El Salvador

El Jicaro Village Water Project - El Salvador

El Jicaro Village Water Project - El Salvador

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
El Jicaro, El SalvadorEl Jicaro Village Water Project - El Salvador

Community Description
El Jicaro is located in the hills northwest of the city of Chalatenango, in El Salvador. In the late seventies, this small community became the first guerrilla camp in the area and was a magnet for campesinos in the neighboring villages who decided to join the guerrilla movement. More than thirty years later, El Jícaro is a peaceful place, with a new generation of community members, many of whom are descendants of the guerrillas who fought and gave their lives in an attempt to change the society in which they lived.

El Jícaro has a population of approximately 235 people, making up about 64 households. About 40% of the population is under the age of twenty. On average, community members have a sixth grade education. Agriculture is the primary means of income in the community, with the main crops being corn, millet, and beans. The majority of the families in the community have lived there since 1994, when the community was resettled following the signing of the Peace Accords after the Civil War.

There is a primary school that goes up to 9th grade, a communal meeting house, a Catholic church, and a community mill in El Jicaro. There are also two small shops that sell basic amenities and snacks.

Problem Addressed
In El Jicaro, a group of five women, recently began a bakery with support from a Peace Corp Volunteer and funds from a World Connect grant. The bakery is located on communal land in the center of the community. The women have all the supplies for baking. However, there is no water connection at the site for use by the women or the public. The women must use buckets to transport water for baking and cleaning. In addition, the women do not have a water basin and must crouch on the floor while washing trays and other baking dishes. 

Project Description
This project will provide a water spigot for the community and a pila for the women at the bakery site. A pila is a large water basin found in most homes in rural El Salvador that is used for storing water, washing clothes,  and washing dishes.

A pila will ensure that the women can clean up in a more feasible and comfortable way. A small investment will make a large difference for these women as they establish their new business. A water spigot near the bakery site will be used as a public source of drinking water.

As mentioned earlier, the bakery is located in a central location where many visitors from outside communities as well as community members pass by. The spigot will be built under the direction of the community council and the water committee at this location to benefit many as a source of drinking water.

Project Impact
There are 235 people living in the community who will be impacted. This project will also benefit visitors to the community.

Peace Corps VolunteEl Jicaro Village Water Project - El Salvadorer Directing Project
Ofira Honig

Monitoring and Maintenance
The pila will be stored inside the bakery and taken outside for use. The community will donate the labor for all of the work needed to prepare the ground and connect the pipes for the public water spigot. The bakery women, wanting to contribute for their water usage, have offered to pay the $1 monthly quota per household for personal usage of water once the spigot is installed.

Comments
Although this project is small, the water spigot and pila purchase will have a significant impact, especially on the five women of the bakery in El Jicaro. These women have worked hard to get the bakery business off the ground and are first-time business owners. They work extremely hard to make enough money to take out their $5 a day salary. This project will strengthen their business and make their lives, as well as the lives of all those in the community and those who visit, a bit easier.

Fundraising Target
$240

Donations Collected to Date
$240

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Michael and Jessica Raposa, of Charlestown, MA, USA.

The Peace Corps Volunteer was evacuated from the country for security reasons, and was not able to implement the project.  Donations for this project were re-allocated to other projects.

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San Miguel Ingenio Water Tank Project - El Salvador

San Miguel Ingenio Water Tank Project - El Salvador

This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the National Peace Corps Association.

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Location
San Miguel Ingenio, El Salvador

Community DescriptionSan Miguel Ingenio, El Salvador
San Miguel Ingenio is located in the Northwestern part of El Salvador. It belongs to the municipality of Metapán and the Department of Santa Ana.  The community is located about 40 minutes from Metapán, which is the nearest town to San Miguel Ingenio.

There is an active community organization (LA ADESCO), which meets regularly to improve community institutions and solve problems. The ADESCO is also in charge of the water system.
 
Problem Addressed
San Miguel Ingenio only has one water tank for their entire community.  A 15,750 gallon cement tank sits above the community on a mountain, fed by a nearby mountain stream.
 
The community has noticed that the tank is starting to deteriorate on the outside. Moss is starting to grow and there are watermarks that are slowly deteriorating the cement foundation. The community organization is committed to preserving the water supply, and believes that the tank can be protected from this damage.

Water Tank in San Miguel Ingenio

Project Description
The project shall be to clean, smooth, seal, and apply waterproof paint on the water tank in such a way as to prevent it from deteriorating, and ensure that it will last for many years to come.

The community contribution will be buying all the necessary materials to clean and prepare the tank. Community members will scrape off the moss and use detergents to clean the tank.  The community will also provide all the labor to paint the tank and ensure that the paint covers the tank properly with two coats.  Water Charity is supplying the town with funds for the paint, paintbrushes, and other incidentals.

Project Impact
1500 people live in the village and use this water supply for everything.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Maureen Mitchell

 
Water Tank Workers

Monitoring and Maintenance
LA ADESCO will monitor the project and do follow-up visits to the tank to ensure the paint was applied properly. Maureen will oversee the project, and she (or the current PCV stationed there) will see to it that the tank is kept up and functional.

Dollar Amount of Project
$500

Donations Collected to Date
$500

Dollar Amount Needed
$0 = This project has now been fully funded.  

The Peace Corps Volunteer was evacuated from the country for security reasons, and was not able to implement the project.  Donations for this project were re-allocated to other projects.

Water Tank Inspection

San Miguel Ingenio, El Salvador (Water Tank)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Estanzuela Water System Project – El Salvador

Estanzuela Water System Project – El SalvadorLocation
Estanzuela, Township Paturla, Town of Joateca, Department of Morazan, El Salvador

Community Description
The community of Estanzuela in the township of Paturla lies 2 km from the town of Joateca, in the mountainous Northeastern portion of El Salvador on the border with Honduras. The main source of income in the community is farming, specifically corn and beans.

The community is home to around 45 families, a little over 200 inhabitants.

The school in Estanzuela is an elementary school with grades kindergarten to 6th, and has 32 students. The water for the school comes from a natural spring 250 meters north of the school.

The spring is owned by a community member who also uses the water for his fish farm; thus he has not allowed for the treatment of the water with a chlorine solution from the spring in the one tank that holds the water, as this action would kill his fish. Unfortunately, parasites and diarrhea are two of the biggest health issues for this community, and cannot be prevented in this situation.

Estanzuela Water System Project – El SalvadorFrom the cement tank at the natural spring the water runs in tubes to a tank at the school. The school tank currently rests upon a rotting and leaking frame. This tank lies right next to where the children have their recess, and where the mothers cook lunch, providing a potential danger to both the children and mothers.

Project Description
This project is to build a water system to serve the school. A new cement tank will be built at the natural spring. Piping will then be installed to transport the water to a new storage tank at the school.

The tank at the spring will measure 1.5 meters square. The piping will run underground a distance of 250 meters.

The new Rotoplas storage tank will have a capacity of 1,100 liters, and will be placed on top of the kitchen.

Water Charity funds will be used to purchase the Rotoplas tank, as well as 150 bricks, 6 bags of cement, and the PVC piping.

The labor will be done without charge by a 5-person work group made up of parents of the students.

The water in the new tank will be treated with a chlorine solution at the uphill spring tank by the health promoter.

Estanzuela Water System Project – El SalvadorProject Impact
This project will benefit all of the 32 children, ages 4 to 13 who attend the school, as well as their teacher, 25 mothers who cook lunches daily for the children, and 50 community members who attend health and other meetings.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Shelby Fallon

Comments
The project creates a system to provide an uninterrupted source of clean water for the use of students, staff, and community.

Shelby previously completed the Aguas Frias Water System Project – El Salvador.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of the Paul Bechtner Foundation.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Shelby Fallon of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Shelby and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Sunsulaca Water System Project - El Salvador

Sunsulaca Water System Project - El Salvador

This project is to build a new water tank for the communities of El Tablon, Los Fuentes and Agua Zarca in the town of Sunsulaca. It is being implemented under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Elsa Augustine.

Location
Municipality of Cacaopera, department of Morazán, El Salvador

Sunsulaca Water System Project - El Salvador

Community Description
Sunsulaca is a small community located in northeastern El Salvador in the municipality of Cacaopera in the department of Morazán. Sunsulaca is a rural, agrarian community that is located 9 kilometers outside of San Francisco Gotera, the capital city of the department of Morazán, and 160 kilometers from the country´s capital, San Salvador.

Guerrilla forces were based in this region during the Salvadoran civil war (1980-1992), and the fighting that occurred in the region did great damage and left Morazán the poorest department in all of El Salvador. Since the end of the war, Morazán and the rest of El Salvador have worked hard to develop infrastructure that is suitable for the ever-growing Salvadoran population, but this has proved a constant challenge, especially when it comes to finding secure, potable water sources.

The neighborhoods of El Tablon, Los Fuentes, and Agua Zarca within Sunsulaca have joined together to form a community water committee (Proyecto Comunitario de Agua Potable) to address their common need for potable water. This committee has successfully constructed a functional water system, but it is of insufficient capacity to meet the water demands of all community members, especially as the population continues to grow.

The committee constructed a large water tank at the edge of the river, from where all of the community water is drawn. This tank collects water, and then, using electricity, pumps the water up to a receptor tank, which is located at high elevation on the top of a hill, Cerro Caballo, in the center of the community. From there, by force of gravity, water runs from the tank into the households that are connected to the water system at set times every day.

While the mechanics of this water system work well, the water tank that serves as a receptor in the center of town is too small to pump water to all of the households in the community at a sufficient rate.

At the moment, approximately 85 households are able to receive water from this system every day, while there are more than 110 households total that would ideally be able to draw water from this source.

Those who are not currently connected to the water system are forced to travel to the river for all of their needs, whether it is to wash clothes and bathe in the river, or haul buckets of water back to the house for cooking and drinking. Also, those who are connected to the water system and do receive running water in their house still do not receive water at a frequency that would be ideal to meet all of their water needs.

The water committee has already taken measures to install a chlorification mechanism into the water tank, so the water that is reaching houses through the water system is treated and potable.

Sunsulaca Water System Project - El Salvador

Project Description
Under the direction of the Proyecto Comunitario de Agua Potable (Community Potable Water Project), a large receptor tank will be built on Cerro Caballo, a hill that is central to the community, so that all households will receive potable water. The additional capacity will allow for water to be delivered for up to 5 hours each day.

The majority of materials necessary to complete this project have already been acquired through various donations. The land where the tank will be constructed was donated by a member of the community, and the water committee plans to do all of the labor themselves with the help of future beneficiaries of the water tank project.

Water Charity funds will be used to buy the remaining materials that are needed to complete construction of the water tank (sand, cement, bricks, and gravel), as well as to pay part of the daily fee of the carpenter who will lend technical expertise to the community members who do the manual labor.

Project Impact
This project will immediately directly benefit approximately 550 citizens of Sunsulaca in 110 households. As the community continues to expand in the coming years, an additional 15-25 people will benefit each year.

Comments
This is an important infrastructure project that will ensure a regular supply of safe water to 3 communities. It has tremendous community participation and support, and will improve the health and wellbeing of the entire town.

$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the Debi Kerr and Charles Augustine, of Boston, MA, USA.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Elsa Augustine of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Elsa and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.


This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Amulunco Water Project – El Salvador

Amulunco Water Project – El SalvadorLocation
Cantón Amulunco, Municipality Santiago Nonualco, Department La Paz, El Salvador

Community Description
Amulunco is a small, rural community located in the foothills of active Volcano San Vicente, overlooking the Pacific Ocean, 80 kilometers southeast of the country's capital, San Salvador.

About four hundred people make up the town and its surrounding areas. Like many rural Salvadoran communities, the majority of people live very modestl

Amulunco Water Project – El Salvador

y, working in agriculture. The main subsistence is the cultivation of corn, kidney beans, sorghum, fruit and livestock.

Although the community is very small, the school boasts an enrollment of around two hundred fifty students, most of whom walk or bus in from nearby towns. Fifteen years ago a highway was built right outside of Amulunco which led to a huge spike in population. The population growth has been vital to the 

town’s development, but has put a lot of stress on its natural resources.

Amulunco, ironically signifying “water source” in the Mayan language Nauhatl, shares a water source with two other, similarly-sized communities.

Each town is divided in two or three sectors, each receiving running water one day a week for a few hours. This is often not a sufficient amount of water to sustain the average Salvadoran family for an entire week. Most people are forced to haul water or wash their clothes in a river a few kilometers away.

There are two, three-room schools in the community. (One was added after the population increase to house all of the students). Like the rest of the community, the schools only have running water once a week.

Each school had a water tank, but with the record-breaking rains that flooded El Salvador in October 2011, one of the water storage tanks fell and broke during the storms. The water tanks are/were connected to the pipeline, but are unable to fill up or store any water for later use. As they are the only source of water in the schools, water is used quickly to drink and wash hands.

Amulunco Water Project – El SalvadorProject Description
This project is to renovate the water system providing water to Centro Escolar Cantón Amulunco.

The broken water tank in one of the schools will be replaced. Filters will be installed in both tanks. Gutters will be installed to collect water from the roof and pipe it to the tanks, enabling the tanks to fill up with rain water during monsoon season.

The project will be implemented under the direction of the Asociacion de Desarrollo Comunitario, Cantón Amulunco.

Project Impact
This project will benefit the 250 students, 7 teachers, and 3 school cooks.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Mariel Frankl

Comments
With new filters and tanks full of rain water, students will be able to wash their hands and have potable drinking water every day during the school year. In addition, the school “cafeteria” will have an ample supply of safe water to be used for cooking.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00 + additional amounts.

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Rachel Rajput, of San Francisco, CA, USA, with the help of friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Mariel Frankl, with additional amounts for future projects.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Mariel of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Mariel and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Funds Needed : 
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El Pital and Las Tablas Spring Catchment Project – El Salvador

El Pital and Las Tablas Spring Catchment Project – El Salvador

This project is build a new spring water catchment box and retaining wall to serve the communities of El Pital and Las Tablas.

The work will be implemented by El Pital ADESCO and Comite de Agua under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Jessica Henry.

El Pital and Las Tablas Spring Catchment Project – El Salvador

Caserios El Pital and Las Tablas are home to about 700 people, and are located in Canton La Magdalena, Municipio Chalchuapa, Departamento Santa Ana, El Salvador.

The two communities share the same water source, an underground spring. They are growing quickly, and are eager to protect their main water source through preventative measures and community collaboration.

The area has an ADESCO and Cooperative Las Tablas. A recent community collaboration resulted in the repair of the access road to the communities. Two holding tanks for water were recently completed under the El Pital Spring Water Project – El Salvador.

The problem facing the communities is that due to the heavy rains and flooding that plagued El Salvador this past October, the area surrounding the natural underground spring suffered a great deal of erosion. This spring is the singular source of water for the aforementioned communities, and without a retaining wall and an improved main water capture box (the caja), the area around the spring is in great danger of collapsing and may dislodge the existing tanks that provide water for the communities.

El Pital and Las Tablas Spring Catchment Project – El Salvador

The spring is embedded in the hillside, and if the earth around it collapses or is washed away in this year's rainy season it will devastate the community. The repairs achieved with Appropriate Projects funds will protect the natural environment and ensure that these growing communities continue to have access to safe drinking water.

A 15 ft by 5 ft tall retention wall will be built at the point of origin of the spring to prevent further erosion and the danger of the collapse and landslide of the earth surrounding the spring.

The aging leaking spring box, put in 35 years ago, will be completely replaced. The finished spring box will measure: 3 x 3 meters and 125 cm tall.

Project funds will be used to purchase materials, including cement, iron bars, sand, bricks, and wire. Also included will be delivery of materials and food for the lunches of the workers.

All labor will be donated by various community members called upon by the water committee. The committee will send out convocations, or invitations, the day before the donated day of labor, requesting the head of household to present himself for work, or pay $5 so the committee can pay another person to do an additional day of work.

The whole community is contributing to the project. The water committee also has a list of skilled construction workers, about 15 in the community, and at least one of those skilled workers will be present each day of construction.

To contribute for this project, please click on the Donate button below.


This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE. We are still soliciting donations for this project.

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Santa Cruz Water System Project – El Salvador

Santa Cruz Water System Project – El Salvador

LocationSanta Cruz Water System Project – El SalvadorCanton Santa Cruz, Santiago de la Frontera, Santa Ana, El Salvador

Community Description
The village of Santa Cruz is located about 55 kilometers northwest of the city of Santa Ana near the border with Guatemala.

Santa Cruz has a population of 362 inhabitants living in 129 houses, a school that includes 180 students, and a clinic that provides non-emergency medical treatment. The clinic and the school make available valuable services to the neighboring 6 communities in the area and are dependent on the local water source as well.

The running water system for the entire rural community, created 25 years ago, consists of a large water tank and pump, a well, a concrete storage box, and various piping to deliver the water to the buildings.

The seasonal change from rainy to dry season has drastic impacts in all areas of life in the region, especially the water supply. During the dry season the river that supplies the water source for the community recedes, and consequently the water is taken from an open well in the ground instead of the stream.

From there, it is sent through a concrete storage container that regulates the flow to the tank. This water source provides a sufficient amount of water to fill the tank once a day. This sustains four hours of access per day to the families, the clinic, and the school.

A second and separate ground water source that exists nearby is not currently being utilized, as it requires development beyond the current resources of the community.

Project Description
This project is to increase the water supply to the village by expanding the water delivery system.

Santa Cruz Water System Project – El SalvadorA separate micro-system will be built and joined to the existing well by creating a separate holding box connected into the other source. This will connect this structure directly to the tank, thus doubling the amount of water to the current tank.

In addition, the structural integrity of the tank will be improved, as substantial wear and tear has occurred over the years. (Although the expected life span of this type of tank is estimated to be ten years, through appropriate maintenance and repair, the tank can surpass the normal longevity.)

Project funds will be used to purchase basic materials, including concrete, brick, iron, and sand.

The community members who maintain the system will transport the materials and use them to build the second concrete storage container attached to the separate ground water source.

Project Impact
1,042 people will benefit from the project, including 362 residents of the village, 180 students of the school, and 500 patients at the clinic.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Louis Smith

Comments
This project will succeed in doubling the amount of water supply for the entire community throughout the dry season, as well as provide the necessary and much-needed maintenance to the existing system.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Louis Smith of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Louis and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

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Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Centro Escolar Julián Aparicio Water Project – El Salvador

Centro Escolar Julián Aparicio Water Project – El Salvador

Location
Barrio San Juan, Chinameca, San Miguel, El Salvador

Community Description
Chinameca is located in eastern El Salvador within the Sierra Tecapa-Chinameca range in the department of San Miguel. The city is located on the northern slope of Cerro El Limbo at an elevation of 580 meters above sea level. Chinameca is 19.1 km west of the city of San Miguel, 2 miles south of the city of Nueva Guadalupe, 2.5 miles east of the city of Jucuapa, and 4 miles south of the Panamerican Highway.

Chinameca is a large town with a total population of 22,311 people. The urban population represents 27.9% of the total. Women hold the majority, and 48% of the population falls between the ages of 18 and 59. More than 32% of the population is of school age (4-17 years). About 8% of the population is younger than 3 years, while over 11% is 60 years of age or older.

Rural areas are dominated by agricultural production, especially coffee, fruit crops, and grains. The sale of these agricultural products serves as the main source of income. A series of public and private institutions serve as places of employment for the local urban population.

Centro Escolar Julián Aparicio Water Project – El SalvadorPublic facilities in the community include City Hall of Chinameca, the sub-delegation of the National Civil Police, the local clinical division of the Ministry of Health, local and national courts, House of Culture, five public elementary schools, one national institute, local offices of the Salvadoran Social Security Services, and Central Farmer’s Market. The private sector consists of the industrial sector, various shops and services.

The industrial sector focuses exclusively on the processing and exporting of coffee. Commercial enterprises include a number of convenience stores, restaurants, hardware stores, bakeries and pharmacies. The service-oriented businesses include a local transportation cooperative, a number of churches, international divisions of the Red Cross, Lions Club and World Vision, professional offices offering medical, dental and legal consultations, a number of Internet cafes and beauty salons, two gas stations, a car wash, and a local NGO with a tree nursery. The city of San Miguel and its institutions also provide employment to the citizens of Chinameca, given the close proximity of the two cities.

There are concerns in Chinameca directly related to water quality and content. It is widely known that water supplies in Chinameca have higher than acceptable levels of fecal coliform, total coliform, and E. coli, as well elevated levels of diluted metals (a result of the geology of the area.)

Centro Escolar Julián Aparicio Water Project – El SalvadorThe biological contaminants and metals in the water supply of Centro Escolar Julián Aparicio have the potential to put at risk childhood development and other public health complications. These are especially high for children still in development stages, like the children attending the school.

Project Description
This project is to install a water tank and filtration and purification system at the school, and to implement a series of interactive health and environmental education activities.

A fully-equipped plastic water tank with a capacity of 5,000 liters will be installed to ensure an abundant and reliable supply of water at the school.

A water filtration and purification system will be installed. This will help in reducing the susceptibility to diseases transmitted by contaminated water and mitigation of development risks and other health complications as a result of elevated pollutant concentrations in the water.

Finally, a series of interactive health and environmental education activities will be carried out to teach good personal hygiene practices as well as proper water use practices to protect and conserve local water sources.

To implement the project, three quotations from different water tank and material suppliers were obtained. In addition, a local mason was hired to carry out the site preparation and installation of the new water filtration, purification, and distribution system.

The site has been measured to ensure accurate and appropriate placement of the new water tank and system. The site still has to be prepared for the new tank, including a thorough cleaning and leveling of the area.

The water tank and the new system will be purchased and transported to the school by the supplier. With the help of the supplier, contractor, and a number of local community members the new tank will be installed in the school.

Centro Escolar Julián Aparicio has contributed $700.00 to the project and has already purchased the water purification system with these funds. An additional $575.00 of in-kind community contribution has been guaranteed by La Asociacion para el Desarrollo de Chinameca (ASDECHI) and local community members.

Through the Peace Corps Partnership Program, friends and family have raised $1,539.54 which will be used to purchase a fully-equipped 5,000 L plastic water tank.

Appropriate Projects funds will be used to purchase materials necessary for the completion of the water filtration and distribution system.

Upon completion of the physical portion of the project, an education campaign will begin in collaboration with school staff and the local Ministry of Health, with students and teachers attending. This will instill the benefits of clean drinking water and personal hygiene practices to ensure public safety and health, in addition to a focus on water in an environmental context.

Project Impact
617 children y 26 teachers of Centro Escolar Julián Aparicio will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Adam Birr

Comments
This project will ensure a healthy and sanitary environment for the children and staff at the school. Our participation in the larger program adds to a huge amount of public and private support, ensuring the success and sustainability of the project.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of Six Senses Resorts & Spas as a part of their The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Adam Birr of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Adam and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Centro Escolar Caserio Toreras Water Project – El Salvador

Centro Escolar Caserio Toreras Water Project – El Salvador

Location
Caserio Toreras, Department of La Union, El Salvador

Community Description
Caserío Toreras is a small community in the northeastern corner of El Salvador located on the Honduran border. It is made up of 40 houses with a population of 225, and is very rural and isolated. Only vehicles with four-wheel drive can enter the community when the road is dry.

Centro Escolar Caserio Toreras Water Project – El Salvador

The economy is made up of subsistence farming and cattle raising. 36% of the population are adults over the age of 24, 23% are adolescents between ages 15-24, 30% are children between ages 5-15, and 11% are children under 5 years old. The population is 46% male and 54% female.

One third of households still do not have electricity, and more than half do not have their own source of water.

Within the community there is a school, Centro Escolar Caserío Toreras. The school runs from kindergarten through sixth grade. There are three teachers and currently there are 54 students attending, all residents of Caserío Toreras.

The school currently has six flushable toilets. However, they are not serviceable due to poor conditions in the piping. Generally, water falls for several hours each morning, filling a tank, located next to the bathrooms. That water comes from a natural source and is carried by 550 meters of plastic tubes. There are then metal pipes that carry the water from the tank to each of the six toilets as well as two sink spigots.

The plastic tubes and pipes are currently in such poor condition that, because of leaks, hardly any water gets to the toilets. Almost all of the water is wasted, and within a few hours the tank is empty.

Project Description
This project is to replace the tubes that carry the water from the source to the school’s tank, as well as to buy several barrels in which to keep the water for flushing the toilets.

With this project, 550 meters of plastic tubes will be replaced with more reliable PVC pipes. With the PVC pipes the water will arrive from the source to the tank without leaks.

Two plastic barrels will be purchased and placed by the bathrooms. Instead of trying to fix all of the metal piping that runs underneath the bathrooms, the barrels will

Centro Escolar Caserio Toreras Water Project – El Salvadorbe filled with the water from the tank. This will allow the toilets to be flushed by pouring water into the toilets using buckets. It is a much simpler solution and the people are accustomed to flushing toilets in this manner.

A local community development organization, the ADESCO Crismo, will be in charge of the project. The members will install the tubes and supervise the project along with the teachers from the school.

Project Impact
The project will directly benefit the 54 students and 3 teachers at the Centro Escolar Caserío Toreras. In addition, it will serve the 168 remaining inhabitants of the community, as the school is used for all community meetings and events.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Tyler Dato

Comments
This problem resolves the critical problem of providing water for use in the bathrooms by utilizing the functional parts of the existing infrastructure, and replacing the segments necessary to make the system functional. Water in the bathrooms will have a significant positive effect on the hygiene and health of the students, teachers, and community.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project now has been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Peace Corps Volunteer Tyler Dato of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Tyler and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

Aguas Frias Water System Project – El Salvador

Aguas Frias Water System Project – El SalvadorLocation
Aguas Frias, Joateca, Morazan, El Salvador

Community Description
The community of Aguas Frias can be found in the canton of Paturla, east of the municipality of Joateca in the department of Morazán. Currently, the community is struggling to find ways to gain access to potable drinking water, specifically for the school.

The only way to get water to the school from a natural water spring 300 meters away is to perforate the surface of the earth about 1 meter and fill buckets with the water which is then taken back to the school. Every day 2-4 children leave class to perform this process and provide water to their peers.

Aguas Frias Water System Project – El SalvadorFor many years, farmers and families working and living near the fresh water spring used it communally. During this time a small well was constructed to make the process easier for those who wanted to get water from the spring. As of 2008, when the school was constructed, the spring became a daily water source for its students, which they used to drink, cook and wash their hands.

Last year, in 2010, there was a landslide during the winter where the well had been, destroying the easy access it provided and leaving the community and the school without access to potable water.

Project Description
This project is to bring potable water to the school and the community. Specifically, a covered spring box will be built to allow community members to retrieve water for daily use. In addition, piping will be run from the spring box to the school through which water will be provided to the school.

Aguas Frias Water System Project – El SalvadorThe spring box will built by erecting a cement wall around a ditch in the natural water spring. A cement cover will prevent leaves and other materials that might fall into the box from disrupting the flow of water.

The manual labor will be performed by the school advisory board, or the Asociación del Consejo Escolar, which is made up of parents of students who attend the school.

Project funds will be used to buy cement to construct the spring box and its cover and the cement base for the tank at the school, 200 meters of poliduct tubing, which will run underground to the school, as well as the 1,100 liter Rotoplas tank, which will be placed at the school.

The teachers, students, and health promoter will be able to treat the water with a chlorine solution that kills parasites in the water by adding a few drops on a regular basis.

Project Impact
This project will benefit all of the 72 children, ages 4 to 14 years, who come from the communities of Estanzuela, Aguas Calientes, Coquinka and Cerro de Ocote Seco who attend the school. In addition, at least 200 other community members will benefit.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Shelby Fallon

Comments
This project will deliver safe drinking water to the school and relieve the students of the burden of hauling water each day.

In addition, the spring box will greatly benefit the community members who live near the spring and use it daily. This is expected to lead to the reduction the number of cases of diarrhea and waterborne illness in the community.

Dollar Amount of Project
$555.00

Donations Collected to Date
$555.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has been fully funded through the generosity of The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative, together with friends and family of Peace Corps Volunteer Shelby Fallon.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Shelby of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Shelby and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

 

 

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Country: 
Funds Needed : 
Progress: 

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