Ghana

Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project III - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Kwabeng / Nsutam, Atiwa District, Eastern Region, Ghana

Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project III - GhanaCommunity Description
Kwabeng / Nsutam is a town in south Ghana and is the capital of Atiwa District, in the Eastern Region of Ghana. Atiwa district was carved out of what is now the East Akim Municipal District. It is about a 1 ½ hour drive from Accra, the capital city of Ghana.

With a population of 7,200, the main occupations are farming and trading. The crops grown are maize, plantain, cocoa, cassava, cocoyam, banana and yams. Families usually grow enough to feed themselves and surplus is sold at the nearby market. Cocoa marketing is controlled by the government.

Almost everyone is engaged in traditional farming. Because of the previous illegal mining that went on in the area many people from other regions and outside Ghana such as Togo, Nigeria, Benin, Mali, are the major occupants of the community.

Some of the languages spoken by the people are Akuapim twi, Asante twi, Ewe, haussa, Larteh and a small number speak Ga adangbe. The people eat dishes such as Banku with okro stew or hot pepper sauce, fufu with soup, rice and stew and yam or plantain ampese (boiled) with stew.

The community has one of the lowest levels of education and highest dropout rates in the country. This is due to the illegal mining activities that took place previously. School children are mostly out of class to work at mine sites in order to make money to feed their families.

There are five basic schools and one senior high school in the community. However, most of the pupils in the high school are from outside the community, staying as boarders, placed in the school by the Ghana education service through a computerized school selection system.

Problem Addressed
One phenomenon that has received a lot of attention and discussion in Ghana is illegal small-scale mining, popularly referred to as ‘galamsey’. It has had immediate and long-term effects on the environment, agriculture, habitat and livelihoods as a whole.

Though ‘galamsey’ affects many facets of life, two areas in which its impact is being felt most is the pollution of rivers and water bodies and land degradation. The extent to which rivers have been polluted and land degraded exerts significant pressure on individuals who live near and depend on river bodies as source of drinking water and livelihood.

There were reports in 2015 that showed that ‘galamsey’ operations in the East Akyem District were polluting the Birim, Densu and Ayensu rivers which served as sources of water for communities in those catchment areas. In spite of the negative effects of illegal mining on rivers and other water bodies, many communities in the rural areas, due to lack of alternative sources of water, tend to use the same polluted rivers without any fear. They drink, cook, bathe and perform all tasks with the polluted water, despite of the risk of contracting diseases, such as cholera, dysentery, and fever.

Mining in the community has led to the destruction of the forests. The land is in a highly degraded state, reducing the protection of the waterways, preventing the purification of the water and air by trees, and causing depletion of soil nutrients.

Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project III - GhanaProject Description
This project is to raise, plant, and maintain 100,000 trees.

The species were chosen for their soil enrichment and water conservation characteristics. Seedlings will be raised at the Call To Nature Permaculture site at Kunkunuru. The trees will then be distributed and planted in two areas of the eastern region of Ghana, Kwabeng / Nsutam.

This initiative will reclaim a total area of 50 acres of illegal mined / degraded land.

Under this methodology, within about one year, the land will be enriched and recharged with water content to its normal capacity for use by the native farmers.

The trees will provide numerous benefits such as:

° Ground water recharge
° Erosion control
° Provision of habitat for aquatic bodies
° Prevention of water and air pollution
° Increase energy conservation
° Filtering the soil from toxic chemicals used on the land
° Food and medicinal benefits
* An educational resource for students and the local people.

The trees are to be planted in alleys, inter-cropping cedrela and pigeon peas at 10 feet intervals to allow a heavy canopy formation in a short period.

The pigeon peas will then be cut drop within the first six months after transplanting in order to fasten the soil nutrient build up.

The project will be done as a partnership involving schools, churches and the general public, coming together out of mutual self-interest to achieve a successful future outcome in the region.

The project will involve:

- Nursery establishment
- poly potting and seeding
- watering / nursery maintenance
- Leveling and filling of pith at mined site
- Transporting and distribution to main site
- Making holes, compost application and planting
- One year monitoring and maintenance by CTNP team and the community
- And then after one year the project handed over to the community

Water Charity funds will be spent on the following materials and services:

- Purchasing of the poly bags
- Transportation
- Seeds
- Nursery set up
- Maintenance and operational cost by CTNP team for 1 year
- Feeding for participants during planting.

Project Impact
7,200 people will benefit directly from the project.

Project Administration
The project will be administered by Solomon Amuzu, Founder and Director of Call to Nature Permaculture. This is the third tree planting project in the series.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Call To Nature Permaculture team will monitor and maintain the project for one year after transplanting, and then hand it over to the community.

CTNP will provide technical training for some community members who are leaders and responsible to ensure the sustainability of the project.

CTNP will continue to do a monthly follow-up on the project to ensure success.

Communal labor will be organized as needed upon request by the CTNP team and the community leaders to ensure that the project is well taken care of, including replacement, weeding and pruning.

Project Funding
This project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

Country: 
Progress: 

Yagha Borehole Project II - Ghana

Yagha Borehole Project II - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Yagha Borehole Project - GhanaLocation
Yagha, Upper West Region, Ghana

Community Description
Yagha is a rural community within the Jirapa district in the Upper West region of Ghana. The community is located right off the Wa-Lawra paved road. The community consist of about 4,000 people, most of are from the Dagaaba tribe and speak the dialect of Dagaare, which is only spoken in the Upper West Region of Ghana.

The people in the community are mostly subsistence farmers. Their main crops are maize, millet, groundnuts and yam. All of these are used to prepare local food, but a large portion of millet is used to prepare a drink called pito. This is a semi-alcoholic drink is prepared by almost every woman in every house in the community.

Yagha, Upper West Region, GhanaThe community has a primary school and a JHS, where a large portion of the youth (mostly boys) attend regularly. The children are the ones who fetch water the most. They go before and after school to fetch for their compound, and sometimes even during school break, because of the overcrowding at the current boreholes.

Problem Addressed
Yagha is confronted with a number of infrastructural challenges, but one of the biggest is access to potable drinking water. While conducting a needs assessment, the Chief of Yagha expressed extreme worry about the access to clean water, the importance of stopping the fetching of dam water and the need for the construction of a new borehole closer to the town center.

The community has three boreholes in total, which is not enough to serve the entire community, therefore most people fetch water from the nearby dam. Yagha consists of over 4,000 people and the boreholes are only capable of serving 1,800 people at maximum. This means that not only is there a severe shortage of water, but also the boreholes that are in existence are being overworked and the resources are rapidly being exhausted.

As the community members are fetching water at the dam for drinking and preparing food, there is a high rate of bacterial infections and diarrhea, due to the fact that animals also bathe and drink from this same water source. The only other source of water collection is from rain water harvest. However, due to the short rainy season, this does not provide enough water to sustain a household, and most people find themselves in a running very low on water during the insufferable hot season.

Yagha Borehole Project - GhanaProject Description
This project is to build a borehole in a strategic location in the community.

The borehole will be drilled to a depth of 70 meters in an area which has a good discharge of ground water. The project will employ an Afridev manual water pump and constructed with NC pipes, which is economical and sustainable.

There will be a concrete platform that leads to a runoff area, with a concrete basin at the end for water collection. This excess water will be used to water the permagardens that are being constructed and the livestock that passes by.

Around the concrete basin, a soak-away pit will be built to manage water overflow. This will prevent breeding pools for mosquitoes.

There will be a fence built, and a chain provided to lock the borehole when not in use. This way, the WASTAN committee can guarantee that borehole users have to pay a small fee when they use the borehole. The funds accumulated can then be used for maintenance purposes should the borehole ever breakdown.

The work will be directed by Rural Empowerment for Accelerated Development (READ) Ghana, a locally-based NGO based in Wa, the capital of the Upper West Region.

Yagha Borehole Project - GhanaThe borehole will be built on land made available by the community. Volunteers will clear the project site and dig the animal water reservoir. They will also collect all locally available materials for the borehole development work, namely stones and sand. They will also provide much of the labor needed for construction.

The RASHBASH Company Limited will be hired for the construction (the digging down to the water table and the construction of the borehole structure itself). RASHBASH has considerable experience and expertise in the borehole industry in Ghana, having executed several borehole projects at competitive cost. They have successfully executed similar projects in all the 11 districts in the Upper West Region of Ghana.

In summary, the community will provide the land, labor, water, and resources needed, such as rocks and sand, while Water Charity funds will pay for the remainder (hiring of the RASBASH and the remaining resources).

Project Impact
600 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Taylor Bailey

Monitoring and Maintenance
A borehole management committee (an extension of the WATSAN committee) will be established to play a leadership and coordination role to ensure the sustainability of the project. As per the suggestion by community members, it will have 6 members (3 men and 3 women). Their roles will consist of making sure the borehole is being used and maintained properly. To enable this, READ Ghana will provide training for the committee and selected community members on the basis of strong leadership, management skills.

The borehole management committee, together with the whole community, will decide on reasonable fees to charge the users monthly. These fees will be collected and saved in an account with St. Joseph Credit Union-Jirapa. This will enable the community to maintain the borehole whenever it breaks down.

Fundraising Target
$4,375

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$785

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,590

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

School Tank Remediation Project - Ghana

School Tank Remediation Project - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

School Tank Remediation Project - GhanaLocation
Akrofonso, Ashanti, Ghana

Community Description
Akrofonso is a town in the Ashanti Region of Ghana, with about 1,800 inhabitants. It is an hour's drive from Kumasi, the Ashanti regional capital.

Problem Addressed
An abandoned water hole was left by a contractor who built the school next to this hole. The hole is approximately 5 feet deep and the students play inside the hole. It has standing water because of rain and contains debris from the community as well as the students. It is a home for mosquitoes and needless to say, students are often out of school because of malaria, according to the principal.

Project Description
The hole will be renovated and turned into a summer hut. The work consists of: - cleaning out and sealing the hole permanently -creating a sitting ledge around the hole -extending concrete all around the hole to prevent mud buildup due to rain -covering the entire area with a roof The community will provide unskilled labor under the supervision of an experienced contractor.

Project Impact
423 members of the student population of the primary and middle schools will benefit directly from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
This project will be managed by Peace Corps Volunteer Susan Fatherree. In prior Peace Corps assignments, Susan completed the Ban Nongkad School Kitchen Project - ThailandMbazwana Primary School Water Project – South Africa, and Mbazwana Primary School Sanitation Project – South Africa

School Tank Remediation Project - GhanaMonitoring and Maintenance
The improvements will be developed under the direction of, and monitored and maintained by, the school.

Fundraising Target
$1,100

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in Ghana.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,100

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Weremuso Borehole Project - Ghana

Weremuso Borehole Project - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Weremuso Borehole Project - GhanaLocation
Weremuso, Brong Ahafo Region

Community Description
Weremuso is a large village located next to Kwaa-Paa, about a 40 minute drive from the district capital Sunyani, with a population of about 1,008 people. The main source of income is from agriculture and trading, mostly among women. In addition, young men and women serve as laborers at the various mining sites.

The Brong-Ahafo Region is located in south Ghana. Brong-Ahafo is bordered to the north by the Black Volta River and to the east by the Lake Volta, and to the south by the Ashanti region, Eastern and Western regions, and to the west by the Ivory Coast southeastern border. Some of the languages spoken by the people are Twi, English, Ewe, Bono and Hausa.

Because this location is a center of mining activity, it has associated problems, such as school dropout and teenage pregnancy. Due to economic hardships at home, a large number of children between the ages of 6 and 15 abandon their classrooms for gold mining, to either make a living or make a few Ghana cedis to support their parents.

The few children who are in school also work in illegal gold mining concessions after school to earn money to pay for their own education. They usually do not wear any protective gear, and are exposed to all manner of bodily injury, especially to the eyes and feet.

Weremuso Borehole Project - GhanaProblem Addressed
The people of the village suffer from lack of access to potable water. Their lands and water bodies have been largely destroyed as result of illegal mining activities and the use heavy chemicals on their land. The illegal mining in the area causes several environmental and health problems.

Several accidents have occurred, and in some cases, people have died from water-related issues. In April 2015, at least 16 people lost their lives as a result of consuming polluted water. This community now needs to transport water from nearby towns, and pay unaffordable prices.

Another serious impact is the health hazards as a result of pollution from gases, noise and dust. Coal mines release methane which can pollute the air. Sulphuric acid is utilized in the mining operations, which drains into the water bodies, and adversely affects them.

The movements of rock in the case of surface mining impacts the land negatively. Craters are left in the areas where mining activities took place, destroying landscape and lush vegetation in the process.

Deforestation is resulting in changes in the ecosystem which includes increasing the levels of carbon dioxide in the air.

Leakage of chemicals into the environment adversely affects the health of the local population.

Project Description
This project is build a borehole to supply ample water for the people of Weremuso.

The borehole will reach a depth of about 50 meters. Water will be accessed by a hand pump. Above-ground improvements will include a concrete area, water storage / filtering system and tap from which people will draw water, as well as a channel and soak pit for removal of excess runoff.

A contract will be awarded to a borehole construction firm with experience in the region.

Activities prior to implementation include cost analysis, location selection, geologic and topographic consultation, and preparation of design sketches.

Weremuso Borehole Project - GhanaThe community will contribute a monthly fee per home toward the maintenance and repairs of the facility, as well the unskilled labor needed for project implementation.

H2O Africa Care will provide management, supervision, accounting, monitoring, and reporting.

Project Impact
1,008 people will benefit from this project.

Project Manager
The project will be implemented under the direction of Nana Kudjoe Kesse, Executive Director and Chief Operations Officer of H2O Africa Care.

Nana previously completed four wells as part of this program.

We are grateful to Solomon Amuzu, of Call to Nature Permaculture, who is providing additional assistance and oversight.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community will charge small monthly fees to take care of repairs and other related work when needed. A caretaker will be assigned to perform the management function for the smooth running of the facility.

H20 Africa Care team will do a monthly check on the facility to ensure its sustainability.

Project Funding
The funding for this project has been provided by an anonymous donor.

If you like this project, please make a general-purpose donation to Water Charity, so that we will have funds available to immediately start our next project in Ghana.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Ataneata Borehole Project - Ghana

Ataneata Borehole Project - Ghana

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Ataneata Borehole Project - GhanaThis project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Location
Ataneata, Brong-Ahafo Region, Ghana

Community Description
Ataneata is a large village located between Kwanfinfin and Weremuso, about 4 hours’ drive from the from the district capital Sunyani, with a population of about 980 people. The main source of income is from agriculture and trading. In addition, young men and women serve as laborers at the various mining sites.

Ataneata Borehole Project - GhanaThe Brong-Ahafo Region is located in south Ghana. Brong-Ahafo is bordered to the north by the Black Volta River and to the east by the Lake Volta, and to the south by the Ashanti region, Eastern and Western regions, and to the west by the Ivory Coast southeastern border. Some of the languages spoken by the people are Twi, English, Ewe, Bono and Hausa.

Because this location is a center of mining activity, it has associated problems, such as school dropout and teenage pregnancy. Due to economic hardships at home, a large number of children between 6 and 15 abandon their classrooms for gold mining, to either make a living or make a few Ghana cedis to support their parents.

The few children who are in school also work in illegal gold mining concessions after school to earn money to pay for their own education. They usually do not wear any protective gear, and are exposed to all manner of bodily injury, especially to the eyes and feet.

Problem Addressed
The people of the village suffer from lack of access to potable water. Their lands and water bodies have been largely destroyed as result of illegal mining activities and the use heavy chemicals on their land. The illegal mining in the area is plagued by several environmental and health problems.

Ataneata Borehole Project - GhanaSeveral accidents have occurred, and in some cases people have died from water-related issues. In April 2015, at least 16 people lost their lives as a result of consuming polluted water. This community now needs to transport water from nearby towns, and pay unaffordable prices.

Another serious impact is the health hazards as a result of pollution from gases, noise and dust. Coal mines release methane which can pollute the air. Sulphuric acid is utilized in the mining operations, which drains into the water bodies, and adversely affects them.

The movements of rock in the case of surface mining impacts the land negatively. Craters are left in the areas where mining activities took place, destroying landscape and lush vegetation in the process.

Deforestation is resulting in changes in the ecosystem which includes increasing the levels of carbon dioxide in the air.

Leakage of chemicals into the environment adversely affects the health of the local population.

Ataneata Borehole Project - GhanaProject Description
This project is build a borehole to supply water for the people of Ataneata.

The borehole will reach a depth of about 50 meters. Water will be accessed by a hand pump. Above-ground improvements will include a concrete area, water storage / filtering system and tap from which people will draw water, as well as a channel and soak pit for removal of excess runoff.

A contract will be awarded to a borehole construction firm with experience in the region.

Activities prior to implementation include cost analysis, reading and location selection, geologic and topographic consultation, and preparation of design sketches.

The community will contribute a monthly fee per home toward the maintenance and repairs of the facility as well the unskilled labor needed for project implementation.

H2O Africa Care will provide management, supervision, accounting, monitoring, and reporting.

Project Impact
980 people will benefit from the project.

Project Administration
The project will be implemented under the direction of Nana Kudjoe Kesse, Executive Director and Chief Operations Officer of H2O Africa Care.

Nana previously completed the Ntobroso Borehole Project - Ghana and the Kwanfinfin Borehole Project - Ghana

We are grateful to Solomon Amuzu, of Call to Nature Permaculture, who is providing additional assistance and oversight.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community will charge small monthly fees to take care of repairs and other related work when needed. A caretaker will be assigned to perform the management function for the smooth running of the facility.

H20 Africa Care team will do a monthly check on the facility to ensure its sustainability.

Project Funding
The funding for this project has been provided by an anonymous donor.

If you like this project, please Donate, so that we will have funds available to immediately start our next project in Ghana.

Conclusion of Ataneata Borehole Project - Ghana

Conclusion of Ataneata Borehole Project - GhanaThis project has been completed under the direction of Nana Kudjoe Kesse, Executive Director and Chief Operations Officer of H2O Africa Care. To read about the start of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project, the third by H2O Africa Care, was designed to build a borehole to supply water for the people of Ataneata.

Nana reports:

Conclusion of Ataneata Borehole Project - GhanaBringing you more great news, as we finished the Ataneata community borehole, and they have clean and accessible water for the first time.

The project was to provide clean and accessible drinking water (borehole) for 980 people at Ataneata village in the Brong Ahafo Region (previously, illegal mining community).

The project started by a contract awarded to LEE YOUNG drilling company. H2O Africa then worked with the community to set a schedule, meeting together with the drilling company to decide a location for the borehole.

We had to walk in various areas in the community to find a suitable location. With the aid of ground water detector, a perfect place was located along the main road opposite Sam's block factory.

Chiefs and elders of the community then prayed and poured libation to ask permission from ancestors for the project to begin.

The drilling company then started the process the next day, and within 2 days they had hit the water table at a depth of 70 m.

The base of the drilled area was then cemented, and a hand pump installed for a full functioning borehole. A concrete tank measuring 20 feet long and 5 feet high divided into 4 different chambers was built to serve as storage and filtering line.

Conclusion of Ataneata Borehole Project - GhanaThe first chamber of the tank was filled with pebble stones, second filled with char coal, third chamber filled with sand and char coal, the final chamber then serves as pure water storage chamber where fetching is done with the aid of a tap. The idea behind this is to store pumped water in the tank as well filter any unwanted particles that might contaminate the water through three different chambers.

In getting the water from the ground the hand pump is moved up and down to build the pressure that brings the water upwards. The water then travels through a 2-inch PVC pipe connecting the pump and the first filtering concrete chamber and then into other chambers. On top of the chambers are metal plates (anti rust) that serves as a removable lid in accessing the various tanks.

Attached to the fourth tank is a tap where water can be fetched from. All metal parts of the resource were painted with anti-rust, and concrete parts painted with white base emulsion paint with green emulsion finishing to provide protection and beautification.

After all, the elders of the community were informed about the project conclusion, and they came over for a look and tasting of the water.

The village spokesperson, Mr. Agyeman then thanked H2O and Water Charity on behalf of the community for providing them with this wonderful facility.

Thank you once again for funding this project.

We extend our thanks to Nana for completing this important project.

Conclusion of Ataneata Borehole Project - Ghana

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Kwanfinfin Borehole Project - Ghana

Kwanfinfin Borehole Project - Ghana

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kwanfinfin Borehole Project - GhanaThis project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Location
Kwanfinfin, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana

Community Description
Kwanfinfin is a large village, with a population of about 1,780 people. The main source of income is from agriculture and trading. In addition, young men and women serve as laborers at the various mining sites.

The Brong Ahafo Region is located in south Ghana. Brong Ahafo is bordered to the north by the Black Volta River and to the east by the Lake Volta, and to the south by the Ashanti region, Eastern and Western regions, and to the west by the Ivory Coast southeastern border. Some of the languages spoken by the people are Twi, English, Ewe, Bono and Hausa.

Because this location is a center of mining activity, it has associated problems, such as school dropout and teenage pregnancy. Due to economic hardships at home, a large number of children between 6 and 15 abandon their classrooms for gold mining, to either make a living or make a few Ghana cedis to support their parents.

The few children who are in school also work in illegal gold mining concessions after school to earn money to pay for their own education. They usually do not wear any protective gear, and are exposed to all manner of bodily injury, especially to the eyes

Problem Addressed
The people of the village suffer from lack of access to potable water. Their lands and water bodies have been largely destroyed as result of illegal mining activities and the use heavy chemicals on their land. The illegal mining in the area is plagued by several environmental and health problems.

Several accidents have occurred, and in some cases people have died from water-related issues. In April 2015, at least 16 people lost their lives as a result of consuming polluted water. This community now needs to transport water from nearby towns, and pay unaffordable prices.

Kwanfinfin Borehole Project - GhanaAnother serious impact is the health hazards as a result of pollution from gases, noise and dust. Coal mines release methane which can pollute the air. Sulphuric acid is utilized in the mining operations, which drains into the water bodies, and adversely affects them.

The movements of rock in the case of surface mining impacts the land negatively. Craters are left in the areas where mining activities took place, destroying landscape and lush vegetation in the process.

Deforestation is resulting in changes in the ecosystem, which includes increasing the levels of carbon dioxide in the air.

Leakage of chemicals into the environment adversely affects the health of the local population.

Project Description
This project is build a borehole to supply water for the people of Kwanfinfin in the Brong Ahafo Region.

The borehole will reach a depth of about 60 to 75 meters. Water will be accessed by a hand pump. Above-ground improvements will include a concrete area on which people will stand when drawing water, as well as a channel and soak pit for removal of excess runoff.

Ntobroso Borehole Project - GhanaKwanfinfin Borehole Project - GhanaA contract will be awarded to a borehole construction firm with experience in the region.

Activities prior to implementation include cost analysis, reading and location selection, geologic and topographic consultation, and preparation of design sketches.

The community will contribute a monthly fee per home toward the maintenance and repairs of the facility as well the unskilled labor needed for project implementation.

H2O Africa Care will provide management, supervision, accounting, monitoring, and reporting.

Project Impact
1,780 people will benefit from the project.

Project Administration
The project will be implemented under the direction of Nana Kudjoe Kesse, Executive Director and Chief Operations Officer of H2O Africa Care

Nana previously completed the Ntobroso Borehole Project - Ghana

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community will charge small monthly fees to take care of repairs and other related work when needed. A woman will be assigned to perform the management function for the smooth running of the facility.

H2O Africa Care will ensure sustainability after the improvements are completed.

This project has been paid for through the generosity of an anonymous donor. If you wish to support similar projects, please donate to our Western Africa Water & Sanitation Program

Conclusion of Kwanfinfin Borehole Project - Ghana 

Conclusion of Kwanfinfin Borehole Project - GhanaThis project has been completed under the direction of Nana Kudjoe Kesse, Executive Director and Chief Operations Officer of H2O Africa Care. To read about the start of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was designed build a borehole to supply water for the people of Kwanfinfin in the Brong Ahafo Region.

Nana reports:

Conclusion of Kwanfinfin Borehole Project - GhanaWe are more than happy to announce our second project conclusion in the Brong and Ahafo region of Ghana.

This project was to provide pure accessible drinking water to the 1,780 people of Kwanfinfin, a major village facing water challenges due to illegal mining operations.

As is done typically in Ghanaian communities, a libation was poured to ask for permission from forefathers for protection and guidance for the project to be commenced on the 7th day of August, 2017.

Representatives of LEE YOUNG Drilling, together with H2O team and elders of Kwanfinfin, surveyed the area for a suitable location. With the aid of ground water detector, a suitable place was located.

The drilling company then started the constructions process, and in about 35 hours, they hit the water table at 70 meters. The top of the borehole was then cemented and a hand pump installed, creating a fully-functioning water system.

The community will later come together upon an agreement to contribute funds towards a construction of storage filtering concrete tanks to improve upon the facility.

Upon conclusion, final prayers were said, to thank and to appreciate the work of Water Charity, H2O and everyone who made this project possible. A great delicious lunch was then prepared by the community that served both H2O team and LEE YOUNG Drilling team, as well as the village elders.

After the lunch, we all came together again with comments on the need for clean water and hygienic environment in Ghana and Africa. For about an hour of conversations we came to realize that this has broadened peoples’ minds.

Below are some happy comments raised by the villager upon having access to clean water:

" We thank Water Charity and H2O for this great water provision.” by Kwame Boabeng

" We thank God for this.” by Alhaji Mumuni

" We have no way to go through much purification process just to drink water (smiled )."

A wonderful advice was by given Agya Kwaku to warn everyone “not to wash clothes at the facility."

" I will ask daddy to buy me a water bottle so I can fill it up here for school.” 5-year-old Benard Kusi

Together they said “ooh Water Charity and H2O, this community can't thank you enough for this wonderful water facility"

We extend our thanks to Nana for completing this important project.

Conclusion of Kwanfinfin Borehole Project - GhanaConclusion of Kwanfinfin Borehole Project - Ghana

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE

Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, Kwahu West District, Eastern Region, Ghana

Community Description
Xxxxxx is a rural community located just off the main Accra-Kumasi road only about a 30 minutes’ drive from the market town of Nkawkaw in the Eastern Region of Ghana. It is surrounded by beautiful mountains and bounded by a river on its north end which shares its name.

Xxxxxx is home to approximately 900 residents with an ever-growing population. The community is comprised of both Muslims and Christians and is divided by the main highway. Xxxxxx also tends to share and borrow resources from its surrounding communities such as markets, schools, and water sources.

The community is full of hard-working, dedicated people who mostly rely on farming to sustain their livelihoods. They grow such crops as cocoa, maize, cucumbers, bananas, and plantains.

Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaIt is a very traditional community where you are expected to greet and revere your elders, treat guests with the utmost respect, and attend religious services and ceremonies whenever possible. Men are expected to go into the fields to work and provide for the family while women maintain the household. People live a simple and humble life with a positive outlook on the future.

Problem Addressed
The community currently has five hand-pumped boreholes within its city limits; however only two are functioning. Two of the boreholes are completely condemned due to poor workmanship, and one recently broke down.

With the expanding population and the demand for water being shared by adjacent communities the remaining boreholes are not enough to address the current need. To add insult to injury, the remaining boreholes are located on only one side of the community. This is causing many residents to travel longer distances and cross the main road in order to collect water.

Furthermore, the task of collecting water is traditionally given to women and children in this community. Some children begin fetching water as early as 3 years old. At times when one or more boreholes are not working due to maintenance issues, women and children tend to travel farther for water as well as have to cross the main highway. This can prove to be very dangerous for the younger children.

During the dry season, water becomes even scarcer because some of the boreholes do not function at these times. This once again causes increased travel time and effort for those sent to fetch the water. These circumstances in turn decreases productivity of the community by taking time away from other things such as school or work.

There are also situations in which individuals decide to collect water from the nearby streams because of the water shortage. This, of course, can lead to a variety of health issues because these waters have not been treated for pollutants.

Project Description
This project is to re-build an existing borehole, install an electric pump, build a platform and install a water storage tank, and install piping to access points in the community.

Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaAn existing borehole, with a yield sufficiently high will be rehabilitated into a mechanized borehole, powered by an electrical pump, that will bring water up from the water table and store it in a Rambo 1,000 Polytank capable of holding 10,000L of water. This tank will be able to satisfy the water demand for Xxxxxx and its immediate surrounding communities as well as alleviate pressure on the electrical pump by allowing time between fillings.

The Polytank will be placed on a concrete stand with four pillars for support as well as a maintenance ladder situated 12 feet above the ground. At the source of the borehole there will be one overhead spout for those who will carry water on their heads without support and one regular spout at the base.

The company will also excavate and lay approximately 250 meters of Duraplast piping for two additional fetching points away from the source with regular spouts.

An additional soakaway pit, aside from the one already located at the existing borehole, will be placed at the end of the extension to prevent standing water near the distal spouts.

Just prior to construction an electrical meter for the borehole will be applied for, and activities designed to teach the community about proper borehole maintenance and sanitation practices will be organized with the drilling company.

Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaA pumping test will be performed at the time of construction to determine the type and size of the pump required to fill the Polytank. A typical pump for this size tank would be a 1.5 horsepower Interdab electrical pump.

In conjunction with Global Communities, a company that has done extensive work in the area of identifying water tables throughout Ghana, a reputable company called LINKS Drilling and Construction, Ltd. was identified. The company provided estimates for the cost of mechanizing an existing borehole. The estimate included having an environmental assessment and hydrological survey performed before any construction will be initiated.

Construction will last for approximately 6 weeks, requiring two weeks for the excavation and tower construction, 3 weeks for foundation drying, and one week for Polytank installation and connection. Throughout the duration of the project, and even after completion, the Water and Sanitation (WATSAN) Committee will continue to conduct community education activities related to water & sanitation and borehole maintenance as well as manage the community’s water and sanitation needs.

The community will provide the land and base of the borehole, conduct trainings and education sessions to the whole community, and engage in communal labor to keep the work site as well as the community clean and well maintained.

Project Impact
961 people will benefit from the project

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Zakiya Miller

Monitoring and Maintenance
The WATSAN Committee will oversee project completion and borehole maintenance after installation.

The Committee will collect funds from the community for the purpose of maintaining and repairing current boreholes as well as the utility costs and upkeep of the new mechanized borehole. The committee will meet monthly to discuss issues of sanitation in the community as well as to hold training sessions and activities on communal work days.

The committee will also be responsible for the continued collection of funds and to ensure that the funds are being spent responsibly on water and sanitation projects.

The Peace Corps Volunteer will work with the community to ensure that the WATSAN Committee is formed and prepared prior to mechanization of the borehole and that adequate funds have been generated to cover the costs of any repairs.

Comments
The borehole will increase the number of vantage points that can be used throughout the community. This will in turn increase water access in areas that are remote or where the population is growing.

The borehole will also decrease the time it takes to fetch water allowing more time for other productive things in the community. It will also reduce the economic strain on the community by lessening the tension placed on the already existing hand-pumped boreholes. This will decrease the likelihood of breakdowns and maintenance malfunctions which will allow funds to be saved more readily in the WATSAN account.

Let Girls Learn
The role of collecting water is primarily reserved for women and girls in the community. This role is expected to be fulfilled whenever there is a need and regardless of other duties that need to be performed.

There is already some gender bias which favors boy’s receiving education over girls when it comes to resources and school fees in the community. This bias can lead to a huge knowledge gap between men and women which can in turn put a greater economic strain on the community as a whole.

Furthermore, a lack of education makes women and girls more vulnerable to gender-based violence, sexually transmitted infections, unwanted pregnancies, and other diseases which can reduce their economic productivity even more over time.

This project will mitigate some of the obstacles young girls must face when trying to get an education by decreasing the time spent away from class sessions due to collecting water.  It falls under our  Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

This project has been supported by an anonymous donor.

Conclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

Conclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

This project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Zakiya Miller. To read about the start of the project, CLICK HERE.

Zakiya reports:

The project has installed a mechanized borehole with 4 vantage points located at the base, and an extension point some 250 meters from the main station with an additional 2 vantage points. This makes a total of 6 new vantage points in the community of Asuoso in the Kwahu West District of Eastern Region, Ghana.

Conclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaThis borehole with an electrical pump will alleviate some of the burdens associated with collecting water including women and children from crossing the dangerous highway to fetch water.

Community members expressed the need for increased water access due to the long queues and far distance residents had to travel to get water. School girls were also missing school instruction time due to the far distance and long waiting times the girls would have to endure to collect water for the school. This sparked the decision to rehabilitate one of the existing manual boreholes and transform it into a mechanized borehole with multiple fetching points.

Just prior to the project initiation one of the 3 functioning boreholes broke down making water even more scarce in the community. This breakdown was particularly concerning because it forced residents to cross the main highway in order to collect water. This was a very dangerous situation for women and young children who are often sent to collect water for the household.

This project took the collective effort of community members, hired contractors, and the Peace Corps to accomplish. The community helped to clear the land, provide water and accommodations for the workers, and organized community resources to help complete the project. This helped build their capacity and take ownership of the development. This project served as a galvanizing agent to build resiliency and self-empowerment within the community so that they can continue to better their quality of life.

Construction began on April 24, 2017 and ended on July 21, 2017. This resulted in one mechanized borehole with an electrical pump to deliver water to 6 different vantage points. Four of the vantage points being located at the borehole base and two additional vantage points approximately 250 meters out in a community extension.

The new borehole is providing increased water access to approximately 900 residents in the town of Asuoso.

Conclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaAfter clearing the land, the contractors began the scaffolding to build the Polytank stand and drilled the pipes into the existing borehole. Bricks were made to construct the Polytank stand and left to dry for about a week. The workers then returned to construct the stands and pillar for the Polytanks and extension. Plaster was added and left to dry for approximately one month due to heavy rainfall. The Polytanks were installed and the electrical pump was connected. The borehole was then tested for functionality. After all tests were performed, the borehole water was treated and then open for public use.

The primary goal was achieved by increasing water access to community members by installing a mechanized borehole over an existing borehole. The borehole has decreased fetching time by decreasing the distance residents have to travel to collect water as well as adding more vantage points for collection. This has in turn helped school aged girls gain more instruction time during the school day because it does not take them as long to fetch water for the school. Community members have been overjoyed by the addition of this new water source and they have promised to keep it well maintained.

We extend our thanks to Zakiya for completing this important project.

Conclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaConclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

Conclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaConclusion of Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

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Bug Nkwanta and New Longoro Water Projects - Ghana

Bug Nkwanta and New Longoro Water Projects - Ghana

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Bug Nkwanta and New Longoro Water Projects - Ghana Location
Bug Nkwanta and New Longoro, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana

Community Description
MoringaConnect (MC) works with small families in Ghana that grow moringa trees. They use a vertically integrated supply chain to process moringa leaves into moringa-based tea and snacks and the oil seeds into beauty products.

Since becoming operational in 2013, they have engaged over 2,300 farming families, provided more than $400,000 of income to them, and planted over 300,000 trees.

New Longoro is a small farming community in the Brong Ahafo Region. It has been one of the primary bases of operations for MC since the company was founded. The entire community has embraced MC and the work they are doing. Based on this success and deep level of engagement, MC launched a nucleus farm just outside the community in 2016. This farm currently provides seeds and leaves for MC's products, income for 30+ tenant farmers who manage their own plots on the farm and sell the harvests directly to MC, and jobs for 30 workers and managers on the farm itself.

Bug Nkwanta is a smaller community on the road between New Longoro and Kintampo, the district capital. It has just a few hundred people living in it but does not have reliable water access. Despite its remoteness and lack of development, it has also been the site of the most successful moringa farmers working with MC nationwide.

Bug Nkwanta and New Longoro Water Projects - Ghana Problem Addressed
MoringaConnect's nucleus farm is right on the Volta River which provides easy access for irrigation and ostensibly for drinking water for the farmers on the land. However, during the rainy season and because of illegal gold mining in the river the water becomes muddy and turbid. As MC expands its workers and tenant farmers on the farm it becomes very challenging to ensure they all have reliable drinking water.

Bug Nkwanta had a borehole dug but the water quality was poor and wasn't going to be adequate to provide potable water for the entire community. Now they are using a pond with standing water that is brackish.

For MC's factory while originally the plan was to connect the newly piped town water system to the factory, after discussing with various stakeholders, the reliability and quality of the grid water was called into question. To mitigate any issues that might arise a borehole with pump and polytank for gravity fed water is necessary.

Project Description
This project is to build 3 boreholes and build out the water delivery and storage systems.

MoringaConnect Nucleus Farm - While the original plan called for an integrated water filtration system using moringa seed press meal there is still R&D to be done on best methods for using press meal as a flocculant. Additionally, there is imminent and growing need for potable water at the farm as they increase the number of farmers they grant blocks of land to. This means a borehole is the most logical and easily sustainable option. They hope to create infrastructure for many of the farmers and people working on the farm to have living quarters there in the future.

Bug Nkwanta and New Longoro Water Projects - Ghana The contractor will conduct a survey, then drill a 5-inch borehole. Upon verifying the water quality, the contractor will install a Afridev hand pump which is designed for durability and heavy use.

MoringaConnect Factory - Washing is a critical step within the processing of moringa leaves into moringa powder and they need reliable flow of potable water to provide for this. Additionally the factory will have between 20-50 people working in it at any given time as well as living quarters for any staff visiting or working from the factory temporarily.

There is grid water in the community which will be connected to the factory and was originally the focus of the project but after further discussions with stakeholders and the local Water and Sanitation Committee they are skeptical about the reliability and quality of the grid water. Thus they have decided to install a borehole to have dedicated water access that is directly under their management.

The contractor will conduct a survey, then drill a 5-inch borehole. Upon verifying the water quality, he will install an electric submersible pump and a polytank to provide a gravity fed water system to the factory.

Bug Nkwanta - The community had had a borehole dug but the water quality was poor and wasn't going to be adequate to provide potable water for the entire community. Now they are using a pond with standing water that is brackish.

Based on the results from the previous contractor, the contractor will conduct a survey, then drill a 5-inch borehole. Upon verifying the water quality, the contractor will install a Afridev hand pump which is designed for durability and heavy use.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Joe Stein, RPCV Ghana, Director of Operations, MoringaConnect

Monitoring and Maintenance
MoringaConnect will manage and maintain the boreholes on the nucleus farm and at the factory. MC's community manager sits on the Water and Sanitation Committee for New Longoro so has experience with managing boreholes effectively.

The borehole in Bug Nkwanta will be handed over for management by the community under their Water and Sanitation Committee. MC will arrange with the committee an equitable commitment for the company to provide some support with the community providing the majority.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor. Please donate to our other great projects in West Africa.

Bug Nkwanta and New Longoro Water Projects - Ghana Bug Nkwanta and New Longoro Water Projects - Ghana

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Ntobroso Borehole Project - Ghana

Ntobroso Borehole Project - Ghana

NPCA and WC logos

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Ntobroso Borehole Project - GhanaLocation
Ntobroso, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana

Community Description
Ntobroso is a large village, with a population of about 1,100 people. The main source of income is from agriculture and trading. In addition, young men and women serve as laborers at the various mining sites.

The Brong-Ahafo Region is located in south Ghana. Brong Ahafo is bordered to the north by the Black Volta River and to the east by the Lake Volta, and to the south by the Ashanti region, Eastern and Western regions, and to the west by the Ivory Coast southeastern border.. Some of the languages spoken by the people are Twi, English, Ewe, Bono and Hausa.

Because this location is a center of mining activity, it has associated problems, such as school dropout and teenage pregnancy. Due to economic hardships at home, a large number of children between 6 and 15 abandon their classrooms for gold mining, to either make a living or make a few Ghana cedis to support their parents.

The few children who are in school also work in illegal gold mining concessions after school to earn money to pay for their own education. They usually do not wear any protective gear, and are exposed to all manner of bodily injury, especially to the eyes.

Ntobroso Borehole Project - GhanaProblem Addressed
The people of the village suffer from lack of access to potable water. Their lands and water bodies have been largely destroyed as result of illegal mining activities and the use heavy chemicals on their land. The illegal mining in the area is plagued by several environmental and health problems.

Several accidents have occurred, and in some cases people have died from water-related issues. In April 2015, at least 16 people lost their lives as a result of consuming polluted water. This community now needs to transport water from nearby towns, and pay unaffordable prices.

Another serious impact is the health hazards as a result of pollution from gases, noise and dust. Coal mines release methane which can pollute the air. Sulphuric acid is utilized in the mining operations, which drains into the water bodies, and adversely affects them.

The movements of rock in the case of surface mining impacts the land negatively. Craters are left in the areas where mining activities took place, destroying landscape and lush vegetation in the process.

Deforestation is resulting in changes in the ecosystem which includes increasing the levels of carbon dioxide in the air.

Leakage of chemicals into the environment adversely affects the health of the local population.

Ntobroso Borehole Project - GhanaIn summary mining has a negative impact on the environment of this village including erosion, formation of sinkholes, loss of biodiversity, and contamination of soil and surface water.

Project Description
This project is build a borehole to supply water for the people of Ntobroso in the Brong Ahafo Region.

The borehole will reach a depth of about 50 meters. Water will be accessed by a hand pump. Above-ground improvements will include a concrete area on which people will stand when drawing water, as well as a channel and soak pit for removal of excess runoff.

A contract will be awarded to a borehole construction firm with experience in the region.

Activities prior to implementation include cost analysis, reading and location selection, geologic and topographic consultation, and preparation of design sketches.

The community will contribute a monthly fee per home toward the maintenance and repairs of the facility as well the unskilled labor needed for project implementation.

H2O Africa Care will provide management, supervision, accounting, monitoring, and reporting.

Project Impact
1,100 people will benefit from the project.

Project Administration
The project will be implemented under the direction of Nana Kudjoe Kesse, Executive Director and Chief Operations Officer of H2O Africa Care

Monitoring and Maintenance
The community has agreed to charge small monthly fees to take care of repairs and other related work when needed. A woman will be assigned to perform the management function for the smooth running of the facility.

H2O Africa Care will ensure sustainability after the improvements are completed.

This project has been paid for through the generosity of an anonymous donor. If you wish to support similar projects, please donate to our Western Africa Water & Sanitation Program

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Ntobroso Borehole Project - GhanaNtobroso Borehole Project - Ghana

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Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project II - Ghana

Local Kids - Ghana

This project is to raise, plant, and maintain 20,000 trees near Accra, Ghana.  It is made possible by the partnership of WATER CHARITY & the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Project Location:
Villagers discussing the projectThis project will be implemented in an area that stretches from Pokromu (village) to Gyankamah (village), all in the eastern part of Ghana which shares a border with the capital city of Accra.

Community Description:
Trees will be planted along the APAPOMU river that has its source from Pokromu, runs through Gyankamah, and finally into the ocean in Accra. This location was identified through a search to determine communities that face a huge water challenges during the dry season in the country. After the search, it was determined that the high level drying of rivers was a result of lack of trees to provide a heavy canopy to prevent evaporation during the hot and dry seasons.
 
Description of Problem:
The community is feeling the impact of draught, caused by a changing climate.  To remediate the effects, and plan for the future, an increase in the number of trees is required, with concentration on placement to maximize benefit. 
 
Village
Project Description:
The project is to raise 20,000 Cedrela tree seedlings, and plant them along the Apapomu river bank.
 
The Cedrela tree was chosen for this project because of the following: fast growing, evergreen, resists drought, heavy canopy formation, food and medicinal benefits, and many more.
 
The trees are to be planted at 10 feet apart on both sides of the river to allow a heavy canopy formation in a short period.  This will help prevent the evaporation during the hot dry weather periods. 

The project will be done as a partnership involving schools, churches and the general public coming together out of mutual self-interest to achieve a successful future outcome in the region. The project will bring together about 500 participants during planting period, with 50 people working at a time over a 10 day period.

Project funds will be spent on the following:Cedrela tree
° 200 bundles of poly bags 
° 1 ton of manure 
° Nursery set 
° Seeds  
° Transportation 
° Feeding for 500 people 
° One year monitoring and maintenance 
 
The project will proceed as follows::
°Nursery establishment and nursing of seeds 
°Nursery maintenance  
°Distribution and planting 
°Trees maintenance, monitoring and evaluation 
° Project hand over to communities/ government
 
Impact:
This project will benefit a population of about 4,800 living in the area.
 
Volunteer Directing Project
Solomon Amuzu, Founder and Director of Call to Nature Permaculture

Monitoring and Maintenance
After the planting, a selected team together with CTNP will monitor and maintain the trees for a period of years, thereafter handing the project over to the community and the government for further maintenance.

Comments
The trees will provide numerous benefits such as:
° Erosion control
° Provision of habitat for aquatic bodies
° Prevention of water and air pollution
° Increase energy conservation
° Food and medicinal benefits
° Result from this project will also serve as educational resource for students and the local people.
 
Solomon has previously done a tree-planting permaculture project with Water Charity in Ghana together with Peace Corps Volunteer Michael McGaskey.  Click Here to see the 1st Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project
 
Dollar Amount of Project
$4,950
 
Donations Collected to Date
$4,950
 
Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the Robert Victor Sager and Beatrice Mintz Sager Foundation.
Gyankamah Village, Ghana
Riverside ApapomaApapomu River, Ghana

Conclusion of Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project II - Ghana

Conclusion of Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project II - Ghana

This project has been completed under the direction of Solomon Amuzu, Founder and Director of Call to Nature Permaculture. To read about the start of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project II - GhanaThe project was designed to raise 20,000 Cedrela tree seedlings, and plant them along the Apapomu river bank.

Solomon reports:

Call To Nature Permaculture Ghana received a support from water charity to assist in raising and planting thousands of fast growing tree species to protect water ways (APAPOMU river) that has its source from Pokromu, runs through Gyankamah, and finally into the ocean in Accra.

In implementing such an educational and environmental impact project like this, CTNP involved local schools and communities throughout the project from sand bagging, seeding and planting. We made this successful one through great acceptance and support from our local partners Gyankama Methodist basic school, Kunkunuru basic school, De Best International school and sunshine Academy as well the village communities that the river travels through: Pokrom, Gyankama, Yaa taa and Asesreso.

After several meetings with school heads and chiefs, we came into an agreement that communal labor must be organized to clear the planting space along the river sides and planting holes are made by the elderly people whereas school kids carry trees and do the planting once transportation and distributions are done at various vantage point along the river ways.

Conclusion of Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project II - GhanaOur plan was to do the tree planting in last June but upon receiving so much rain this year causing the river banks to flood we shifted the exercise to the 10th of September, 2017.

On the 8th of September, 2017 an announcement was made through local radio information center to remind the various villages about the project directed by Gyaase hene and Mmrante hene (local chiefs) of the various communities.

After the announcement, early in the morning the following day on the 9th of September, 2017 strong looking men gathered along the river side with sharp local made cutlasses and earth chisels, clearing and making the holes to enable the planting the following day (10th September) by school kids. A path and a planting distance of about ten feet were made on both sides of the river as specified by CTNP.

It was beautiful as kids planted and learned new things out of class as to how it is important to care about our environment and protecting water ways. School teachers were very happy to be joined by this great initiative. Before the planting CTNP trained six Agricultural science teachers from the various schools to have an idea about protecting water ways with trees where the knowledge gained passed on to school kids.

This project brought together about 505 school kids including teachers and in about 24 hours thousands of trees planted along the water ways.

We were also joined by another wonderful local NGO, "H2O Africa Care" an organization that runs water and sanitation program, was great to have them join us as it raised numerous comments that will improve upon our water protection in Ghana, Africa and the world.

After the planting, snacks and soft drinks were given to the kids to refresh and also to show an appreciation as it did put smiles on their faces.

Conclusion of Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project II - GhanaBelow are few comments raised as we carry on with the exercise:

1: We thank you for this environmental project.

2: Gyaase hene (chief) of Kunkunuru also applaud us for this work and stated that his doors are open for us to get them involve as we want in making the world better place for the future generations. He also advised CTNP to educate the kids about the important of venturing into Agriculture with the notion that farming is for the elderly, poor or the illiterate. Again, he made a request for more trees planted along the roads in the village. He also promised on behalf of the elders that, they will make sure the trees are well taken care of through communal labor effectively.

3: In the near future these trees will grow nicely to protect our river from drying up in the dry season.

4: This is good project to enhance our green club in the school.

5: The saddest comment that was raised by one of the chiefs is "Its rather unfortunate all of our lands have been sold out by forefathers before we were handed over power, CTNP deserves a land in this community for their great environmental program.

We report with happiness as this has been one of the best received project by our communities and as such we say a very big thank you to WATER CHARITY for supporting us to reach this higher height, we hope to be doing more and more in the near future.

We extend our thanks to Solomon for completing this excellent project, and again thank the Robert Victor Sager and Beatrice Mintz Sager Foundation for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project II - GhanaConclusion of Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project II - Ghana

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