Kenya

Ogiek Cultural Initiatives Program Training - Kenya

Ogiek Women

Ogiek TribeLocation: Narok, Mau Forest, Kenya

Problem Addressed:
The 30,000 members of the Ogiek tribe are the indigenous forest-dwelling beekeepers of Kenya. They have likely been there for a millennium, or more. In Kenya, they are considered the lowest of the low on the social totem pole, among other reasons because they do not trade in money, land, or cows, but only in honey. Simon Ndungwenkop, tribal chief and director of the Ogiek Cultural Initiatives Program, says that most members of his organization pay their membership dues in honey. Most of the honey is traded or sold to the Masai community, who use it in rituals.

The Ogiek people are under grave threat. Land speculators, government functionaries, and members of other tribes have been carving up the Mau forest where most of the Ogiek live, often claiming ownership of land that they haven’t even seen. Loggers are clearcutting whatever in the way of trees they can get their hands on. They are also setting fire to Ogiek settlements, burning them out of their homes and settlements.

The Ogiek people are attempting to fight back. They are barricading the “roads” (which can hardly be called that) against heavy equipment, and are replanting trees as fast as they can. They would also like to lodge a legal case to at least put a crimp in the cultural genocide that is taking place.

The Ogiek have no schools of their own, and there are neither schools nor teachers who teach in Ogiek, and there is no written language. As a human and indigenous rights defender, Simon says it is struggle to get his people to understand, no less defend, the rights they have under both Kenyan and international law.Burning an Ogiek Home

As a result of forest depletion, coupled with climate change, water sources dry up, and what remains is contaminated. The one remaining river Kalapichwa, the only close source of water, now looks more like a swamp than a river. Honey production is seriously affected. But, more critically, the Ogiek people are now seriously weakened by waterborne illnesses. Amebiases and bacterial dysentery are common, typhoid and cholera more than occasional.

Child mortality and morbidity are extremely high. There are now so many deaths of young children from waterborne diseases, people no longer count them. And it is difficult to fight for one’s rights when compromised by sickness, or in mourning.

Project Description:
A training program will be set up for 25 people on the edge of the Mau Forest in Narok. The group is located in Olokuseroi village. Besides BioSand Filter fabrication, distribution, installation, and maintenance, they will be instructed in how to teach community sanitation and hygiene, as well as basic business planning. The training will be in Swahili, and translated into Ogiek for those who need.

Filters will be sold to the Ogiek, mostly in exchange for honey (which is quite valuable, and the Ogiek Cultural Initiatives Program does this regularly). There will be a large market for Filters among the Maasai, the Ogiek’s traditional trading partners. If successful, the initiative will lead to more workshops.Terrible Water

Project Impact:
The immediate impact will be in providing employment for 25 participants, and resulting additional income to their families. This will also supplement the income of those who are living on the margins of the forest, whose income from sales of honey is intermittent.

Those with Filters will experience fewer waterborne illnesses, fewer deaths (especially among children), reduced medical expenses, improved school attendance, higher productivity, improved family and community life. The long-term objective of course is the elimination of waterborne illnesses among the Ogiek, and a higher living standard.


Person Directing:
Eric Lung’aho Lijodi, Friendly Water for the World’s Kenya and All-Africa representative, and leader of the Kambiri Group.

Community Group:
Kambiri Water and Sanitation Group is a fully registered group with the department of Social Services in Kenya. The overall mission of this team is provision of Sanitation and low cost clean water service to the community. This team has been in operation since the Year 2006 and has from time to time engaged in providing and selling filters to both individual persons and institutions. In the year 2009 the team participated in the Western Provincial Agricultural Society of Kenya Show, and received an award for their good work by the then Provincial Commissioner.

Kambiri Water and Sanitation Group’s overall mission is to provide of training in sanitation and hygiene and low-cost clean water approaches to the community. This group has been in operation since 2006 and has from time to time engaged in providing and selling BioSand Filters to both individuals and institutions.

Monitoring:
A group monitor will be appointed and trained to follow on Filter installations. A report will be prepared 90 days after the start of the project. Eric will visit with the group after 90 days to work with them on any adjustments needed to the business plan. A survey will be carried out on the health of recipients before and after Filter installation.

Budget Detail 

No.

Item Description

Unit Cost

Total $

1

 2 molds

430

860

2

1 sets of toolkit

450

450

3

 set of starter material

250

250

4

 25 Trainees material

5

125

5

1 Trainers Manual (We always make sure we leave the team we have trained with a trainer manual also)

20

  20

6

 25 Certificates

2

  50

7

25 Trainees meals for 5Days

5

625

8

2 Trainers transport costs from Kakamega

100

200

9

Certificates

     2

  50

10

Taxi (Narok to Olodung’oro for 6 days) There is no accommodation facility at the village)

  50

300

11

Trainers Honoraria

300

600

12

Molds Transport

 

200

13

Follow up

 

600

14

Meals and incidentals

 

700

Expected Outcomes:     

            Short-term:

1.       To train twenty five participants from the Ogiek on Sanitation and hygiene

2.       To train the participants how to make filters

3.       To train participants on how to maintain the filters

4.       To train the participants on setting up business

 

Long-term:

1.      Complete elimination of water borne diseases among the Ogiek

2.      Reduce the cases of absenteeism of school going children due to illness.

3.      Improve the living standard of the Ogiek from the sale of filters.

4.      Improved sanitation and hygiene among the Ogiek.

 

Project Funding: 
This project has been funded through the generosity of a donor who chooses to remain anonymous.

Imukoksei en toreret! - “Everything is Possible!” in Ogiek,
Simon and HeatherSimon

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Gusii Community Network Training - Kenya

Kisii, Kenya

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION, working with Friendly Water for the World.

Gusii Community Network (GUCONET) BioSand Filter Construction Training

Location:Lake Victoria Basin
Kisii, Kenya (near Lake Victoria - click map to enlarge)

Problem Addressed:
Lack of safe and clean water is rampant in most rural communities in Kenya, as well as in urban slums. Water may be available but it is not safe for human consumption. Outbreaks of typhoid, cholera and other water-related diseases are, and have become part of life of, the people living in these areas, especially in southwestern Kenya, which also has among the highest HIV rates in the world.

The Gusii are a minority Bantu tribe located only in southwest Kenya. They make up a large majority of the population of the city of Kisii, and have more than a million members. Because of their minority status, they are almost entirely ignored when it comes to government health and environmental services. Much of their water comes from Lake Victoria, and is contaminated, bringing with it high levels of amoebic and bacterial dysentery, typhoid, and occasionally, cholera.

Water source, Kisii, KenyaProject Description:
GUCONET is an international network working for the sustainable development of the Gusii community. Clean water is a very high priority for the GUCONET secretariat, as they have identified clean water as a major way to lower the disease burden on the community already strapped for health care resources.

Six established groups already identified will send 10 participants each to a five-day training in BioSand Filter fabrication, distribution, installation, and maintenance. They will also learn to teach community sanitation and hygiene. At the conclusion of the training, six separate workshops will be set up, with all necessary tools, steel molds, and starter materials. During the training the teams will undergo a brief introduction on small scale business management. The teams will be able to make filters and sell them to the entire Gusii Community hence making them self-reliant.

The work of the group will be overseen by the GUCONET secretariat.

Project Impact:
The first direct beneficiaries will be the 60 participants who are trained, and their families, who will now have access to both clean water and increased incomes. The groups they come from will be the next line of beneficiaries, and it will spread from there to the entire community. Waterborne illnesses will be curtailed and health improved; people with HIV will live longer; school attendance will increase; medical expenses will be reduced; community productivity will be enhanced. It should be noted that GUCONET has other initiatives in the areas of agricultural improvement and education, and this effort should facilitate greater success in these areas as well. We expect BioSand Filters to proliferate rapidly within the Gusii community.

current water sourceImmediate Beneficiaries:
-          60 Individuals trained
-          300 members of their families

Community Beneficiaries (in first two years):
-          Six groups build and distribute 400 BioSand Filters each in first two years = 2,400 Filters
-          Each Filter serves on average 10 people – 24,000 people served
-          60 Filters go schools and orphanages – 4,200 people served

Future Beneficiaries:
-          Programs expand and require more than two molds each
-          Four groups to be trained in south Kisii – process begins again.
 

Impacts:

-          Waterborne illnesses curtailed

-          Health improved

-          Child morbidity and mortality reduced

-          Medical/pharmaceutical expenses curtailed

-          School attendance increases

-          Community productivity enhanced

Person Directing:
Eric Lung’aho Lijodi, Friendly Water’s Kenya and All-Africa Representative, will lead the training, together with three experienced members of the Kambiri Water and Sanitation Group.Woman collecting water, Kenya

Monitoring:
A group will have a monitor who is trained to visit and check on Filters after installation. A report will be sent 90 days after each group is operational. The GUCONET secretariat will be responsible to ensure reports are forthcoming. After the reports, the business plans for each group will be reviewed, and changes made. The budget for this proposal include funds for two follow-up visits by Eric.

Comments:
Water Charity has done a fair number of these training projects, and we believe that the long term "bang for the buck" is very high on them.  Teach a man to fish etc.  The ripple effect from training people who go on to train others is uncountable.  People will benefit from these projects that we will never know about.  People will drink water from filters that were made by people who never met any of our trainers. 

Furthermore, this knowledge will also benefit everyone it comes in contact with along the way economically.  People will sell clean water and sell filters.  Profits from this get reinvested into more tools, molds and materials.  The ability to teach other needy people to do the same is key.

Helping people to help themselves makes sense.  

It should be noted that we already have a request to train four more groups, mostly people with HIV, in south Kisii. We have put them on hold until we see this training succeed, as we hope they will become a “satellite” project of the GUCONET one.

​To see other projects done with Friendly Water Trainers, click here.

Budget Detail:

No.

Item Description

Quantity

 

Unit Cost

(USD)

Total

Source of funds

1.

Steel molds

12

430.00

5160.00

WC

2.

Tool kits

06

450.00

2700.00

WC

3.

Starter Material

06

250.00

1500.00

WC

4.

Certificates

60

001.00

0060.00

Local Community

5.

Trainees material

60

005.00

0300.00

WC

6.

Participants Transport

60

005.00

0300.00

Local Community

7.

Participants meals

60

005 x5

1500.00

Local Community

8.

Venue

01

050.00

0250.00

Local Community

9.

Trainees Acomm.

60

020 x 5

6000.00

Local Community

10.

Trainers Acomm./meals

03

050 x 8

1200.00

WC

11.

Trainers Transport

03

100 .00

0300.00

WC

12.

Trainers Honoraria

03

300.00

900.00

WC

13.

Transport for molds

12

020.00

0240.00

WC

14.

Follow up

 

 

1000.00

WC

This project has been paid for through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

Water some of the Gusii are drinking now
Collecting Water (kusii, kenya)

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Pap Onditi Pump Restoration Project - Kenya

The pump needing repair in Pap Onditi, Kenya

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location
The town of Pap Onditi, just outside Kisumu, Kisumu County, Kenya
Current water source
Community Description
The Kisumu area is fairly dry, like a lot of the Nyanza region.  The town relies on water from a dammed stream from Lake Victoria that is not potable and is drying up.

Problem Addressed
This area is being hard hit by the current drought in most of western Kenya. Water for the people in the immediate area is taken from a filthy dam shared with animals. This dam is also slowly drying up as it is not replenished. Drinking water is either purchased or sought some distance away. The pump on the local well that had supplied water to the community became non-functional.

Project Description
The project will repair an existing Afridev Reciprocating Hand Pump.
 
This project is being done in concert with the local Franciscan friars.  The village committee under the leadership of Fr. Jabedo has purchased the land parcel upon which the pump sits.  As such, its use will be controlled and safeguarded.
 
For several reasons, the pump has had the pipes removed as well as the pumping mechanism. The PVC pipes were stored in a home that burned and they are gone.

In short, the project will:
  1. replace the missing pump housing parts
  2. install the 110 feet of PVC pipe
  3. reinstall and replace (as needed) the pump components
  4. secure the completed pump.

Pumps across Africa receive a lot of abuse, and generally end up with handles broken, parts needing replacement, and more. In recognition of this, nominal sums will be collected from all of the users to have enough on hand for mainenance and repairs.

Collecting WaterProject Impact
The number of persons served is over 250 in the area and another 50 or so within one mile.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Dave Rowson, RPCV

Monitoring and Maintenance
The local friars and the village committee will be responsible for monitoring and maintaining the pump, and performing repairs as needed.

Comments
Dave was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Kenya until 2013. He and his wife Rebecca, first as PCVs, and then as RPCVs, have done many water and sanitation projects in Kenya in partnership with Water Charity.  CLICK HERE to see a collection of the work they have accomplished to date.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.
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Rusinga Island Parish, St. Joseph's Girls' Secondary School Water Project - Kenya

large tank behind the crowd

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Kakrigu, Rusinga Island, KenyaPoint where the water reaches the school

Community Description
The area is high on the Likongo Hill in Kakrigu, on Rusinga Island. It consists of the St. Joseph's Girls Secondary School, the Rusinga Parish Catholic Church, housing and offices for the Priests and Sisters.  The school, at capacity, comprises 85 students, faculty and staff of 15, and church staff of 10. This community supports the girls' school and local parish.  These girls are from very poor surroundings, and would not be in school if it were not for this school. To get to the main road, which is dirt, the walk is about a mile. From there, the nearest town is Mbita, and that is several miles away. The walk to Lake Victoria is about a mile and a half.

Problem Addressed
The water for the entire community comes from a deep borehole on the hill above all of the structures in this small community. The pump in the well supplies a central tank that then distributes the water through a series of 2-inch pipes. At present, the borehole is not supplying any water. There has been water in the well even in the driest of weather in the past.  A well expert, from Nairobi, has been on site and indicates that the pump is working but the fault may be in the pipe and connections. 

Project Description
This project is to restore water to the community.  180 feet of old pipe will be removed and replaced with lower-cost and more easily handled PVC pipe, and piping to the school will be repaired.

Rusinga Island Parish, St. Joseph's Girls' Secondary School will provide sourcing and coordination.  Dakal Enterprises from Nairobi has provided the project plan and budget.

The length of the project is a matter of days with the benefit of the whole community having access to clean water. The contractor will come to the site, remove the steel pipe and pump from the well, and connect the pump to new PVC pipe installed in the well.
They are the parish priest, Robert Sewe, Sister Ann, children from the hill, teachers, cooks and   residents and local youths.
Project Impact
This project will benefit 110 adults and secondary girl students.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Dave Rowson

Monitoring and Maintenance
The project will use a not-to exceed-contract and will be run in proper project management form. The well is under the access and control of the Parish Sisters, and they will be responsible for the upkeep and monitoring.

Comments
This is a high-impact, quick-turnaround project that will impact, immediately, over a hundred young girls, faculty and support staff.

This project is directly related to ensuring that the St. Joseph's Girls have the maximum opportunity to learn. St. Joseph's Girls Secondary School provides a rigorous academic schedule from Form 1 to Form 4.      

Presently, when there is no rainwater in the tanks, the girls have to trudge to Lake Victoria and carry 20 liters or more water back to their dorms for drinking and washing. There are several problems with this situation.
    
1) Walking nearly 4 miles with such a load is tiring and will affect study time and effort.
2) Lake Victoria is not clean.  Among pollution and fecal runoff, it has schistosomiasis, typhus and other diseases associated with it. Water guard is used, when available, but that is a cost not easily met by most girls. under the tree is the outlet for the school

Having the access to clean water is not only an academic benefit, but is a very important health benefit. So much more should and could be accomplished during the time allocated to hiking to the lake and hauling heavy loads of water back to the school.  The health of the community is a real concern here.

This is the second project Water Charity has undertaken with David & Rebecca Rowson as RPCVs in the parish of Rusinga Island.  To read about the first, which involved a series of small water projects, CLICK HERE.

As PCVs serving together, Dave & Rebecca completed 3 projects with Water Charity in Kenya in this region:

St. Joseph's Girls School Water Project - Kenya
Waware Mixed Day Secondary School Rainwater Harvesting Project - Kenya
Sargy Education Center Rainwater Catchment Project - Kenya

Bravo!  Congratulations to both David and Rebecca for all the great work they have done in Kenya.

This project is part of the Water Charity and National Peace Corps Association East Africa Water and Sanitation Program.  If you would like to see additional projects of this type, please go to that page and Donate.

This project is being funded through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

This project has been finished.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Priests' house and churchThe pump that supplies the junction box


Parish priest, Robert Sewe, Sister Ann, children from the hill, teachers, etc.

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Kiritiri Water Tank Project - Kenya

Villagers

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association, and falls under our East Africa Water & Sanitation Program..

Location

Kiritiri, Mbeere South, Embu County, Eastern Province, KenyaDry season

Community Description
Kiritiri, Kenya is a market community of several thousand located in Eastern Province. Recently, it was made a regional headquarters and the population has grown drastically. The area is south of Mount Kenya, far enough from the effects of the Mountain to get any benefit from the increased rain there. Kiritiri is located on the paved road leading to Kamburu dam, one of the largest hydroelectric dams in the country. Despite that, one in three planting seasons produce enough for excess to sell for income. Water is by far the community's largest concern. Other issues within the community are lack of income and poor housing.

Problem Addressed
When RPCV Jennifer Mueller lived in the community from 1997-1999, there were four water boreholes as well as some shallow hand-dug pits where water collected. Since then, however, 3 of the 4 boreholes have stopped working due to the water table lowering and since a recent political division, Kiritiri is now a district headquarters causing the population to grow considerably. Fifteen years ago, water could be purchased for 5 shillings a 20-liter jerry can, (a fee used to keep the boreholes maintained); the cost has increased to 20 shillings a liter in the dry season (accounting for supply and demand). The one borehole remaining just doesn’t have the capacity for the population growth.

rainy season

Project Description
The Maragwa Umoja group will start to build Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks, and then build water tanks to help with lack of water, poor housing, and lack of income. With the addition of cement to normal local subsoil, and needing little water and no firing to cure (using wood that is scarce), the bricks are then made into uniform interlocking bricks. The hand-operated press machines creating the interlocking bricks take less mortar, thereby reducing costs. The brick presses come in straight and curved forms, the curved specifically for water tanks and the straight bricks for foundations and water draw points. One bag of cement makes 100 to 150 bricks depending on the soil consistency. About 400 bricks are needed for a 5,000 liter tank.

Rainfall in the area and the average size of homes (tin roofs available for catchment area) would make 5,000-liter tanks the best option to sustain an average family of five through a dry season using the water for drinking and cooking. Any greater capacity would rarely fill fully.  The press machines are made in Nairobi, and are hand operated requiring no electricity and few parts with the potential to break. Should replacement parts be necessary, as they are built in-country, parts would be locally available. The tanks then need only a skin of waterproof cement on the inside to make them waterproof, and a roof to prevent malaria-carrying mosquitos from entering... as well as reducing loss from evaporation. 

Project funds will be used to build 10 tanks to get the project started, using them as training. When the business is off the ground and making profits, the group will then use that money to build tanks for the remaining 90+ members. Bricks will also be produced for sale to others in the community

local homeThe brick method allows tanks to be built for half to 2/3rds of the cost of plastic water tanks bought from out of the area. The straight bricks used for the support platforms can also be sold as housing bricks that do not melt away in the rain, as many conventional mud brick or wattle and daub houses do, expanding the business potential beyond just water tanks. 

With both machines, materials for water tanks and houses can be produced locally without transportation costs, as the machine can be moved to the building location instead of moving thousands of mud brick or stone. Costs of the ISSB bricks are a bit more than mud brick but less than the stone quarried out of the area, a local engineer estimates they should be sold for 15 shillings instead of 26 for stone. Mud bricks are about 10 shillings each, but are poor quality, and do not withstand the rainy seasons well.

Once the technology and access spreads across the districts it could reach 10,000 or more with the communities of Iriamurai, Siakago, and Gachoka all within a short distance and lacking water.

Project Impact
This project will directly impact 500 people and indirectly benefit several thousand in Kiritiri itself.
dry season
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jennifer Mueller

Monitoring and Maintenance
Each family receiving a tank, will be responsible for the care and maintenance of the tank.

The tanks are fairly easy to keep once built.  A little water needs to be kept in them to prevent the concrete from cracking over time and to keep it hydrated. Each year they do need to be cleaned of the roof debris that gets washed in as well as cleaning the roof before the rainy season to prevent debris and contaminants from entering the tanks. Once the tanks are in place, the 105 women of the group will have more time for their families and school as well as increased funds from not having to purchase water. As the profits from the business come in, money to build more tanks, pay school fees, improve their housing, and those directly doing the labor, will be paid wages they would not receive otherwise.

Comments

Water Charity has extensive experience with the ISSB technique and has done many projects that utilize them.  A good example is the Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program - Uganda.

The Maragwa Umoja self-help group is a women’s group registered with the government of Kenya, located about a quarter kilometer from the town, founded in 1999, to help improve their situation. They received a grant from the Department of Agriculture a few years ago to build a water pan by placing an earthen dam across a drainage way to help with the water problem in the area. Without any engineering design or assistance on the construction, the end result is that water evaporates quickly leaving them without in the dry season and even when it is there, it is too dirty to be drinkable from sediment and animal access. As water is such a common problem in the area, the group swelled from 20 members to over 105. With the increased membership this project will directly benefit at least 500 members of the group and indirectly benefit several thousand in Kiritiri itself as the demand for the available water sources are lessened.

Jennifer plans on traveling in the summer of 2016 (July at best guess right now) and staying for three months to establish the business side of the project, and oversee the completion of the first tanks.

Dollar Amount of Project
$5,900

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,900

This project has been completed, but we are still accepting donations.  To see the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

dry seasonkitchen in local home

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Rusinga Island Water Projects - Kenya

Rusinga Island Water Projects - Kenya

NPCA - WC LogosThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Rusinga Island

Location: The Kakrigu and Kolo districts on Rusinga Island, Lake Victoria, near Mbita, Kenya

Community Description:  The poeple of Rusinga Island live in small communities with a few farms directly on the island in the middle of Lake Victoria.  Despite being surrounded by water, they get relatively little rainfall, with two short, unreliable rainy seasons.

Problem Addressed:  The basic need for the wellbeing of a large part of the population on Rusinga Island is sustainable agriculture, out of the dependence on the two, short rain cycles. Many of the land holdings that are situated at the edge of Lake Victoria can be invigorated by pumping that water into tanks and irrigating, or by directly spraying pumped water on the crops.  2 of the 3 projects are designed to assist the Rusinga Island Children's Fund with their “Rescue a Child to Learn” program which serves 75 children currently.  The other project builds a rainwater catchment at the Nyamuga Special School for primary children with physical disabilities.

Project Descriptions:

Project 1 - Owira Shamba Project

Mr. Morris Owira is a farmer who relies on the rains and sometimes by the assistance of a borrowed pump to irrigate his crops. He has agreed to allow the Rusinga Island Children's Fund (RICF) to have a piece of the 

Owira Shamba

shamba (farmland) for the exclusive production of vegetables to support the children in the “Rescue a Child to Learn” program, managed by Mr. Obwaya. There are currently 75 children who are assisted in part or totally with school fees. The produce from this shamba plot is purchased by the schools and credited to the accounts of the rescue students. Water Charity will purchase for his farm a 5.5. hp water pump w/intake and distribution hosing, and a 2500 liter water tank.
 
The pump will enable him to take water directly from Lake Victoria, store it in the water tank and continually water his crops. This is a sustainable model that removes the specter of failed or insufficient rains, and provides food for the schools while simultaneously paying for student tuitions
 

Project 2 – Water Catchment – Nyamuga Special School

The second project is in the more traditional water catchment system. There is a new building at the Nyamuga Special School for primary children with physical disabilities. There are times when the children do not have access to water at the school due to watch staff or authorities not being present, such as weekend mornings. The catchment system proposed will provide a 2500 liter tank, filled by the gutter system on the dorm, and accessible to the children independent of the administration.
 
The project will install gutters on the north east side of the building and catch the rainfall from 1500 square feet of roofing. The tank will be installed with a tap that the children will be able to access. Curently, children cannot wash or have water for long periods during the weekends.
 

 Project 3 - Kolo Shamba Project

The third project is in the district of Kolo. One of the men who was associated with Waware Seconday School project in 2012 has organized a large shamba (garden) near the lake. We have agreed with him to provide a 5.5 HP water pump and 2.5K water tank and associated hoses so that he can produce year round farm produce to the schools and local markets. He has agreed to provide our “Rescue a Child to Learn” program a plot of adjacent, that is roughly 150 feet by 200 feet for the exclusive use and production of vegetables for the program.
 
Rusinga Island

All together

Each of these projects is accessing either the water in Lake Victoria or collecting the rainfall to provide, initially the local community and owner, but most importantly for the 75 children who are in the “Rescue a Child to Learn” program. ALL proceeds from the three projects go directly to the support of the 75 children. There are no overheads taken from the proceeds. 
 
Pictured to the right is the young man who is providing the shamba for the use of the Rescue Program. He is Sampson Anyango. He is standing 
alongside the intake point from the lake. We will pump the water into a tank up from this point to a point pictured in the left photograph.
 
This is the piece of land that has been allocated for the exclusive use of the Rescue Program. We will be utilizing the pump and water from the tank to irrigate this shamba. Once again, ALL of the proceeds from Sampson Anyango alongside lake intake pointthis tract of land go to consumption or sale for the rescued children.
 
Water on Rusinga is the critical element. With the purchase of a pump, hosing and a water tank, the farmer can be free from the reliance on the rains. The project is self sustaining and of total benefit to the recipients of the program.
 
The rescued children will be providing some of the labor on the shamba, contributing to their own welfare and self worth.
 

Project Impact:  Improved water and food supply for the community. 2 local farms substantially improved.  75 children given improved access to education. The entire Nyamuga Special School given reliable access to clean drinking water. 

RPCV Directing Project:  Dave & Rebecca Rowson

Both Dave & Rebecca were PCVs in Kenya, and completed 3 fabulous projects for Water Charity during their time there.  http://watercharity.com/search/node/rowson

After finishing their PC service, they started a small NGO to help the children in the Rusinga community.  The Rusinga Island Children's Fund. http://www.rusingaislandchildrensfund.org/ 

Dave is a member of the National Peace Corps Association (NPCA), and also the North Carolina Peace Corps Association and Friends of Kenya, both NPCA member groups.  This project exemplifies the extraordinary role that committed RPCVs can play in furthering the mission of the Peace Corps.  

Monitoring and Maintenance:  Between the community and the NGO Rusinga Island Children's Fund, Inc.. (Dave & Rebecca also teach on Rusinga Island)

Comments:  Once again, this project amply demonstrates the ability of former PCVs to continue to do good for their host nations even when their service is ended, and the good that Water Charity can accomplish by working with the NPCA and its various member groups and RPCVs!

Rusinga Island ShambaFundraising Target
$2,500

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "dedication rights," if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$2,500

This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

 

 

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Kamagambo Day Mixed Compound Rainwater Catchment Project – Kenya

Kamagambo Day Mixed Secondary School Rainwater Catchment Project – Kenya

Location
Kamagambo, Rongo District, Migori County, Nyanza Region, Kenya

Community DescriptionKamagambo Day Mixed Secondary School Rainwater Catchment Project – KenyaKamagambo is a rural community several kilometers north of Rongo in close proximity to Lake Victoria. The population of area is around 19,000 people.

Kamagambo is a very rural farming community that is on the edge of “Luo Land.” Luos take the education of the children very seriously because education is seen as success in their community.

The Kamagambo Day School compound holds a pre-unit, primary, and secondary school. The student body on the entire compound is about 500 students.

Problem Addressed
The compound requires water to supply the kitchen, the farm, and the drinking and sanitation needs of the students and staff.

Although the school recently obtained a 5,000-liter water tank, it is not adequate for the needs of the school.

Project Description
This project is to build an additional rainwater catchment system for the school.

The system will consist of a 5,000 liter tank set on a platform, gutters along the roof, and piping to connect the gutters to the tank.

The platform construction will be a rounded cement foundation with bricks on the perimeter. It will be filled with ballast and hardcore. Once it is packed down and stable, it will be plastered over.

Kamagambo Day Mixed Secondary School Rainwater Catchment Project – KenyaAll the tank materials and gutter-related materials will be in purchased in Kisii and delivered to the school by a hired car/truck.

The gutter system will be made of PVC pipe cut in half. It will extend 115 feet, the entire length of the classrooms, along the edge of the roof.

The school will pay for all of the labor, as well as materials to build the foundation.

Water Charity funds will pay for the tank and tap, PVC pipe, and other materials.

The school will maintain the system after completion.

Classes will receive instruction on hygiene, handwashing, and maintenance of the system.

Project Impact
The project will directly benefit 550 people, including students and teachers/staff.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Ben Switzer

Comments
This is an important project to serve the needs of those who spend their days at the compound.

Ben previously completed the Kamagambo Day Mixed Secondary School Rainwater Catchment Project – Kenya and the Kamagambo Day Mixed Secondary School Latrine Project – Kenya.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$0.00

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

Dollar Amount Needed
$555.00

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Progress: 

Kimathi Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project - Kenya

Kimathi Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project - Kenya
Location
Njabini, South Kinangop District, Nyandarua County, Central Province, Kenya

Community Description
The rivers that flow through the Aberdare Mountain region are the source that provides water for most of the capital city of Nairobi. Despite the fact that the area has a plentiful water supply, the issue remains that many households and schools do not have a system to effectively catch the rainfall and use it to their advantage.

Kimathi Primary School is located within the Njabini sub-location in the Aberdare Mountain Range. The school is stranded in between the Sasumua Dam and the Chania River, leaving it as somewhat of an island in terms of accessibility.

There is only one road leading to the school, making it difficult for the school to acquire new students. This has caused financial issues for the school because the government does not give money to schools with a low enrollment rate. The school is made up of over 200 students and 6 teachers.

Kimathi Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project - Kenya

Problem Addressed
Kimathi Primary School has two water tanks, one of which is broken, leaving only one for all students and staff to use. The water is insufficient, especially when there is no rain for several weeks.

Project Description
This project is to build a rainwater catchment system that will collect water from the rooftops of the classrooms.

The water will be used for drinking, handwashing, cleaning, and cooking.

A 5,000-liter tank will be purchased in a nearby town called Engineer, 17 Km from Njabini, and transported to the school.

The base will be constructed by parents and teachers using dirt and cement.

The gutters and piping will also be installed by the parents and teachers.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the tank, piping, and gutters from the roof to the tank.

Maintenance will be the responsibility of the school staff.

Extra funds will be used to construct simple handwashing stations using 20-liter jerry cans with an added tap.

After the tank is installed, there will be a demonstration conducted by members of the CBO Beautify Aberdare and the PCV describing diseases from inadequate hygiene, showing proper handwashing technique, and conveying general health information.

PKimathi Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project - Kenyaroject Impact
Approximately 220 students and staff will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jennifer Navala

Comments
This is an important infrastructure project to provide for the water needs of the school. It will reduce the incidence of illness and improve the wellbeing of students and staff.

Jennifer previously completed the Njabini Youth Centre Rainwater Catchment Project - Kenya, the Kioneki Primary School Rainwater Catchment System – Kenya, and the Njabini Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project – Kenya.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$275.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$280.00 - This project has received major funding through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation, with the expectation of additional donations from the friends, family, and supporters of the Peace Corps Volunteer.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify the Peace Corps Volunteer of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Mukhonje Secondary School Rainwater Catchment Project – Kenya

Mukhonje Secondary School Rainwater Catchment Project – Kenya
Location
Malava, Central Kabras Division, Kakamega North District, Kakamega County, Kenya

Community Description
Malava is in the Western part of Kenya. It is about 3 hours north of Lake Victoria and 2 hours east of the Ugandan border. It is almost equidistant to the large towns of Webuye and Kakamega and is right off the highway that connects the two.

Malava is the largest town in the area and serves as the hub for all surrounding towns. The population is currently about 15,000 and is rapidly growing.

This part of Kenya is the land of the Luhya Tribe. The Luhyas are known for being very peaceful and welcoming to all guests. Over 80% of its citizens practice small-scale, subsistence farming. The most common crops grown are corn and sugar cane.

Nine months out of the year it rains almost daily while the other three are completely dry. Nearly everyone struggles to find both food and water during the dry season.

Mukhonje Secondary School Rainwater Catchment Project – KenyaProblem Addressed
Mukhonje Secondary School has limited access to clean water. Currently, students are forced to fetch water up to a kilometer away. This takes them away from class and leaves them worn out upon returning. Furthermore, the source they are using is a stream that may be contaminated by fertilizer and manure runoff from nearby farms.

Project Description
This project is to build a rainwater catchment system for the school.

The system will consist of PCV gutters attached to the roof, a 2,500 liter water storage tank, and piping to connect the two.

A local craftsman will be commissioned to attach the gutters to the roof. The craftsman will also build a brick and cement stand for the tank.

The 2,500 liter tank will be purchased and transported to the site, installed on the stand, and attached to the system.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the tank, gutters, and materials for the stand, and to pay the craftsman.

Mukhonje Secondary School Rainwater Catchment Project – KenyaThe community will provide unskilled labor, such as hauling bricks for the stand, and maintain the system after completion.

Project Impact
500 people who attend and work at the school benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Charles Sexton

Comments
This is an important infrastructure project for the school. It will provide adequate water for the needs of the school, thus improving the health and wellbeing of the students and staff.

Charles previously completed the St. Joseph the Worker Home for the Mentally Challenged Borehole Project – Kenya and the Muting'ong'o Health Center Rainwater Catchment Project – Kenya.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$400.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$155.00 - This project has received major funding through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation, with the expectation of additional donations from the friends, family, and supporters of the Peace Corps Volunteer.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify the Peace Corps Volunteer of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Chebukaka Girl’s Primary School Latrine Project - Kenya

Our Lady of Peace Chebukaka Primary School Rainwater Catchment System – Kenya
Location
Chebukaka village, Chwele District, Bungoma County, Kenya

Community Description
Chebukaka Girl’s Primary School is located in Chebukaka village, close to the market and local dispensary. The school is well established, opening in 1962, and remains a respected institution in the community. It is an all-girls primary school with 571 students and 14 teachers.

A boarding section has recently been added for those girls who are in standard eight, the highest level of primary education.

Our Lady of Peace Chebukaka Primary School Rainwater Catchment System – Kenya

Problem Addressed
Recently, due to the heavy rains that occurred this past season, three of the five latrines on compound were washed out, and the structure collapsed. Therefore, there are two latrines serving a population of approximately 600 people, with some of the students living on the school compound and using the facilities around the clock.

The lack of adequate facilities creates intolerable sanitary conditions, with resultant health problems.

Project Description
This water and sanitation project is to construct new latrines on the school compound.

The structure will be positioned on the outer edges of the compound for privacy purposes as well as on an area of the land where erosion is less threatening.

One structure will be built containing 3 ventilated pit latrine stalls. The building will have 4 walls, with a wall separating each of the three stalls. Each stall will be 3.5 feet by 5 feet, and each pit will be dug 30 feet deep.

Construction will begin by digging the pits and assembling the materials needed.

After excavation, a cement slab will be constructed for the floor of the latrine. This will be built out of a combination of iron bars and mesh, holding together a mixture of sand and cement.

Our Lady of Peace Chebukaka Primary School Rainwater Catchment System – KenyaOnce the cement floor is made, walls will be built up around it using bricks and a layer of plaster to solidify the structure.

A roof will then be built out of roofing timber, topped by 9 iron sheets cut to size.

Three doors made of wood will be attached to the building using metal hinges and padlocks. After construction, the new building and doors will be painted.

The school will provide for the labor through parental volunteers and fees paid to carpenters by the school. The school will also provide for timber and iron sheets used for roofing, and small materials such as nails and hinges.

Water Charity funds will be used for other materials such as the sand, cement, bricks, and plaster needed to create the structure.

Project Impact
Approximately 600 people will benefit from the project, including students, teachers, and compound staff.


Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Lindsey Rae Jackson

Comments
This is an important infrastructure project for the school. The additional sanitation facilities will improve health and wellbeing of students and staff.

Lindsey previously completed the Our Lady of Peace Chebukaka Primary School Rainwater Catchment System – Kenya.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00 + additional amounts

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded, with major funding through the generosity of the Elmo Foundation, and the remainder from friends, family, and supporters of Peace Corps Volunteer Lindsey Rae Jackson.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Lindsey of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by the PCV and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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