Ghana

Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project II - Ghana

Local Kids - Ghana

This project is to raise, plant, and maintain 20,000 trees near Accra, Ghana.  It is made possible by the partnership of WATER CHARITY & the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION

Project Location:
Villagers discussing the projectThis project will be implemented in an area that stretches from Pokromu (village) to Gyankamah (village), all in the eastern part of Ghana which shares a border with the capital city of Accra.

Community Description:
Trees will be planted along the APAPOMU river that has its source from Pokromu, runs through Gyankamah, and finally into the ocean in Accra. This location was identified through a search to determine communities that face a huge water challenges during the dry season in the country. After the search, it was determined that the high level drying of rivers was a result of lack of trees to provide a heavy canopy to prevent evaporation during the hot and dry seasons.
 
Description of Problem:
The community is feeling the impact of draught, caused by a changing climate.  To remediate the effects, and plan for the future, an increase in the number of trees is required, with concentration on placement to maximize benefit. 
 
Village
Project Description:
The project is to raise 20,000 Cedrela tree seedlings, and plant them along the Apapomu river bank.
 
The Cedrela tree was chosen for this project because of the following: fast growing, evergreen, resists drought, heavy canopy formation, food and medicinal benefits, and many more.
 
The trees are to be planted at 10 feet apart on both sides of the river to allow a heavy canopy formation in a short period.  This will help prevent the evaporation during the hot dry weather periods. 

The project will be done as a partnership involving schools, churches and the general public coming together out of mutual self-interest to achieve a successful future outcome in the region. The project will bring together about 500 participants during planting period, with 50 people working at a time over a 10 day period.

Project funds will be spent on the following:Cedrela tree
° 200 bundles of poly bags 
° 1 ton of manure 
° Nursery set 
° Seeds  
° Transportation 
° Feeding for 500 people 
° One year monitoring and maintenance 
 
The project will proceed as follows::
°Nursery establishment and nursing of seeds 
°Nursery maintenance  
°Distribution and planting 
°Trees maintenance, monitoring and evaluation 
° Project hand over to communities/ government
 
Impact:
This project will benefit a population of about 4,800 living in the area.
 
Volunteer Directing Project
Solomon Amuzu, Founder and Director of Call to Nature Permaculture

Monitoring and Maintenance
After the planting, a selected team together with CTNP will monitor and maintain the trees for a period of years, thereafter handing the project over to the community and the government for further maintenance.

Comments
The trees will provide numerous benefits such as:
° Erosion control
° Provision of habitat for aquatic bodies
° Prevention of water and air pollution
° Increase energy conservation
° Food and medicinal benefits
° Result from this project will also serve as educational resource for students and the local people.
 
Solomon has previously done a tree-planting permaculture project with Water Charity in Ghana together with Peace Corps Volunteer Michael McGaskey.  Click Here to see the 1st Call To Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project
 
Dollar Amount of Project
$4,950
 
Donations Collected to Date
$4,950
 
Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the Robert Victor Sager and Beatrice Mintz Sager Foundation.
Gyankamah Village, Ghana
Riverside ApapomaApapomu River, Ghana
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Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

Kwahu West Water Project - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, Kwahu West District, Eastern Region, Ghana

Community Description
Xxxxxx is a rural community located just off the main Accra-Kumasi road only about a 30 minutes’ drive from the market town of Nkawkaw in the Eastern Region of Ghana. It is surrounded by beautiful mountains and bounded by a river on its north end which shares its name.

Xxxxxx is home to approximately 900 residents with an ever-growing population. The community is comprised of both Muslims and Christians and is divided by the main highway. Xxxxxx also tends to share and borrow resources from its surrounding communities such as markets, schools, and water sources.

The community is full of hard-working, dedicated people who mostly rely on farming to sustain their livelihoods. They grow such crops as cocoa, maize, cucumbers, bananas, and plantains.

Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaIt is a very traditional community where you are expected to greet and revere your elders, treat guests with the utmost respect, and attend religious services and ceremonies whenever possible. Men are expected to go into the fields to work and provide for the family while women maintain the household. People live a simple and humble life with a positive outlook on the future.

Problem Addressed
The community currently has five hand-pumped boreholes within its city limits; however only two are functioning. Two of the boreholes are completely condemned due to poor workmanship, and one recently broke down.

With the expanding population and the demand for water being shared by adjacent communities the remaining boreholes are not enough to address the current need. To add insult to injury, the remaining boreholes are located on only one side of the community. This is causing many residents to travel longer distances and cross the main road in order to collect water.

Furthermore, the task of collecting water is traditionally given to women and children in this community. Some children begin fetching water as early as 3 years old. At times when one or more boreholes are not working due to maintenance issues, women and children tend to travel farther for water as well as have to cross the main highway. This can prove to be very dangerous for the younger children.

During the dry season, water becomes even scarcer because some of the boreholes do not function at these times. This once again causes increased travel time and effort for those sent to fetch the water. These circumstances in turn decreases productivity of the community by taking time away from other things such as school or work.

There are also situations in which individuals decide to collect water from the nearby streams because of the water shortage. This, of course, can lead to a variety of health issues because these waters have not been treated for pollutants.

Project Description
This project is to re-build an existing borehole, install an electric pump, build a platform and install a water storage tank, and install piping to access points in the community.

Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaAn existing borehole, with a yield sufficiently high will be rehabilitated into a mechanized borehole, powered by an electrical pump, that will bring water up from the water table and store it in a Rambo 1,000 Polytank capable of holding 10,000L of water. This tank will be able to satisfy the water demand for Xxxxxx and its immediate surrounding communities as well as alleviate pressure on the electrical pump by allowing time between fillings.

The Polytank will be placed on a concrete stand with four pillars for support as well as a maintenance ladder situated 12 feet above the ground. At the source of the borehole there will be one overhead spout for those who will carry water on their heads without support and one regular spout at the base.

The company will also excavate and lay approximately 250 meters of Duraplast piping for two additional fetching points away from the source with regular spouts.

An additional soakaway pit, aside from the one already located at the existing borehole, will be placed at the end of the extension to prevent standing water near the distal spouts.

Just prior to construction an electrical meter for the borehole will be applied for, and activities designed to teach the community about proper borehole maintenance and sanitation practices will be organized with the drilling company.

Kwahu West Water Project - GhanaA pumping test will be performed at the time of construction to determine the type and size of the pump required to fill the Polytank. A typical pump for this size tank would be a 1.5 horsepower Interdab electrical pump.

In conjunction with Global Communities, a company that has done extensive work in the area of identifying water tables throughout Ghana, a reputable company called LINKS Drilling and Construction, Ltd. was identified. The company provided estimates for the cost of mechanizing an existing borehole. The estimate included having an environmental assessment and hydrological survey performed before any construction will be initiated.

Construction will last for approximately 6 weeks, requiring two weeks for the excavation and tower construction, 3 weeks for foundation drying, and one week for Polytank installation and connection. Throughout the duration of the project, and even after completion, the Water and Sanitation (WATSAN) Committee will continue to conduct community education activities related to water & sanitation and borehole maintenance as well as manage the community’s water and sanitation needs.

The community will provide the land and base of the borehole, conduct trainings and education sessions to the whole community, and engage in communal labor to keep the work site as well as the community clean and well maintained.

Project Impact
961 people will benefit from the project

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Zakiya Miller

Monitoring and Maintenance
The WATSAN Committee will oversee project completion and borehole maintenance after installation.

The Committee will collect funds from the community for the purpose of maintaining and repairing current boreholes as well as the utility costs and upkeep of the new mechanized borehole. The committee will meet monthly to discuss issues of sanitation in the community as well as to hold training sessions and activities on communal work days.

The committee will also be responsible for the continued collection of funds and to ensure that the funds are being spent responsibly on water and sanitation projects.

The Peace Corps Volunteer will work with the community to ensure that the WATSAN Committee is formed and prepared prior to mechanization of the borehole and that adequate funds have been generated to cover the costs of any repairs.

Comments
The borehole will increase the number of vantage points that can be used throughout the community. This will in turn increase water access in areas that are remote or where the population is growing.

The borehole will also decrease the time it takes to fetch water allowing more time for other productive things in the community. It will also reduce the economic strain on the community by lessening the tension placed on the already existing hand-pumped boreholes. This will decrease the likelihood of breakdowns and maintenance malfunctions which will allow funds to be saved more readily in the WATSAN account.

Let Girls Learn
The role of collecting water is primarily reserved for women and girls in the community. This role is expected to be fulfilled whenever there is a need and regardless of other duties that need to be performed.

There is already some gender bias which favors boy’s receiving education over girls when it comes to resources and school fees in the community. This bias can lead to a huge knowledge gap between men and women which can in turn put a greater economic strain on the community as a whole.

Furthermore, a lack of education makes women and girls more vulnerable to gender-based violence, sexually transmitted infections, unwanted pregnancies, and other diseases which can reduce their economic productivity even more over time.

This project will mitigate some of the obstacles young girls must face when trying to get an education by decreasing the time spent away from class sessions due to collecting water.  It falls under our  Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

This project has been supported by an anonymous donor.

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Yagha Borehole Project - Ghana

Yagha Borehole Project - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Yagha Borehole Project - GhanaLocation
Yagha, Jirapa District, Upper West Region, Ghana

Community Description
Yagha is a small village in Jirapa District, in the Upper West Region of Ghana. It is surrounded by five sub-districts, and the total population of all these districts is around 2,000 people.

People in the village are mostly farmers; otherwise they are food-sellers or construction workers. The village is very rural and remains very poor. Yagha community is densely populated by peasant farmers and life stock herders, all in need of water.

There is only one rainy season a year in the Upper West Region, which is becoming more and more sparse (now from June to September). During dry season and Harmatton season (heavy winds from the Sahara), there is no rain at all, temperatures reach 110 degrees Fahrenheit, and there is dust everywhere.

The community lives with food insecurity, especially during the hunger months. They mostly harvest enough food to feed their families, not making a surplus. The landscape is very dry, with very little vegetation.

Problem Addressed
The community currently has only one functioning borehole, which frequently breaks down, resulting in serious water shortage.

According to Mr. Osman Yaro, medical officer in charge of Yagha Health Post, in 2016 alone, waterborne illnesses accounted for 93 cases from January to April 2016. One of the leading causes of death for children under 5 is diarrhea, and many other diseases are common, such as cholera.

The Regent of Yagha (Mr. Dookuu Bernard) in an exclusive interview expressed worry about the challenges, especially accessibility to water by the children. He disclosed that the whole community has to struggle at the only borehole, which is at the entrance of the Yagha Health Post, for water. This borehole is incapable of meeting the whole communities' demand.

Women and children have to walk long distance to this water source to utilize this facility. The other sources of water include rain water harvested and stored during raining season.

The Yagha community in general suffers from a desperate shortage of water from October to April, for both human and livestock consumption.

Yagha Borehole Project - GhanaTo sum up this project's rationale:

1. Unsafe water means illnesses: Even when water can be found in the unprotected dam or Black Volta River miles away, the water is usually unclean and unsafe and exposes the community to water-borne illnesses such as typhoid and diarrhea. Due to inadequate healthcare available, these illnesses can often kill the young and the old.

2. Women’s burden: The traditional division of roles means those women and their small children bear the biggest burden when it comes to finding water. Even for those women who are closer to the only existing borehole, the task can take up to 2 hours. Due to the high demand and long queues, women sometimes do not return from fetching water until night. As well as adding to women’s already significant workload, the task of fetching water takes them away from other vital tasks which are needed to earn a living and raise a family.

3. Sacrificing education: Children, in their efforts to help their mothers by fetching water, usually sacrifice their study time and this eventually forces them to arrive late at school. They often miss their first classes of the day and there are also concerns about the health related impact of sitting for long hours at the spring in the strong sun and close to the unsanitary water.

Project Description
This project is to build a borehole along the road junction for Jirapa District.

The borehole will be drilled to a depth of 120 meters in an area has proven to have a good discharge of ground water.

Cattle troughs will be built to serve as drinking water for animals reared in the community.

The project will employ an Afridev manual water pump which is economical and sustainable.

There will be a concrete platform that leads to a runoff area, with a concrete basin at the end for water collection. This area will be used for animals' drinking water. This is what Yagha's current borehole has, and it works well.

Around the concrete basin, the community members have agreed to build a soak away pit, in case there is ever any water overflow. This will prevent breeding pools for mosquitoes.

There will be a fence built, and a chain provided to lock the borehole when not in use. This way, the WASTAN committee can guarantee that borehole users have to pay a small fee when they use the borehole. The funds accumulated can then be used for maintenance purposes should the borehole ever breakdown.

The community members have been involved fully in identification and approval of this project. They will participate effectively during implementation of project activities.

The work will be directed by READ, a locally-based NGO based in Wa, the capital of the Upper West Region.

The borehole will be built on land made available by the community. Volunteers will clear the project site and dig the animal water reservoir. They will also collect all locally available materials for the borehole development work, namely stones and sand. They will also provide much of the labor needed for construction.

Yagha Borehole Project - GhanaThe RASHBASH Company Limited has been tapped for the construction. RASHBASH has considerable experience and expertise in the borehole industry in Ghana, having executed several borehole projects at competitive cost in the country both in the private and public arena. They have particularly successfully executed similar projects in all the 11 districts in the Upper West Region of Ghana.

In summary, the community will provide the land, labor, water, and resources needed, such as rocks and sand, while Water Charity funds will pay for the remainder.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Caitlin Wright

Monitoring and Maintenance
READ will undertake the following to ensure smooth and efficient implementation of the project:

Write and submit monthly briefs on program implementation
Organize end of project review
Carry out End of Program Evaluation

Project monitoring will be carried out jointly with donor agencies, communities and participants throughout the project implementation. Monitoring data will be used to compile regular progress reports that will be submitted to donor agency.

A survey to establish the extent to which people of Yagha area have been able to access clean water will also be conducted. The data collected shall be analyzed quantitatively. READ will give reports to all relevant bodies.

A borehole management committee will be established to play a leadership and coordination role to ensure the sustainability of the project. As per the suggestions of the community members, it will have 6 members (3 men and 3 women). Their roles will be to represent the beneficiaries, coordinate the provision of materials and administer the overall implementation. To enable this, READ will provide training for the committee and selected community members on leadership, management, operation and maintenance of the scheme.

The borehole management committee, together with the whole community, will decide on reasonable fees to charge the users monthly. These fees will be collected and saved in an account with St. Joseph Credit Union-Jirapa. This will enable the community to maintain the borehole whenever it breaks down.

Let Girls Learn
The construction of a new borehole will help girls remain in school. Many young girls end up late to school due to fetching water and other household chores. This is especially pertinent if they live far away from the one borehole in Yagha, as they have to walk longer distances and wait in line.

By providing another borehole, mothers will have less of a dependency on their children, and fetching water will become easier for many community members.

Girls will also be less likely to get water borne illnesses that may keep them out of school.

This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  Additional donations that are made using the Donate button below will be allocated to other projects in Ghana.

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Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - Ghana

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - GhanaLocation
Oyibi - Legon in Accra and Nsawam - Adaeso, in the Eastern region, Ghana

Community Description
This project will be implemented by planting trees along roadsides from Oyibi - Legon in Accra and Nsawam - Adaeso in the Eastern region of Ghana. These two locations were identified through a search to determine the areas of greatest need.

Problem Addressed
Many urban areas of Ghana are devoid of trees. Trees are a necessary part of the water cycle, whereby rainfall is captured and finds his way down into the water table.

In addition, trees are needed to:

o Help to combat climate change

o Clean the air

o Provide oxygen

o Cool the streets and city

o Increase energy conservation

o Prevent water pollution

o Prevent soil erosion

o Shield children from ultraviolet rays

o Save water, as shade from trees slows water evaporation from thirsty grasses

o Provide food and medicine

o Provide canopy and habitat for wildlife

Project Description
This project is to plant and maintain 20,000 trees in two areas of Ghana.

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - Ghana

The project is being implemented by Call to Nature Permaculture (CTNP), a Ghana-based NGO, led by Solomon Amuzu, its Founder and Director. CTNP previously implemented Water Charity’s Call to Nature Permaculture Project - Ghana, which resulted in a great increase in the scope of operations of CTNP by facilitating water storage and distribution. 

CTNP has already begun planting the seedlings, and is readying them to be transplanted. Once this is done, the trees will be maintained for one year by CTNP and selected community members. The responsibility for the trees will then be handed over to the various communities and the state.

The Albizia tree was chosen for this project because it is fast growing and strong, provides a heavy canopy, and produces huge numbers of flowers for pollination.

The trees are to be planted along roadsides for stretches measuring 25 km each from Oyibi - Legon in Accra and Nsawam - Adaeso in the Eastern region of Ghana. With the rising levels of heat worldwide this is a move toward alleviating effects of climate change.

The lack of trees has made the ground in many areas very hot and dry. Trees recharge ground water, and when it rains, water pours onto the plant leaves and follows the root structure. Surface water is able to make its way deeply into the ground and finally into the water table, thereby increasing the amount of water stored in the ground.

The project will require a mobile water supply to initiate and to maintain the trees, through periodic watering, for a period of one year, the time needed for the trees to develop a strong root system.

Water Charity funds will be used for the purchase of a used pickup truck, water tank, hose, and fuel for one year.

CTNP is providing the seedlings, and the labor for implementing the project.

Project Impact
3,850 residents will directly benefit. In addition, all the travelers to and from the nation's capital, Accra will indirectly benefit.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Michael McGaskey

Call to Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project - Ghana

Monitoring and Maintenance
Solomon Amuzu will perform the regular monitoring and maintenance of the project in order to ensure its sustainability. He will document the results with an eye toward creating a model that can be replicated.

RPCV Michael McGaskey will assist with monitoring and maintenance of the project.

Comments
The project has as one of its major objectives the improvement of capacity of an active, successful, and forward-thinking local NGO. The effectiveness of the tree planting effort can provide a model for expansion of the concept to other areas of Ghana, and other countries in Africa.

A second project like this has been undertaken for Water Charity by Solomon.  Read about the 2nd Call Of Nature Permaculture Tree Planting Project, and consider supporting both of these worthy efforts.

Fundraising Target
$5,950

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,950

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

 

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Ponyentanga Borehole Project - Ghana

Ponyentanga Borehole Project - Ghana

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY & the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Ponyentanga Borehole Project - GhanaLocation
Ponyentanga, Wa West, Upper West Region, Ghana

Community Description
The community is a rural community in the Wa West district in the Upper West region of Ghana. The community is located on the main road from Kumasi heading to Wa, but still has a high poverty rate estimated at 85% by USAID. The major tribes in the community are the Dagaaba, Waale, and Birifor tribes, all speaking a dialect version of the language Dagaare spoken in the Upper West region of Ghana and some portions of Burkina Faso.

In the community, like most places in Ghana, fetching water is primarily an activity done by girls. Even more so, the girls tend to be of school age, who spend most of their time fetching water, preparing food, and cleaning, rather than doing their homework.

The people in the community are mostly subsistence farmers. Their main crops are maize, millet, and yams. All of these are used to prepare local food, but a large portion of millet is used to prepare a drink called pito. This is a semi-alcoholic drink is prepared by almost every woman in every house in the community. They use this drink to give offering at church services and to sell in the market.

Problem Addressed
At the moment, many of the students and neighboring community members are forced to fetch water at a nearby dam, as the borehole closest to the school is almost two kilometers away. Students choose to stay at home instead of coming to school due to a lack of water at the school. This results in attendance at school being incredibly low and little engagement outside of school.

Ponyentanga Borehole Project - GhanaMany students chose to go home during class hours in order to drink water and decide not to return to school afterwards. The girls selected to fetch water to the school stay at home rather than suffer carrying water from the borehole all the way to school. As the community members are fetching water at the dam for drinking and preparing food, there is a high rate of bacterial infections and diarrhea, as the dam is also used by the cattle for drinking.

Project Description
This project is to build a borehole in the community.

A geophysical survey will be conducted (using a terrameter for the 4-point Wenner test) arranged for by the WATSAN committee. This way, once they are able to select a location, the probability of hitting freshwater will be very high.

Once a location has been chosen, the WATSAN committee will mobilize the school and neighboring community members to collect stones and sand used for the mixing of concrete for construction. The committee will then contact the drilling engineer (that they arranged through the Community Water and Sanitation Agency office in Wa) to come and start drilling the borehole. The drilling engineer will mobilize the drilling rig at the work site and drill through both overburdened and other types of rock (at an estimated 80 meters).

In addition to paying for labor, Water Charity funds will be used to purchase PVC pipes to lower into the drilled hole. The drilling engineer will then do a discharge test, 90% recovery test, and a physio-chemical and bacteriological analysis of the water to ensure that the water is clean.

When this is finished, the WATSAN committee and the drilling engineer will work together with community members to create the pump pad and install the already purchased Afridev hand pump.

Ponyentanga Borehole Project - GhanaProject Impact
The project will give 500 people access to clean water. This includes students and teachers at the school campus, and surrounding family members who live close to the school.

The WATSAN committee will benefit from the project by increasing their capacity to plan and make new boreholes, and learn more about maintenance for the existing ones in the community.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Sean Sinclair

Monitoring and Maintenance
The WATSAN committee will receive training from the Community and Water Agency in Wa and monitoring and maintaining borehole. Currently, only one members has the expertise on repairing bore holes. In the next coming weeks, the WATSAN committee will have a workshop where that one member will share his knowledge on maintaining boreholes with the other members. Then, when the project is completed the committee will be able to maintain and monitor the bore hole.

The community plans on charging ten pesewas per basin of water to collect funds for future maintenance and repairs.

Comments
While this project has not been undertaken as an official Peace Corps Let Girls Learn project, it accomplishes the same objective of creating conditions that will enable girls to go to and remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$2,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$2,9000

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been paid for by an anonymous donor.  

Additonal donations will be allocated to other projects in Ghana.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Ponyentanga Borehole Project - GhanaPonyentanga Borehole Project - Ghana

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Call to Nature Permaculture Project - Ghana

Boy gardening on the farm

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

LocationMichael with the youth in the garden

 Kunkunuru, Greater Accra Region, Ghana

Community Description
Call to Nature Permaculture has a general site for its school garden that is a two-acre piece of land offered by the elders of Kunkunuru community.  The site has a small dam which was created through sand winning activities (illegal sand mining) many years back. Due to a high water table and good amount of clay, the existing dam is suitable to store water for gardening.

Problem Addressed
It takes students many hours to scoop enough water from the dam to water the whole field. This does not give them enough time to engage in other activities, which include preparing beds, planting, weeding, staking, and numerous other tasks. A better water storage and distriribution system is needed to improve effectiveness.

Boys working in the gardenProject Description
This project is to greatly increase the water storage capacity, and build and extensive water distribution system.

Currently the size of the dam measures 20 × 30 feet with a depth of 1 meter. An excavator will be hired to open it up to 50 × 70 feet a depth of 2 meters.

After excavating, vetiver grass will be planted on the banks of the dam to keep it firm and compact since its root travels many meters into the soil. After this, water plants will be introduced into the dam to prevent evaporation and also to improve aquatic life in the dam.

An irrigation system will be set up to allow many hours of watering will to be done in just 5-10 minutes, thereby giving the community enough time to engage in other activities. The main system will consist of PVC pipes running through the middle of the farm. Attached to these are the spray tubes, which run between the planting beds. A water pump will pull water from the dam and distribute it through the spray tubes to water the plants.

 
Young girl working on the farm

Through this project, students are able to learn how to grow their own food using permaculture, a method that cares for the earth, people and fair trade. At the beginning of every week the produce is harvested and shared among the schools for their meals, surplus is sold at a well-organized farmers market, and money is saved to support poor students to further their education. In addition, surplus food is donated to the orphanage and the disabled institutions.

The project accomplishes many objectives, including the development and proliferation of the permaculture technology, teaching useful skills to students, improving food security in the community, assisting in small business development, and providing humanitarian aid.

Community Organization
Call to Nature Permaculture, led by Solomon Amuzu, its Founder and Director 

Project Impact
This project will benefit more than 3,000 people.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Michael McGaskey

Monitoring and Maintenance
Michael and Solomon will supervise the construction.  The improvements will be maintained by Call to Nature Permaculture

This project is made possible through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

To donate for similar projects in West Africa, use the Donate button below.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

Girls gardening

Shallow well

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Boti Primary School Bore Hole Project - Ghana

Boti, Ghana

 

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.WC & NPC Logos

Location

Boti, Eastern Region, Ghana

Community Description
Boti is a community of just under one thousand people, though it's easy to learn most of their names.  The tight-knit community revolves around personal interactions of meal times or a calabash of palm wine. Boti parallels a two-mile stretch of the Pompom River that eventually is the source of the Boti Falls tourist attraction a few miles downstream.  The beauty of the green lush jungles is breathtaking.  Four months of the year, however, dry season comes and the Pompom turns to sand, and the jungle browns and decays.Water hole
      
The Town is the epicenter for the communities around it, hosting a primary school, junior high school and clinic for up to six surrounding villages. Many people come to Boti for its resources; however, access to clean water is not one of Boti's strengths, with only one bore hole for its residents.

Problem Addressed
Four months of the year, the problem is comparitively small.  The biggest issue that faces residents of Boti in the rainy season is pollution and contaminated water. When the Pompom flows most of the village gets their water from the river.  However all along the river as well as upstream, people wash cloths, wash themselves, and often, pollute their river with trash and human waste.  Even when the river is roaring, there isn't a safe drop to drink.  

In the dry season, there is virtually no water around.  The single borehole has long lines and often has to be left to sit to recharge before more water can be taken.  The water once taken from the Pompom for all the activities that don't involve drinking, becomes unavailable.
      
Community health and hygiene is affected.  The schools and clinics suffer particularly in the dry season as the water is needed for patient and students, and often things as simple as hand washing are ignored to conserve the water to drink.

Woman carrying waterProject Description
This project is to build a borehole near the primary school in Boti.  

The location is in the central of a heavily-populated part of town and will provide access to water for all the students in the primary school.  The project will be constructed using the most up-to- date borehole and pump technology available in Ghana.  The majority of the funds will be provided to the contractor for the classes, pipe assembly and actual digging.  

The community, will donate skilled labor to building a concrete apron around the bore hole to ensure cleanliness of the area and longevity of the bore hole. 

Project Impact
This project will benefit at least 300 people.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Topher Mongeon

Monitoring and Maintenance 
The water sanitation committee will monitor the construction of the bore hole done by the contractor.  They will help manage the process and funds, seeking assistance as needed from PC volunteers and staff.  At the end of the construction the water sanitation committee will attend basic maintenance classes to ensure the longevity of the bore hole.

Comments
The community organization involved in this project is the Boti Water Sanitation Committee.Dry well

In the Boti community, much like most communities in Ghana, men never fetch water.  Although they drink it, bathe with it, wear clean clothes and eat fufu and stew (the national cuisine), men never fetch water.  It's a woman's role.

And of the women, it's usually females of a student’s age that are fetching water.  Often times those that are older are pregnant, watching children or simply an elder.  However it is female students that carry most of the water for the community.  When the school is out of water the teacher sends the girls out of class to let girls fetch.  When they arrive home, rather than homework, the families will have girls fetch.  A bore hole will decrease time and energy devoted to fetching water and allow girls to reain in school  

PCVs live in their communities for two years.  They get to know the people, the culture and the struggle.  they eat like Ghanaians, travel like Ghanaians, sweat like Ghanaians, but they don't suffer like Ghanaians.  Peace Corps won't let them live without clean drinking water, but the kids, the elderly, the crooked backed farmers live without clean water, sometimes without water at all.  Kids look at pure water sachets (Ghana's version of bottled water) like candy or a treat, because of the rarity it is that they may be guaranteed clean water.  

Topher states that, “I joined PC to realize some of the struggle the global communities have, but to also alleviate that suffering if possible.”

This bore hole will help students learn more in school by staying healthy and not fetching water during class times.  It'll keep breastfeeding mothers healthier, it'll give women more time to spend with their children or working on small income generating activities.  It can increase small animal husbandry and micro gardens filled with veggies that families can't afford in the dry season.  It's incredible, when you think about it, how valuable one drop of water is.

This project has been made possible through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

Please use the donate button below so that we will have funds on hand for more great upcoming projects in Ghana.

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Bonkwae Well Rehab and Water System Project - Ghana

Bonkwae Well Rehab and Water System Project - Ghana

 

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location

Bonkwae WomanBonkwae, Techiman Municipal district, Brong Ahafo region, Ghana

Community Description
Bonkwae is a rural farming village in the Brong Ahafo region of Ghana.  Most people in the village are subsistence farmers or cashew cash croppers.

Problem Addressed
Within the Bonkwae community there is a shortage of clean, potable water during the dry season.  The two boreholes no longer provide enough water year-round to support the roughly 1,000 local residents. 

Many of the community members are forced to walk far distances to polluted rivers to fetch water for their family's daily water requirement. Collecting water from these sources is not only harmful due to increased waterborne diseases, but also takes away from important daily activities, such as attending school, farm, or work.  This is especially true for women and children, as they are most often required to fetch water.  The Bonkwae community has identified the lack of clean water as an immediate concern of utmost priority.

Bonkwae currently has one borehole with 3 taps, located on the southern side of the community (the community is split in half by a major highway connecting Techiman and Sunyani). A well on the northern side of the community, downhill from the village, about 800 meters from the current borehole, is in need of restoration.  It is located near a small river and has an ample water supply year round.  However, children collecting water for homes on the northern side of Bonkwae have to cross a high-speed highway to access water.

The mechanized well broke down some years ago and now the current method of accessing the water is with a rope and bucket.  The Ghanaian government originally installed the well by using community funds. Unfortunately the community does not have the resources to fix this mechanized well. 

collecting waterProject Description
The project will create a system that will bring water into the village from the unused well. This will be accomplished using a motorized pump that will bring water to a polytank located in the Bonkwae community.

A community meeting run by the chiefs and the Bonkwae WATSAN committee will be held to plan out the communal labor days, the sustainability plan and to discuss how the project will work. 

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the following construction materials: sand, cement, gravel, pump, polytank, pipes and fittings to create the pipeline for the water system. 

The community has already done the water quality test, and the water tested high quality.  The community will purchase tiles for the water set-up and in-kind labor to clear the land, survey it, set the tiles and construct the system. 

After the land is cleared by community members, the construction of the pipeline will begin.  The pipe has a diameter of 1.5 inches, and will be buried 2 feet deep. 

The construction of the pipeline will be completed by Joshua Oppong, an expert borehole plumber. He will employ local masons and laborers to assist him. The digging will be done by local community members as a common community labor practice.  

Borehole and pumpProject Impact
The project will impact 1,000 residents.

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jasmine Staff is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, who served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ghana from 2011 to 2013. She founded and runs Change the World of One (CWOO) a nonprofit organization that connects those who wish to help others and change the world with those in need, locally and globally.

Monitoring and Maintenance
Traditionally, a woman will manage the pump by collecting a small water fee (20 peswas per huge metal head-pan/bucket) and locking the taps at night or when the electricity is off. The water fee is saved and used to fund repairs and replacement parts for the borehole. She is also responsible for keeping the area clean and preventing mistreatment of the resource.
     
The Bonkwae community has a WATSAN (Water and Sanitation) Committee set up and trained by the Municipal Assembly’s Department of Water and Sanitation.  The Bonkwae WATSAN committee was trained on how to address and identify issues for the current boreholes, either by repairing or contacting professional assistance. They also have a savings account at a local bank. Money collected from the use of the current boreholes have been saved and put aside in the account in case any needs to repair the facilities were to arise. 

With the proposed project, a similar plan will ensue.  Bonkwae residents will be charged for the use of the pipeline and money saved will be added to the savings account for future collecting from the riverrepairs and maintenance. 

Additionally, the Bonkwae WATSAN committee will hire a professional to conduct water testings annually in the Bonkwae community.   Further training on how to maintain the proposed pipeline will be also be provided by the Municipal Assembly’s Dept. of Water and Sanitation. Change the World of One will provide training sessions in Twi to the WATSAN committee and the village elders to guide them in creating and implementing their sustainability plan. On-the-ground Ghanaian staff members of the nonprofit organization will check in on the project periodically, continuing sustainability trainings and receiving regular reports from Bonkwae’s WATSAN committee.

Comments
The goal of providing year-round access of clean, potable water will be achieved through the construction of this water system.   

Dollar Amount of Project
$5,600

Donations Collected to Date
$5,600

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Ghanaian womancarrying water
Road to Bonkwaethe road

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Bormase Basic School Water Catchment Project - Ghana

Bormase Basic School Water Catchment Project - GhanaLocation
Bormase, Upper Manya District, Eastern Region, Ghana

Community Description
Bormase is a small community of farmers and bead makers. There is no electricity or running water.

There are only about 5 people living in the community who have completed secondary the school. About 50 percent of the men and 90 percent of the women do not speak any English.

The road was paved in 1972 and since then has not had any substantial maintenance work done on it. It is very deteriorated, and thus extension officers, nurses, and other outside resources, are reluctant to come. It can take 3 hours or more to wait for a car to fill to come to the community.

The farmers grow mostly maize and cassava, with some yam, coco and plantains to supplement their diet. Cassava and maize are the two cash crops. The cassava is processed into gari, which is a fried cassava powder, a cheap staple food all over Ghana.

Bormase Basic School serves three communities, with a total population of under 400 residents. The large majority of school-going children, up to form six, attend the school. The population is typically around 150 students, with children ranging from five years to fifteen. The school is one of the pilot programs for the Ghana School Feeding Program.

Bormase Basic School Water Catchment Project - GhanaProblem Addressed
The only source of potable water is a borehole a quarter of a mile down the main road. This causes considerable traffic at the borehole.

Currently, students go to the borehole in the morning, meaning their classes are typically delayed up to an hour. Also, they do not wash their hands before meals and are reluctant to use their drinking water for this purpose.

Project Description
This project is to install a rainwater catchment system and 3 handwashing stations at the school.

The system will consist of a polytank, a gutter system, a block platform for the tank, and three buckets with spouts for use by the students. The tank will be used to keep the barrels filled and the garden watered.

A polytank is a large water tank made out of a very durable plastic that is very commonly used in Ghana. A 2,500 liter tank will be purchased in the regional capital, Koforidua, an hour and a half from Bormase, and transported by hired truck. The polytank has a faucet at the base to draw off water.

The stand will be built of cement blocks and earth. It will be circular about the size of the polytank itself. Inside the wall of cement blocks will be filled in with earth and then leveled off to support the tank. The stand will be about 2-3 feet, with enough space below the faucet on the take to allow for a small bucket. Cement will be used for a runoff area underneath the faucet.

The tank will be in front of the school, just under the point where two perpendicular roofs converge. The water will be used for drinking by the children and to water the garden. The garden will grow tomatoes, okra, peppers, carrots, and other vegetables that aren't normally grown in the area. This is part of an effort to educate children about farming possibilities.

Bormase Basic School Water Catchment Project - GhanaThe gutters will be attached by hangers attached to the roof, meeting at the convergence of the roofs so that water will drain directly into the polytank.

Each handwashing bucket consist of a 50-liter bucket with a spout attached to the bottom. Three buckets will be purchased from Koforidua. Two will be placed near the area where the children are fed and the other will be placed just outside the latrine.

The older children will fill the handwashing buckets daily. The teachers will ultimately be responsible for the buckets, and will ensure they are locked inside the school office at the end of each day.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the polytank, cement, gutters, hangers, and 3 handwashing buckets, and for transport of the materials.

Labor to build the base and install the tank and gutters will be donated by the community. The water, health, and sanitation officer for the area will oversee the installation.

The community will maintain a supply of soap, and has already donated enough soap to last for a few months.

Water barrels will be purchased with community-donated funds and placed in the garden.

Project Impact
150 students will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Joseph Stein

Comments
This is an important infrastructure project for the school. It will decrease the amount of time and effort needed to retrieve potable water, and provide sufficient water to maintain the garden.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555

Donations Collected to Date
$555

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been fully funded.

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Funds Needed : 
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Sefwi-Bonwire School Rainwater Harvesting Project - Ghana

Sefwi-Bonwire School Rainwater Harvesting Project - GhanaLocation
Sefwi-Bonwire, Akontombra District, Western Region, Ghana

Community Description
Sefwi-Bonwire is a small community of approximately 600. It is a cocoa-farming community that comes from the kente-weaving town of Bonwire in the Ashanti region. The town has one borehole, as well as some nearby, non-flowing, streams. The town was wired for electricity in December 2012.

The town is beginning a latrine project, in which 15 household latrines with handwashing stations will be constructed. Through that, a reinstated WATSAN committee will start a campaign to encourage handwashing throughout the town.

There is currently a primary school and a junior high school in town, both on the same plot of land. There are two open-air public latrines and six household toilets, four of which are in teacher quarters.

Sefwi-Bonwire School Rainwater Harvesting Project - Ghana500 students, many of whom come from neighboring towns, attend the two schools.

Students currently spend at least 30 minutes each morning collecting water from the borehole to bring to the school for drinking throughout the day.

Project Description
This project is to build a rainwater harvesting system and handwashing station at the site shared by the primary and junior high schools.

Under the direction of the Sefwi-Bonwire PTA, the project will result in a poly tank with gutters to collect rainwater and an attached spout, to be used as a handwashing station for both schools.

The gutters will be attached to the side of the roof and then additional gutters will be attached on one end to angle them into the poly tank.

Sefwi-Bonwire School Rainwater Harvesting Project - GhanaThe platform for the tank will be built on a round structure of bricks with a cement covering.

A soak-away pit will be dug beneath the faucet for runoff.

Masons in the town will assemble the structure and the gutters.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the tank, faucet, and cement. Any additional funding will be covered by the school.

The joint PTA will fund the sand, gutters, piping and fittings.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Gayle Robinson

Comments
This is an excellent infrastructure project to provide for the water and hygiene needs of the schools

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation with the help of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Gayle Robinson.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Gayle of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Gayle and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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