Guinea

Pita Prefecture Pump and Basin Project - Guinea

Pita Prefecture Pump and Basin Project - Guinea

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Pita Prefecture Pump and Basin Project - GuineaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons.

Pita Prefecture, Guinea

Community Description
The communities of Mboukeya, Hafia and Bouroure Feto are located in the Fouta Djallon highlands in central northern Guinea. The population of the 3 villages combined is approximately 1,400 people. The main economic activities in the area are farming, herding, blacksmithing, fabric dying and tailoring.

With the help of a local farmer, a group of farmers in the area came together in 2013 and organized themselves into three gardening cooperatives. They started with a smaller space but when they saw that it was going well they moved to a bigger space offered by one of the members. The 3 cooperatives farm together in a 2-hectare area.

Pita Prefecture Pump and Basin Project - GuineaThe cooperative members pool their money to buy inputs such as seed, fertilizer and tools. They also work together to collect wood to fence the area so that animals such as cows, sheep and goats cannot get in. Depending on the season, they farm potatoes, peanuts, beans, eggplants, tomato, cabbage, onions, peppers, and watermelon. Produce is then sold in Pita, a larger town about 10 km away.

The land is divided up into plots with 1 or 2 farmers assigned to a plot. Each cooperative consists of 20 members. Out of the 60 members, 44 are women.

Problem Addressed
The land used by the 3 cooperatives is located next to a river, but lack of advanced equipment for irrigation means that during the dry season the land they can farm is confined to what is next to the river.

The area is currently watered using watering cans. While the entire area is a little over 2 hectares, they can only farm about three fourths of a hectare, less than half the space, during the 6-month dry season.

Project Description
This project is to build a water basin and install a motor pump to allow for water from the river to be used for irrigation of the cooperative land.

As the area is on a slope, the basin will be built at the top allowing for improvements in the following years in the form of canals to further ease watering. For now the area will be watered using hoses attached to the basin.

The cooperatives will provide all materials needed to build the basin (sand, gravel, cement, bricks) and they will be in charge of all aspects of basin construction.

Members of the cooperatives will be trained to maintain the irrigation system. The trainings will consist of general cooperative management, management of funds for the motor pump, motor pump maintenance, and basic bookkeeping.

Two well-respected people from the community will help with these trainings. One works in the Agriculture department at the local government level and received training on cooperative finances while working with the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). He will be helping the cooperatives to establish rules and procedures regarding the motor pump fund. They will need to establish rules to guide them in terms of a) contributing for fuel, b) contributing for parts and c) contributing for the cost of repairs. The other community member is a local farmer who works with cooperatives in the area and has experience working with motor pumps. He will provide training for 1 or 2 people on motor pump maintenance.

Pita Prefecture Pump and Basin Project - GuineaThe PCV has already started working with a select group of women (4 women in leadership roles from each cooperative) to train them in literacy and basic bookkeeping. The majority of the women in these groups cannot read or write which makes it hard to do any sort of accounting. Armed with these skills the cooperatives will be able to effectively manage funds needed for motor pump fuel and maintenance as well as other cooperative expenses.

Project Impact
This project will benefit 300 people, consisting of 60 cooperative members and their families.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
M. Quezada

Monitoring and Maintenance
To ensure sustainability, the PCV and workshop trainers will work closely with the cooperatives to establish rules and procedures for the motor pump fund. A small amount will be collected from each person to be used for fuel, maintenance, and repair.

A set of spare hoses will be provided to replace those that are no longer serviceable.

This project has been fully funded through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

Pita Prefecture Pump and Basin Project - GuineaPita Prefecture Pump and Basin Project - Guinea

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Lelouma Prefecture Well Project - Guinea

Lelouma Prefecture Well Project - Guinea

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Lelouma Prefecture Well Project - GuineaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxx Sous-Prefecture, Lelouma Prefecture, Labe Region, Guinea

Community Description
Xxxxx is a mid-sized town with a population of about 20,000 in the mountainous Fouta Djallon region of Guinea. There is lots of activity in the community, as it houses the mayor as well as the sous-prefect.

There are over 20 primary schools. There is one secondary school that serves the entire community. The weekly market on Thursdays is filled with all types of vegetables, meat, and other treats. There are many small boutiques that sell basics as well as charge telephones.

There are many women's groups that spend their days gardening and creating small savings accounts. There are also many groups working with beehives to collect honey in the forest.

Lelouma Prefecture Well Project - GuineaProblem Addressed
There is a lack of safe and healthy environment at the secondary school. Every day, female students are responsible for arriving early or missing class to pull water from a neighboring well to use in hand washing stations and for drinking. Most students walk at least an hour to attend school, as it is the only secondary school in the sous-prefecture.

The lack of potable water and the task of retrieving water for the school are deterrents for attending school, especially after the first year. While there are more female than male students, the dropout rate for female students is much higher than for male students. The female students also miss school during their menstrual cycles because they are embarrassed to use more water to wash because others will know.

Project Description
This project is to construct a hand-dug well on the school grounds.

A local Well digger will hand dig and line the well. A concrete cap and a pulley system will then be installed.

Lelouma Prefecture Well Project - GuineaThe community has provided their contribution in the form of sand, gravel, and cement, which have already been purchased and delivered. They will also provide the transport for all local materials.

All governmental officials in the sous-prefecture, as well as school officials and the parent’s association, are working to develop this project. Many students have been involved in the planning process, and will continue to work after construction, on activities such as hand washing sessions and creating a school garden to raise money for a library.

Project Impact
365 students will benefit from the project

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
K. Kayser

Monitoring and Maintenance
A committee of community members will be responsible for ensuring the quick and correct construction of the well. They will also be responsible for utilizing school funds to complete any repairs necessary in the future.

Lelouma Prefecture Well Project - GuineaThe PCV will work with the biology teacher to teach two students from each class how to treat the well with bleach every month to ensure that it stays clean. Hand-washing sessions will be conducted every Saturday after classes.

A local women's group will provide the seeds and equipment for a school garden and will teach the students how to earn income from gardening.

Let Girls Learn
This project is part of the Let Girls Learn program started by the White House, in partnership with Peace Corps. The goal is to keep girls attending to school. It is a part of Water Charity’s Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

This project is designed to eliminate one of the many barriers of girls’ school attendance. As the girls are usually the students required to come early or leave class to retrieve water, this well will allow them to spend more time in class. They will also have more water accessible for drinking, hygiene, and sanitation.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE

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Djelibakoro Well Project - Guinea

Djelibakoro Well Project - Guinea

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Djelibakoro Well Project - GuineaLocation
Djelibakoro, Republic of Guinea

Community Description
Djelibakoro is a village of 12,000, situated where the Niger River and the Sansando River meet. It experienced rapid growth during the past decade after the construction of a major bridge over the Niger, and now hosts the largest weekly market between the major Guinean cities of Kankan and Siguiri.

The citizens of Djelibakoro have prospered from this growth, but it has also been a source of pressure on the area’s natural resources, including groundwater. The two great rivers dominate life in Djelibakoro, which partners annually with neighboring villages to host of one of Guinea’s oldest and largest fete de mars or lake festivals. Still, Djelibakoro sits at the edge of the Sahel, and it knows thirst every year.

Problem Addressed
During the wet season, Djelibakoro’s location is optimal for easy access to groundwater, and the majority of families have access to shallow hand dug wells. Unfortunately, this situation changes dramatically during the 4-6-month dry season. Hand-dug wells dry up and villagers are left to rely on potentially contaminated surface waters (classified as “unimproved” by the U.N Millennium Development Goals), or on the 5 functioning machine-dug tubewells.

For 12,000 residents, 5 tubewells is clearly insufficient. Women closest to the tubewells wait in line for hours to access water while the majority of villagers walk long distances (some more than a kilometer) to access surface water. Families drinking from surface waters are at particular risk from diarrheal diseases, which account for an estimated 10% of deaths in children under 5 worldwide.

Djelibakoro Well Project - GuineaProject Description
This project is to build a well in Djelibakoro.

Action Terrestre International will drill a deep borehole (estimated to be about 50 meters deep), and will install a manual hand pump of Indian manufacture. Piping will be installed and the well will be sealed. Surface improvements will include a concrete slab, drainage indentation, and soak pit.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Shreyan Sen will work closely with Mr. Fofana, a local school teacher and former Peace Corps counterpart, and the Djelibakoro water committee to ensure successful completion of construction. Mr. Fofana or a water committee member will visit the construction site at least four times per week.

Project implementation will also be monitored by local Peace Corps Volunteer partners. Two current Peace Corps Volunteers, Kathryn Boyle and John Leaderman, will physically visit the site and confirm construction progress.

The project is expected to take 10 days to complete. The well will be managed by the Djelibakoro Water Committee after completion.

Project Impact
12,000 people will benefit from this project.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Shreyan Sen, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Djelibakoro from 2012 to 2014, will administer the project.

Djelibakoro Well Project - Guinea

Monitoring and Maintenance
After completion of the well, Shreyan and Mr. Fofana will continue to monitor the project for one year. Mr. Fofana will check in with the community water committee on a biweekly basis, in person or via telephone. If any significant maintenance issues are reported, then the well construction company will be consulted.

If a problem requires significant expense for remediation, then the construction company will be required to return to Djelibakoro and perform repairs as per their one year performance guarantee.

Comments
There is a gender discrepancy among Guinean students--over 80% of the junior high school students in Djelibakoro are male. The water burden is a contributor to this disparity. Young women may be withdrawn from school to compensate for the long wait times or long distances required to access water during the dry season. Water scarcity causes women to lose time that could be spent studying or engaging in after school clubs.

Water Charity has designated this project with a LGL+ tag, as it is in the spirit of the Peace Corps Let Girls Learn program. Improved health facilities, especially for adolescent girls and pregnant women, will improve the ability of girls to remain in school.

This project is being funded by an anonymous donor. To allow us to pay for more great projects like this one, please donate to our Western Africa Water & Sanitation Program by clicking the Donate button below.
 

 

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

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