Conclusion of Salamata Well Improvement Project – Senegal

Conclusion of Salamata Well Improvement Project – SenegalThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Katie Pollak. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK
HERE.

The project was to improve 12 wells in Salamata.

Katie reports:

Construction is complete on the Salamata well improvement project. Twelve wells were improved through the addition of cement well heads, reinforced openings and drainage platforms.

Work slowed down slightly due to Ramadan and heavy rains, but progressed quickly once the weather cleared up. All of the work was done by a local mason, the Salamata community health worker and members of the beneficiary households. Cement was purchased at a local boutique and transported by Salamata community members to their homes. Each household also provided the sand, stone and water necessary to mix the cement.

In addition to eleven household wells, an improved platform was laid around the well at the village “case de santé”, the primary care health facility. With the improvements made to this water source, it is less likely to cause complications due to infection when used by the midwife for labor and delivery.

Although we originally estimated that 400 people would benefit from this project, community health worker Aly Balde said the project will directly impact the whole village – nearly 1,000 people! “I’m very happy with this project – it will do a lot for improving the health of Salamata,” he said.

In order to multiply the benefits of the improved wells, we will follow up the construction phase with health workshops to encourage hand washing, clean water and the use of rehydration solution to treat diarrheal disease.

Thank you for your support!

We are grateful to Katie for completing this excellent project, and again extend our thanks to Jean Lasser, along with Katie’s friends and family, for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Salamata Well Improvement Project – SenegalConclusion of Salamata Well Improvement Project – Senegal