Cambodia

Sandan District Latrine Project - Cambodia

Sandan District Latrine Project - Cambodia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Location
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Sxxxxx Village, Sandan District, Kampong Thom Province, Cambodia

Sandan District Latrine Project - CambodiaCommunity Description
Located 75 kilometers north and east of Kampong Thom provincial town in central Cambodia, Sandan District is a sprawling administrative district encompassing nine communes, each with anywhere from five to thirteen villages.

To the north lies the Prey Long forest, stretching across northern Kampong Thom Province into Preah Vihear and Stung Treng provinces, the largest evergreen forest in Southeast Asia and home to a remarkable variety of flora and fauna, as well as several indigenous communities on the southern fringes in Sandan District. The land begins to roll with small hills in the east, where rubber and cassava farms have brought relative prosperity to several small towns. To the south and west, the land is wide and flat, dominated by rice fields and occasional patches where the remnants of the once-sprawling Prey Long forest still remain.

In the center of this landscape lies a cluster of villages collectively referred to as Sandan town. At their heart is Sxxxxx Village itself, which houses the various administrative buildings and offices for Sandan Commune as well as Sandan District: the district seat, education office, and police and army posts; a commune hall and agricultural development office; the district health center and high school.

Benjamin Rost - CambodiaProblem Addressed
Despite tremendous progress in recent years, Cambodia still faces significant challenges in the WASH sector. Less than half of the national population has access to basic sanitation, and 41 percent still practice open defecation -- a figure that rises to 51 percent when looking at exclusively rural populations (JMP, Progress on Drinking Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene, 2017).

The practice of open defecation is associated with diarrheal diseases and overall poor health indicators, particularly among children, and working to end open defecation is crucial for Cambodia if it is to achieve the targets for WASH, nutrition, and maternal and child health established in the 2015 Sustainable Development Goals.

Sxxxxx Village boasts higher-than-average rates of latrine coverage, but 36 (of 109) households still lack adequate sanitation solutions, and diarrheal illnesses, especially among children, remain a leading cause of health center visits and missed days of school and work.

Sandan District Latrine Project - CambodiaProject Description
This project aims to build local capacity and ownership of Sxxxxx Village as Sandan District’s first Open Defecation Free (ODF) village. The project combines a social marketing campaign and social mobilization with subsidized latrines for the 36 remaining households that lack the resources to afford a latrine at the standard cost, and will result in the declaration of Sxxxxx as an ODF village.

During the first stage, villagers will participate in VHV-led education sessions around the ill effects of open defecation and an introduction to the fecal-oral cycle. A local builder will lead introductory sessions on latrine construction and maintenance. Villagers will work with the builder to select the best latrine option for their home, and will additionally develop latrine maintenance and sustainability plans.

The infrastructure component of this project consists of the construction of latrines for 36 households in Sandan Village. A local business will provide the materials and labor at a discounted cost for a full latrine sub- and superstructure: a three-cylinder septic tank (one meter in diameter) and cover; a latrine base (one meter by one meter) with brick foundation; a tiled floor and ceramic bowl; and a superstructure of wood and tin.

Sandan District Latrine Project - CambodiaThe final stage of the project will involve additional WASH education sessions on topics such as handwashing and household WASH. Houses that have functioning latrines will receive plaques that demonstrate their support for and commitment to maintaining Sandan Village as an ODF community.

A Village Health Volunteer (VHV) has taken the lead in community mobilization and encouragement, and will play a crucial role in facilitating the educational sessions on latrine maintenance and WASH topics. Each household constructing a latrine through this project will make a monetary contribution of $25.00, as well as contribute labor during the construction itself, so as to increase households' ownership of and investment in their individual sanitation solutions.

A local craftsman has spent considerable time and effort already in designing the ideal set-up of latrine and superstructure for households, and has agreed to discount materials costs so as to make latrines more accessible for the village's poorest residents.

Throughout October and November, the VHV and the PCV will hold three sessions for participating families. The first will be open to the community at large, and will consist of education around the dangers of open defecation and an introduction to the fecal-oral cycle.

Sandan District Latrine Project - CambodiaThe second session will be for the 36 families that will be constructing latrines. The local builder will join to discuss latrine construction and maintenance, and contracts will be drawn up for each household that detail the specific type of latrine each household will be receiving, from a set list of different options. Each household will also work to craft its own latrine maintenance plan. The final session will involve the PCV, the VHV, and the builder going house to house to review final construction plans.

Building will begin in mid-/late-November and continue into December. Families will assist with the building in order to take more direct ownership of their new latrines, as well as to help keep costs down and accelerate the timeline required to construct 36 new latrines.

Water for the latrines will come from wells, as is standard practice in the area: buckets are filled with water and placed inside the latrine superstructure. Regular cleaning and ensuring that there is always water in the buckets will be included in education sessions on latrine maintenance and handwashing, as well as in households' maintenance plans.

From January through March, three follow-up sessions will be held to discuss additional WASH topics and to help trouble-shoot any initial problems or concerns that families have with their new latrines. These sessions will be open to anyone from the community, and will cover topics such as latrine cleaning and maintenance, handwashing with soap, household WASH practices, and the linkages between WASH and nutrition.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
B. Rost

Monitoring and Maintenance
As part of participation in the project, households will complete latrine maintenance plans that they will adhere to and reference over the coming months and years in order to maintain a standard of usability and quality. The head latrine builder will additionally lead a session on latrine maintenance, covering such topics as what to do when a septic tank fills up or how to replace or repair certain latrine components, and will be available in coming years to work with villagers to make any large-scale repairs.

Buy-in from local leaders -- the VHV leading the project, the Village Chief -- are crucial to the continued monitoring of Sandan's ODF status. The plaques declaring an ODF household will be distributed after an initial assessment as to whether a household has adequate sanitation facilities, but as latrines age and new houses are built, both the VHV and the Village Chief will be responsible for ensuring that ODF standards continue to be met by both individual households as well as the community as a whole.

The health impact of this project will continue to be monitored at the health center, in terms of community members visiting for diarrheal illnesses. Informal follow-up assessments will ask villagers as to the health and economic benefits that they have received from living in an ODF community.

Fundraising Target
$6,700

Funds raised in excess of the project amount will be allocated to other projects in the country.

Donations Collected to Date
$250

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT

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Dollar Amount Needed
$6,450

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Bakong High School Water Project - Cambodia

Bakong High School Water Project - Cambodia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Hun Sen Prasat Bakong High School, Siem Reap Province, CambodiaLocation
Hun Sen Prasat Bakong High School, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia

Community Description
Caring for Cambodia partners with the Cambodian government to provide preschool and K-12 education to over 6,600 children in Siem Reap Province. This project impacts the students, faculty, and community at one of the target high schools, Hun Sen Prasat Bakong High School, reaching more than 1,700 people, including the 930 female students from Grades 7-12 who currently attend the school. Many of these individuals and families live in homes without water, and must either purchase or carry in and filter their own drinking, tooth brushing, cooking and handwashing water supply.

Problem Addressed
There is an immediate need for water filtration and other WASH infrastructure at Bakong High School as the old filter has expired. In addition, there is a shortage of bathroom facilities, for the students, especially to serve the needs of the females.

Project Description
This project is to build a potable water system throughout the school, build 3 new toilets, repair the existing toilets, provide a water filtration system, and renovate the handwashing systems at Bakong High School.

Three new toilets will be built and designated for use by female students, ensuring that they will support menstrual health management. A few repairs will be made to existing toilets and the drainage system as they have worn down over the years.

The old water filtration system will be refurbished, and a new, more sustainable filtration system added, consisting of a biosand filter and a UV filter. Local expertise and supplies will be used, with the work being done by a Cambodian biosand-filter provider.

PVC will be laid where needed to connect the filtered water to the handwashing stations. The unfiltered water will be directed from the well to the toilets.

Old Filtration SystemThe handwashing stations, previously supplied by USAID, will be refurbished and connected to the campus-wide potable water drinking system. Soap will be maintained at each of the handwashing stations to aid in the prevention of diarrhea and other diseases.

The school has already made a financial commitment to this project and has spent $250 to connect their new well to the old filtration system which helps distribute the water across the campus. They will also raise another $75 to show their strong commitment to the health of their students. The filtration company will make another in kind donation of $200 by discounting their product and the hired labor is also contributing by discounting their regular cost by $47.

Project Impact
1,700 students, in addition to their families, will benefit from the project. The potable water will be made available to the broader community, allowing families who need it to come and access potable water for their families.

Project Administration
Christin Spoolstra, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer (RPCV), now Deputy Country Director, Caring for Cambodia.  To read about the 4 prior projects Christin did with Water Charity, CLICK HERE.

Monitoring and Maintenance
CFC will teach school staff to conduct weekly maintenance and water filter flushing, to ensure that all water on the campuses is clean and healthy. Technicians from Water for Cambodia will test the water quarterly.

Comments
The potable water system is an affordable and sustainable solution to the water and sanitation needs of the school.

Clean, potable water on the campus has a strong and direct impact on the health of the students, directly correlating with their attendance and achievement. Access to clean water and toilets helps stop the spread of transmissible diseases which weaken students over time and can cause them to miss school, fall behind, and eventually make the choice that school is not for them.

Funding
This project has been funded through the generosity of the International Foundation.

If you like this project, and wish to contribute to our next project in Cambodia, please donate.

Student CouncilStudent Council at BHS

 

StudyingStudents in Bakong Village

 
 
Conclusion of Bakong High School Water Project - CambodiaConclusion of Bakong High School Water Project - Cambodia
This project has been completed under the direction of Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Christin Spoolstra, Deputy Country Director, Caring for Cambodia. To read about the start of the project, CLICK HERE.
The project was designed to build a potable water system throughout the school, build 3 new toilets, repair the existing toilets, provide a water filtration system, and renovate the handwashing systems at Bakong High School.

Christin reports:

Conclusion of Bakong High School Water Project - CambodiaCaring for Cambodia was able to work alongside Hun Sen Prasat Bakong High School and the surrounding community to complete the needed WASH infrastructure at the school.

We switched to a more sustainable filtration system, using local expertise and supplies, and refurbished existing handwashing stations and toilets. We also built a new block of three toilets, exclusively for female students.

Caring for Cambodia will continue to care for the upkeep of these projects, including paying for quarterly water testing at Water for Cambodia and providing soap at the toilets and handwashing stations to aid in the prevention of diarrhea and other diseases.

This project directly improved the lives of all 1,645 students from Grades 7-12 as well as their families and the wider community as the newly potable water is accessible to community members.

During construction, the workers revised their estimate and the new toilets cost $45 less than our projected cost. The construction worker for the new toilets also decided to discount $40 from his normal price to help with the project which was an unanticipated community contribution. As such, with Water Charity’s approval, $85 in funds from Water Charity will be applied to maintenance of the filtration system, including quarterly water testing.  

We extend our thanks to Christin for completing this important project.

Conclusion of Bakong High School Water Project - CambodiaConclusion of Bakong High School Water Project - Cambodia

Conclusion of Bakong High School Water Project - CambodiaConclusion of Bakong High School Water Project - Cambodia

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Svay Leu District Water Purification Project - Cambodia

Svay Leu District Water Purification Project - Cambodia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Svay Leu District Water Purification Project - CambodiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxx Xxxx, Svay Leu District, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia

Community Description
Xxxxxxxx Xxxx is a quiet, rural village located down a long dirt road, approximately 8km from the health center and the district market. It consists of around 120 families, all of whom live in wooden, stilted houses along their rice fields. Most community members make their living through farming, or selling various wares out of the fronts of their houses.

The village contains one small primary school next to its community meeting hall, where moms and their children can be seen gathered throughout the day. The community hall is where all major events happen, including trainings from NGOs, blessings of the village by the local monks, annual vaccination outreach, and celebrations for the many Khmer holidays.

Xxxxxxxx Xxxx has two major water sources that feed the whole community, dug out rice fields that collect water during the rainy season.

Problem Addressed
The main health issue the community faces is hygiene-related illness, especially in terms of clean water. Although there is a large water source located in Xxxxxxxx Xxxx, the water itself is dirty and can be unsafe to drink, especially for younger children, older community members, and pregnant or nursing women.

Svay Leu District Water Purification Project - CambodiaMost community members know about hygiene and sanitation, as there are many NGOs in the area that educate on these topics. However, there are no programs in place to bridge the gap between education and access to materials. As this is a low-income, rural community, this project will help families to sustainably and affordably improve their access to clean water and proper hygiene practices.

Project Description
The Village Health Support Group (VHSG) seeks to bridge the gap between education and access by providing 30 families with biosand water filters, and 50 families with hand washing containers to be placed outside of their bathrooms.

The biosand filters are made of concrete, and will contain gravel, sand, and biological layers. They will remove bacteria and other pathogens, and will be procured locally.

The project will begin with two, 1-day education trainings, where health topics concerning hygiene, clean water, and water storage will be discussed. The first training will be for the 30 families who will receive a water filter. This training will cover why having clean water is important, how to properly store clean water, and the positive short term and long-term impacts of using clean water.

The second training will be for the 50 families who will receive a hand washing container. This training will cover the importance of washing your hands, the proper hand washing technique, and how washing your hands can positively impact you and your families’ health.

Svay Leu District Water Purification Project - CambodiaAfter these educational trainings, 5 smaller trainings will occur at participants’ houses, with 6 families in attendance at each. These trainings will cover how to properly install and maintain your water filter, with one being done for demonstration. These six families are then responsible for helping each other install and maintain their water filters in their homes. In addition, there will be 5 separate trainings for the families who want a hand washing container.

Community involvement is a major component of this project, and is essential for its success. This is ensured through attendance fees that promote ownership over the project and by having participants be responsible for building, transporting, and maintaining their water filters and hand washing containers.

Project Impact
500 people will benefit from this project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
C. Becker

Monitoring and Maintenance
With 1- and 3-month follow-ups, the PCV and her counterpart will visit the participants’ houses to observe whether they are implementing what was learned at the trainings, as well as if their water filters are being properly maintained.

Since the community members are being trained on how to maintain their water filters and hand washing containers, and are responsible for installing and building them themselves, it creates ownership over the project and makes it more likely the community will be invested in its success.

Funding
This project has been funded by the International Foundation. Please Donate to Water Charity to allow us to start new projects in Cambodia and elsewhere.

Svay Leu District Water Purification Project - CambodiaSvay Leu District Water Purification Project - Cambodia

 
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High School Water and Sanitation Project - Cambodia

High School Water and Sanitation Project - Cambodia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

High School Water and Sanitation Project - CambodiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxx Xxxx Village, Ou Prasat Commune, Mongkol Borei District, Banteay Meanchey Province, Cambodia

Community Description
Conveniently located on Cambodia’s National Road 5, Xxxxx Xxxx High School serves as the point of convergence of 24 villages of the bucolic and widely dispersed commune. Due to its proximity to the market, the pagoda, and the national highway, Xxxxx Xxxx High School educates the clear majority of the community’s youth ranging from grade 6 through grade 12.

Problem Addressed
There were 3 prior Peace Corps Volunteers in the village. Each of these implemented projects at the school during their service, including painting a world map and globe, sprucing up and adding books to the library, and building 4 latrines on the south side of campus.

The school director, Mr. Modell, counterpart, Mr. Sophall, and the PCV have identified a two-part concern to address:

High School Water and Sanitation Project - Cambodia(1) Xxxxx Xxxx High School educates nearly 1,400 students, who are taught by 70 teachers. For this large population, there are no hand washing facilities anywhere on school grounds. The lack of adequate facilities is a public health concern, leading to the spread of disease.

Additionally, the female students miss school when they are menstruating because they do not have a way to wash away blood from their hands, bodies, or clothes.

(2) The school has only 10 working toilets available. Six of them are on the south side of campus and 4 are located on the west side of campus. None of them accommodates the needs of female students, in that that they are not separated from the boys’ latrines and they do not have the walls and doors to provide security and privacy.

There are 2 toilets on the north side of campus that have never been used, because when a Japanese NGO built them om 2014, they did not also build a water source.

This means that all the grade 7 and grade 8 students have the option of either defecating outside or walking across campus to use a toilet. This leads to most of our male students choosing to go outside, and there being an excess of female students having to wait for the toilets on the south side of campus

Project Description
This project is to improve the water access and sanitation conditions of the school by building a water storage container, a guttering system, 5 latrine stalls and a changing room, and handwashing stations.

High School Water and Sanitation Project - CambodiaOn the north side of the campus, a water storage container will be located next to the 2 existing latrine stalls, behind the grade 7 building. The container will be 1 meter in diameter, 2 ½ meters tall, and will have a 1 meter deep base. This container will be made of concrete and will model the water containers on the south side of campus.

A 10-meter gutter system will be built to convey rain water run-off into the water storage container. While one water container is likely not sufficient for long-term water demands, the school director has already begun rallying the community to donate funds to build one additional container. These water containers will connect to the 2 existing stalls through plastic pipes that the contractors will lay under the ground leading to the latrines.

Once operational, these two stalls will be dedicated to the male students. In addition to the existing 2 stalls, the water source will also provide water to the additional 5 female stalls to be built and the hand washing facilities.

Next, the 5 new latrine stalls and one changing room will be built. They will be equipped with a private sink, for female students. The latrine structure will be built of clay brick and concrete. The block of five latrines will be 8 meters wide. The latrines will be 2.5 half meters deep and 2.5 meters tall.

The changing room is designed to be more spacious, at 2 meters wide and 2.5 meters deep. Each latrine stall will be covered in porcelain tile with a porcelain squat-style toilet for easy daily cleaning. Each latrine will also have a cistern with access to water from the water storage container via a spigot from the water pipe Each stall will also have access to a waste bin for disposal of sanitary napkins.

High School Water and Sanitation Project - CambodiaThe 6 stall doors (5 latrine stalls and one changing room stall) will be behind a wall to provide female students privacy and safety. The wall will have a depth of 2 meters and will be 10 meters wide. The roof of the building will extend to cover the wall area. Behind the wall, 10 hand washing spots for the female students will be built to clean their hands in privacy.

The hand washing station will be rudimentary, consisting of faucets to release water with a ledge for hand soap, and a 3-meter-wide mirror. The contractors will build a small trench along the wall with a slope out one end of the building for the water from handwashing to escape. The floor will be poured concrete such that any excess water can be swept out and the floors can be kept clean.

The contractors will build waste storage containers behind the new latrines. The containers will consist of 3 units, each made of 4 individual concrete pieces. These pieces will be assembled such that 3 pieces will lay underground, the remaining one above ground. The remaining piece above ground will have a small door, such that when the containers are full, they can be pumped. The latrines will be connected to the storage container via 100-millimeter pipes.

On the south side of campus, a hand washing station with 10 spots to wash will be constructed in front of the existing 6 stalls. Along the wall of the grade 9 building, the contractors will connect 10 faucets to the existing water storage containers. The water that is released will drain into a narrow, poured concrete trench.

High School Water and Sanitation Project - CambodiaThe work will be done by community members during the months of August, September and October, while school is not in session.

The education component will begin with WASH lessons while the facilities are being built from August to October. In the first week of the new school year, there will be a celebration for the new facilities. Community members, students, and teachers will post on social media about the new facilities and the importance of sanitation.

At the start of the school year, a WASH session will be held for all the teachers to attend. This session will provide a general overview of WASH practices and the health benefits. The school director will explain the importance of all the teachers and himself to be models for the students by actively exhibiting positive WASH practices and encouraging non-compliant students to also practice hand washing.

Then, Mr. Sophall, Mr. Modell, and the PCV will ask 24 teachers (four from each grade level - two male and two female) to attend 3 additional WASH sessions. This is so that they can each work with Mr. Sophall and the PCV to train their students. Once the teachers have demonstrated understanding of positive WASH practices, they will hold two WASH session for their students.

Finally, when the school year is wrapping up, Sophall and the PCV will prepare materials and lessons to teach the grade 11 students with their counterparts how they will teach the coming year's grade 7 and grade 9 students. Three sessions will be held to instruct the grade 11 students in how to help teach the next year’s sessions.

Project Impact
1,480 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
L. Aylward

Monitoring and Maintenance
This project will be monitored by the PCV while she is in country, the school director, the teachers, and community members.

Xxxxx Xxxx High School has an existing system to sustain their latrines. Each grade has a day of the week in which they are expected to clean the latrines. With the construction of additional latrines and the hand washing stations, this same system will be applied.

At the end of each school year, the designated teachers, under Mr. Sophall’s supervision, will instruct the current grade 11 students with 3 sessions. These sessions will be aimed to prepare these students to lead the next year’s sessions for grade 7 and grade 9, only to be assisted by the teacher if necessary.

Let Girls Learn
This project particularly benefits girls by aiming to remove the barrier to education that menstruating can cause. With the new latrines, changing room with private sink, and general hand washing stations, females will no longer have to leave school when they start menstruating. With access to female-friendly facilities, comes access to female-friendly education.

Funding
This project has been paid for through a grant from the International Foundation.

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Tram Kak District Water Project - Cambodia

Tram Kak District Water Project - Cambodia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Tram Kak District Water Project - CambodiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxx Xxxx Commune, Tram Kak District, Takeo Province, Cambodia

Community Description
In the rural community of Xxxx Xxxx Commune, many families are rice farmers. The eighteen villages that Xxxx Xxxx Health Center serves, thrive off the land of lush green rice fields during rainy season and dry, cracked dirt during the dry season.

Although the commune serves over 1,000 people, the families are intertwined as one large family. Like many communities in Cambodia, families in the area are recovering financially, structurally, physically, mentally, and developmentally from their broken past.

Problem Addressed
In 2015, a new maternity ward was built without consideration of distance and accessibility to the health center's current water source. Currently, there is no running water in the delivery room or the bathroom attached to the maternity ward.

During a delivery, the midwives ask the family of the woman in labor to take a bucket to fill it up with water located about 20 meters from the delivery room. With this one bucket of water, the midwives perform their hand washing and washing of medical supplies.

The current water source is a small well that can be unreliable during hot season. Therefore, the staff needs to pull water from the pond, which is not hygienic.

Tram Kak District Water Project - CambodiaIn addition to the lack of running water, the community has not had any formal education on proper hand-washing techniques. Proper hygiene practices go beyond the health center. The community does not know the appropriate elements and techniques needed to wash their hands to prevent illnesses.

Project Description
This project is to build a reliable, running water source at the health center.

Both the delivery room and the bathroom have access points (i.e. sink, toilet, cistern) that were installed during the construction of the building in 2015. A well and tank will be constructed at a location behind the maternity ward near the delivery room and the bathroom.

Water will be pumped from the well up to the tank using an electric motor. The water will be stored in the tank until someone turns on the faucet in the maternity ward. The water will then flow from the tank to the delivery room or bathroom.

The base of the tank will be constructed from concrete and be 2 m x 2 m. The plastic tank will hold 1,500 L of water. The structure of the tank will include a metal roof to protect the tank and water inside from overheating.

The construction of the well, tank, and pipes will be done by local companies specializing in well and tank construction.

The health center staff will undergo a training involving knowledge and skills about why, how, and when to wash their hands

In addition, the midwives will be trained on necessary knowledge to be passed on to new mothers about hygiene related to post-natal care involving breastfeeding, bottle feeding, personal hygiene, and hygiene of their baby.

Tram Kak District Water Project - CambodiaOnce all nine staff members can demonstrate and explain hand washing, they will then use this knowledge to lead trainings. The first training will be with the Village Health Volunteers. They will go through a similar workshop related to critical information about hand-washing and skills on how to train others.

In November, at the start of the new school year, the health center staff will lead a training with class monitors and selected teachers. All the trainings will cover proper hand-washing techniques, critical hand-washing times, and knowledge of hygiene.

The health center staff has accumulated savings over the past few years to help contribute 25% for supplies, materials, and labor of the project. Their contributions will mainly go toward training materials and their contribution of time to train others in the community.

Recently, the health center chief installed wall shelves and soap to accompany the sinks in the old health center as well as the maternity ward.

Project Impact
Over 1,000 people will benefit from this project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Shelby Farmer

Monitoring and Maintenance
The staff maintains the facilities on a daily basis. The health center chief takes responsibility in budgeting and contacting individuals to maintain the running water and in restocking the soap every month through the monthly budget assigned to the health center at the commune level.

In addition, the midwives’ training on hygiene related to maternal health care will be sustained through the constant flow of patients who come in for ANC and PNC check-ups. The sustainability of knowledge will occur during midwives’ interaction with this target audience.

In addition, the staff member responsible for outreach meets with the Village Health Volunteers when going to their village. He will assess retained knowledge of hand-washing during his outreach.

Comments
The new well and tank will provide running water, allowing midwives to perform safer, more hygienic deliveries, and will provide an opportunity to educate the community about basic hygiene.

This project has been paid for through a grant from the International Foundation.

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Funds Needed : 
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Dang Tong District Water Project - Cambodia

Dang Tong District Water Project - Cambodia

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This project is made possible through the partnership of WATER CHARITY and the NATIONAL PEACE CORPS ASSOCIATION.

Dang Tong District Water Project - CambodiaLocation
This project summary has been redacted for security reasons to omit the specific project location.

Xxxxxxxxx, Dang Tong District, Kampot Province, Cambodia

Community Description
Xxxxxxxxx is home to about 10,000 people. It is located directly on the national road, so it's not your typical quiet Cambodian community. Many people commute to and from the local provincial town or the capital city every day.

Even though Xxxxxxxxx may be more hustle-and-bustle than your average Khmer community, none of the famous Cambodian friendliness has been lost. Every day is different from the next in the village.

Problem Addressed
Xxxxxxxxx Health Center serves the greater community's pre/post-natal care needs. Pregnancy check-ups, deliveries, and vaccinations are all done there. The center also provides basic medication and simple procedures, such as minor sutures.

Dang Tong District Water Project - CambodiaCurrently, all water provided to the health center is pumped out of a well on the corner of the property and placed in plastic buckets in the rooms where it will be used. Stagnant water is a breeding ground for mosquitos, bacteria, and therefore disease. The health center staff is left with no other practical option than to use this water for hand washing, cleaning minor wounds, and sanitizing medical equipment. This greatly increases the probability for staff and patients to contract or spread disease.

Project Description
This project is to construct a system to deliver water from the site of the well directly to the rooms of the health center to be used for all medical needs . Water will be pumped from the well using a motor and directed into a 2,000-liter water tank. The tank will stand 6-8 meters off the ground, supported by stilts. A series of pipes and hoses will connect the water tank directly to the rooms requiring water (bathrooms, ante-natal care room, delivery room), which are already equipped with sinks and a water disposal system.

Dang Tong District Water Project - CambodiaThe Xxxxxxxxx Health Center staff will implement the project and maintain the system, which is expected to result in an improvement in hygiene and sanitation. Time and energy will be saved, and there will be a great improvement in patient care.

Project Impact
The entire community of 10,000 people will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
A. Gonglach

Monitoring and Maintenance
The running water system requires minimal upkeep. The plan for sustaining the project requires nothing more than occasionally pumping water into the water tank, and taking care of the water pump and pipes.

This project has been funded through the generosity of the International Foundation.

Dang Tong District Water Project - CambodiaDang Tong District Water Project - Cambodia

 

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Cambodia Water and Sanitation Program

Cambodia Water and Sanitation Program

We are pleased to announce the implementation of our new Cambodia Water and Sanitation Program. The first phase of the program is budgeted at $60,000. Funding has already been received from a U.S.-based foundation in the amount of $25,000.

The program is being implemented at once, with the intention of raising the remaining funds through donations and grants over the next several months. This will allow for a regular and continuing flow of projects over the coming year.

The program seeks to complete 20 water, sanitation, public health, and environmental projects in the neediest rural villages of Cambodia. The projects will be cost-effective, using appropriate technology and local labor. They will be administered by Peace Corps Volunteers and Returned Peace Corps Volunteers. Each project will be planned and implemented quickly and completed in a matter of months.

Many of the project will be aimed at creating conditions that further the goal of allowing girls to go to, and remain in, school, and will be included under our Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide.

Today, there are over 100 Peace Corp volunteers stationed in Cambodian villages. In addition, there are over 400 Returned Peace Corps Volunteers who have served in the country since 2007, some of whom will be available to manage projects.

Cambodia Water and Sanitation ProgramThe Cambodia Water and Sanitation Program is designed to counteract the following conditions:

6.3 million out of 14.9 million Cambodians are unable to access clean drinking water, most of them poor and living in rural areas.

The lack of access to clean water leaves Cambodian children vulnerable to diseases, such as diarrhea, the second leading cause of death among children under five.

40% of primary schools and 35% of health centers in the country do not have access to safe water and sanitation.

Water Charity was started in 2008, and projects began in Cambodia in 2009. Since then, 76 projects have been completed in the country, including wells, pumps, latrines, handwashing stations, water systems, rainwater catchment systems and towers, along with filter projects, agriculture projects and solar/environmental projects.

The new program follows the model of our extremely successful WHOLE WORLD Water Program – Cambodia, which was completed in 2015 

We are seeking donations from foundations, other nonprofits, businesses, and individuals who recognize the value of our model. Please direct any questions you may have to mail (at) watercharity.org, or contribute now by clicking on the Donate button below.

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Meanchey Middle School Water Project - Cambodia

School girls from Meanchey Middle School

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos

Location

Meanchey Middle School, Roneam Village, Meanchey Commune, Sandan District, Kampong Thom Province, Cambodia

Community Description
Meanchey is a farming commune located in rural Kampong Thom, Cambodia. The Meanchey Middle School is the only middle school in a commune of over 3,400 people. Fifteen teachers educate 284 students age 11 to 18 years old. A large majority of people in Meanchey are farmers and usually have one or two additional jobs such as teaching or selling produce at the market in order to support their families. Many families don't have access to clean water and use the local river for showering and washing their clothes. Although people in this community face many challenges, you will rarely see them without a smile on their face. They know how to find happiness in simple things, and tend to work together to solve common problems.

Problem Addressed
A challenge the school faces is the lack of access to clean water. For years the school has depended on rainwater and a broken well as their primary sources of water for basic needs. Rainwater is not a dependable source in Cambodia, especially during the dry season. The old well stopped working after a big flood in the area in 2004 and now only produces dirty water. 

The school has no history of securing an adequate, uncontaminated water supply. Sanitation is also lacking in the school. Since there are few waste bins and no recycling bins, students throw trash on the ground and do a poor job of cleaning it up once a week. The school director and teachers have communicated their concern regarding the health of their students due to the lack of safe drinking water and uncleanliness of the school. The consequences are diarrhea, skin disease, respiratory illnesses, intestinal and other waterborne diseases.  These diseases decrease the amount of time children are in school. The school has expressed interest in a well, a hand washing station, water filters and waste/ recycling bins.  They also have a request to provide education on proper hand washing, drinking safe water and the importance of maintaining a clean environment.

Boys at the schoolProject Description
Local construction workers will construct a well at the Meanchey Middle School.  

A hole will be dug 45 meters deep using safe techniques.  A 3 x 4 meter area outside of the well will be cemented. A motor will be used to pump water out of the well and into the latrines and hand washing stations.

A hand washing station will be built next to the latrines on the right side of the school near the 8th and 9th grade classrooms and another will be repaired next to latrines on the left side of the school by the 7th grade classrooms. Locally purchased waste and recycling bins will be placed throughout the school.
 
School teachers and the Peace Corps volunteer will conduct a two-hour session to promote proper hand washing techniques, the advantages of drinking safe water and the importance of maintaining a clean environment for each of the seven classrooms in the school, educating all 284 students over the course of three days. Students will volunteer to be peer educators and pass on the information they have learned to elementary school students, demonstrating they have understood the material and are reinforcing it by teaching it to others.

The school will provide bars of soap to the hand washing stations at all times. Each of the seven classrooms will be supplied with low-maintenance, portable and effective ceramic water purifiers to provide safe drinking water for students.

Project Impact Trash outside of the school
This project will impact 299 people; 284 students and 15 teachers will benefit from this project.  Future students and visitors will benefit as well.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Valerie Rojas     

Monitoring and Maintenance 
Students in the school’s youth group will monitor the new facilities and notify the director when repairs are needed or they are out of soap for hand washing. The school director has committed to repairing or making necessary adjustments within a month of receiving notice. The PCV will monitor behavior change in the school such as students washing their hands appropriately and disposing of trash in bins and recycling.  The PCV will also provide additional education or reminders as needed.

Comments
The community organization involved with this project is the Meanchey Middle School Teachers. The project is part of Water Charity's ongoing Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide.
 
Let Girls Learn: Lack of clean facilities is a leading cause of girls dropping out of school. Girls often miss school throughout the duration of their period every month because the bathrooms have no water or waste bins to allow for sanitary pad disposal or hand washing. Many of them never go back. The lack of clean water also adds to unsanitary conditions in the bathrooms which is harder on the girls since the boys are able to use the bathroom outdoors. 
The Bathrooms

This project will ensure girls access to clean bathrooms and therefore lower the amount of drop outs among girls.  Sustainable improvements in hygiene behavior patterns require more than education activities and, at the same time, facilities are not sufficient on their own to improve health. A holistic approach that combines the promotion of behavior change and the provision of facilities will lead to a sustainable outcome for the school.

Building the capacity of the middle school staff will be an integral part in the sustainability of managing and sustaining hygiene, water and sanitation programs for long-term success. The Peace Corps volunteer will work with the school to enable the school environment as well as promote community-based management to ensure the effectiveness and sustainability of all water, sanitation and hygiene efforts.

The director and teachers are equipped with the knowledge and skills to effectively manage their own facilities and have advocated for the basic right to safe water. The attainability of their own water source instead of dependency on unreliable sources will lead to empowerment and participatory approaches i.e. community-led hand washing demonstrations for a healthier learning environment.

The water source and the environmental component will promote key hygiene behaviors such as hand washing with soap, using clean toilets, treating and drinking safe water and protecting the environment which once learned will remain a part of their lifestyles. 

Dollar Amount of Project
$1,800

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed

$1,800

 

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

This project has been completed.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

Old Well

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Ang Metrei Primary School Bathroom Project - Cambodia

Girls at the well

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.NPC & WC Logos
This is a project under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama and the Peace Corps to expand access to education for girls around the world!

Location

Rolaing Kruel Commune, Samrong Tong District, Kampong Spue Province, Cambodia

Community DescriptionStudents playing
Surrounded by a health center, pagoda, and market, Ang Metrei Primary School is located in the heart of the village. Due to its location, and its easy accessibility from a main road, Ang Metrei Primary School has the largest number of students in the entire commune.  Six large villages that surround the school send their children there. The school is constantly alive with students learning in the mornings and afternoons. When school is not in session, children can be seen running around, and playing games such as soccer and “lot kawsaou” (jump over the rubber band). In this game you can find students, especially young girls, flying through the air as they try to jump over a long braided rubber band at different heights.

Problem Addressed
Ang Metrei Primary School is located in the heart of the village and despite the constant heavy flow of foot traffic, there is no clean area for teachers or students to relieve themselves.

Currently the school has two latrines for the whole school. These latrines are falling apart and are nearly unusable. Every day, teachers and students have to carry buckets of water from a faraway well, about 100 meters from the latrine, to fill the cisterns in the bathrooms. Since this is labor-intensive, often enough the latrines are left without water, making their use quite difficult. This creates a situation ripe for open defecation, and this induces fear in teachers and students, especially females.

Since there is no clean bathroom available with clean water to use, teachers and students will limit the amount of water they consume while at school.  In doing so they hope to suppress any urge they may have to use the school bathroomsbathroom while at school. This is very dangerous because long-term dehydration is damaging to health. Especially in Cambodia, where the heat can become intolerable, teachers and students need to make sure they are regularly hydrating. During the hotter months (March-May) an increase in the number of young women and children can be seen going to the private clinics for IVs because of dehydration.  The opportunity of spreading disease and illness is increased by the lack of clean running water.

Due to its inconvenience, students will not wash their hands on a regular basis, ultimately creating an easy environment for illness and disease to spread.  Open defecation, combined with the lack of an area to properly clean up, creates an easy facilitator for the oral-fecal route, which further leads to dangerous dehydration.

Project Description
This project is to build new, sanitary restroom facilities for the Ang Metrei Primary School.  It will include a large water tank, and handwashing stations.

Construction will begin by digging a 5-meter square pit that is 2.5 meters deep.  The latrines will be built upon the first 3 meters of this pit. The remaining 2 meters will hold the main waste cement container that will be hand-constructed with clay bricks and cement.  The first 3 meters of the pit will contain three 1 x 1 x 1 meter handmade brick boxes. These boxes will receive the initial waste that is gravity flushed from the toilets and flows through a 100-millimeter pipe into the main waste tank located within the pit directly behind the latrines. 

The main waste tank will be 2 m long x 5 m wide x 3 m high. The tank will be hand made by contractors using clay bricks and cement.  The tank will have an excess of 0.5 meters above ground to allow for a metal door to be created on top of the main waste tank to allow easy access for waste to be pumped when full. 

The latrine structure, which will all be constructed from clay bricks, will be created over the first 3 meters of the pit. The dimension of the whole latrine structure, with its three stalls, is as follows: The width of the floor is 5 meters, the height of the structure is 3 meters, the width of the roof 5.6 meters, and the depth from the front of the structure to the back is 3 meters. The walls and floors of each latrine will be covered in porcelain students at the welltile. This will allow for easier cleanup after every use. The toilets will be porcelain squat style and each bathroom will have a cistern.

On the entrance side of the latrine structure, two sinks will be installed, one on the left wall and one on the right wall. These two sinks will be made of durable metal to guarantee longevity. The location of these sinks is key because it is easily visible from the bathroom stall. As soon as teacher and students exit the stall they will see a sink for them to use.

The sinks will be adhered to the walls with a combination of glue, screws, and cement.  The roof of the latrine structure will consist of a flat surface made from cement in order to create a sturdy base on which the 2,000 liter water tank will rest. This tank will be made from durable metal. Water from the tank will be gravity fed through 21-millimeter pipes into the latrines and sinks.   

The 2,000-liter tank will be replenished by a private water supply. The school is in the beginning stages of installing plumbing to receive running water from this company. The private company cleans and uses the water from the nearby river. The water pressure from the water plant is strong enough to pump water into the tank. All that will be needed is to install a valve on the 21-millimeter pipe leading to the tank from the pipes, installed before the start of the project.  The water company has promised to install the plumbing into the school for free before the start of the project. This guarantees that teachers and students will have continuous access to water in the latrines and sinks.  Nonetheless, the water from the water plant is not potable. It is however safe for common everyday use.

The school, at this time, has water filters, given by USAID, in each of its classrooms for the teachers and students to use. These filters have not been as beneficial as they could be because everyone that attends the school limits the amount of water they drink in a day because they do not want to have to use the bathroom while at school. By constructing latrines with continuous access to running water, PCV & Studentsteachers and students will not only feel comfortable using the bathrooms, but this will encourage proper hydration while at school. Lastly, the installation of the sinks will further encourage students to practice proper hand-washing techniques. Teachers will help reinforce this practice by holding hand washing workshops in their respective classes.

Project Impact
This project will directly impact 619 people, including 600 students ranging from the ages of six to twelve years of age and 19 teachers on staff.  This project will also impact visitors and future students and staff.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Giselle Campos

Monitoring and Maintenance
This project will be monitored and maintained by the PCV and well as teachers, parents and community members.

Comments
This project is part of our Let Girls Learn Initiative

Young women and children are the most vulnerable when dealing with issues related to water and sanitation. For young boys, urinating in public is a common practice. However, for young girls urinating in public is highly frowned upon. For this reason girls will limit the amount of water they will drink in a day because they are afraid of having to use the bathroom when away from home. This action promotes dehydration, which is very dangerous in a country with a hot tropical climate. IVs in the arms of young women are too commonly seen in Cambodia. While talking with one of the doctors at a local private clinic he said that the most common reason why his female patients come to seek his care are for symptoms related to dehydration. With the implementation of this project, a clean and safe space for young girls to use the bathroom while they are at school will be created. In doing so their health and wellness will increase, while ultimately decreasing absences from school due to symptoms related to dehydration.
Students running
PCV Volunteer, Giselle Campos states that, "Ang Metrei Primary School holds a special place in my heart. Every Sunday you can see me with at least 10 kids playing a pick up game of soccer. This has become something special that my kids look forward to at the end every week. My favorite moment had to be when I first met seven-year-old PoPo at the school. She was a very shy girl who would hide away from playing team sports. After countless encouragement, and a little footwork she now dominates our games with poise and ease. Who knows, maybe we will see her in the future SEA Olympics."

Dollar Amount of Project
$2,100

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed

$2,100

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.

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Khnach Romeas Secondary School Water Project - Cambodia

Khnach Romeas Secondary School Latrines

This project is made possible through the partnership of Water Charity and the National Peace Corps Association.
NPCA & WC LOGOSThis is a project under the LET GIRLS LEARN Program, a collaboration of First Lady Michelle Obama and the Peace Corps to expand access to education for adolescent girls around the world!


Location
Khnach Romeas Village, Khnach Romeas Commune, Bavel District, Battambang Province, Cambodia

Community Description
The Khnach Romeas Secondary School is located in a farming village and is the only secondary school in the commune.

The School Problem Addressed
The Khnach Romeas Secondary School has no dependable water source for basic sanitation needs. The latrines that exist are broken, and insufficient for the number of students.

Latrine construction has promising gains to deliver in terms of increased access to education for girls. Furthermore, hand washing facilities as a complimentary measure to latrine construction mitigates the risk of contamination. Lack of potable water and sanitation is one of the biggest issues affecting the health of children across Cambodia, particularly those who live in the countryside, and schools are a focal point for the spread of disease.

Project Description

Water Charity will help the Khnach Romeas Secondary School to a achieve a reliable water supply, for purposes of sanitation and hygiene.  This will include a well, the repair of two existing latrines, the construction of two new latrines, a hand washing station, and a water storage container. The goal is to help the teachers and students, particularly female students, of the Khnach Romeas Secondary School gain access to water and sanitation in order to achieve safe, clean latrines, and water for hand washing.

An anonymous survey concerning the views students hold of the school latrines will be distributed to the entire school population before and after the construction and repair of school latrines.  The data collected from the surveys will be compared and analyzed. 

In addition, four secondary school teachers will conduct a 20-minute session on education and demonstration of proper hand washing techniques and behaviors for the entire school following the morning flag ceremony, educating all 659 students. A holistic approach that combines the promotion of behavior change and the provision of facilities will lead to a sustainable outcome for the secondary school.

School GroundsProject Details

1)  Local workers will construct a well in front of the secondary school.

(a) A hole will be dug 50 meters deep and 40 centimeters in diameter.

(b) A motor will be used to pump water out of the well.

2. Local workers will situate one 3000-liter water storage container on top of a 3-meter tall stand made of steel. 

(a) Rainwater collection jars have been an inefficient method to store water for the primary school. Four of the seven rainwater collection jars owned by the school have cracked due to the lack of water being stored inside the jars.

(b) A water storage container will be a safe and reliable means of storing water. 

(c) The school owns another structure for water storage.  However, the roof has been destroyed by fruit falling from the nearby palm fruit tree. The school will pay for a new roof for the structure and to trim the tree to prevent any future damage. The existing structure will be another means of water storage from the well. 

3. Local workers will build a 3-meter by 4-meter hand washing station next to the latrines of the secondary school. 

Teachers(a) Four secondary school teachers will conduct an educational demonstration to promote proper hand washing techniques and behaviors for the entire school, educating all 659 students. 

(b) The secondary school will provide bars of soap to the hand washing station at all times and will maintain the hand washing station to ensure working order. 

(c) The hand washing station will be next to a palm fruit tree and, as stated earlier, the school will pay for the tree to be trimmed to prevent damage of the hand washing station. 

4. Local workers will construct two new latrines and will repair the existing two malfunctioning latrines. 

(a) The school will maintain the latrines to ensure working order, which will become far more manageable with a dependable water source. 

(b) At least six latrines are needed for the use of a school of over 600 students.

5. An anonymous survey distributed to all students before and after the construction and repair of latrines.

(a) One month following the repair and construction of the latrines, a follow-up survey will be distributed to all students. 

(b) Data will only be obtained from the surveys completed by female students. 

(c) The female student population data collected from the surveys distributed before and after the repair and construction of the latrines will be compared and analyzed.

Project Impact
659 students, 35 teachers, and all the other people who visit the school.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Evalynn Romano

Monitoring and Maintenance
The secondary school will repair the motor if it is to malfunction in the future, and will pay the monthly electricity costs from motor use.

Comments
This project is part of the LET GIRLS LEARN program sponsored by FLOTUS Michelle Obama, as well as Water Charity's Let Girls Learn Initiative - Worldwide.  It is intended to have a positive effect in keeping girls in school after they reach adolescence.  Lack of clean facilities is a leading cause of women dropping out of school.

Water Charity is proud to have sponsored the very first LGL project, and continues to be a leading contributor to the program, as evidenced by projects like this one.

Evalynn has recently completed another project for Water Charity in her service in Cambodia.  Click the link to read about the Kors Ream Primary School Well and Water System Project and its CONCLUSION.

Fundraising Goal
$5,700

Donations Collected to Date
$0

Dollar Amount Needed
$5,700

This project has been completed.  However, donations are still being accepted.  To read about the conclusion, CLICK HERE.

 

ADOPT THIS PROJECT BY CONTRIBUTING THE DOLLAR AMOUNT OF PROJECT
Donations of any amount will be appreciated. The full amount will allow you a posted dedication, if that is something you would like.
Giggling Girls

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