The Gambia

St. Matthew's School Water Project - The Gambia

St. Matthew's School Water Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

St. Matthew's School Water Project - The GambiaLocation
St. Matthew's Basic Cycle School, Kaimoh (aka Kayimu), Western Region, The Gambia

Community Description
St. Matthew's School is the only Basic Cycle School in the area around Kayimu (Kaimoh) village, which is due south of Sibanor and less than 1/2 mile from the border with Senegal in the Western Region of The Gambia. GambiaRising's Community Coordinator Isatou Camara, is a teacher at the school, which draws students from a number of surrounding communities. In 2016, GambiaRising funded a donkey cart school bus from Kayenga village to transport a crippled student, and a half dozen new students, too small to walk the distance to school, who were also enrolled.

The school now has 281 students and 16 teachers.

Problem Addressed
The school participates in the World Food Programme's school lunch program but in recent years that program consists largely of donated rice, and the school strives to supplement the lunch with fresh vegetables and fruit. Nearly 20 years ago, an excellent well and garden was designed, providing drinking and washing water for the school, and with excess water designed to flow down into the garden.

St. Matthew's School Water Project - The GambiaOver the years, the garden fence has fallen into disrepair. Although the school has attempted to shore it up with fallen branches and twigs, goats still frequently find a way in.

The school was "managing" until recently, when the hand-pump stopped working. Teachers and village women are now carrying water from the village well to water plants in the garden, but the school itself has no source of water.

Project Description
The project has four parts:

1) Repair of the hand pump - a professional will be brought in to repair the Mark II pump mechanism. The community will build bricks to repair the wall around the pump. The water will be used for all school purposes, and to irrigate the garden.

2) Replacement of the garden fence, with sturdier materials, while also expanding the size of the garden - New fencing material will be purchased, and a new fence will be built, expanding the size of the garden while making it goat-proof again. All labor for this will be donated by the community.

3) Installing handwashing stations - 2 handwashing stations will be installed, consisting of barrels with spigots. These will be periodically filled with water from the pump.

St. Matthew's School Water Project - The Gambia4) The school has 6 latrine toilets and 4 ill-conceived flush toilets, with no water connection, installed many years ago. Buckets and cups will be purchased for each toilet so that students can clean themselves and when appropriate, manually flush the toilet with water from the bucket.

Project Impact
297 students and teachers at the school will benefit from the project.

Project Administrator
Mike McConnell, Managing Trustee, GambiaRising, and Former Country Director for Peace Corps in The Gambia from 2007 through 2009, is leading the project.

Mike previously directed the Fula Bantang Senior Secondary School Well Project - The Gambia and the Njie Kunda Latrine Project - The Gambia

Monitoring and Maintenance
GambiaRising's Community Coordinator, Isatou Camara, lives and teaches at the school.

Isatou's husband, Kebba Sanyang, is GambiaRising's Up Country Program Coordinator and will oversee the project as well (Although Mr. Sanyang works further up country in Fula Bantang, his family home is near Sibanor, and he visits St. Matthew's often.

Mike McConnell, GambiaRising's Managing Trustee, visits The Gambia regularly, and will ensure that the improvements are properly used and maintained.

Let Girls Learn
Of the 281 students at the school, 143 are girls. Eight of the school's 16 teachers are women, as is the Principal. This project will restore the water supply, allow the garden to thrive, and maintain proper sanitation and hygiene, all of which contribute toward making it easier for girls to spend time on their studies and remain in school.

This project has been funded by an anonymous donor. Please choose from among the many other projects that need your support.

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Upper Fulladu District Water Extension Project - The Gambia

Upper Fulladu District Water Extension Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Upper Fulladu District Water Extension Project - The GambiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxx, Upper Fulladu District, Central River Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Xxxxxx is located in the Upper Fulladu West district of the Central River Region of The Gambia on the west coast of Africa. The village is ethnically Fula, with a couple of Wolof and Mandinka tribe compounds. The village has 20 compounds, about 26 tax-paying households, with a population between 250-400 depending on the time of year.

The major income generation comes from farming season, between the months of June to January, with all members of the household being extensively involved in all stages of agriculture from preparing the fields to harvesting. The majority of farmers employ subsistence-farming techniques with no modern equipment, and the scant surplus of crop that is not used for sustenance is usually sold for a small profit.

Xxxxxx has a large basic cycle school (early development care or nursery school through grade nine). The school services students from villages up to 5 kilometers away, and employs about 30 staff including administration, teachers, cooking, cleaning, and laundering staff, security, and local food vendors.

Upper Fulladu District Water Extension Project - The GambiaProblem Addressed
The only clean water source in Xxxxxx is a closed hand pump in the center of the village. However, it is also a popular clean water source for many people living outside the village, frequented by workers at the Bansang Hospital and Regional Health Team, students from the Sololo Basic Cycle School, and Bansang locals. All these groups have expressed that the water in Xxxxxx is the best quality and worth the few kilometers just to fill up a couple of bidongs (local plastic water jugs). Pickup trucks and ambulances come daily to fill up a few bidongs for drinking water.

For this reason, community members spend a lot of time waiting to fetch water for their own compounds and families. At peak hours in the early morning and late afternoon, women often wait to pump water for up to 30 minutes to fetch a small bucket, not nearly enough water to cook, clean, and launder for a whole family.

Additionally, during the PCV baseline health survey of the village, people expressed that environmental sanitation and malaria were prevalent health problems facing the village. Only 1/20 compounds contained a tippy tap or pre-made hand washing station and upon observation, and only 4/20 male heads of compounds could list the four critical hand washing.

The local community health nurse works mostly with primary healthcare (PHC) villages, larger villages of more than 30 compounds that have a health clinic in the vicinity, and often small non-PHC villages such as Xxxxxx are neglected.

Project Description
This project is to extend the only current closed pump in the village of Sololo through an extensive pipe network to new taps in various locations around the village.

Water will be pumped from the current well to a 4,000 L above-ground water tank and distributed throughout the village through a pipeline network that will exit through taps closer to compounds on the outskirts of the village.

Able bodied men and members of the youth group will help with the manual labor part of the project, which will be factored into their contribution.

Once the taps are constructed, the water committee and compounds immediately surrounding the taps will attend two meetings: (1) a training implemented by Water Point, a local Public Health Officer, and the PCV on tap usage, and (2) a training for the compound heads to work on a system of payments for their local tap.

Upper Fulladu District Water Extension Project - The GambiaAfter the construction of the tap system, the construction of a health corner, to serve as an educational center, will begin. A health mural will be painted on a wall facing the center of the village, and the station will be properly fenced to keep out livestock and reduce the amount of standing water.

Once all construction and labor has finished, the committees (VDC, water, youth) will have monthly meetings to continue the development of the village.

Project Impact
1,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
B. Hu

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV and counterparts will use the project logic model of intervention to monitor the implementation of the project activities and to track project performance. Similarly, the model will be used to evaluate the immediate outcomes (impacts) of the project as well as the long-term impact whether the intervention has achieved the expected objectives and goal of the project. The PCV and counterparts will use Peace Corps water, sanitation, and hygiene data collection tools to collect the relevant figures during the project implementation.

Comments
The specific objectives of this project include contributing toward improved access to education for girls in the community, improving health care status of members of the community, and improving health care knowledge of the members of the community. This project will impact all members of the village and members of the greater community, who travel lengthy kilometers to pump drinking water.

Let Girls Learn
This project qualifies as a Let Girls Learn project because it reduces the burden on girls to collect water, thereby making it easier for them to remain in school. It is a part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide

The Water Charity participation in this project has been funded by an anonymous donor.

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Njie Kunda Latrine Project - The Gambia

Njie Kunda Latrine Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Njie Kunda Latrine Project - The GambiaLocation
Njie Kunda, Fulladu West, Central River Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Until 2015, there was no school in Njie Kunda and parents felt that the nearest Lower Basic Cycle School, in Fula Bantang, was too far for young children to walk to school.

In 2015, the alkalo of the village provided GambiaRising with a list of more than 100 children from Njie Kunda, Sinchu Sambuldu, and Sinch Yerro villages who were not in school, along with a map of the land the village had set aside for a school. If GambiaRising could provide the materials (corrugate, cement, wood for roof frames, benches, blackboards), the community would build itself a two-classroom school.

In September, 2015, the school opened with two Nursery classes (Nursery 1 and Nursery 2) and two 1st grade classes. Already, it was in double shift. A total of 114 students were enrolled; 50 boys and 64 girls. The school hoped to add a 2nd grade and 3rd grade, after which students would be able to walk to Fula Bantang, where there are schools going all the way to 12th grade. In September, the 2nd grade was added, and the school's enrollment swelled to 176.

Njie Kunda Latrine Project - The GambiaProblem Addressed
While there is a village well not far from the school, there are no toilets. With 176 students currently enrolled, and plans to add a third grade next year, this is not acceptable. The school has erected a screen for partial privacy but only boys use it and students need to go to "the bush" when they need to relieve themselves.

Project Description
This project is to build three girls' pit latrine toilets and two boys' pit latrine toilets for the school. These will be located above two different pits, separated by 5 meters, for privacy.

Two handwashing stations, consisting of a stand and a water barrel with a spigot, will be located between and close to both toilet facilities.

Community members will dig the pits, mold bricks from local materials, strengthened with cement, and build the holding tanks and the houses for the toilets. They have already demonstrated that they are motivated and capable, having built the school itself in 2015.

Project Impact
181 people will benefit from the project, consisting of 176 students and 5 teachers.

Njie Kunda Latrine Project - The GambiaProject Administrator
Mike McConnell, Managing Trustee, GambiaRising, and Former Country Director for Peace Corps in The Gambia from 2007 through 2009.

Mike previously directed the Fula Bantang Senior Secondary School Well Project - The Gambia

Monitoring and Maintenance
The UpCountry Program Coordinator for GambiaRising, Kebba Sanyang, is the Principal of St. Therese's Basic Cycle and Senior Secondary Schools in nearby Fula Bantang. He has worked with the community before and oversaw the construction of the school in 2015.

Mike will oversee the project, and verify that the facilities are being used correctly and kept in the proper repair during his frequent visits to the school.

Let Girls Learn
Of the 176 students enrolled currently at Njie Kunda Lower Basic Cycle School, 106 are girls. The addition of latrines will make it easier for the girls to remain in school. While this is not an official Let Girls Learn project, it carries with it the same attributes, providing for the sanitation and hygiene needs of girls. Therefore, we designate it a Let Girls Learn + project.

This project is part of our ongoing Western Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

This project has been made possible through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

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Chissey Majaw Pump Project - The Gambia

Chissey Majaw Pump Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Chissey Majaw Pump Project - The GambiaLocation
Chissey Majaw, Jokadu, North Bank, The Gambia

Community Description
Chissey Majaw is located in the Jokadu region of The Gambia’s North Bank. The village is ethnically Wolof, along with Fula and Bambara constituents. The village has 54 compounds with a population of approximately 1,100.

Farming is the main source of income for all compounds, with groundnut being the main cash crop and coos being the staple crop. In The Gambia, the farming season extends from June to January, with all members of the household being extensively involved in all stages of agriculture from preparing the fields to harvesting. The majority of farmers employ subsistence farming methods with little or no modern equipment and the scant surplus of crop that is not used for sustenance is usually sold for a small profit.

Chissey Majaw has a lower basic school, which consists of EDC (Early Child Development) through grades six. The lower basic school serves Chissey Majaw as well as the neighboring villages of Tallen and Drammeh Joka.

Chissey Majaw Pump Project - The GambiaProblem Addressed
Presently, Chissey Majaw’s sole source of clean water is a borehole and tap system. Taps are placed at strategic points throughout the village, providing all compounds with a nearby water source. However, the borehole’s functionality is a problem. Last year, due to a variety of reasons, the borehole was only functional approximately 60% of the time. Especially during the dry season, the borehole tends to be problematic.

With a less than optimum supply of water, lines and waits for the tap become extremely long. Most compounds resort to drawing water from the village’s only other source of water, the open well. This decreased supply of water has the largest effect on the female population of Chissey Majaw. Since fetching water is primarily a female chore, many girls spend an inordinate amount of time waiting to fetch water – time that could be better used at school, studying, or performing other chores.

Furthermore, the increased use of the open well has increased the frequency of diarrhea in the village. Out of 26 compounds surveyed, 23 reported that their children suffered from diarrhea in the past three months. Reports from the local health post confirm that diarrhea is the most prominent affliction in the village.

Other than the borehole, Chissey Majaw has two non-functioning F.R.G.-era hand pumps. In the past, the village has been vigilant in its maintenance of the pumps. However, the pumps were malfunctioning at a rate that placed a large economic burden on the village. Furthermore, the provider of the F.R.G. pumps went out of business, making parts for repair difficult to find. The village has done its best to remedy the water situation. However, it can no longer find the necessary parts to fix the existing hand pumps.

Chissey Majaw Pump Project - The GambiaProject Description
This project is to install two new pumps in the village. This project will contract with Swe-Gam, a company with extensive water project experience, to replace the two outdated handpumps with the more modern BluePumps. A representative of Swe-Gam has visited the village and surveyed the wells. Water Charity has extensive experience in The Gambia, working with Swe-Gam on the installation of BluePumps.

Both wells are 36 meters deep and have their own aquifers - separate of each other and the borehole. It will not be necessary to re-dig the wells for the pumps; the contractor will simply replace the machinery, including pipes and pumping mechanisms, with the Blue Pump machinery.

The Peace Corps Volunteer (PCV) and his counterpart will facilitate a water committee training held by the neighboring village of Fas Omar Saho. 6 community members will be chosen to from Chissey Majaw’s water committee and receive training from select committee members of Fas Omar Saho. Fas Omar Saho is a neighboring village whose water committee has been noted for its efficiency and production - a model for water management. Chissey Majaw already has a fund for maintaining its borehole. However, this training will educate its water committee on incorporating the BluePumps into its water management methodology. The goal of this training is to strengthen the community’s water management capacity for ensuring the sustainability of the village’s clean water.

Upon completion of construction, PCV and counterpart will hold a training teaching Village Support Group members proper clean water practices.

Chissey Majaw Pump Project - The GambiaProject Impact
1,100 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
K. Hamzah Ahmed

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV and counterpart will use the project logic model of intervention to monitor the implementation of the project activities and to track project performance. Similarly, the model will be used to evaluate the immediate outcomes (impacts) of the project as well as the long-term impact whether the intervention has achieved the expected objectives and goal of the project.

PCV and counterpart will use Peace Corps water, sanitation, and hygiene data collection tools to collect the relevant figures during the project implementation. Sustainability of a clean water supply is the goal of this project.

A sub-committee for water system management was established under the village development committee and shall be responsible for monitoring the operations of the newly constructed BluePumps and existing water supply system. The management team will be trained on basic maintenance procedures to reduce the cost of the routine maintenance of the water system (borehole system and hand pumps).

There is already a system maintenance fund in place, with every compound head contributing 300 dalasi yearly and every married couple contributing 100 dalasi yearly. By following this model, the village has already accrued 60,000 dalasi for the maintenance of its water system.

The PCV and the counterpart will further train the water committee members on basic financial administration and management procedures to ensure financial records are up to date and funds are available to pay for routine maintenance cost at all times

Let Girls Learn
This project qualifies as a Let Girls Learn project because the goal is to reduce the spread of infectious diseases through utilization of clean water, improved hand hygiene, and sanitation. Project objectives include:

(1) Improved access to clean and quality water sources to the current borehole water system by creating a reliable, clean source of water, accessible throughout the year for the village,

(2) Improved access of quality education for girls through an improved water facility, and

(3) Improved the lower basic school’s garden projects through improved access to water to increase additional nutrition vegetables for the children.

Fundraising Target
$3,900

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$3,900

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been funded through the generosity of Thomas Black.

Additional donations will be allocated to other projects in The Gambia.

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Bantunding Water System Project - The Gambia

Bantunding Water System Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Bantunding Water System Project - The GambiaLocation
Bantunding, Wuli East, Upper River Region, The Gambia

Community Description
Bantunding is a village located in the Wuli East District of the Upper River Region in The Gambia. The population is approximately 1,500, with currently 65 compounds. Its inhabitants are all from the ethnic group, Mandinka, and farming is the main source of livelihood.

The agricultural system is based on subsistence methods with limited use of modern technology and family farming major practices in this community. Groundnut is the main cash crop and coos, and rice are the major staple crops. The Gambia has a six-month farming season (the first three months include their rainy season) where the entire family assists in preparing the fields, planting, growing, and harvesting their crops. Every family in the village owns farms and participates in the process. Their farms are mainly sustenance, with the sparse surplus being sold for a profit.

Bantunding has a two-classroom lower basic school with Grades 1-3. This year they began an Early Childhood Development Class (ECD) in a straw hut with more than 50 kids coming per day.

Bantunding Water System Project - The GambiaThe neighboring village, Baja Kunda, has a full basic cycle school and senior secondary school (Grades 1-12). The school is about four kilometers away, and by the time the students reach Grade 9, it is approximately the ratio of three boys to one girl. The girls often drop out of school earlier to stay to help their mothers at home, and get married. Of the 22 compounds surveyed, there was an average of 18 children per compound and 4.3 women of child-bearing age.

Problem Addressed
Bantunding has only one clean source of water, a hand pump located in a corner of the town, with the farthest compound a quarter mile away.

Since there is only one source of clean water, and its location is inconvenient, this result in at least 1/3 of the compounds are drinking out of open wells or inconsistently using the hand pump. Since drawing water is mainly a girls’ chore, there is a lot of time spent waiting to draw water, when they could be using the time to be in school, studying, or completing other chores.

Another problem is the high frequency of diarrhea in village. In an initial study, 20 out 22 compounds stated that their children had diarrhea in the past three months. The information collected from the nearby Health Center l (4 km away) also confirmed that the top three health concerns among kids from Bantunding were: diarrhea, malnutrition and malaria.

Bantunding Water System Project - The GambiaProject Description
This project is to complete the work implemented by the community and already underway to drill a borehole, install a pump, powered by 6 solar panels, and build a piping system, with 15 taps.

The main components of the project activities include: digging a borehole using modern equipment, installing 6 solar panels that will run the pump to draw water up, adding two 2,000-liter water tanks for storage, and laying pipe to connect 15 taps at major junctions throughout the village.

Through subscriptions and donations from relatives working abroad and in other areas of the country, Bantunding has raised over $6,000 USD for the project. The funds were used to dig the borehole and lay 660 meters of pipe for the network, and install seven taps to be connected to the tanks.

The BajaKunda Ward Development Program gave $5,000.00 USD of the 2014 and 2015 tax revenue to aid this project. The village is providing all unskilled labor from their men.

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the following: (i) to complete 660-meter pipe network (ii) to purchase and fix seven additional taps, (iii) to set up the solar panels, (iv) to erect and install the water tanks, and (v) to complete the system by adding in the pump.

The PCV and her counterpart will conduct water hygiene and quality management training for the community members, and water committee members will be trained on institutional management, resource mobilization and management as well as basic maintenance of the water system by the Regional Water Resources team base in the Regional capital (Basse) to enhance sustainability of this project beyond the grant life cycle.

The PCV and her counterpart will be working with Village Development Committee (VDC). A village base Community Base Organization legally registered to facilitate and manage local development activities of Bantunding. This body has led the design of the project, will facilitate the implementation of the project activities as well as manage the operation and maintenance of the project.

The VDC, headed by the Chairman, will serve as the contracting authority for the contract to deliver the project. Similarly, the VDC will be responsible for mobilizing both local and external resources to successfully execute the project activities, as well ensuring the sustainability of the project after the grant funding.

Project Impact
1,500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Alicia Vander Wal

Monitoring and Maintenance
The PCV and counterpart will continually monitor the implementation of the project activities to ensure the design is being followed correctly. They will also use data provided by the school and the nearby hospital, as well as Peace Corps’ own collection tools, to monitor whether the project and planned interventions are meeting the short-term and long-term outcomes of this project.

The PCV, counterpart, and community health nurse (CHN), will conduct teachings at the school and different groups of the community, as well as going compound-to-compound as necessary, to provide education regarding safe water storage vessels, hand hygiene, and how to prevent diarrheal diseases.

The water committee will be trained, with the help of the contractor, as well as Regional Water Resources team, on maintaining the tap system, collecting monthly dues from the compound, and possibly extending the project as deemed necessary. The committee will also be trained by the PCV and counterpart on basic financial record keeping to ensure fees are being paid, funds are available, cost of repairs, and that the committee is being accountable with the money.

Comments
Project objectives include: i) improved health of children, especially school-aged and those under five, due to a decrease in diarrheal diseases, ii) decrease in rates of diarrheal diseases based on education provided regarding handwashing and proper water storage vessels.

Expected outcomes include but are not limited to: i) a decrease in time spent collecting water by women and girls ii) increase in time spent studying and attending school for the girls iii) improved school attendance rates due to less sick days taken.

Let Girls Learn
This project qualifies as an official Let Girls Learn project, as it provides resources that accrue to the benefit of adolescent girls. As they are largely relieved of the arduous and time-consuming responsibility of waiting at the single nearby location or retrieving water from distant locations each day, they are able to attend and remain in school.

Fundraising Target
$4,100

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$470

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$3,630

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Boiram Borehole and Water System Project - The Gambia

Boiram Borehole and Water System Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
Boiram, The Gambia

Boiram Borehole and Water System Project - The GambiaCommunity Description
The country of The Gambia, which surrounds The River Gambia, has a population of 1,882,450 people. Of the five regions, the Janjangbureg region in Central River Region and the Basse Local Government Area in the Upper River Region, have the poorest rating on social indicators in comparison to the other regions. Much of UNICEF’s area-based interventions are focused in these two regions, with a view to closing the equity gap between the more privileged and most vulnerable.

Boiram, which is 20 km from the city of Janjangbureh, is a 4,000-5,000-person village located in the CRR region of The Gambia. It is an agricultural-based community whose primary source of income includes farming (rice, coos, peanut, and corn) and the peanut trade industry. It is involved in many outreaching programs including: VDC (village development Committee), VSG (village support group), PTA (Parent Teacher Association), NANA (National Nutrition Agency) applicant and many more agricultural based committees.

The school located within the village is a basic cycle school (up to grade nine) and serves the neighboring 5 villages. Currently there is a CHN (community health nurse) who lives in Boiram and serves the neighboring villages (up to 10 km).

The village consists of 160 compounds. There has been a 68.8 % increase population in the last year and a half, which has limited the water supply tremendously. This has caused countless village conflicts regarding water usage, school absences, and increased parasitical disease rates resulting from intake of open well water.

Boiram Borehole and Water System Project - The GambiaProblem Addressed
There is high mortality rate for children under five, and only 32% of households have an improved drinking water source on their premises.

The use of unprotected wells for drinking water is common in the predominantly rural areas, at 21.8% and is highest in the Janjanbureh Local Government Area (LGA), situated in the Central River Region, with about 30%. In terms of sanitation, 40% do not have access to sanitation.

Boiram is located in the Central River Region and is facing continuous village expansion. In addition to high child diarrhea rates, women bear the burden of the shortage of water. From 2-5 in the afternoon, 80% of the taps open.

Each woman is allotted two 20-liter water units and spends every minute at the tap so as not to miss her turn and lose her opportunity at a day’s clean water supply. This impairs school attendance for young girls who must help carry water, interpersonal relationships, and prospects for financial stability.

Project Description
This project is to build a borehole and install a piping system for Boiram village.

Modern borehole drilling technology and equipment will be used to drill the borehole, and solar power will serve as the main source of energy to pump water.

With the support of the PCV the community will hire a competent and qualified water engineering company to deliver the project. Upon signing the contract, the contractor will start drilling the borehole, to a depth of about 50 meters, within 7 days, supply the solar panels and connect the borehole to the existing 100,000-liter tank, as well as extend the pipe network to provide an additional 6 taps.

Boiram Borehole and Water System Project - The GambiaThe PCV, counterparts and staff from Department of Water Resources in CRR will train 10 water committee members on water hygiene, sanitation, basic water system maintenance and management of the solar panels.

Through the support of the PCV and counterpart the committee members will turn in train 36 community cluster representatives.

Water Charity funds will be used to pay for the mobilization cost of the machinery to drill the borehole, provide antisol, casing, and screen for the borehole, as well as pay for the digging of trench for borehole housing, installation of a new submersible pump: (Grundfos Pump SQ flex DC/AC Pump), construction of the solar support structure, and installation of 8 solar panels with all necessary cables and connections.

Currently, 23 stand taps are in the community and this will be increased to 29 through this project.

Project Impact
5,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Cameron Hatlevig

Monitoring and Maintenance
A two-day intensive water system management and facility maintenance training to strengthen the local community members’ capacities in order to ensure sustainability of the project.

After construction is completed, a 1-dalasi monthly payment will be collected from each user by the water committee. Under the responsibility of the village secretary, funds will be deposited into a bank account, so that there will be funds available when needed for maintenance, repairs, and expansion.

Let Girls Learn
This project is a Peace Corps Let Girls Learn Project.

Countless young women wait hours for their chance to draw water. Since women predominately secure drinking water and bathing water, they are the ones who are being forced to sacrifice their time and energy. This project, to make water readily available, increases their ability to go to and remain in school.

Comments
This project will provide for an increased water capacity for the entire village, doubling the water supply, and allowing women to fetch water twice a day and for longer periods of time.

The project will improve the overall health of the village and will serve to empower women. Fiscal responsibility, fundraising, budgeting, community based project management, proper handling and treatment of water, as well as management of a solar water facility will also be improved.

Fundraising Target
$5,000

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$0

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,000

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Boiram Borehole and Water System Project - The GambiaBoiram Borehole and Water System Project - The Gambia

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Fula Bantang Senior Secondary School Well Project - The Gambia

Fula Bantang Senior Secondary School Well Project - The Gambia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION, in cooperation with GambiaRising.

Fula Bantang Senior Secondary School Well Project - The GambiaLocation
Fula Bantang, The Gambia

Community Description
Fula Bantang is a rural Fula community where most its members are farmers and cow herders, and have little income otherwise. The community has received assistance from the Catholic Education Secretariat in the form of a clinic and a basic cycle school built within the village.

Education is important to many of the members of Fula Bantang, but in many peoples' minds it is still second to farming. This is due to the immediate benefits that farming provides. It is not uncommon for students to be pulled out of school for a time to help their families on the farms.

Due to the rural nature of the village and surrounding villages, tradition holds very strong. Women tend to be married off at a young age (often before finishing school). Due to the lack of a close senior secondary school, it is not uncommon for boys to be sent off to continue their education after grade nine while their sisters stay in the village or get married off.

The community where this project is to take place is composed of Fula Bantang as well as surrounding villages, with potential that this project will support students from all over the country as the secondary school grows and expands.

GambiaRising is a small, committed team of Gambians and Americans working to make it possible for deserving Gambian students to stay in school. The community realized the need for a senior secondary school, and has been working together with GambiaRising to build the school.

Problem Addressed
There is no source of water at the school. The school has very limited funding because in The Gambia, schools’ funding comes from the national level. At that level, most of the development money comes from grants and from NGOs whose resources are limited. The rural communities do not have the funds to assist.

There is clean water available to the village in the form of a tap system. Unfortunately, this water is only accessible from one solar pump, where access is limited to three hours each day because of lack of capacity.

Fula Bantang Senior Secondary School Well Project - The GambiaProject Description
This project is to build a well at the secondary school.

The well will have a Mark II hand pump as well as a solar pump to provide for the needs of the school and the surrounding community

The water will be used for drinking, cooking, sanitation, and hygiene, as well as to irrigate the school gardens and farms.

The water table is 13 m deep and the driller has provided assurance that the water will be reached, as well as a guarantee that the well will last for over forty years. The well will be lined with concrete rings, and sealed to excluded contaminants.

Construction of the school was started in the old Fula Bantang football field next to the clinic, under the direction of Kebba Sanyang (the school’s head teacher), Raphael Jawo (a community member and teacher), and Musa Mballow (a community member and head of the school management committee).

Workers from the local communities were hired to build the school. These same workers will also build the well.

The steps for completing the well are as follows:

  • Have a community meeting to inform the community about the construction and to take community members’ input on the planning of the project
  • Identify a contractor for the project
  • Identify the most suitable site for the well on the campus
  • Purchase the required materials
  • Commence work on the well
  • Monitoring and supervision of the construction, done by officials from CES (Catholic Education Secretariat) as well as selected community leaders
  • Hand over the project
  • Establish a water committee from students at the school.

Throughout construction, day and night watchmen will be employed to look after all the materials and equipment belonging to the school.

Water Charity and GambiaRising are jointly funding this project, with Water Charity funds used for the building of the well and installation of the hand pump, and GambiaRising funds used for construction of the solar pump.

Project Impact
More than 1,000 people will benefit from the project, including students, community members, teachers, and clinic workers.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Tim Solfest, Peace Corps Volunteer

Mike McConnell, Managing Trustee, GambiaRising, and Former Country Director for Peace Corps in The Gambia from 2007 through 2009. 

Monitoring and Maintenance
After construction, the well will be consistently monitored and maintained by members of the school, including the watchmen.

Comments
This project falls under the Water Charity Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide. The designation is given to projects with the objectives of, and in the spirit of, the Peace Corps Let Girls Learn program.

The project will provide the only source of water for the school. In addition, it will provide members of the community with another source of water that is closer for some compounds, and will lessen the amount of time women spend carrying water to and from the well as well as waiting their turn to fill their buckets.

The well will also make water available to the St. Lazarus Clinic, located next-door. All women from Fula Bantang and surrounding communities who are pregnant or have young children come to the clinic, which is the site of monthly health clinics.

This project is part of our ongoing  Western Africa Water & Sanitation Program.

This project has been made possible through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

This project has been completed. To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Fula Bantang Senior Secondary School Well Project - The GambiaFula Bantang Senior Secondary School Well Project - The Gambia

 

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Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program – Phase 3 - The Gambia

Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program – Phase 3 - The Gambia
NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is made possible through the collaboration of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.
 
Location
Niamina Dankunku, Niamina East, and Niamina West Districts, Central River Region--South, The Gambia
 
Community Description
Remote, rural villages are all struggling with clean water access and related health issues due to breaking and broken handpumps.
 

Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program – Phase 3 - The Gambia

Problem Addressed
Many of these rural villages struggle with clean water access. For numerous communities, the government installed handpumps in the 1990s.  However, due to low capacity to maintain or repair these pumps, many of them are breaking and broken. This leaves women and girls, those traditionally responsible for collecting water, with little choice but to walk farther in search of working water points.
 
However, some communities have no option but to resort to pulling out broken pumps and turning protected wells into open wells.  Villagers using ropes and buckets to draw water are at high risk of contaminating their water sources and spreading debilitating waterborne diseases like dysentery and diarrhea.
 
In addition, when pumps are dismantled, handpump components commonly go missing or are stolen and concrete slabs are broken and damaged, leaving no possibility of fixing them. Similarly, some villages have never benefited from drinking from protected wells, and instead have relied on open wells for generations.  Locally dug open wells are not only sources of dirty water, but also physically unsafe and pose a safety hazard for the very children and women who use them. 
 
Project Description
This project seeks to replace 1 aging Mark II handpump and completely rehabilitate four malfunctioning or defunct Mark II water points with new robust and durable Bluepumps, in a total of four villages (Sare Sambel, Sare Bakary, Kalikajara, and Dankunku). Moreover, this project also seeks to repair two broken Mark II handpumps in Fula Kunda, a fifth village.

Project in DKK

 
Without these immediate replacements/repairs, communities are either under constant threaten of their pumps failing at any time, or are currently forced to walk further to find clean water sources or simply to drink out of dirty, open wells. Through these timely rehabilitations, we seek to replace dilapidated, and outdated water infrastructure with more sustainable, preferential options; restore clean water points/eliminate dependence on dirty water sources; and where limited by funds, perform quality repairs to extend the life of old Mark II pumps until replacement by Bluepumps is possible. 
 
Project Impact
Through a “hub and spokes” approach, this project will rehabilitate pumps at both a central, hub—the Dankunku District Health Center—as well as 4 underserved, remote satellite villages. Combined, these pump works will benefit approximately 2,800 direct beneficiaries. Indirectly, the more than 26 villages that rely on the District Health Center (patients from outside Dankunku District are often referred to this health center) will also benefit.
 

Installation FK

A short description of each community is below:
 
Sare Sambel is a small, ethnic Fula village of 150 people from 6 compounds. They have a working German Mark II handpump that we serviced with new moving parts in 2013. However, this pump is the village’s sole source of clean water. It can break at any time, and the closest village with a clean water source is at least a 30 minute walk away.  We aim to replace their old Mark II with a new and long-lasting Bluepump.
 
 
Sare Bakary is a community of approximately 200 people from 7 compounds. They have a newer GWE Mark II cylinder that is malfunctioning. The low weight of the rods (due to the shallow depth of the well) and the tight tension in the rod plunger mean that the pumping action brings very little water.  The community has an open well which they have resort to drink from, as well as 3 weak, small-volume piston pumps, but neither provide the volume or quality needed to meet the village’s demands. The nearby village of Choya has a solar borehole and tap stand system as well as a functioning Bluepump, but due to poor inter-village relations, the sharing of these resources with Sare Bakary is not possible. We seek to replace Sare Bakary’s problematic Mark II pump with a new Bluepump to provide the community with a durable solution to their water needs.
 
Kalikajara is a village of 117 people from 12 compounds. They had two handpumps installed 19 years ago over a single well. The pumps failed and were pulled out 5 years ago, and the village has since turned the covered well into an open one, drawing water by buckets and rope. We plan to clean debris that has fallen into the open well over the years, shock chlorinate the water, reset the slab and close the well, and install two new Bluepumps. This is without a doubt, our most ambitious well rehabilitation effort ever, and arguably, the most impactful.
 
Dankunku Health Center’s independent solar water system broke long ago and now depends on a tap stand hooked up to Dankunku's larger solar borehole water system, as well as a double pedestal handpump well in front of it. The village borehole system sometimes shuts down and is closed at night, leaving the health center with just one working Mark II handpump, which we fixed a couple years back. The well also has an Indian Mark II pump, which stopped working years ago. The pipes and rods were locked up the Health Center store, but the cylinder has gone missing. We aim to install a Bluepump on this Indian Mark pedestal to improve clean water access for medical patients and their families.  
 

Installation at FK

Fula Kunda is a village of 350 people from 14 compounds. They have two breakdown prone Mark II handpumps that are 23 years old. We have serviced them every year from 2012 through 2014. They stopped working, forcing women and girls to fetch water in neighboring Dankunku. Upon inspection, we found one handle stuck, and the other not drawing water, causing us to think that sand had clogged one pipe (sand was drawn in limited quantities when we fixed this pump in 2014) and that the other had an issue with the plunger/cylinder mechanism. This project seeks to attempt to fully rehabilitate both of these nonfunctioning pipes.
 
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jeremy Mak, a member of the National Peace Corps Association and the Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Los Angeles.
 
Monitoring and Maintenance
The villages will be responsible for their own wells and handpumps.  Should repairs become needed, Water Charity will authorize follow up projects and ensure the continued functionality of the installations.
 
Comments
Jeremy did this well repair and installation project simultaneously as he was doing a water filter distribution project in the region.  That project can be seen HERE. Truly incredible work, adding to his already impressive list of projects done with Water Charity, both as a PCV and as an RPCV.  Go Jeremy!
 
Dollar Amount of Project
$9,000
 
THIS PROJECT HAS BEEN FULLY FUNDED DO TO THE GENEROSITY OF JEREMY'S FRIENDS AND FAMILY!
Any further donations to this project will go to future projects by RPCV Jeremy Mak, or in The Gambia.
 
This project has been completed.  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

 

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Niamina Water Filter Project - The Gambia

Niamina Water Filter Distribution Pilot Project - The Gambia

NPCA & WC LOGOSThis project is made possible through the collaboration of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.

Location
Niamina Dankunku and Niamina West Districts, Central River Region--South, The Gambia

Community Description
Remote, rural villages along the river that are all struggling with clean water access, and the related health issues.Kalikajara Village, The Gambia

Problem Addressed
Many of these rural villages struggle with clean water access. For numerous communities, the government installed handpumps in the 1990s.  However, due to low capacity to maintain or repair these pumps, many of them are breaking and broken. This leaves women and girls,those traditionally responsible for collecting water, with little choice but to walk farther in search of working water points.

However, some communities have no option but to resort to pulling out broken pumps and turning protected wells into open wells.  Villagers using ropes and buckets to draw water are at high risk of contaminating their water sources and spreading debilitating waterborne diseases like dysentery and diarrhea.

In addition, when pumps are dismantled, handpump components commonly go missing or are stolen and concrete slabs are broken and damaged, leaving no possibility of fixing them. Similarly, some villages have never benefited from drinking from protected wells, and instead have relied on open wells for generations.  Locally dug open wells are not only sources of dirty water, but also physically unsafe and pose a safety hazard for the very children and women who use them. 

Project Description
There are at least 5 villages in the Gambia Lifewater Project's (GLP) program area that currently rely on open wells for their drinking water. (e.g. Si Kunda, Kalikajara, Borehole, Colley Kunda, Modikaya). 3 additional villages have functioning handpumps, but have water quality/taste issues. GLP proposes to pilot the use of Sawyer Point One filters for at least 4 of these villages, improving the health for approximately 1,000 people. Filters will be communally owned by the village but individual households where they are installed will be responsible for caring for them. 

A total of 50 Point One filters will make up this project.   3-5 Sawyer filters will be installed in each village at the household level to provide clean water for the whole community and evaluate local reception of the new water filtration technology for potential future distribution. Water Charity proposes to conduct a series of 3-4 trips to each village. 
 
  • The first will re-assess the water situation, sensitize the village, and demonstrate the use of the Sawyer water filter, and ask the village to choose 3-5 households to pilot the filter. Careful attention will go towards placement of the filters so that they will be evenly dispersed throughout the village and not concentrated in one area. 
  • The second (ideally 1-3 days later) will re-visit the village and assess the proper placement and waterproofness of the material of the pedestal on which the Sawyer filter and bucket will rest. WC will also if there is an opportunity to install a larger capacity bucket/water container with multiple filter outlets.
  • The third trip will involve installing Sawyer filters with appropriate-sized food grade buckets and handing them over to households, along with instructions. Special care will be placed on showing responsible households how to care for and maintain/backflush the filters.
  • The fourth trip (if possible) will monitor usage of the filters and troubleshoot any issues for immediate attention and for future planning.
Si Kunda Village, The GambiaProject Impact
It is envisaged that the whole roll out for 4 villages will take up to two weeks to implement once initiated. Again, this project is expected to benefit up to 1,000 women, children, and men. This is part of Water Charity's ongoing FIlters For Life Program - Worldwide, and this filtration component will complement The Gambia Lifewater Project's ongoing pump repair and installation works and general hygiene and sanitation improvement projects.

To date, GLP and Water Charity have rehabilitated or installed 40 pumps in 26 villages in Niamina West and Niamina Dankunku, benefitting more than 14,000 local Gambians with improved clean water access. 
 

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jeremy Mak, a member of the National Peace Corps Association and the Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Los Angeles.

Monitoring and Maintenance
The Villages will be responsible for the maintenance of their filters.  Additionally, local GLP and PCV workers will be able to monitor the success of the project, as well as contact us at Water Charity to expand filter distribution as needed.

Comments
Jeremy has done a large number of projects with Water Charity.  Starting as a PCV, then as an RPCV, and including quite a few ambitious programs to repair or provide new pumps in communities where their old pumps had ceased functioning.  Water Charity has funded these Gambia Lifewater Pump projects readily, and will continue to work with Jeremy through a new round of pump and filter projects.  To see a complete list of projects that Jeremy has worked on with Water Charity, CLICK HERE.  In fact, while doing this water filter installation project, Jeremy was simultaneously doing a well handpump installation project in 5 nearby villages!  This project can be seen HERE.

Dollar Amount of Project
$2,800

Donations Collected to Date
$2,800

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Gamrupa Danmark.

This project has been completed!  To see the results, CLICK HERE.

 

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Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program – Phase 2 - The Gambia

Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program – Phase 2 - The Gambia

Location
5 villages in Niamina Dankunku and Niamina West Districts, Central River Region-South, The Gambia. The villages are Choya, Madina Wallom, Dankunku Fula Kunda, Sare Gynalko, and Brikama Lefaya.

Community Description
These 5 villages are smaller ethnic Fula communities that are largely under-served by government and NGO agencies. These poor, pastoral and farming villages enjoy few basic services, and as a result, health outcomes are fairly low. For the most part, their subsistence livelihoods are tied to the growing season and cattle herding.

Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program – Phase 2 - The Gambia

Problem Addressed
Water access is a main issue throughout the area, mostly due to breaking and broken water pumps. This adds a huge burden to local communities, especially women and girls, as they are traditionally responsible for collecting water for household use.

When pumps break and cannot be fixed, women and girls must walk farther to find other working water points. As pumps are breaking, the remaining operational water taps are increasingly stressed by rising water needs.

Lower access to water also means less water to drink, bathe, and water animals and crops. For these farmers, it simply means less opportunity to raise income and provide for their families.

In addition, general health, sanitation, and hygiene standards remain low, due to poor levels of awareness and bad practices.

Project Description
This program is to improve water access and sanitation conditions across five villages.

Firstly, 3 German Mark II handpumps (2 in Dankunku Fula Kunda and 1 in Mt. Carmel, an elementary school in Sare Gynalko) will be repaired.

A previous Water Charity project fixed the two 22-year old pumps in Fula Kunda last year. However, both are now experiencing problems. One no longer draws water, and the other one has a leak in the cylinder, requiring locals to prime the pump every time water is drawn (the water seals no longer work).

This decrease in water access has forced local women and girls to walk to neighboring Dankunku to fetch water there. The distance and physical burden adds greater hardship to their lives and takes time and energy away from other productive pursuits.

This project will also fix the 17-year-old handpump in Mt. Carmel's garden. The housing, handle, axle, and bearings have broken completely, and the pump no longer draws water. It broke 4 years ago, leaving schoolchildren without a water source in their garden. The school's other pump and borehole tap are too far away to supply water to grow short-term vegetables.

This project will carry out comprehensive inspection, maintenance, spare parts, and repairs on all 3 pumps so that they are in working order.

Secondly, this program will fund scheduled maintenance for the 3 Bluepumps installed by Water Charity in 2012 in the Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project. A dedicated crew from local Bluepump distributor SWE-GAM will travel upcountry in the next month to Choya, Madina Wallom, Brikama Lefaya villages to pull out the rods and cylinder of these pumps to inspect parts for preventative and precautionary servicing.

The Bluepumps are much more durable that the Mark IIs and deliver much more water, and it is a priority to insure their continued operation. Surrounding villages are also heavily relying on these pumps for drinking and watering their animals.

Thirdly, this program will conduct a modest soap distribution in Choya and Brikama Lefaya villages. A mix of regular and antibacterial soap will help assist beneficiaries who chronically experience soap shortages (due to lack of money to buy adequate amounts for growing families) to fight lingering skin infections.

Central River Region Handpump and WASH Improvement Program – Phase 2 - The GambiaFourthly, this program will carry out some activities originally envisaged under the Brikama Lefaya Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Improvement Project. It will construct a new toilet in Brikama Lefaya village to replace an old toilet that was filling up, caving in, and whose slab breaking. It will also construct up to 5 showering slabs in the same village to provide improved areas for bathing (rather than perching on top of a single block or a discarded piece of metal corrugate, villagers now have a safe place to comfortably bathe).

Currently, the villagers bathe themselves in reed-screened areas behind mud houses. These areas have no flooring, so the used water pools, creating an unsafe environment for algae and bacteria. Creating concrete floors with rebar supports and soak-away drains will give villagers more comfortable and hygienic places to shower.

Lastly, this program will purchase a kit and parts to build rocker micro-irrigation pumps for gardens on a future trip. Rather than painstaking watering plants one at a time by a bucket or container, the construction of irrigation kits and water reservoirs will help locals more quickly and efficiently distribute water for their short-term crops. 3 to 5 of these pumps will be built for gardens in different villages.

Project Impact
1,300+ people will benefit from the project, including those from the following villages:

Choya - 450
Madina Wallom - 150
Dankunku Fula Kunda - 400
Sare Gynalko - 250
Brikama Lefaya - 50

In addition, villagers from Sambang, Dankunku, and Buniadu who use Brikama Lefaya's Bluepump, and those from Jamara, who use Madina Wallom's Bluepump, will benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Jeremy Mak, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer

Comments
This is Phase 2 of a large-scale program to undertake a series of projects to (1) repair and install handpumps and (2) to improve water, sanitation, and hygiene conditions in the region.

To read about Phase 1 of this project, and its successful conclusion, CLICK HERE, where you can also read about the other projects completed under Jeremy’s direction. Links on that page will take you to the individual projects in that phase of the program, and you can navigate through the entire Gambia Lifewater Program to date via the links below this post.

Dollar Amount of Project
$1,500.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will give you "naming rights", if that is something you would like.

Any contributions in excess of the Dollar Amount of Project will be allocated to other projects directed by this PCV and/or projects of other PCVs in this country.

Dollar Amount Needed
$1,400.00


This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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