season, along with the constant supply generated by the three new wells, will help supply water, during the dry season in order to sustain home permagardens and tree nurseries in the households of the SOLID members and their surrounding neighbors. The hope is that the technology will be replicated by other community members to apply the new technology, once they see how beneficial it can be to their household.Villagers

The project is designed with materials that are accessible and attainable for people at the community level: cement, plastic tanks, and metal piping. The majority of the funds will be used to obtain the materials necessary to establish a rainwater harvesting system. The SOLID members have been planning and working hard to secure their own finances through a peanut butter IGA in order to support and sustain this desired project.

After the rainwater catchment systems are built, then the action plan to establish permagardens and tree nurseries will be put into place. In addition to learning about proper water management, SOLID members will be trained in the proper development of a permagarden and how to establish a tree nursery. Furthermore, all SOLID members will be expected to establish one or both of these environmental practices and will be held responsible by the plan of monthly monitoring at their homes. The positive impact will motivate the greater community to adopt these practices in their homes.

Project Impact
2,070 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Amanda Larson

Monitoring and Maintenance
Community forestry officers will be placed in charge of monitoring tree nurseries and gardens. SOLID members will monitor the water catchment.

SOLID MembersComments
After SOLID completed training the locals on water issues and rainwater catchment, in November 2014, SOLID Volunteers were anxious to apply what they had learned in order for them to have the tools, connections, and finances needed in order to make the water project a reality for their local communities.

SOLID Volunteers began working on computer skills so that they could eventually write and submit funding proposals. As they continued to practice this skill, they developed a Peanut Butter IGA in order to fund community development projects.

PCV Amanda Larson, and Salome Mumba of SOLID, a water engineer who lives and work with the Ministry of Agriculture as well as various NGOs in Lilongwe, have desinged this project. With Salome Mumba’s insight and understanding of practical technologies that are beneficial in rural regions, the project follows methodologies that have proven successful in other regions in Malawi.

This project is a part of our ongoing East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

This project has been fully funded by a major WC donor who prefers to remain annonymous.

Further donations to this project will be applied to Amanda's next project or to future Peace Corps projects in Malawi.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Men of the villageCertificate
Meeting

 

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Malawi Borehole Training Program

Malawi Borehole Training Program

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Introduction
Two million people in Malawi don’t have access to safe water. Over 3,000 children die each year from diarrhea caused by unsafe water and poor sanitation.

The people of Malawi have an urgent need for local sources of safe water. This can only be met by a plan to develop the required infrastructure.

The construction of boreholes has proven to be the best remedy to provide for the water needs of the people. However, there does not exist sufficient capacity in Malawi to quickly and effectively implement the needed projects over the entire country.

There is a shortage of drilling companies, trained workers, and equipment needed to have a widespread impact.

Malawi Borehole Training Program

This project is to develop and build the capacity of local contractors to proceed with drilling at a swift pace in all areas of Malawi.
 
Background
Water Charity and Village X created a model to work with local leaders and water committees, assess the local needs, plan specific borehole projects, drill the boreholes and install the necessary hardware and above-ground improvements, evaluate the results, and maintain and repair the well and pump.

The model was implemented as the Malawi Borehole Program in early 2015, and since that time 5 new community-led boreholes have been built.

All of the boreholes were drilled in the Upper Shire Highlands of Southern Malawi (see green circle). Village X is tracking and reporting the impacts of the boreholes and providing live picture project updates.

Water Charity and Village X are proceeding with the program by drilling several more boreholes in the Southern Region, under the direction of Village X Country Representative Myson Jambo.

Program Description
This program is to expand the Malawi Borehole Program to the Central and Northern Regions of Malawi. This entails hiring and training a Village X Country Representatives for each of two new regions, the Central Region and Northern Region, under the direction of the Southern Region Representative.

This is a program of training and capacity building in the new Regions, based on the successful model developed during the implementation in the Southern Region. The result will be a strong network of trained and skilled drilling companies and personnel spanning the entire country. It will provide a continuous flow of drilling projects in areas of great need, and improve the infrastructure of the country.

The program will be implemented under the direction of Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Michael Buckler, CEO of Village X.

This is a sub-program of the Malawi Borehole Program and the East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

While this program is currently fully funded, we encourage you to donate to above umbrella programs, so that we can continue to do this kind of work.

UPDATE:

2016 -- The Malawi Borehole Program looks to scale!

Our man on the ground Myson has identified 23 new water projects spanning Malawi. Geographical breakdown: 9 in the south, 7 in the central, and 7 in the north. Selections are based on meetings and phone calls with health centers, traditional authorities (chiefs), and district water departments. Myson confirmed that each proposed site is located in a high-poverty area with a high waterborne illness rate and lack of existing clean water sources. Of the 23 villages identified, 8 have already started raising money.

Here are the villages:


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Bakili Village Well Project - Malawi

Bakili Village Well Project - Malawi

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location
Collecting wate from a puddleBakili Village, Mulanje District, Malawi. 

Community Description
Bakili is a typical rural Malawian village without running water or electricity, located along a dirt road, a great distance from any paved road or urban area. Bakili lost a 14-year-old girl who went to fetch water from the local river and presumably drowned. Her body has not been recovered. 
  
Problem Addressed
There is no accessible clean water source for rural residents of Bakili Village. This leads to illness and, in some cases, death, particularly among children under the age of 5. Residents currently fetch water for drinking and cooking from dirty wells or waterways like streams or rivers. Women, in particular, are vulnerable in the absence of clean, nearby water sources. In our partner villages, women fetching water from sometimes distant, unsanitary sources have experienced domestic abuse for taking too long (husbands suspect infidelity), rape (when women venture into remote areas), and death from drowning in flooded rivers during the rainy season. 

Project Description
This project entails constructing a borehole in Bakili Village.

The borehole location was chosen by a village project committee, acting on behalf of the entire village. The site is publicly accessible. Construction will be done by EZ Borehole Drillers, a company located in Blantyre, with substantial experience in the area, including other boreholes funded by Water Charity. The installation will take three days to complete. It is expected that water will be reached at about 45 meters, but the wells will be drilled to depths of about 60 meters, if necessary.

Before drilling, a hydro-geographical assessment using electrical measurements will be conducted to find the depth of the underlying aquifer. The borehole will be guaranteed for one year by EZ Borehole Drillers. Above ground, the boreholes will include a standard metal pump mechanism, a cement foundation to protect the pump mechanism, a cement spillway to channel excess water, and a clothes washing station. 

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the skilled labor as well as for the materials that cannot be found locally, such as piping, fixtures and fittings, and concrete. Communities will contribute volunteer labor, materials, including bricks and sand, and about $400 in cash.

Collecting WaterProject Impact
Bakili Village, Mulanje District, Malawi. 97 households; 474 people.  

Project Administration
The project will be administered by Michael Buckler, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Malawi from 2006 to 2008. He is the founder and CEO of Village X, a social enterprise located in Washington, D.C. dedicated to improving community development work in sub-Saharan Africa.  He is a member of the National Peace Corps Association, Friends of Malawi, and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington, D.C.

Monitoring and Maintenance
EZ Borehole Drillers will conduct 2 days of community-based borehole management training. Trainees will include the village chief and members of two borehole management committees, a technical committee (responsible for upkeep and maintenance) and a sanitation committee (charged with keeping the borehole tidy and planting a vegetable garden that utilizes excess water from the well). The technical committees will collect a maintenance fee of 100 MK (about 20 cents) per month per household to ensure that there are sufficient funds to adequately maintain the facility and repair it when needed. 

This is an important infrastructure project that will improve the health and wellbeing of Bakili. It is well planned, with strong management and fiscal safeguards in place. It incorporates elements of oversight and buy-in by the residents to make them sustainable into the future.

In addition, Village X will gather data from nearest health clinic to evaluate the impact of the borehole, comparing rates of waterborne illness before and after installation.

Comments
This marks the 5th project in the Malwai Borehole Program. It also falls under our East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

Not only will Water Charity and Village X finish the initial 7 villages in our original concept, but due to the rampant success of the program, we well be expanding it to include a wider area of Malawi.  We are working on helping train more people to do boreholes, and will be expanding this program northward to help more communities in need.  Exciting stuff indeed!

Dollar Amount of Project
$7,600

This project has been fully funded by an annonymous donor.  If you would like to support this effort, please consider donating to the Program as a whole, or Water Charity's project fund, so we can do more projects like this.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

Current water source for BakiliWater collection

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Kazembe Village Well Project - Malawi

Kazembe Village Well Project - Malawi

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is a product of the partnership between Water Charity & the National Peace Corps Association

Location
Kazembe Village, Mulanje District, Malawi.

Kazembe water sourceCommunity Description
Kazembe is a typical rural Malawian village without running water or electricity, located along a dirt road, a great distance from any paved road or urban area. Kazembe residents fetch water from the Nalada River. Consequently, infant mortality rates are high and, on average, 4 cases of cholera are diagnosed in Kazembe each month.

Problem Addressed
There is no accessible clean water source for rural residents of Kazembe Village. This leads to illness and, in some cases, death, particularly among children under the age of 5. Residents currently fetch water for drinking and cooking from dirty wells or waterways like streams or rivers. Women, in particular, are vulnerable in the absence of clean, nearby water sources.  Women fetching water from sometimes distant, unsanitary sources have experienced domestic abuse for taking too long (husbands suspect infidelity), rape (when women venture into remote areas), and death from drowning in flooded rivers during the rainy season.

Project Description
This project entails constructing a borehole in Kazembe Village. The borehole location was chosen by a village project committee, acting on behalf of the entire village. The site is publicly accessible.

Construction will be done by EZ Borehole Drillers, a company located in Blantyre, with substantial experience in the area, including other boreholes funded by Water Charity. The installation will take three days to complete. It is expected that water will be reached at about 45 meters, but the wells will be drilled to depths of about 60 meters, if necessary.

Before drilling, a hydro-geographical assessment using electrical measurements will be conducted to find the depth of the underlying aquifer. The borehole will be guaranteed for one year by EZ Borehole Drillers. Above ground, the boreholes will include a standard metal pump mechanism, a cement foundation to protect the pump mechanism, a cement spillway to channel excess water, and a clothes washing station.  

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the skilled labor as well as for the materials that cannot be found locally, such as piping, fixtures and fittings, and concrete. Communities will contribute volunteer labor, materials, including bricks and sand, and about $400 in cash.

Project Impacts
washing clothes at the water source704 people in 179 households will benefit.  Village X will gather data from nearest health clinic to evaluate the impact of the borehole, comparing rates of waterborne illness before and after installation.

Project Administration
The project will be administered by Michael Buckler, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Malawi from 2006 to 2008. He is the founder and CEO of Village X, a social enterprise located in Washington, D.C. dedicated to improving community development work in sub-Saharan Africa.  He is a member of the National Peace Corps Association, Friends of Malawi, and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington, D.C.

Comments
This borehole will be located in Mulanje District. In partnership with Village X. Water Charity has already funded borehole projects in Phalombe, Zomba and Chiradzulu Districts.  This will be our 4th project with Mike as part of our Malawi Borehole Program.  It also falls under our East Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

NOTE: For the sake of efficiency, given Kazembe's remote location and proximity to borehole candidate Bakili Village, the Kazembe and Bakili boreholes will be drilled in tandem. The Bakili borehole is a separate project though, with separate payments for each borehole, made after each borehole is completed and tested for water quality and proper operation.

Monitoring and Maintenance
EZ Borehole Drillers will conduct 2 days of community-based borehole management training. Trainees will include the village chief and members of two borehole management committees, a technical committee (responsible for upkeep and maintenance) and a sanitation committee (charged with keeping the borehole tidy and planting a vegetable garden that utilizes excess water from the well).

The technical committees will collect a maintenance fee of 100 MK (about 20 cents) per month per household to ensure that there are sufficient funds to adequately maintain the facility and repair it when needed.

This is an important infrastructure project that will improve the health and wellbeing of Mwanga. It is well planned, with strong management and fiscal safeguards in place. It incorporates elements of oversight and buy-in by the residents to make them sustainable into the future.

This project has been fully funded by an anonymous donor.  Please consider donating to the Program as a whole, or Water Charity's project fund, so we can do more projects like this.

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.
Washing with dirty waterCollecting water that isn't safe

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Mwanga Village Well Project - Malawi

Mwanga Village Well Project - Malawi

npca and wc logosThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location and Community Description
Mwanga Village, Phalombe District, Malawi. Located along a rural stretch of newly paved road that connects the towns of Zomba and Phalombe, the commercial center of Mwanga has electricity and three boreholes, two of which are inaccessible to the general population -- one at the clinic and one at the Catholic mission. There is one publicly accessible borehole at the primary school, but it produces salty water and goes dry during the dry seasons. Mwanga is a large village and the location for the proposed borehole is a rural area, about 3 kilometers from the existing boreholes just described.  

Mphato, who was raped fetching water and is now HIV+Problem Addressed
There is no accessible clean water source for rural residents of Mwanga Village. This leads to illness and, in some cases, death, particularly among children under the age of 5. Residents currently fetch water for drinking and cooking from dirty wells or waterways like streams or rivers, especially the Mombezi River.

Women, in particular, are vulnerable in the absence of clean, nearby water sources. In the rural sections of Mwanga, women often ask their husbands to fetch water using their bicycles, from a borehole located several kilometers away, in another village. The men usually resist. Some husbands abandon their wives over the perceived indignity. One husband in Mwanga got so upset with his wife that he tied her naked body to a pole as an act of humiliation (that husband then fled the village to avoid prosecution by local authorities). Under these conditions, wives are left with no choice but to fetch water from nearby, unsanitary sources.  

Project Description
This project entails constructing a borehole in Mwanga Village. The borehole location was chosen by a village project committee, acting on behalf of the entire village. The site is publicly accessible. 

Construction will be done by EZ Borehole Drillers, a company located in Blantyre, with substantial experience in the area, including the Mlenga and Likoswe boreholes funded by Water Charity in February 2015 and June 2015, respectively. The installation will take three days to complete. It is expected that water will be reached at about 45 meters, but the wells will be drilled to depths of about 60 meters, if necessary. Before drilling, a hydro-geographical assessment using electrical measurements will be conducted to find the depth of the underlying aquifer. The borehole will be guaranteed for one year by EZ Borehole Drillers. The Mlenga and Likoswe boreholes are functioning well, with no reported breakdowns or complaints. 

Above ground, the boreholes will include a standard metal pump mechanism, a cement foundation to protect the pump mechanism, a cement spillway to direct water into a nearby vegetable garden, and a clothes washing station. 

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the skilled labor as well as for the materials that cannot be found locally, such as piping, fixtures and fittings, and concrete. Communities will contribute volunteer labor, materials, including bricks and sand, and about $400 in cash.

Project Impacts
Mwanga Village, Phalombe District, Malawi. 112 households; 671 people. There is a heath clinic at the center of Mwanga, and Village X will gather data from that clinic to evaluate the impact of the borehole, comparing rates of waterborne illness before and after installation.

Getting ready for a projectProject Administration
The project will be administered by Michael Buckler, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Malawi from 2006 to 2008. He is the founder and CEO of Village X, a social enterprise located in Washington, D.C. dedicated to improving community development work in sub-Saharan Africa.  He is a member of the National Peace Corps Association, Friends of Malawi, and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington, D.C.

Monitoring and Maintenance
EZ Borehole Drillers will conduct 2 days of community-based borehole management training. Trainees will include the village chief and members of two borehole management committees, a technical committee (responsible for upkeep and maintenance) and a sanitation committee (charged with keeping the borehole tidy and planting a vegetable garden that utilizes excess water from the well). 

The technical committees will collect a maintenance fee of 100 MK (about 20 cents) per month per household to ensure that there are sufficient funds to adequately maintain the facility and repair it when needed. 

This is an important infrastructure project that will improve the health and wellbeing of Mwanga. It is well planned, with strong management and fiscal safeguards in place. It incorporates elements of oversight and buy-in by the residents to make them sustainable into the future.

Timing
EZ Borehole Drillers can conduct a survey at the site immediately and install the borehole in early July.

Fundraising Target
$7,600

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been funded by a major Water Charity donor, who prefers to remain anonymous.

Comments
This project falls under the Malawi Borehole Program, which is, itself, included within the Water Charity and National Peace Corps Association East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion CLICK HERE.

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