Lesotho

Fobane Borehole Project - Lesotho

Fobane Borehole Project - Lesotho

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Fobane Borehole Project - LesothoLocation
Ha Tumo, Fobane, Leribe District, Lesotho

Community Description
Fobane is an underdeveloped, rural village lacking in electricity and running water. About 4,000-5,000 people reside in the village, and the lifestyle revolves around agriculture and taking care of animals.

In the main village, Ha Tumo, where the chief resides, there is a clinic, high school, and primary school. Unemployment and poverty are major concerns, and the village's youth have severely limited options of employment within the village.

In 2014, in order to tackle this problem of unemployment, a group of university-educated young adults who call the village home formed a local association, Haeso ke Fobane, to brainstorm a solution. The aim was simple: to create jobs and opportunities in the village while also providing goods and services with those jobs. With a focus on agricultural projects, the most essential needs were land and water.

The association raised funds through financial contributions through members and by raising chickens to sell during various holiday seasons. Through these funds, land was acquired in the heart of the village. Now the only obstacle that remains is a water source for the land.

Fobane Borehole Project - LesothoProblem Addressed
In the village, unemployment is a serious problem that leaves Job seekers helpless, depressed, and unproductive. Even those that complete university education can find themselves without a job for several years after graduating, and settle for menial labor. This unfortunate fact leads some students to undervalue and even give up on education.

Haeso ke Fobane, works to create jobs and services in the village through agricultural projects. The organization lacks a water source to accomplish its objectives.

Project Description
This project involves the construction of a water borehole for a community association situated in the rural village of Fobane. The land is situated in the central area of the village adjacent to the clinic.

A contractor located in Ficksburg, South Africa will be in charge of the construction, working with four laborers.

The borehole will have a depth of 14 to 16 meters. An electric pump will be installed. A 1,000 L water tank will be elevated four meters above the ground.

The construction will be completed within two weeks, during which the laborers will be provided with food and lodging by the community association.

The association raised funds through financial contributions through members and by raising chickens to sell during various holiday seasons. Using these funds, land for the borehole was acquired in the heart of the village.

Fobane Borehole Project - LesothoProject Impact
200 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
John Lee

Monitoring and Maintenance
The contractor will provide a six-month warranty for the borehole in case any problems arise. After the warranty expires, the borehole will be maintained by the association, Haeso ke Fobane. Any damage or repairs needed will be dealt with by the association using their budget.

Comments
The completion of this project will allow for the creation of jobs and services in the village through agricultural projects, rescuing villagers out of the tight grasp of unemployment.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor. If you like the work that Water Charity does in implementing water, sanitation, public health, and environmental projects throughout the world, please select one of our other projects to support.

This project has been fully funded by an anonymous donor in the U.S.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Fobane Borehole Project - LesothoFobane Borehole Project - Lesotho

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Sefateng Village Latrine Project - Lesotho

Sefateng Villager

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Sefateng, Lesobeng, Thaba Tseka, LesothoYouth in Sefateng playing soccer

Community Description
Sefateng (the place of the tree) is a chieftainship of 75 families. Sefateng is a sustenance farming and herding community. Harvest is from March to June, and at the end of each harvest day, everyone eats fresh peaches, peas and mustard greens, while sitting on the ground on blankets cleaning the last of the previous year's barley.

Almost every Saturday everyone gets together for a community meeting to discuss water conservation, herding patterns, or ploughing regulations with the village chief. Afterwards, the cattle theft neighborhood watch will break off for a separate meeting focused on sheep selling rules, and effective punishment methods for those unfortunate cattle thieves who happen to be caught in the act. 

Secondary school fees are commonly paid in sheep, as the price of one sheep is equal to one year of sending your child to school. Girls spend the weekends collecting firewood--since everybody in the village cooks on an open fire--and picking wild greens, while the boys herd sheep all day in the surrounding mountains. Many boys opt out of school to live in the mountains, continuously herding until they earn enough cattle to pay the bride price. Then they marry and hire their own herd boys.  

After the work is done, people sing and dance. All the women from the village get together at 5 pm for cultural dance, and the men frequently dance outside the shop, which is not always a sober dance.

Problem Addressed
There is currently one latrine in the area, and public defecation is regularly practiced.  

The Sefateng community lacks latrines, and has wanted latrines for many years. They started to dig holes and collect stones for a project three years ago, but they lacked the funds to complete the project. When Martha, the Peace Corp Volunteer, explained the possibility of project funding, they immediately started to put together a plan. The latrine project addresses many community needs. The lack of latrines and hence regular open defecation, has resulted in polluting the community's water source, and has also contributed to the spread of fecal-oral diseases. The community is also fed up with the inconveniences of not having easily accessible latrines, as is common in much of Lesotho.

Project Description
This project is to build latrines for 39 families in a mountainous community in rural Lesotho. 

The holes are to be two meters deep and one meter across on each side.  The dimensions were chosen in accordance with the holes in a neighboring village. The buildings are to be of corrugated iron and about 6 feet high and 3 feet across on each side, the standard size in the areaThe structures will be bought from a shop about two hours from the village.  They are sold in a package, which includes the frame, ventilation pipe, iron, and seat for one latrine.  

The goal of this project is to:

1) provide access to pit latrines that will improve quality of life, and
2) eliminate public defecation, thereby reducing the transmission of fecal-oral disease and improving land and water sanitation.  

Youth in SefatengWater Charity funds will be used to pay for necessary materials and latrine construction.

Each of the 39 families involved in the project have made a 100 Maluti contribution. Each family is also responsible for digging a hole, collecting sand, and collecting stones for their own latrine. 

Many of the families have already started digging holes. Only a few families are still digging. The project committee has been accountable for making sure each family completes their part on time, as each family is responsible for the hole, sand, and stones for their own future latrine. After the community finishes their portion of the manual labor, the necessary materials for the project will be purchased, and contract laborers hired to construct the latrines. 

It is anticipated that construction of all of the latrines will be completed in four months. The latrine committee is committed to making sure the latarines are built in a timely manner. 

The digging of the holes is almost complete, and the villagers are waiting for a good rain so sand and stones can be easily collected. There is a lack of water in the village currently, which makes laying the cement hard at this time. Contractors will be hired to build the structures once the holes are dug, sand and stones collected, and the materials and cement have been purchased. 

Project Impact 
This project will benefit about 300 people.Woman cooking

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Martha Wagley

Monitoring and Maintenance
After the latrines are constructed, the community will organize a session with the local clinic to teach proper latrine use and maintenance. The community will be responsible for monitoring and maintenance, with the PCV ensuring follow-through by the community.

Comments
Currently, the community defecates on the land surrounding the river, which is the main water source in the area. The river is used for washing clothes, bathing, and as drinking water. In addition, the river is a long trek from the homes of many community members. Hence, the project will improve land and water sanitation, reduce spread of fecal-oral transmitted diseases, and eliminate the inconveniences presented by the lack of latrines.

Dollar Amount of Project
$3,400

Donations Collected to Date

$0

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,400

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

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St. Camillus Farm Irrigation Project - Lesotho

Youth at the St. Camillus Orphanage

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location
Mohlakeng, Mohale’s Hoek District Capital, Lesotho

Community Description

Mohlakeng is a community council located in the Maseru District of Lesotho. Its population in 2006 was 18,906. The community of Mohlakeng consists of 81 villages.  Lesotho is an enclaved, landlocked Kingdom in southern Africa completely surrounded by South Africa. It is just over 30,000 km2 (11,583 sq mi) in size and has a population slightly over two million. About 40% of the population lives below the international poverty line of US $1.25 a day. 

The St. Camillus Centre community where the project will be taking place consists of almost 60 individuals: 20 orphans and vulnerable children who live at the St. Camillus children’s home, 15 orphans who live with foster parents in the villages adjacent to Mohlakeng, and 24 adults who are living with HIV/AIDS who are dependent on the Centre for food, clothing, and rent money.  Mohale’s Hoek is considered by the Ministry of Social Development to be one of the three most vulnerable districts in Lesotho: 24% are HIV+, 75% rely on subsistence farming on the limited arable land available (10%), approximately 70% live at or below the poverty level, and 40% of children under the age of 5 years are malnourished.  
farm
St. Camillus is one of the few orphanages in Lesotho that cares for children under the age of 5 years.  There currently are 10 children less than 5 years and 80% of them are below normal weight for their age.  Funds to maintain the Centre’s operations are chronically limited and food shortages occur regularly thus impacting the quality and quantity of nutritious food provided.

Problem Addressed
The St. Camillus Centre does not have adequate irrigation to grow the crops necessary to feed their residents and sustain their center.  Relying on rainwater is high risk due to changing weather patterns, resulting in less rain beginning later during the growing season, thus negatively impacting harvest yield and their ability to feed the children, and earn a small income from the sale of vegetables to the public.  The Ministry of Agriculture has recommended that St. Camillus dramatically change its farming techniques by adopting Conservation Agriculture to achieve a better yield and improve our income.  

Project Description
A critical component of the project includes installing an irrigation system on over 4,800 square meters of vegetable fields at the St. Camillus Farm. With a regular water source from irrigation, fed by natural underground water and cached rain water, the harvest yield will be improved. This in turn will enable more produce to be brought to the market and provide a more reliable source of nutritious food for individuals living in the center.

A “s
Worker on the farmpray” irrigation system will be installed on the fields, as it provides the best versatility for crop rotation with less water loss than a “sprinkler” system. Centrifugal pumps will be installed at the water tanks, fed by wells and rainwater. Irrigation hoses will be placed in trenches and covered with soil. The operation of the sprinklers will be manual (on/off) and a specific watering schedule specific to each crop will be followed. 

Thabang Mpokathe, Director of the Qalakheng Evergreen Farms, (QEF), has created a master plan for the design and a phased installation schedule.  To purchase at the best price, the majority of equipment and supplies will be obtained from stores specializing in irrigation in Bloemfontein, Republic of South Africa, and transported to the St. Camillus Centre.  

St. Camillus staff will prepare the fields, dig the trenches, and lay the pipes while QEF staff  will install the valves, sprinklers, and controls. The QEF Director will train the St. Camillus staff in operating and maintaining the irrigation system.  

Phase one is already underway, and irrigation will be installed in the first field of almost 3,400 square meters.  Phase two and Phase three are pending acquisition of sufficient funds.  Phase two will entail installing irrigation for 1,120 square meters of farm field, and Phase three completing the irrigation in the remaining fields.

The purchase and installation of the irrigation equipment and supplies is a collaborative effort between the vendor, Qalakheng Evergreen Farms and the St. Camillus farm staff. Sister Juliana and the St. Camillus Farm Manager, Mme Mamello Manele are responsible for overseeing the installation, and ensuring that all equipment and supplies are accounted for and installed.  A successful testing of the irrigation system is required before the work will be considered completed, and final payment made to the vendor.

In addition, St. Camillus will offer quarterly workshops to the community (starting in the 2nd quarter of 2016) in conservation agriculture and irrigation. The goal is provide training in the tools and techniques to improve farming practices in the community, raise the level of income and provide more abundant nutritious food.  The goal is to train 20 individuals each quarter (up to 80 per year), focusing on inclusion of the under-employed, impoverished individuals, and people living with HIV/AIDS. With education from the workshops and practical experience on the farm, these individuals will gain the knowledge and expertise to implement the new methodologies on a scale appropriate to their means.

Project Impact
At least 120 individuals will be impacted in 2016 and this number will increase as the farm becomes more successful. Those individuals under the care and support of the St. Camillus Centre will be directly impacted: 20 resident orphans, 15 orphans in community-based foster homes, and 24 people living with HIV/AIDS (total 59 individuals) by the improved harvest yield and sales achieved by the irrigation project. These individuals receive food, clothing, education, and employment as a result of the vegetables and income produced by the St. Camillus Farm.

Fields before irrigation systemThe Centre will be able to ensure employment to the existing 4 farm workers and 4 orphanage matrons, it will hire 2 additional full time staff and will augment the number of workers (up to 6 or more) during the planting and harvesting seasons. Even these small numbers of employed community residents improve the economy and wellbeing of the region surrounding the Centre.  The increased and more reliable vegetable harvest will impact families in the Mohale’s Hoek District capital and surrounding villages who rely on the market for a secure source of produce throughout the year.

The Mohale’s Hoek District capital and surrounding villages support numerous public and faith-based pre-school, primary, and secondary schools.  All the schools provide lunch for their students and have already sought commitments from the Centre to provide fresh vegetables that will enhance the nutrient value of the school meals.  The Centre is also planning to market produce to the local hospital, hotels, and large Catholic convents in the Mohale’s Hoek area.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Stephanie Sales

Monitoring and Maintenance
Ntate Thabang Mpokathe, Director of QEF, will train the farm staff on the operation and maintenance of the system. Ntate Kometsi, Assistant Farm Manager, is responsible for weekly maintenance checks and reporting and/or repairing irrigation issues, as needed.

Comments

The St. Camillus Centre for Orphans and Children is directly involved in the planning, implementation, management, monitoring, and reporting of the irrigation project.  Sister Julian, Director of St. Camillus Centre, manages all aspects of the project. St Camillus collaborates with our consultant, Ntate Mpokathe, Director of QEF to ensure adequate Sister with an orphanresources are available and that all St. Camillus staff is well trained to maintain the irrigation system after implementation. 100% of the income from produce sales is used to maintain the non-profit, charitable activities and operations of the St. Camillus Center, which includes the orphanage, sponsoring foster children, providing sustenance to the needy, and the farm.  The sale of the produce will enable the Centre to reduce its dependence on funds from international NGOs and charitable organizations as well as improving the quality of care and support for those individuals now served.

St. Camillus has recently joined a coalition of local farmers, sponsored by the Ministry of Agriculture, who meet monthly.   Leaders from the Ministry of Agriculture and the Ministry of Commerce facilitated a meeting, which included both farmers and a coalition of local produce vendors.  Local vendors in the 3 district capitals near the St. Camillus Centre expressed strong interest in purchasing local produce. The coalitions and the Ministry of Agriculture are very motivated to reduce the dependence on the import of produce from South Africa and are identifying mechanisms to better plan and coordinate crop rotations, pricing, and sales management. The benefits to the community are clear: improved crop management to serve local nutritional needs, better sale prices to the local community, and overall strengthening of the local economy due to increased employment.

This project has been fully funded by an anonymous donor.


This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

fields beforefields before

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St. Felix Primary School Rainwater Catchment and Storage Project - Lesotho

Location
Ha Mali, Leribe District, Lesotho

St. Felix Primary School Rainwater Catchment and Storage Project - LesothoCommunity Description
St. Felix Primary School is the only school in the remote village of Ha Mali, Lesotho, adjacent to the Ts’ehlanyane National Park. The school serves 240 students in grades 1 thru 7.

Previously at St. Felix the local Division of Rural Water Services installed a tank and carousel operated pump on the school grounds, but the water source at that location failed years ago. Since then, students and staff get their water from the outlet of a small nearby spring which is open to debris and animal use. They use this water for drinking, washing hands and watering their gardens. This is particularly dangerous as there are a large number of HIV-positive students at the school who have compromised immune systems.

The school garden produces greens and vegetables, which are a major component of the free lunch served daily at this school.

Project Description
This project is to construct a rainwater catchment and potable water storage system at the school's largest classroom building.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase a 5,000 liter tank, downspout, locking tap & reducer, caulk and sealant tape. Guttering and a concrete base for the tank are already in place.St. Felix Primary School Rainwater Catchment and Storage Project - Lesotho

The school principal will manage a team of paid staff and parent volunteers to install the system.

The staff will be trained on procedures for maintaining the system in good condition using weekly inspection and treatment, tank cleaning, and accurate record keeping.

The project will provide easy access to potable water for drinking and washing.

The increased supply of water will be available for use in the school’s vegetable gardens. The principal and teachers will use the project to teach the students about potable water standards and the risks of consuming non-potable water.

Project Impact
240 students and 7 staff at St. Felix Primary will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Maggie Day

Comments
This is a great solution for satisfying the critical water needs of the school.

St. Felix Primary School Rainwater Catchment and Storage Project - LesothoMaggie previously completed the Ha Mali Community Center Rainwater Catchment and Storage Project – Lesotho.

Dollar Amount of Project
$550.00

Donations Collected to Date
$550.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the Green Family, of Lakewood, Ohio, USA in loving memory of Moeketsi Sera and Matope Motjanyela.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Maggie Dayof your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Maggie and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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St. Alphones Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project - Lesotho

St. Alphones Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project - Lesotho
Location
Morifi Ha Belo, Butha Buthe, Lesotho

Community Description
St. Alphones Primary School is located in the village of Morifi Ha Belo, approximately 5 km from Butha Buthe camptown. The student population is over 500. Eight different villages are represented among the student body. The school is a central meeting place for community members and the site of weekly matches for the local football league.

Recently, members of the Morifi Ha Belo community built an above-ground water tank adjacent to St. Alphones Primary School, located in Upper Morifi. The tank was constructed using natural resources, including stone and home-made cement. However, the community could not finish the project, as they lacked the financial resources.

Project Description
This project is to construct a rainwater catchment system at the school.

The system will consist of gutters to catch rainwater from the roof of one of the school buildings, piping to route the water into the existing tank, and piping to distribute the rainwater to the school and village communities.

St. Alphones Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project - LesothoTwo members of the community who have been actively involved in the project will purchase the necessary materials from Boloka, a hardware store in a nearby town. Boloka will transport these materials free of charge to the site.

A construction worker from a nearby village will then coordinate the completion of the project, which includes installing gutters, building a cover for the tank, and attaching a tap to the tank.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase steel gutters, gutter brackets, nails, cement, paint, a tap, and related materials, such as galvanized sockets and nipples that will secure the tap to the tank. Additionally, the funds will pay the construction worker a small stipend.

The construction worker will complete this project with help from members of the community, who will work without charge.

The principal of St. Alphones Primary School will appoint a staff member to oversee the maintenance of the tank throughout the year.

Project Impact
500 students and 12 staff will directly benefit from the project. The surrounding community and members of the local football league will also be impacted.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
James Kruger

Comments
This project will improve the quality of life for members of the school and village communities in a number of ways:

The school will be able to use the new source of water to prepare lunch for its students. Monday through Friday, half-a-dozen or so women from the surrounding area prepare lunch for the entire student body. Currently, they must transfer water over a long distance.

The school will be able to use the new source of water for its vegetable garden. Teachers and students maintain a small plot adjacent to the school, where they grow vegetables such cabbage and peas. The vegetables are sold to the local community to raise funds for the school. As with the school’s cooks, teachers and students cannot access water easily.

Schoolchildren and staff will be able to use the new source of water to wash their hands. Currently, it is difficult for members of the school community to maintain hygienic practices. The tank will be positioned between school buildings and bathrooms, making it easy for them to keep clean.

The tank will also be used when school is out of session. The school is located in the center of Morifi Ha Belo; certain families will now be closer to the tank than all other sources of water.

Football players will be able to use the tank during and after matches and practices. On Sundays, the local football league uses the pitch for matches. Monday through Friday, the Morifi Ha Belo football team uses the pitch for practices.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been largely funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation with the help of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer James Kruger.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify James of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by James and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Mamolopolli Infirmary and St. Margret's Convent Water Project - Lesotho

Mamolopolli Infirmary and St. Margret's Convent Water Project - Lesotho

Location
Qacha's Nek, Lesotho

Community Description
Mamolopolli Infirmary and St. Margret's Convent are located in a compound in Qacha's Nek, Lesotho. Mamolopolli Infirmary houses 8 Daughters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, Roman Catholic Sisters, 6 of whom are retired and several are living with sickness and disabilities. The retired Sisters have spent their lives dedicated to serving their community as per their mission, though they are unable to move around successfully enough at this time to continue much of that work.

St. Margret Convent has 3 Sisters who work in service of the community. All of these Sisters live in the spirit of service fulfilling roles in the community that aren't desirable to others, such as working to alleviate poverty, caring for the sick, and empowering and building skills for youth.

Mamolopolli Infirmary and St. Margret's Convent Water Project - Lesotho

The Sisters residing on the compound work at local preschools and the local prison, and they are the primary caregivers for the only orphanage in the district's main town. The orphanage provides care, a home, and support for 7 double orphans who are unfortunate causalities of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Lesotho.

The Sisters also run several small model income-generating activities such as sewing school uniforms, some of which are given to double orphans. They also run a successful agricultural project where they sell fruits, vegetables and eggs at reduced cost to local low-income people. The food produced is also used to support the sick and disabled sisters, and the project is used to help teach the orphans and other interested people the skills required for agricultural production.

The Infirmary and the Convent have a very successful rainwater collection system in place. However, groundwater is required on the compound for drinking as well as in times of drought, which is becoming increasingly common in Lesotho as the effects of climate change are being felt.

Project Description
This project is to provide water for the needs of the compound.

An electric pump to draw up the required groundwater from the well will be installed. In addition, a large stone and concrete tank reservoir will be built for storage. Finally, the necessary piping will be installed to connect up the entire system.

The Sisters will first identify the person with the required skills. Next they will find the pump that will meet the needs of the community. They will then obtain concrete, sand, stones and pipe, and build the reservoir tank.

The Sisters will ensure that the pump is compatible with the electrical system, and also the well infrastructure that is in place, and then proceed with the installation of the pump.

The work will be done primarily by the qualified person that is identified, with support from the able bodied Sisters and two Peace Corps Volunteers.

Mamolopolli Infirmary and St. Margret's Convent Water Project - Lesotho

Water Charity funds will be used primarily to buy the electric pump, as this is the most inaccessible part of the project, given the financial situation of the Convent and Infirmary.

The Sisters will finance the balance of the project with a loan, and pay for it over time. The community will contribute by building the reservoir tank and obtaining the necessary supplies and equipment.

Project Impact
The beneficiaries will be the 11 Sisters who reside on the compound, 13- 30 patients per day from within the immediate and surrounding communities served by the nurse, 98 students served by the Early Childhood Care and Development Center (preschool), 74 prisoners to whom they provide socks for the winter and whom they help with life after release, and 16 orphans whom they care for.

Additionally the pump will enable water security for the surrounding community, which is connected to the town's central water supply, which often goes on and off. During the times when it is off, the sisters provide water to the immediately surrounding community of about 30.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Carol McFarland

Comments
Because of the work the Sisters perform in the community, the effects of this project become much greater: It is a project that is caring for the care deliverers.

Especially the orphans, but many others who are cared for by the Sisters’ work will benefit from this water project. Also, the agricultural and sewing projects are important within the community, both for their products, and also because they are good examples of small income-generating activities that are possible and can be replicated.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed

$0 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of an anonymous Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, who served in Lesotho.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.


This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Ha Mali Community Center Rainwater Catchment and Storage Project - Lesotho

Ha Mali Community Center Rainwater Catchment and Storage Project - Lesotho

Location
Ha Mali, Leribe District, Lesotho

Community DescriptionHa Mali Community Center Rainwater Catchment and Storage Project - LesothoHa Mali is a small village with approximately 100 homes, mostly rondavel style, adjacent to the Ts'ehlanyane National Park.

The Ha Mali Community Center operates vegetable gardens and a poultry program that provides training and food for 35 double orphans of Ha Mali. They also offer a range of activities for youth on Saturdays, after school classes for adults, and a morning preschool.

Water, which is contaminated and not healthy to drink, is now collected from the river at the bottom of the hill. It is becoming increasingly difficult to keep up with the food and training programs because of the inadequate supply of safe water.

Project Description
This project is to install a rainwater catchment and storage system, consisting of gutters, downpipes, and 2 tanks, for the Ha Mali Community Center.

The gutters will be placed on opposite sides of the roof, along the front and back of the building, attached to the existing framing. Fascia boards will be added as necessary.

Each gutter will be connected to a separate tank. The tanks will be placed on concrete pads at opposite corners of the building. The pads will be built with concrete remaining from renovation of the building.

The tanks will include spigots just above their base for drawing the water into containers. Drinking water will be provided for all program participants, including for the double orphans program, preschool, after-school, monthly support group meetings, workshops, and quarterly HIV outreach events. The water will also be available for irrigation.

Ha Mali Community Center Rainwater Catchment and Storage Project - LesothoAll labor for pad construction, transport of materials and equipment to the site, securing tanks to the pads and attachment of gutters and down pipe, and fascia board if necessary, will be provided by members of the Ha Mali Support Group, Preschool Parents, and Maliba Lodge, the organization that funded the Ha Mali Community Center renovation last year.

The tanks will be maintained by Center staff, and the water in the tanks will be chlorinated on a regular basis.

Project Impact
The project will benefit about 100 people, including preschool students and their teacher, double orphans, support group members, children who visit on Saturdays for variety of programs, and adults and youth who attend English and business classes.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Maggie Day

Comments
This project will immediately improve the health and wellbeing of all people who depend on the services of the Center.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through a donation on behalf of Commonwealth Bank BP&D Easter Raffle, New South Wales, Australia.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Maggie Day of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Maggie and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Maluti Adventist Hospital Water Project – Lesotho

Maluti Adventist Hospital Water Project – Lesotho

Location
Mapoteng, Lesotho

Community DescriptionMaluti Adventist Hospital Water Project – LesothoIn the countryside of Lesotho, where over 70 percent of Lesotho’s people fight over nine percent of arable land, subsistence farming, on which the people depend, has diminished in recent years. Alternate floods and droughts have reduced farmers’ yields to a bare minimum, leaving more than a quarter of the population food insecure.

Lesotho ranks 141 out of 162 countries in the 2011 Human Development Index, behind Benin, Yemen and Bangladesh. Three out of five children are living in dismal poverty. Every fourth child is orphaned.

In this country of 1.8 million, 500,000 out of 825,000 boys and girls live on under 1.25 dollars a day and without proper shelter, according to United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).

Almost 40 percent of children under five suffer from chronic malnutrition and are stunted. Both under-five and infant mortality figures have persistently gone up in the past decade.

Maluti Adventist Hospital is the regional hospital serving Mapoteng town and 33 villages in Lesotho. The hospital has up to 160 inpatients at one time. There are more than 5,000 hospital admissions per year and more than 50,000 outpatient visits.

Project Description
This project is to install collection pipes in the seasonal water catchment reservoir to allow for the filling of storage tanks for the dry season. The water will be used to irrigate a hospital garden of 2 acres.

Food is used for the hospital patients and orphans. Drinking water is currently used to irrigate the garden during drought, so this will spare drinking water.

Maluti Adventist Hospital Water Project – LesothoThe project will begin with the purchase of PVC pipes and an additional water storage tank using project funds.

Collector pipes will be installed in the reservoir which is currently connected to three storage tanks. The pipes will have small holes drilled in them a foot above the floor of the reservoir. Silt will remain below the level of the pipes and can be periodically removed. Clean water will then run down to the storage tanks each time a heavy rain occurs.

To complete the project, the additional storage tank will be installed and connected.

At this time, runoff channels to the reservoir are being cleared by the hospital maintenance staff. Maintenance staff of the hospital and volunteers will do remainder of the work.

Project Impact
5,000 persons admitted to the hospital each year, and 210 staff members, will benefit from the increased availability of drinking water. In addition, 36 orphans included in the Bana Ba Rona project will also benefit from the food production.

 

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Terry Ellard

Comments
This is a high-impact low-cost project that will benefit a huge number of people. This is Water Charity’s first project in Lesotho, and we are pleased to take this first step to help in alleviating the suffering of the people of this country.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, through the generosity of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Terry Ellard, with additional funds donated for future projects.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Terry of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Terry and/or those other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
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